Report Overview:
Total Clips (25)
Alumni (3)
Art, School of; Office of the President; Scholarships (1)
Athletics (5)
Blossom Music; Music (2)
College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (1)
College of Business (COB); College of Undergraduate Studies; Entrepreneurship (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Higher Education; Human Resources; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Office of the Provost (1)
Safety (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
Politics aside, Chris Penso follows his dream to officiate and will work U.S. National team friendly in Cleveland 05/28/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio – A decade ago, Chris Penso fell seven votes shy of becoming a 21-year-old mayor still working toward his accounting degree at Kent State....

Former Green resident McKenzie Jackson seeks 'Big Break' on Golf Channel 05/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

After two episodes of Big Break Mexico, McKenzie Jackson and her team look to be in big trouble. The Golf Channel competition, which includes the former...

Jewell Cardwell: Hoban alum walking a mile in tornado victims' shoes 05/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

He didn't wait to be phoned or summoned some other way to give aid. Rather, Charlie McVan quietly made a few phone calls on his own and volunteered...


Art, School of; Office of the President; Scholarships (1)
Exhibit shows off Lefton's photography 05/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A special evening featuring the photographic works of Kent State University President Lester Lefton was recently held at the KSU School of Art Gallery...


Athletics (5)
UA athletes fail to qualify 05/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Four University of Akron athletes competed in the third and final day of the NCAA Division I East Preliminaries on Saturday, but none qualified to join...

Kent State golfers chase national championship (Page) 05/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

As Kent State football and baseball each went on historic runs in the past 12 months, the Golden Flashes men's golf team did as well, though that's becoming...

Conners, Pendrith lead Kent State men's golf team into NCAA Championships (Page) 05/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

They're two of the top collegiate golfers in the nation, who happen to live under the same roof in Kent. They're both from Ontario, yet had no bond...

Garaway's Miller ends Kent career with another NCAA trip 05/28/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Kevin Miller left high school with plenty of accomplishments on the golf course. He was a state runner-up as a Garaway High School freshman and won...

Freaks come out for GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile 05/28/2013 al.com Text Attachment Email

If you saw the GoDaddy.com Bowl at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile on Jan. 6, you saw more than Arkansas State defeat Kent State 17-13: You saw a freak...


Blossom Music; Music (2)
Single Tickets for 2013 Blossom Music Festival on Sale May 28 05/24/2013 BroadwayWorld.com Text Attachment Email

...Kent/Blossom Music Celebrating its 46th season in 2013, Kent/Blossom Music began under the direction of George Szell when The Cleveland Orchestra and Kent State University launched a partnership in 1968, the year Blossom Music Center opened. Kent/Blossom Music's advanced training program brings...

MIAMI STRING QUARTET AND SPENCER MYER OPEN KENT AND BLOSSOM MUSIC FESTIVAL FACULTY CONCERTS (Robinson) 05/24/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

...Quartet and pianist Spencer Myer will open the Kent/Blossom Music Festival faculty concert series with a performance on Wednesday, June 26 at 7:30 p.m.at Kent State University.The concert will be held in Ludwig Recital Hall at the Music and Speech Center, located at 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent on the...


College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (1)
KSU announces Sines as interim dean for College of Applied Engineering 05/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University announced Robert Sines as interim dean for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology at the Kent Campus...


College of Business (COB); College of Undergraduate Studies; Entrepreneurship (1)
Tri-C JazzFest attracted financial support as well as audiences this year: Higher Education 05/28/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Cuyahoga Community College's JazzFest, bolstered by gifts and grants, needed less support from the college to balance its budget this year, according...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Around Charlestown 05/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Andrea Presley recently was honored with the Barbara Donaho Distinguished Leadership in Learning Award from the Kent State University College of Nursing....


Higher Education; Human Resources; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Part-time college faculty fight for better pay and working conditions (Sledzik) 05/28/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Part-time instructors, who now do much of the teaching on many college campuses, are fed up with what they say are poverty wages and for the first time...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
At School Papers, the Ink Is Drying Up (Goodman) 05/27/2013 New York Times - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...participating. Nationally, nearly two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But Mark Goodman, a journalism professor who oversaw the study, said a disproportionate number of those without newspapers...


KSU at Stark (2)
Twenty under 40! Emily Ribnik (Ribnik) 05/28/2013 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

On paper, the two parts of Emily Ribnik's job may sound unrelated, but both are focused on keeping people healthy and safe. Ribnik serves as mental...

On the Beat: A funky flea market heads downtown 05/24/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...operatic version of Arthur Miller?s Salem witch trials drama ?The Crucible? is certainly unexpected. Yet on June 7, 8, and 9, the theater department at Kent State University at Stark will present composer Robert Ward?s opera ?The Crucible,? which won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize for music and remains one...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
'Dig into Reading' is summer theme at Streetsboro Library 05/28/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

“Dig into Reading” is the theme for programs at the Pierce-Streetsboro Library this summer. Registration for Summer Reading Club and Storytime ...


Office of the Provost (1)
Two African Americans in New Higher Education Administrative Positions Filed in Appointments on May 24, 2013 05/24/2013 JBHE Weekly Bulletin Text Attachment Email

...education from Jackson State University in Mississippi. Fashaad Crawford is the new assistant provost for accreditation, assessment, and learning at Kent State University in Ohio. He was the associate vice president for planning, assessment, and research management for the Division of Diversity,...


Safety (1)
Mystery of vanished KSU student spans 35 years (Peach) 05/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University student Judy Martins was last seen leaving a friend's Dunbar Hall dorm room on the Kent campus early on the morning of Wednesday,...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Cleveland theater auditions for May 24 and beyond 05/24/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Jerome in "South Pacific." Must look between the ages of 6 and 12; Asian or African-American descent preferred. Performances: June 13-29 with rehearsal at Kent State University beginning May 29. Send a head shot and contact information to artistic director Terri Kent at tkent@kent.edu.


Town-Gown (1)
Art, Wine Fest is Saturday Downtown 05/24/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...Meadery. Food will also be available for purchase from Taproot Catering. This event is generously sponsored by: AMETEK, Downtown Gallery, Hometown Bank, Kent State University, McKay Bricker Framing & Black Squirrel Gifts, Secret Cellar, Taproot Catering, Wild Earth Outfitters, and Williams, Welser,...


University Press (2)
Book talk: Cleveland native back with new novel 05/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...American Memory. He is an adjunct professor of Civil War Studies at Gettysburg College. More on Civil War Two more books about the Civil War come from Kent State University Press: In Conflicting Memories on the “River of Death”: The Chickamauga Battlefield and the Spanish-American War, 1863-1933,...

Tom Rodd: Revolution, counter-revolution and making W.Va. 05/28/2013 wvgazette.com Text Attachment Email

West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872, By John Stealey, to be published...


News Headline: Politics aside, Chris Penso follows his dream to officiate and will work U.S. National team friendly in Cleveland | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio – A decade ago, Chris Penso fell seven votes shy of becoming a 21-year-old mayor still working toward his accounting degree at Kent State.

The former manger of a family-owned pizza shop wanted to bring change to his hometown of Dover, located about 20 miles south of Canton in Tuscarawas County. Ambition and the road less traveled have enabled Penso to fulfill another goal: to bring order to soccer fields around the globe.

Last year, the sport's governing body, FIFA, approved him as an international referee, one potentially capable of officiating World Cup and Olympic games. Sixteen years after working his first youth soccer game for $22, Penso will serve as the fourth official in the United States- Belgium exhibition match Wednesday night at FirstEnergy Stadium.

“Had I become mayor I would never have had time to devote to travel and training (for officiating),” said Penso, who made a second unsuccessful bid for office in 2007. “It's funny how everything happens for a reason. I couldn't be happier, I'm in a great place.”

Penso, who lives in Akron with his wife, has packed plenty into his 31 years. Beyond his political dalliance, he has worked briefly as Transportation Security Agency screener and highway state patrolman. The one constant has been his love for officiating. The most vocal soccer moms and disgruntled Sunday-league amateurs have been unable to sour him on it.

In 2006, Penso was earning $50,000 with the Ohio State Patrol when he marched into the lieutenant's office and told him he'd rather be issuing yellow cards than speeding tickets.

“I probably reffed three games in a 19-month span while going through the training and working on the job,” he said. “Officiating is a young man's job and if I wanted to make a career of it I had to dedicate more time to it.”

His parents, Kent and Lisa, who own Penso's Pizza in Dover, were skeptical, but supportive. He worked his way through ranks, reaching Major League Soccer in 2009.

Penso sees similarities in patrolling highways and soccer fields. Both involve making split decisions, administering rules, explaining decisions, managing personalities and keeping emotions in check. He's had amateur players spit on him and take swings.

His soccer supervisors appreciate the way he arbitrates games.

“He's definitely the good cop,” said Don Wilbur, who evaluates referees for the MLS and FIFA among other soccer organizations. “Chris is someone of high character on and off the field. He works hard and keeps his nose clean.

“He's got a bright future ahead of him and it wouldn't surprise me if he made it to a World Cup one day.”

Officiating soccer at highest level is a demanding and grueling profession. In a sport where one call can change the course of a 1-0 game, officials must be in position to make it.

That's why you don't see any white-haired men running up and down fields like in the NFL. Each season, Penso must earn his FIFA re-appointment, an honor that comes with a 45-year-old age limit, he said. Penso is one of just seven American FIFA referees.

His ultimate dream is to be selected for the 2018 World Cup.

His desire and schedule keeps him moving. He worked an MLS game in Salt Lake City on Saturday before flying to Edmonton, Alberta where he will referee the Canada-Costa Rica match on Tuesday. His wife, Tori, can sympathize. She, too, is a soccer referee.

Tori and many of Penso's family and friends will attend Wednesday's friendly at the stadium. His role as a fourth official in Cleveland will have him on the sidelines, controlling the bench areas, administering substitutions and acting as the “fourth set of eyes” for the referee and his two assistants.

Soccer officials communicate through headsets and Penso will be looking for any off-the-ball transgressions such as a punch or kick the referee might not detect. Keeping the peace between Clint Dempsey and Vincent Kompany is a long way from calling under-12 youth games in New Philadelphia.

“These last 16 years have been quite an experience,” Penso said.

The referee said he would have cherished the chance to govern his hometown, a longing first implanted as a high school senior attending city council meetings for his Advanced Placement government class. After his officiating career ends, he might return to Dover to take over the pizza business.

Maybe he gives politics, a tough game by another name, a second chance. Penso better keep the yellow and red cards handy.

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News Headline: Former Green resident McKenzie Jackson seeks 'Big Break' on Golf Channel | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After two episodes of Big Break Mexico, McKenzie Jackson and her team look to be in big trouble.

The Golf Channel competition, which includes the former Green resident, in the early stages gives teams “strikes” for losing challenges; each strike means that one team member will have go home when the show decides to collect on the strikes. After two episodes, Jackson's four-member team has two strikes while neither of the other two teams has any. The third, potentially pivotal episode is at 9 tonight, after a replay of the second show at 8.

The series puts a lot on the line, including a six-figure package of cash and prizes and an exemption to play in a PGA or LPGA event in November. That's pretty attractive to someone like Jackson. Her first pro-golf paycheck, in January 2012, was $950 — for a third-place finish. And, while she lives in Arizona, she laughingly said she will keep her 330-area-code mobile phone “as long as my dad keeps paying for it.”

Regardless of the outcome on the show, the daughter of Kurt and Kim Jackson of Green might already have come up winners. Through the show she has added sponsors, not to mention Twitter and Instagram followers (she's @mckenzie1207), new visitors to her website (www.mckenziefjackson.com) and friend requests on Facebook.

The new attention is somewhat surprising for the 24-year-old, though not a complete shock. With a 2011 degree in marketing from Kent State, she knows the importance of getting public attention; hence the website, which invites people to “follow me as I chase my dream to the LPGA.”

She went to the LPGA qualifying school in 2012 but missed the cut by 2 strokes; she plans to be back there later this year. She has been playing the Cactus Tour and other circuits, and she is eligible for events on the Symetra Tour, the LPGA's developmental tour.

And all this came after she planned to be a softball player. While a student at Green High School, she said, “I didn't start playing golf until I was almost 17 years old. … I picked it up as a joke with my friends, and tried out for the team and actually made the team.” At the same time, at 5-foot-3, she thought she was big enough for high school softball but “in college it's like, they're a little bit bigger girls. … I just decided I'm going to walk on [in golf] at Kent State and had to earn my scholarship.”

She later went pro and, while on the Cactus Tour, was urged to try out for Big Break. “I auditioned out here at one of the golf courses,” she said. “I didn't really think anything of it. … I never really was so religious about watching [the show] but I knew what it was.” Jan Dowling, an assistant golf coach at Kent, had been on Big Break III, and Jackson is friends with Allison Micheletti, who was on Big Break Atlantis.

Still, she said, “I got a call that I was finalist and then I got a call about a month later that I was on it.” Taping was in January and February — although Jackson couldn't even tell people she was on the show. “It was pretty tough,” she said. “But that's OK. I'm good at keeping secrets.”

The series puts golfers through various challenges, which might involve playing straightforward golf but can also include stunts like breaking a pane of glass with a shot, or playing blackjack — with different parts of the green marked for different cards. It requires golf skills but is at some remove from playing in tournaments. Jackson said the competition never involved just playing 18 holes against each other.

“It's like, well, you kind of have to take it one shot at a time,” she said. “In golf, if I hit a bad shot, I can still make the putt. I can make up for it. … [The show] is one shot at a time.” And that one shot might not be followed by a chance to make up for an error, because of the structure of the challenges.

On the one hand, she said the pressure on each shot was good, because it reminded her that “you've got to learn to execute when needed.” On the other, after the show was done, she said, “I struggled. We never played 18 holes of golf. So when I got back, I played a tournament and it was like I didn't know what I was doing. I hadn't played a full round of golf in a month and a half. … It took me about four tournaments to get back to where I was before I left.”

The team aspect of the show was also challenging. “I'm a competitor and I don't like other people's golf determining how well I do,” she said. “In softball, that was a team thing, that's all it was. But in golf it's not a team thing, it's a you thing. And it was hard for me to go back that, because I wasn't used to it. But my team was great, and they're good people.”

And now, she said, “I'm back where I want to be” in her second year as a pro and “I'm going 120 percent.” But TV has given her a noticeably higher profile. She walked into a store not long ago and “four people wanted to take their picture with me. I was like, ‘oh, my gosh.' When I walk out of the house, I don't think people are going to know who I am. It's pretty wild. … And then [Wednesday] I got off the golf course, and this little girl came over to me. She's in a golf outfit and said, ‘McKenzie, can you take a picture with me? I watch you on Big Break Mexico.' ... It's really cool that these little girls are looking up to me.”

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News Headline: Jewell Cardwell: Hoban alum walking a mile in tornado victims' shoes | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: He didn't wait to be phoned or summoned some other way to give aid.

Rather, Charlie McVan quietly made a few phone calls on his own and volunteered himself to go to a place he had never been to help those he had never met; to Moore, Okla., which was decimated last week by an EF5 tornado that blew through Texas, Kansas and Oklahoma with little warning for nearly 40 minutes.

Folks who know Charlie McVan were not surprised by his passion. Nothing less would be expected of someone like the Archbishop Hoban High School graduate (Class of 2001) who went on to Kent State University and now works as a consultant out of Cleveland.

He was merely taking his cue out of a passage in the Bible, namely Matthew 25:45:

“He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.' ”

It's that kind of passion that piloted McVan to take time off from his job (shortly after the tornado touched down) and book a flight to Oklahoma, said Jason Horinger, director of service and outreach for Hoban and a former Hoban classmate of McVan.

Horinger said McVan talked to him before leaving to cement himself where it would do some good.

As fate would have it, it was Hoban seniors' final day of school on Wednesday when McVan left for Moore, Okla., where 24 people are known dead. “We decided to launch a fund-raiser to help with the relief effort.” Horinger said. At this writing there was close to $1,000 in the fund. The collection runs through this week.

In addition, students and friends of Hoban have been collecting basic supplies, heavy on baby products like formula and diapers.

“It's just great to have someone like Charlie who has boots on the ground who can tell us what's most needed and [to what organizations] we should direct our donations. … Charlie is a funny guy. He's definitely a go-getter. When he makes up his mind to do something he does it. That's just Charlie!'' Horinger said.

“He sent photos of the devastation from the plane and as soon as he landed he rented a car.”

Charlie — who grew up in the Portage Lakes/New Franklin area but currently resides in Cleveland — said he was between work assignments when the tornado hit and had the time to take off work. “I was doing stuff at the time, but it was not more important [than what was happening in Oklahoma],” said the 30-year-old who was reached Friday in the high-volume Oklahoma traffic.

“I didn't have a lot of solidified plans except just getting there,” he said, adding that he relied a lot on social media like Twitter. “Hooking up with different organizations was difficult because telephone reception, which is better now, was pretty terrible.”

Once there, approaching the city from the southernmost point where the tornado started, Charlie said he passed a church — the Harvest Church — with a sign that said Disaster Relief; so he walked into the church to help.

Mostly he worked removing debris, delivering water and helping families ferret out what little they could salvage. Many of the families who had homes, although with no power, to return to refused to leave, fearing looters. So Charlie and others found themselves running errands for them.

The television news accounts of the situation on the ground doesn't begin to tell the story of the devastation in Oklahoma, Charlie insisted.

“What strikes me is that literally everywhere you go, to the stores or walking through the neighborhoods, how many times you're asked ‘Are you OK? What do you need?' ”

And this: “There are so many American flags,” he said. “You see them everywhere. … That says to me we're tough people. … ”

“It's just so reassuring to know what ties us together!”

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News Headline: Exhibit shows off Lefton's photography | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A special evening featuring the photographic works of Kent State University
President Lester Lefton was recently held at the KSU School
of Art Gallery on East Main Street in Kent. Selected photos from Dr.
Lefton's portfolio were available for purchase. All proceeds benefited Study
Abroad Scholarships at KSU. From left, Lester Lefton talks about his works
with his wife, Linda, and J.R. Campbell, professor and director of the Fashion
School at KSU. To view some of Dr. Lefton's work, visit www.lesterlefton.com

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News Headline: UA athletes fail to qualify | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four University of Akron athletes competed in the third and final day of the NCAA Division I East Preliminaries on Saturday, but none qualified to join the six Zips that will already be heading to the NCAA Outdoor Championships. Alexis Cooks, who is already qualified for the national meet in the discus throw, attempted to qualify in the shot put as well but fell short with a distance of 43 feet, 4½ inches.
Nick Banke threw 175 feet, 7 inches
in the men's hammer throw, Jessica Delic threw 138 feet, 5 inches in the women's javelin and Martel Durant cleared 6 feet, 10.76 inches in the men's high jump.

• On Friday, Kent State University freshman Dior Delophant became the school's third qualifier for the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships. Delophont cleared 5 feet, 11¼ inches in the women's high jump at the NCAA Division I East Preliminaries, tying for second place. She joins fellow freshmen Reggie Jagers and Danniel Thomas, who qualified in the men's and women's discus, respectively.

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News Headline: Kent State golfers chase national championship (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As Kent State football and baseball each went on historic runs in the past 12 months, the Golden Flashes men's golf team did as well, though that's becoming a regular occurrence.

KSU finished fifth in the nation at last year's NCAA Championships — the best finish in school history and the second top six finish in five years — and have again qualified for the 30-team format after placing fifth (the final spot that earns a bid) in the regional tournament.

It's an extension of the amazing run that so many programs at Kent State went on in the past 12 months. Director of Golf and coach Herb Page happens to be best friends with the Golden Flashes' baseball coach, Scott Stricklin. Considering football and basketball are often the two sports that get the most fanfare, Page and Stricklin have something in common as coaches building exposure the hard way. Page, though, is somewhat of an ambassador of all KSU athletics.

“I'm Kent State blue and gold through and through, and that was the best summer and fall we've had in 35 years when our baseball and football teams made that run,” Page said. “I'm Strick's biggest fan and I got to know [then KSU football coach] Darrell Hazell. We root for everybody, and I'm assuming everybody's rooting for us.”

Stricklin is on course to establishing KSU as a viable, national baseball program. Page is already there with men's golf.

With Kent State again qualifying for the NCAA Championships, it's the fourth consecutive bid for KSU, making it one of only eight schools to do so. The Golden Flashes are also one of only four schools to have finished in the top 20 in the last three seasons.

Thirty teams qualify for the NCAA Championships, which run from today to June 2 at Capital City Club's Crabapple Course. The tournament is broken up into two “sections.” The first includes 54 holes of strictly stroke play, with the top eight teams advancing to single-elimination match play. Last year, KSU advanced to that second tier but fell to No. 1-seeded Alabama. Page says that making it to the top eight is the biggest step toward notching another school-record finish.

“When you get into that group of eight and go to match play, at that point, it's anybody's game,” he said. “We were close last year [to winning a national championship], we were close four years ago. It's one of our goals. Everybody wants to win and we've been there, we've been close. It's right in front of us, and it's up to us.”

Led by juniors

Juniors (and roommates) Taylor Pendrith and Corey Conners lead this year's edition. Pendrith was named the 2013 Mid-American Conference Player of the Year. Conners held that distinction last season. Both play on the Canadian National Team and both hold a top 50 ranking in the Golfweek/Sagarin Rankings (Conners is No. 30, Pendrith No. 43). Page called Pendrith one of the longest hitters in the country and someone who only recently realized how good he could become.

The other three members are senior Kevin Miller, sophomore Nick Scott and junior Kyle Kmiecik.

The group actually came close to missing the NCAA Championships before Pendrith chipped in on the final hole for birdie, giving the Golden Flashes a cushion “that 20 minutes before, just wasn't there.” That resilience, Page says, is KSU's biggest ally.

“These men have been mentally tough,” he said. “We've had our backs against the wall a couple of times. It's good news, bad news. They'll make a bad swing and turn around and birdie the next hole. They're like a relief pitcher in baseball. They give up a shot and come right back.”

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News Headline: Conners, Pendrith lead Kent State men's golf team into NCAA Championships (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: They're two of the top collegiate golfers in the nation, who happen to live under the same roof in Kent.

They're both from Ontario, yet had no bond until they decided to join the national powerhouse Kent State men's golf program in 2010.

They've become best buddies off the golf course, and friendly rivals on it.

Their golf games are different. One churns out fairways and greens like a machine, the other unleashes booming drives that would make John Daly's jaw drop.

Both approaches, though, produce similarly stellar results.

They've kept the Mid-American Conference Player of the Year award in the same household the past two seasons, the consistent ball-striker winning it last year followed by the monster driver this spring.

They're preparing to lead the Golden Flashes into the NCAA Championships for the fourth consecutive season on Tuesday in Atlanta, after spearheading last year's program-record fifth-place effort at the NCAA event.

They're juniors Corey Conners and Taylor Pendrith, Kent State's Canadian one-two punch.

They're the two main reasons fellow Ontario native and veteran Kent State coach Herb Page believes this year's squad has a legitimate chance to exceed last year's record-setting effort and possibly capture a national championship this week.

"That's always been the goal. We don't dodge it. And with Corey Conners and Taylor Pendrith, absolutely it's possible," said Page. "Those two guys are pretty special. Two self-taught young men from Ontario. I'm proud of where they're from."

Conners and Pendrith have given Page plenty to be proud of since they first joined forces at Kent State in 2010.

CHANCE MEETING

When Conners and Pendrith first met, one knew little about the other.

Even though both young men were well-regarded amateur golfers from Ontario, who had already committed to continue their blossoming golf careers at Kent State, their paths had seldom crossed until Conners from Listowel and Pendrith from Richmond Hill were randomly paired for an event in Ontario during the summer of 2010.

"The first time we met, we played together in a better ball. That was kind of neat," Pendrith recalled with a smile. "He lives an hour-and-a-half from me, so I didn't know him too well before. We talked and it was like, oh you're going to Kent State, too. We'll probably be roommates."

That prediction proved to be correct.

"We were in Fletcher (Hall) the first year and the dorm again last year, and this year we have an apartment together," said Conners. "It's worked out pretty well."

Page made the pairing possible by recruiting his homeland, which has always worked extremely well. Page has nabbed dozens of stars from Canada over his storied 35-year career as KSU's coach, including touring pros Jon Mills, David Morland and Bryan DeCorso, among many others. He typically hasn't had to fend off many challengers to land Canadian recruits, as was the case with both Conners and Pendrith.

"They were sort of hidden gems. They weren't highly recruited," said Page. "I locked them up pretty early, then they got better and better."

Page vividly recalls recruiting both players.

"They're kind of opposites," said Page. "I've known Corey Conners since he was 14 or 15 when he was a little kid. He was a hockey player. He wasn't great (as a golfer), but I just had my eye on him, and he just kept getting better and better.

"Corey was moving along and had a great junior (golf) career, but Pendrith is really a diamond in the rough. His junior record will not overwhelm you. We were told through one of our connections to take a look at him and, wow. He's just got some skills that you can't teach."

Page paired his two Ontario recruits for obvious reasons, and they hit it off immediately as freshman roommates.

"We've always been really close since we've been here," said Conners. "It's definitely helped, feeding off each other, both working hard. You see one guy's playing well and it just pushes the other to do well."

"We practice together, play together all the time," said Pendrith. "You get used to being around each other, you know their game. He can help me and I can help him, we know each other so well."

DIFFERENT GAMES

The similarities between Conners and Pendrith end when they hit the links.

Conners (6-foot, 170) is a model of consistency from tee to green while the 6-1, 205-pound Pendrith crushes away with his driver, averaging more than 350 yards off the tee.

"They're kind of the same in many ways, but then there are some real opposites in their golf games," said Page. "Conners is absolutely a pure ball-striker. When he came here, he was hitting lots of fairways and greens and that's never changed. Pendrith just kills the ball. The average PGA Tour ball speed is around 168 to 172 (mph), and his ball speed is 185. He's like Bubba Watson, Gary Woodland. It's a gift."

Of course, both players had aspects of their game that needed fine-tuning when they arrived at Kent State.

"I've always been a real good ball-striker, but my short game has improved," said Conners. "I'm able to hit a bunch of different shots and have gained a lot of confidence around the greens. I've got some tips from Herb and (assistant coach Rob Wakeling), and from Ben Curtis when he's around, which is nice. They've helped me with the short game for sure. Instead of missing a green and making a bogey, I'm able to save par, which is crucial. You can turn a 76 into a 72 that way easily."

Pendrith credits Wakeling, a former star player at Kent State that Page calls his "original long-ball guy," with adding versatility to his game.

"When I came here, I just had one stock shot," said Pendrith, referring to a hook he hit off the tee no matter the situation. "I worked a lot with Rob, and he's helped me learn to hit different shots. You've gotta have more than one shot if you want to be successful and that's helped me a lot, being able to hit the ball both ways. And also my putting's improved a lot. Herb's helped me a lot with the putting stroke, and I'm just very confident with the putter now."

Despite his monster drives, Page believes Pendrith's short game is his strength.

"He's a big guy and he kills it, but he's probably got the best hands on the team," said Page. "The best part of Pendrith's game is his short game, his touch and feel. We don't touch his short game. He was not very good with his putter when he got here, but we made a change and he took it right in."

Page has also seen a drastic improvement in Conners' putting.

"He had kind of a little hitch and he was lifting his head, and we got in front of the mirror and got a little different thing going," said Page. "This spring, he's starting to putt a lot more consistently. Same thing with his pitching, he's really improved in those areas. He's gotten bigger and stronger since he's been here. His ball speed has increased 10 to 15 mph, so he's hitting it a lot further now than he was as a freshman. And he's very confident. That's a great trait to have.

INSTANT IMPACT

While breaking into the lineup of a traditionally powerful program like Kent State typically takes some time, Conners and Pendrith were instant contributors.

Pendrith shot a team-low 220 to tie for 14th place at the NCAA East Regional, while Conners had two solid rounds to help Kent State finish 19th at the 2011 NCAA Championships during their freshman year.

That proved to be just a hint of what was to come the following season.

Conners was named MAC Golfer of the Year after winning the MAC tourney, then went on to earn All-American honors after finishing a program-record fourth at the 2012 NCAA Championships. He had four top-five finishes and wound up with a stroke average of 71.74, third-best in program history for a single season behind Curtis and Mills.

Pendrith was no slouch himself, recording a team-high six top-10 finishes while averaging 72.49 strokes per round.

Together they led Kent State into the match-play portion of the NCAA Championships, which narrows the field to the top eight teams after three rounds of play. The Flashes actually finished in a tie for eighth with Florida State, then won a one-hole playoff.

"The playoff, that was quite a bit of pressure, one hole," said Conners. "It felt pretty cool being in that position, and being able to win the playoff was obviously even sweeter. Then getting into match play makes you feel pretty good, gives you lots of confidence."

Kent State lost its match-play opener to Alabama 3-1-1 despite Conners' victory, but the experience of playing on collegiate golf's biggest stage gave the Flashes tons of confidence heading into the 2012-13 campaign.

"This year has gone pretty well. We got a team victory, played pretty consistently and now we're headed to the NCAA finals," said Conners. "It's always a goal to get there and it's always tough to get there. It's been successful so far, but our work's not quite done yet."

Pendrith led Kent State to its fifth straight title at the MAC Championships, following in his roommates' footsteps with an eight-shot victory that clinched the MAC Player of the Year award. Then, Conners led the way with a seventh-place finish as the Flashes grabbed the fifth and final NCAA qualifying spot at the Fayetteville Regional.

Conners and Pendrith will be joined by teammates Kevin Miller (senior) and Kyle Kmiecik (junior), who also played on last year's fifth-place NCAA squad, for the NCAA Championships at the Capital City Club Crabapple Course in Atlanta, along with sophomore Nick Scott.

Kent State is one of only four programs in the country to finish among the top 20 in each of the last three years.

"We've been there, we've been through it," said Page. "The bright lights don't bother us, because we've beaten the best. Can we beat them this week? That's what we've gotta do. We've gotta play a little better, a little more consistent and we've gotta stay away from the big numbers.

"But these guys are capable. They are really tough mentally, the toughest group I've ever coached. They hang in there."

SKY'S THE LIMIT

No matter what happens this week, Conners and Pendrith will not part ways once the season ends.

"We have similar summer schedules," said Pendrith, "so we'll be able to travel together, play practice rounds together."

Page is thrilled whenever he sees Conners and Pendrith together -- on or off the course.

"I think they're good for each other," said Page. "They play together all the time, they share rides back and forth home. They're best of buddies, yet I think they sort of push each other along. There's nothing better then to have that inner-team competition."

Eventually, Conners and Pendrith will part ways as they chase their respective pro careers. Until then, the "self-taught young men from Ontario" will continue to bring out the best in each other, thanks to the unbreakable bond they've formed at Kent State.

"My goodness they've got some big upside, both of these guys," said Page. "Thank goodness there's not a draft after the junior year like there is in other sports. If there was, they're gone after this year. Agents are talking to me about them already. It'll be interesting to see where they're at five years from now."

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News Headline: Garaway's Miller ends Kent career with another NCAA trip | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kevin Miller left high school with plenty of accomplishments on the golf course.

He was a state runner-up as a Garaway High School freshman and won back-to-back individual titles at the state tournament as a junior and senior as the Pirates won state team championships in 2007 and 2008.

Playing in big matches is something Miller has continued through a four-year career with the Kent State University golf team.

The Flashes finished fifth at the NCAA Fayetteville Regional last week as Miller picked up a pair of birdies on the back nine to shoot 75 on the final day.

This is the 17th time the Flashes have played in the NCAA Championships, but Miller will be the first player in school history to have played in the big event four times.

Now a senior with the Golden

Flashes, Miller also is part of the fifth graduating class to capture a Mid-American Conference title each year he was a member of the team.

“That's pretty rare,” said Miller, a business management major, who has a 74.5 scoring average through 137 career matches. “I guess I've been lucky to have been on some pretty good teams.”

Miller shot his career low of 66 this season and his teams have a winning percentage of .619 throughout his career.

“I've been lucky to have had a chance to play some great Division I competition through the years,” Miller said. “We get to play the top teams every week.

“Because of that, we have to play well every week, and that really drives you to get better.”

Miller said he's mostly played in the No. 3 spot, but position is not a big thing with this team.

“Our team is really deep,” he said. “Anybody playing one through five can post the best score on any given day.”

Miller is not the only area golfer on the team at Kent. Former Pirate teammate Jake Troyer is a freshman on the squad.

“It's been great to have him as a teammate again,” Miller said.

Four years of college golf have produced some big-time memories for the Garaway golfer.

“We went to Puerto Rico one year, that was probably the most fun I've had on a trip,” he said. “But we went to San Diego last year and got to stay in a resort on the beach.

“I got to play at Riviera one year, that was probably my most memorable course.”

While Miller's plans for the week are set in Atlanta, he's not real sure about where things go from here.

“I don't really know what I'm going to do going forward,” he admitted. “I want to stay an amateur through the summer, but then I'll have to decide if I want to try to play professionally or get a real job.”

Kevin Miller left high school with plenty of accomplishments on the golf course.

He was a state runner-up as a Garaway High School freshman and won back-to-back individual titles at the state tournament as a junior and senior as the Pirates won state team championships in 2007 and 2008.

Playing in big matches is something Miller has continued through a four-year career with the Kent State University golf team.

The Flashes finished fifth at the NCAA Fayetteville Regional last week as Miller picked up a pair of birdies on the back nine to shoot 75 on the final day.

This is the 17th time the Flashes have played in the NCAA Championships, but Miller will be the first player in school history to have played in the big event four times.

Now a senior with the Golden

Flashes, Miller also is part of the fifth graduating class to capture a Mid-American Conference title each year he was a member of the team.

“That's pretty rare,” said Miller, a business management major, who has a 74.5 scoring average through 137 career matches. “I guess I've been lucky to have been on some pretty good teams.”

Miller shot his career low of 66 this season and his teams have a winning percentage of .619 throughout his career.

“I've been lucky to have had a chance to play some great Division I competition through the years,” Miller said. “We get to play the top teams every week.

“Because of that, we have to play well every week, and that really drives you to get better.”

Miller said he's mostly played in the No. 3 spot, but position is not a big thing with this team.

“Our team is really deep,” he said. “Anybody playing one through five can post the best score on any given day.”

Miller is not the only area golfer on the team at Kent. Former Pirate teammate Jake Troyer is a freshman on the squad.

“It's been great to have him as a teammate again,” Miller said.

Four years of college golf have produced some big-time memories for the Garaway golfer.

“We went to Puerto Rico one year, that was probably the most fun I've had on a trip,” he said. “But we went to San Diego last year and got to stay in a resort on the beach.

“I got to play at Riviera one year, that was probably my most memorable course.”

While Miller's plans for the week are set in Atlanta, he's not real sure about where things go from here.

“I don't really know what I'm going to do going forward,” he admitted. “I want to stay an amateur through the summer, but then I'll have to decide if I want to try to play professionally or get a real job.”

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News Headline: Freaks come out for GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If you saw the GoDaddy.com Bowl at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile on Jan. 6, you saw more than Arkansas State defeat Kent State 17-13: You saw a freak show, at least according to Bruce Feldman, who is cbssports.com's college football insider.

In Feldman's annual piece "Freaks List: The 20 craziest athletes in college football," two players from that GoDaddy.com Bowl are on the list for the 2013 season - Kent State running back and kick returner Dri Archer and Arkansas State defensive tackle Ryan Carrethers. Archer is No. 7 and Carrethers No. 10 on the list.

The Freaks List tries to identify the most outstanding athletes and physical specimens in college football.

Feldman said Archer "may be the quickest man in college football."

Carrethers, a 332-pounder, impressed Feldman with his 16 percent body fat and 400-pound power clean, 664-pound squat and 400-pound incline bench press.

The list also includes former UMS-Wright standout Jay Prosch, who now plays fullback at Auburn. He was No. 20.

The No. 1 player is South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney. In addition to Prosch and Clowney, SEC players on the list are Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel (No. 6), Mississippi State linebacker Benardrick McKinney (No. 8), Arkansas center Travis Swanson (No. 11) and Ole Miss WR Donta Moncrief (No. 13).

The rest of the list includes Minnesota defensive tackle Ra'Shede Hageman (No. 2), Baylor running back Lache Seastrunk (No. 3), Michigan offensive tackle Taylor Lewan (No. 4), Southern Cal wide receiver Marqise Lee (No. 5), Wisconsin linebacker Chris Borland (No. 9), Wake Forest linebacker Justin Jackson (No. 12), Notre Dame running back George Atkinson III (No. 14), Oregon tight end-running back Colt Lyerla (No. 15), Arizona State linebacker Carl Bradford (No. 16), Florida State running back James Wilder (No. 17), Virginia Tech defensive end James Gayle (No. 18) and UTEP wide receiver Mark Jackson (No. 19).

The GoDaddy.com Bowl will be called the GoDaddy Bowl in 2014. It will be played on Jan. 5.

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News Headline: Single Tickets for 2013 Blossom Music Festival on Sale May 28 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: BroadwayWorld.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Single tickets for The Cleveland Orchestra's 2013 Blossom Music Festival go on sale Tuesday, May 28, online at clevelandorchestra.com , by telephone, and in person at the Severance Hall Ticket Office.

As announced on February 17, the Blossom season continues a 40-year tradition opening with Salute to America concerts with the Blossom Festival Band. Music Director Franz Welser-Möst conducts three programs at Blossom, including opening night for The Cleveland Orchestra. Highlights of the season are The Joffrey Ballet's return under the direction of Tito Muñoz and the Blossom Music Festival premiere of Pixar in Concert with conductor Richard Kaufman.

The Blossom season showcases the Orchestra in nine programs and features three principal musicians as soloists: Joshua Smith , flute, Mark Kosower, cello, and Franklin Cohen, clarinet. Conductors Nicholas McGegan, Stéphane Denève, Bramwell Tovey, Jahja Ling, and David Afkham return to Blossom, and Kirill Karabits makes his Cleveland Orchestra debut. Returning guest artists include pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, soprano Christine Brewer, bass Alan Held , and violinist Gil Shaham. Debut artists include soprano LubaOrgonášová, pianist Cédric Tiberghien, violinist Ray Chen, and pianist Martin Helmchen.

A wide variety of popular music will be featured at Blossom this summer, including a premiere performance of the music of Simon & Garfunkel under the direction of Michael Krajewski . Broadway stars will take the stage in a Broadway's Leading Men program, led by Jack Everly . Cleveland Orchestra conductor Robert Porco will conduct highlights from the Gershwins' Porgy and Bess , and Bramwell Tovey leads an evening of the music of popular song, including music by Cole Porter and Jerome Kern .

Franz Welser-Möst Conducts

Music Director Franz Welser-Möst conducts the Orchestra's opening night at Blossom on Friday, July 5, with a program featuring soprano Luba Orgonášová in her Cleveland Orchestra debut performing as soloist in Strauss's Four Last Songs , followed by Shostakovich's Symphony No. 8.

Mr. Welser-Möst will lead Beethoven's Grosse Fuge for string orchestra, Liszt's Totentanz for piano and orchestra with Jean-Yves Thibaudet, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 ("Eroica") on Saturday, July 6. A commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Wagner's birth will be presented Saturday, July 13. Mr. Welser-Möst will conduct selections from Tristan and Isolde , Die Walküre , and Die Götterdämmerung . Soprano Christine Brewer and bass Alan Held will join the Orchestra in excerpts from the final scene of Die Walküre . Ms. Brewer will also sing the "Liebestod" from Tristan and Isolde and Brünnhilde's Immolation Scene from Die Götterdämmerung .

The Joffrey Ballet Returns

The Cleveland Orchestra and The Joffrey Ballet continue an ongoing collaboration in two performances on Saturday, August 17, and Sunday, August 18, featuring Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring , celebrating the 100th anniversary of the work's shocking Paris premiere in 1913. The production is a reconstruction (currently on tour across the country) created by the Joffrey in 1987, of Vaslav Nijinsky's original choreography and the costumes designed by Nicholas Roerich. In addition to The Rite of Spring , the programs will include Interplay , choreographed by Jerome Robbins to music by Morton Gould , an energetic and brightly colored ballet full of youthful playfulness, and John Adams 's Son of Chamber Symphony, reminiscent of classical ballets such as Swan Lake , but distinctly contemporary, with choreography by Stanton Welch .

Pixar in Concert

Pixar in Concert premieres at the Blossom Music Festival on Saturday, August 31, and Sunday, September 1, on Labor Day weekend. The Cleveland Orchestra will perform selections from all 13 smash-hit Pixar films with visually stunning clips projected on large screens. The clips capture the essence of each film, including their beloved characters and the popular music. The films are: A Bug's Life , Brave , Cars and Cars 2 , Finding Nemo , Monsters, Inc ., Toy Story , Toy Story 2 and 3 , Ratatouille , Up , and WALL·E . The concerts will be followed by fireworks, weather permitting.

Orchestral Masterworks

The Orchestra takes the spotlight at Blossom in performances of masterworks from the classical, romantic, and twentieth-century eras. Nicholas McGegan will lead a performance of Haydn's Symphony No. 103 ("Drum Roll). Stéphane Denève leads Debussy's La Mer , Ravel's La Valse , and Saint-Saëns's Piano Concerto No. 2 with Cédric Tiberghien in his Cleveland Orchestra debut. Conductor Kirill Karabits makes his debut in a program including Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto with Gil Shaham and Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5. Bramwell Tovey will conduct Holst's The Planets . Violinist Ray Chen, in his Cleveland Orchestra debut, joins conductor Jahja Ling for Vivaldi's The Four Seasons . David Afkham will conduct Schubert's Symphony in C major ("The Great"). The program also includes Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 1 with debuting guest artist Martin Helmchen.

Cleveland Orchestra principals appearing as soloists at Blossom this season are: Joshua Smith in Mozart's Flute Concerto No. 1, Mark Kosower in Barber's Cello Concerto, and Franklin Cohen in Navarro's II Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra.

Popular Favorites and Broadway Hits

The smooth sounds of Simon & Garfunkel will be revisited onstage at Blossom in a tribute by vocalists AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle, conducted by Michael Krajewski. Chart-topping songs on the program include "Bridge Over Troubled Water," "The Sound of Silence," "The Boxer," "America," and "Mrs. Robinson."

Highlights from the Gershwins' Porgy and Bess return to the Blossom stage conducted by Robert Porco. Acclaimed for her recent portrayal of Bess at the San Francisco Opera, soprano Laquita Mitchell will be joined onstage by Leontyne Price Vocal Competition winner Eric Greene, baritone, as Porgy, Broadway star Rodrick Dixon , tenor, as Sportin' Life, and the Blossom Festival Chorus.

Four of today's most talented Broadway leading men, along with one leading lady, join conductor Jack Everly and the Orchestra for great moments in musical theater history, including selections by Andrew Lloyd Webber , Stephen Sondheim , and Rodgers & Hammerstein . The hits include "Ya Got Trouble" from The Music Man , "Maria" from West Side Story , and a medley from LES MISERABLES .

Blossom Festival Band

Continuing a 40-year annual tradition, the Blossom Festival Band, conducted by Loras John Schissel, celebrates Independence Day with A Salute to America on Wednesday, July 3, and Thursday, July 4. The program features music by Gershwin and Sousa, and the explosive Tchaikovsky "1812" Overture, followed by fireworks.

Kent/Blossom Music

Celebrating its 46th season in 2013, Kent/Blossom Music began under the direction of George Szell when The Cleveland Orchestra and Kent State University launched a partnership in 1968, the year Blossom Music Center opened. Kent/Blossom Music's advanced training program brings more than 40 musicians from around the world to Ohio each summer for professional training in chamber music and orchestral studies. Participants receive lessons, coachings, and masterclasses with members of The Cleveland Orchestra and other elite faculty for five weeks in June and July. On Saturday, July 27, participants will perform with The Cleveland Orchestra in a side-by-side concert and also present a pre-concert program, conducted by Cleveland Orchestra Assistant Conductor James Feddeck, prior to The Cleveland Orchestra's concert at the Blossom Music Festival.

Twenty Cleveland Orchestra musicians serve on the faculty at Kent/Blossom Music. Twenty alumni of Kent/Blossom Music are now members of The Cleveland Orchestra.

Family-friendly "Under 18s Free" tickets continue at every Blossom Music Festival concert

The Cleveland Orchestra continues its mission to offer free tickets to young people 17 and under for every Blossom concert again this season. More than 26,000 young people attended Blossom Music Festival concerts through the "Under 18s Free" ticket program in 2011 and 2012.

The "Under 18s Free" initiative is an integral part of The Cleveland Orchestra's Center for Future Audiences, which was created to provide broader access for the Northeast Ohio community and is endowed through the leadership and generosity of the Maltz Family Foundation.

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News Headline: MIAMI STRING QUARTET AND SPENCER MYER OPEN KENT AND BLOSSOM MUSIC FESTIVAL FACULTY CONCERTS (Robinson) | Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Miami String Quartet and pianist Spencer Myer will open the Kent/Blossom Music Festival faculty concert series with a performance on Wednesday, June 26 at 7:30 p.m.at Kent State University.The concert will be held in Ludwig Recital Hall at the Music and Speech Center, located at 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent on the university's campus.

The performance will include such works as "String Quartet in F minor Op.95" by Ludwig Van Beethoven, "String Quartet No.9 in E-flat major Op.117" by Dmitri Shostakovich and "Piano Quartet in A major Op.26" by Johannes Brahms.

Resident ensemble of Kent/Blossom Music Festival, the Miami String Quartet features Benny Kim and Cathy Meng Robinson on violin, Scott Lee on viola and Keith Robinson on cello.Meng Robinson and Robinson have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A.Glauser School of Music at Kent State.The quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.and its own concert series in Palm Beach, Fla.

Myer was the gold medalist of the 2008 New Orleans International Piano Competition.In 2012, he began performing with cellist Adrian Daurov as the Daurov/Myer Duo.

"This is a full throttle concert with some of the best offerings from the greatest composers from the classical, romantic and modern eras," said Robinson, who also serves as the co-artistic director of the Kent/Blossom Music Festival.

Myer's involvement in Kent/Blossom Music began in 2007.He has performed as a soloist with The Cleveland Orchestra, and has appeared with New York City's Park Avenue Chamber Symphony, the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra and the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra.

A six-concert subscription is $72 for adults and $60 for seniors.To purchase a subscription, call the Kent/Blossom Music Festival office at 330-672-2613 or visit www.kent.edu/blossom.Subscriptions may be purchased with check or credit card (Visa, MasterCard or Discover).Single tickets will go on sale June 3.Tickets for adults are $15, $13 for seniors and $5 for students.

The Kent/Blossom Music Festival faculty concerts feature performances by the high-profile musicians - including members of The Cleveland Orchestra - who serve as faculty for the Kent/Blossom Music Festival summer program.

For more information on the Kent/Blossom Music Festival, visit www.kent.edu/blossom.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: KSU announces Sines as interim dean for College of Applied Engineering | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University announced Robert Sines as interim dean for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology at the Kent Campus effective immediately through June 30, 2015.

Sines takes on the role after a long history at Kent State, most recently as Dean and Chief Administrative Officer, Kent State University at Trumbull, a position he assumed in November, 2010 after previously holding the role on an interim basis from July 2003 to June 2005. In between, Sines was an associate dean at the Trumbull Campus, where he has also served as an assistant dean, associate professor, and assistant professor. Sines is a 20-year veteran of the U.S. Army.

Dr. Wanda Thomas assumes Sines' current role as Dean of Kent State University at Trumbull on an interim basis while maintaining her role as Associate Provost, Dean of the Regional College.

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News Headline: Tri-C JazzFest attracted financial support as well as audiences this year: Higher Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cuyahoga Community College's JazzFest, bolstered by gifts and grants, needed less
support from the college to balance its budget this year, according to preliminary data provided by Tri-C.

The college contributed $76,164 from its general fund to cover the costs for the event, which marked its 34th year in April. Total expenses were $674,956. The budget does not include the annual contract for its managing director - $70,000 this year – nor the cost for other employees who work on the event and are paid by the college.

The college had transferred a total of $791,700 from its general fund in the previous five years to cover JazzFest deficits. Tri-C officials said it is more important to promote jazz than to turn a profit.

The JazzFest draws thousands to concerts by top artists, performances by rising stars and educational workshops and programs for students.

Revenues this year were $598,792. That includes gifts and grants of $274,726, about $100,000 more than last year. Revenues in 2012 – primarily from ticket sales boosted by top acts – were $696,587. And expenditures – primarily performer fees – were $825,265 last year.

New this year were performances on weekend afternoons, along with hotel and restaurant packages, in hopes of drawing jazz fans from outside Cleveland. Also new were JazzFest memberships, which begin at $25 and offered savings on concert tickets.

The strength of the college's Jazz Studies program this year was highlighted by the acceptance of eight students as third-year transfers to the Berklee College of Music in Boston, a top institution for training students for careers in popular music.

It is the largest class of students to be accepted in the 12 years Tri-C has had an articulation agreement with Berklee. The students perform on drums, acoustic bass, trumpet, guitar and vocals. Some have been accepted at other four-year schools, and are weighing their choices.

For information about the Jazz Studies program or Summer with the Jazz Masters, Tri-C's summer camp for ages 12 to 18, visit www.tri-c.edu or call Steve Enos at 216-987-4256.

Book sale biggest ever: The 67th annual Book Sale at Case Western Reserve University will be held in the Veale Convocation Center Saturday through June 4.

The move to the center, at 2138 Adelbert Road, from Adelbert Gym was prompted by donations of more than 80,000 items from private collectors, estates, professional libraries, alumni and the public. Sale items include books, DVDs, CDs and record albums.

The sale, held by CWRU's Association for Continuing Education, will be held from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and June 3 and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 4.

Admission is free but for $20 people can preview the sale from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. More information is at acesite.org/book-sale or call 216-368-2090.

Kent State to encourage entrepreneurs: Kent State University freshmen will have an opportunity to explore entrepreneurship in a program tied to the book "Who Owns the Ice House?" this year's Common Reading book.

Interested students can enroll in a three-credit hour course through the College of Business Administration with the Ice House Entrepreneurship Program.

"Who Owns the Ice House? by Clifton Taulbert and Gary Schoeniger is a true story about an African-American, "Uncle Cleve," who defied convention and triumphed over adversity as an entrepreneur.

The Ice House Entrepreneurship Program was developed through a partnership with the Kauffman Foundation and the Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative. The program allows students to develop skills including critical thinking and collaboration.

Art students given funds to travel: Six Cleveland Institute of Art graduates have been awarded President's Traveling Scholarships ranging from $3,000 to $4,500.

Joshua Maxwell, a biomedical art major from Beavercreek, Ohio, will explore the Great Lakes region, visiting preserved and disturbed habitats.

Painting major Amanda Pierce of Madison will visit Europe. Ceramics major Emily Giuliano of Lakewood will visit independent magazine festivals and publishers in the U.S.

Ceramics major Anna Wallace of Durham, N.C., will study in Paris. Fiber and materials major Mathew Grady of Parma will travel to Budapest. Drawing major Lindsay Matthews of Euclid will travel to London and France.

CIA's scholarships date back decades.

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News Headline: Around Charlestown | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Andrea Presley recently was honored with the
Barbara Donaho Distinguished Leadership in
Learning Award from the Kent State University
College of Nursing.
Andrea, a nurse at Robinson Memorial Hospital
in Ravenna, was awarded this honor to recognize
her exemplary efforts in the guidance and
training of student nurses in the clinical setting.
This award was created to give recognition to
the clinical partnership between the Kent State
University College of Nursing and area hospitals
and is given to clinical unit leaders, prefects and
nurses who work diligently to train the students,
taking time out of their daily schedules and working
without being paid for these services. Andrea
and her husband, Mark, have three sons. Congratulations,
Andrea!

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News Headline: Part-time college faculty fight for better pay and working conditions (Sledzik) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Part-time instructors, who now do much of the teaching on many college campuses, are fed up with what they say are poverty wages and for the first time have organized in Ohio.

Known as adjunct professors, their issues over working conditions have been brewing for years as colleges have increasingly turned to adjuncts to teach classes. By some accounts, part-timers and other non-tenured faculty comprise more than 70 percent of the instructional workforce nationally -- a reverse of the trend decades ago when most instructors were tenured or on the tenure track.

Part-time faculty earn a median of $2,700 per three-credit course, according to a 2010 survey by the Coalition on the Academic Workforce, with no benefits or job security.

Salaries of full-time faculty, by comparison, range from a median of $47,000 for a non-tenure track position, to about $116,000 a year, on average, for a full professor. Those numbers come from the latest pay report of the American Association of University Professors.

Tensions escalated recently after some colleges around the country said they will cut courseloads and the hours of adjuncts in order to avoid having to pay for health insurance. Under the federal Affordable Care Act, colleges would be required as of next year to provide health coverage to employees who work more than 30 hours a week

The University of Akron told faculty in April that it was limiting adjuncts' hours because it cannot afford to take on millions of dollars more in health-care costs. The move prompted the Ohio Part-Time Faculty Association, the new group advocating pay equity, to stage its first protest earlier this month.

The rally on the Akron campus drew adjuncts from other area universities, including Stark State College in North Canton, which is limiting adjuncts to 29 hours a week so it doesn't have to pay health benefits under the federal law.

Lakeland Community College also has told its part-time faculty they will be limited to 29 hours a week, which includes class preparation time, grading and answering student e-mails. But the college said in a statement Friday that most of its part-time faculty would not be affected.

At Baldwin Wallace University, adjuncts will be limited to nine credit hours per semester, said spokesman George Richard.

The moves have triggered debate over calculations used to determine outside-classroom hours that go into teaching. At Stark State, it has led some part-timers to under-report their hours so they don't get fired, said Mike Lyndall, an instructor there who took part in the Akron rally.

Maria Maisto, an adjunct English instructor and organizer of the Ohio Part-Time Faculty Association, said the limit on part-timers' hours is the latest in a number of grievances. The association -- affiliated with a national group she heads called The New Faculty Majority -- has no collective bargaining rights, but it's trying to generate public awareness and spur talks with university administrators.

"We're pushing for a livable wage," said Maisto. "And certainly due process. When you're fired here, when you are non-renewed, you have no ability to contest that."

Universities say the growing use of adjuncts is an economic necessity as state support of higher education has eroded.

"If you hire tenured faculty at age 30, you're potentially giving them a 50-year job guarantee," said Terry Hartle of the American Council on Education, which represents universities. "Colleges and universities are looking, like most employers, for flexibility."

The shift to part-time faculty has been particularly pronounced at public community colleges. For instance, U.S. Department of Education data show that 10 percent of the Cuyahoga Community College faculty was part time, non-tenure track in 1995. The percentage grew to 76 percent by 2009.

Teachers filling the part-time jobs in many cases are PhD's competing for a shrinking number of full-time faculty positions. Some adjuncts have other jobs and teach one or two courses to supplement their income. But some carry courseloads comparable to full-time faculty.

Evan Chaloupka, an adjunct English instructor, said he taught eight courses at Lakeland and several other colleges this past academic year, earning less than $20,000.

"It's the Walmart model," said William Sledzik, an associate professor at Kent State University who writes a blog on topics including higher education. "We keep our labor costs at a minimum, and in doing so we're able to maximize profit out of each section."

Sledzik has blogged that overuse of poorly paid adjuncts cheats students. Some critics point to a study published in the Journal of Higher Education in 2006 that showed graduation rates suffered at public community colleges when they relied heavily on part-time faculty.

But Sledzik acknowledges colleges are in a tight spot financially.

Hartle of the American Council on Education said colleges have had to reduce personnel expenses.

"If 75 percent of your budget is faculty and staff, you better think long and hard about how to address that and maintain a quality institution," Hartle said.

Maistro said association members are expecting other institutions, including Tri-C, to announce mandatory workload reductions to avoid health insurance requirements.

Tri-C spokesman Al Moran said the college is exploring its options, but has not decided whether to reduce adjuncts' hours.

At Cleveland State University, spokesman Joe Mosbrook said most adjuncts don't teach enough course hours to fall under the health-care law. But the university will not impose restrictions on adjuncts' hours, he said.

University of Akron officials said budget pressures forced them to limit part-time instructors to eight credit hours per semester next fall. The university is facing a $26.7 million deficit next year.

Without the limit, Akron said it would take on more than $4 million in additional health care costs.

About 400 of Akron's 1,014 part-timers would be affected by the mandatory limits. As a result of the policy, the university is looking to hire 200 additional adjuncts for next fall to offset reduced courseloads.

"We're looking at a budget gap we need to manage," Provost Mike Sherman said in a recent interview. "If we didn't manage to that part-time definition, there would be 400 part-timers we'd be obligated to provide health care to."

Kent State University issued a statement saying the administration is still exploring implications of the federal health-care law.

"The university has not taken any actions or made any decisions related to the Affordable Care Act that would impact faculty's assignments, hours, or requirements," the statement said. "Personnel actions taken at other institutions will not influence decisions made at Kent State University."

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News Headline: At School Papers, the Ink Is Drying Up (Goodman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: New York Times - Online, The
Contact Name: WINNIE HU
News OCR Text: The Clinton News used to be the source for everything that mattered to its readers in the northwest Bronx. It published 10,000 copies every other week in the 1930s and even circulated overseas among Bronx residents fighting in World War II.

It, like newspapers everywhere, has struggled to adapt as print costs soared, and Facebook and Twitter became the media of choice among younger generations.

The difference is that The Clinton News is a high school newspaper, written and read by the students of DeWitt Clinton High School. Now, as it marks its 100th year as one of New York City's oldest student newspapers, The Clinton News stands as a testament to another ink-and-broadsheet legacy that is rapidly fading.

Fewer than one in eight of the city's public high schools reported having a newspaper or print journalism class in an informal survey this month by city education officials, who do not officially track the information. Many of these newspapers have been reduced to publishing a few times a year because of shrinking staffs, budget cuts and a new focus on core academic subjects. Some no longer come out in print at all, existing only as online papers or as scaled-down news blogs.

If New York is the media capital of the world, “you wouldn't know it from student publications,” said Edmund J. Sullivan, executive director of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, which runs award competitions and workshops for high school journalists. He counts 7 of the city's 560 public high schools as active members, down from about 85 in the 1970s. In comparison, 23 of the city's private schools are participating.

Nationally, nearly two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But Mark Goodman, a journalism professor who oversaw the study, said a disproportionate number of those without newspapers were urban schools with higher percentages of minority children. “They tend to have fewer resources,” he said, adding that this divide contributed to a long-term problem of low minority representation in the ranks of the media industry.

The student newspaper has long been a cherished tradition at many of the nation's top high schools, one that allowed students to take initiative and hone their writing skills while absorbing lessons in ethics and responsibility. It provided a public forum for debating civics with intellect and passion and, as a bonus, added a scholarly note on college applications.

But the decline of these newspapers in recent years is not a loss only for schools, but also for an industry that is fighting for survival. Students raised on a diet of Internet posts and instant messages may be unlikely to be future newspaper readers.

“If we don't even have a newspaper at this level, how are they going to develop a love for it?” said Joshua Sipkin, who advised an online newspaper, now defunct, at Information Technology High School in Queens. “Most kids aren't even aware of newspapers unless they're handed a free Metro New York.”

At the High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology in Brooklyn, “there was no prouder moment” than when the school newspaper came out, said David M. De Martini, an assistant principal. But the paper, The Statement, quietly disappeared this spring after an unsuccessful, multiyear online experiment to replace a printed version that had to be supported partly through bake sales and PTA grants.

Even the World Journalism Preparatory School, a public school in Queens that teaches its 600 students to use journalism skills to explore the world around them, has struggled to find a way to support the school paper, an experience the principal said provided a valuable real-world lesson about the industry. This year, the school eliminated financing for the paper after repeatedly telling students that it could not afford to indefinitely pay $10,000 a year to print it. The students, after failing to sell ads, opted for an online paper.

“This is how publications survive or not, and having some responsibility for the revenues that support it is crucial to understanding the business,” said Cynthia Schneider, the school's founder and principal. “I don't want them to go through their high school life thinking everything is handed to them.”

At many high schools, an even bigger factor in the disappearance of school papers is declining student involvement. Francis Lewis High School's once robust newspaper, The Patriot, has struggled to continue as a modest online project after the school, in Queens, stopped offering a journalism class that produced most of the stories for the print edition. John Pagano, the former adviser, said that when students no longer received a grade for their work, “it was very hard to get articles.”

“It's a war of attrition,” said Rob Schimenz, president of the New York City Scholastic Press Association, a group of newspaper advisers from 45 schools. The association stopped sending information to every city high school a few years ago because so few were responding.

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News Headline: Twenty under 40! Emily Ribnik (Ribnik) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: On paper, the two parts of Emily Ribnik's job may sound unrelated, but both are focused on keeping people healthy and safe.

Ribnik serves as mental health counselor for students at Kent State University's Stark campus. She also trains faculty and staff on Kent campuses how to respond to a “shooter or violent intruder.”

“I teach how to survive those type of incidents. We talk about what to do if you hear gunshots or see someone shooting, how to make the best decision,” she said. “Sometimes that means getting out, getting away, sometimes it means barricading yourself in. If the person is right in front of you, how to talk to them, or as a last-ditch response, how to fight back.”

The response training workshop also is offered to students.

“The more people who know what to do, the better off we all are, especially in those situations.”

Ribnik admits she knew ahead of time that she had been nominated for a Twenty Under 40! award. Lisa Hart, her nominator, kept asking her oh-so-casual questions about her background.

“I finally asked her, “What's going on?” and she had to tell me. When I found out I won, I was at a conference in Cincinnati. I was really excited, but I was in the middle of a session and had to be quiet!”

Ribnik joined the staff at Kent State Stark two years ago, and intends to stay in this area permanently. To attract more young professionals, she said, Stark County must continue to offer “a lot of continuing education opportunities.”

“And a lot of networking opportunities, at all different levels,” she said. “In my field, that means having events with

people from all different areas of mental health, from students to CEOs to

high-ranking psychiatrists. That kind

of exposure is very attractive to young

professionals.”

ABOUT EMILY RIBNIK

Age: 32

Occupation: Clinical mental health counselor, Kent State University at Stark, and A.L.I.C.E. instructor (Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate, which is shooter response training)

Education: Master of education in counseling and bachelor's degree in psychology from Kent State University, Walsh Jesuit H.S. in Cuyahoga Falls

In the community: Was instrumental in forming CARES: Consultation - Assessment - Referral - Education at Stark at the KSU Stark campus, volunteered to provide crisis response training to the Canal Fulton Library staff.

Accomplishments: Presented at conferences and led numerous training events: Annual All Ohio Counselors' Conference, International Crisis Intervention Team Conference, American Counseling Association Conference, and Ohio and Michigan local law enforcement trainings.

Family: Husband, Shon Edmison; parents, Nancy Sistek, stepfather Rick Sistek, father Ron Ribnik and stepmother Sue Strong.

Nominated by: Lisa Hart of Kent State University at Stark.

Hart says: “Her work is her mission, and we're fortunate to have her working in Stark County. Everyone should be so lucky as to work with someone like Emily, who is passionate about promoting mental health and making her community a safer place.”

On paper, the two parts of Emily Ribnik's job may sound unrelated, but both are focused on keeping people healthy and safe.

Ribnik serves as mental health counselor for students at Kent State University's Stark campus. She also trains faculty and staff on Kent campuses how to respond to a “shooter or violent intruder.”

“I teach how to survive those type of incidents. We talk about what to do if you hear gunshots or see someone shooting, how to make the best decision,” she said. “Sometimes that means getting out, getting away, sometimes it means barricading yourself in. If the person is right in front of you, how to talk to them, or as a last-ditch response, how to fight back.”

The response training workshop also is offered to students.

“The more people who know what to do, the better off we all are, especially in those situations.”

Ribnik admits she knew ahead of time that she had been nominated for a Twenty Under 40! award. Lisa Hart, her nominator, kept asking her oh-so-casual questions about her background.

“I finally asked her, “What's going on?” and she had to tell me. When I found out I won, I was at a conference in Cincinnati. I was really excited, but I was in the middle of a session and had to be quiet!”

Ribnik joined the staff at Kent State Stark two years ago, and intends to stay in this area permanently. To attract more young professionals, she said, Stark County must continue to offer “a lot of continuing education opportunities.”

“And a lot of networking opportunities, at all different levels,” she said. “In my field, that means having events with

people from all different areas of mental health, from students to CEOs to

high-ranking psychiatrists. That kind

of exposure is very attractive to young

professionals.”

ABOUT EMILY RIBNIK

Age: 32

Occupation: Clinical mental health counselor, Kent State University at Stark, and A.L.I.C.E. instructor (Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate, which is shooter response training)

Education: Master of education in counseling and bachelor's degree in psychology from Kent State University, Walsh Jesuit H.S. in Cuyahoga Falls

In the community: Was instrumental in forming CARES: Consultation - Assessment - Referral - Education at Stark at the KSU Stark campus, volunteered to provide crisis response training to the Canal Fulton Library staff.

Accomplishments: Presented at conferences and led numerous training events: Annual All Ohio Counselors' Conference, International Crisis Intervention Team Conference, American Counseling Association Conference, and Ohio and Michigan local law enforcement trainings.

Family: Husband, Shon Edmison; parents, Nancy Sistek, stepfather Rick Sistek, father Ron Ribnik and stepmother Sue Strong.

Nominated by: Lisa Hart of Kent State University at Stark.

Hart says: “Her work is her mission, and we're fortunate to have her working in Stark County. Everyone should be so lucky as to work with someone like Emily, who is passionate about promoting mental health and making her community a safer place.”

3 questions: Emily Ribnik

What's your favorite local bar or restaurant? Lucca's and Piada, and Primavera before attending a theater production at Kent State Stark.

When you have a free day, where do you go? “I'm still learning the area, but any place that has a festival, community events, and our (Kent Stark) campus theater productions — supporting those is very important to me.”

What is Stark County's best asset? “The amount and diversity of colleges and universities here. We have ones that focus on vocational and technical, four-year colleges, public and private — that's a huge variety in one county. And the amount of young professionals that brings in, the diversity, is amazing.”

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News Headline: On the Beat: A funky flea market heads downtown | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Kane, Dan
News OCR Text: AMBITIOUS OPERA

In a season where the entertainment norm is 3-D superhero movie sequels, an operatic version of Arthur Miller?s Salem witch trials drama ?The Crucible? is certainly unexpected. Yet on June 7, 8, and 9, the theater department at Kent State University at Stark will present composer Robert Ward?s opera ?The Crucible,? which won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize for music and remains one of the most-produced American operas.

The Kent Stark production, with stage direction by Brian Newberg and musical direction by Judith Ryder, will be performed at 8 p.m. June 7 and 8, and 2:30 p.m. June 9 (ASL interpreted). The cast members, who boast extensive operatic credentials, include Brian Johnson as John Proctor, Laurel Seeds as Elizabeth Proctor, Ken Kramer as Thomas Putnam, Lara Troyer as Ann Putnam and Melissa Davis as Abigail Williams.

Tickets, $14 for adults and $10 for senior citizens and students, go on sale Tuesday at www.stark.kent.edu/theatre and 330-244-3348.

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News Headline: 'Dig into Reading' is summer theme at Streetsboro Library | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “Dig into Reading” is the
theme for programs at the
Pierce-Streetsboro Library
this summer.

Registration for Summer
Reading Club and Storytime
may be done starting
Wednesday by going to the
library or calling 330-626-4458.

Summer Reading Club is
for children who have finished
grades kindergarten
through four. Programs will
be on Tuesdays from 1:30 to
2:30 p.m. or Wednesdays from
1:30 to 2:30 p.m. beginning
the week of June 10 and ending
the week of July 8.

Each week will include stories,
games, crafts, and perhaps
reader's theaters or
puppet shows. Each child is
asked to read every day between
weekly meetings.

The Kent State University
Trumbull Summer Stock
Theater will present a play
at the July 2 meeting. Drew
Murray will present a magic
show on July 17 during the
end party at 1 p.m. in the city
park behind the library for
participants of both Summer
Reading Club and Storytime.

There will be a weekly
drawing starting in July
for students in grades five
through 12.

Storytime for ages 2 to 5
will meet on Tuesdays at
11:15 a.m. or Wednesdays at
10:30 a.m. starting the week
of June 10 and ending the
week of July 8. Storytimes
include stories, music, crafts,
puppets, finger plays and
flannel board stories.

The library is also looking
for volunteers who have completed
at least grade five to
help with the Summer Reading
Club program.

They may come into the library
or call 330-626-4458 to
volunteer or for more information.

For more information, visit
www.portagelibrary.org.

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News Headline: Two African Americans in New Higher Education Administrative Positions Filed in Appointments on May 24, 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: JBHE Weekly Bulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tonjanita Johnson was appointed vice president for communications and marketing for the University of Tennessee system. She has been serving as chief deputy to the president of Stony Brook University, a campus of the State University of New York system. Previously, she was associate vice president for marketing and communications at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro. She will begin her new role on June 24.

Dr. Johnson holds bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Alabama. She earned a doctorate in urban higher education from Jackson State University in Mississippi.

Fashaad Crawford is the new assistant provost for accreditation, assessment, and learning at Kent State University in Ohio. He was the associate vice president for planning, assessment, and research management for the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the university. He joined the staff at Kent State in 2011 after teaching graduate courses in education at the University of Louisville.

Dr. Crawford is a graduate of South Carolina State University. He holds master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Louisville.

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News Headline: Mystery of vanished KSU student spans 35 years (Peach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University student Judy Martins was last seen leaving a friend's Dunbar Hall dorm room on the Kent campus early on the morning of Wednesday, May 24, 1978.

It was the end of spring quarter at the university, but witnesses said Martins, 22, was dressed in a Halloween costume on that particular night. A gaudy red wig covered her dark hair, and her hazel eyes were hidden behind large sunglasses. Clad in gaucho-style jeans, a brown and yellow blouse, beige trench coat and brown boots, she carried a large, white imitation leather shoulder bag.

At about 2:30 a.m., she headed back to her room in Engleman Hall, a walk of about 300 yards from Dunbar Hall that should have taken three to four minutes. She apparently never made it.

Martins has not been seen since that morning. And much of the evidence and files collected by police immediately after her disappearance has been disposed of because police can't prove a crime occurred.

A resident of the Cleveland suburb of Avon Lake, Martins was a general studies major and resident student adviser. She was 5 feet 4 inches tall and 120 pounds at the time of her disappearance, and wore glasses, which police found in her dorm room after she disappeared.

Martins was reported missing by another resident student adviser on May 26, according to media reports at the time. Her student ID card and many of her possessions were found in her dorm room, and her family said it was unlike Martins to not call and check in.

A supervisor on the case in 1978, current KSU Police Chief John Peach calls Martins' disappearance "a real mystery."

KSU and Kent police mounted a massive search for Martins, using borrowed National Guard helicopters fitted with infrared scanners to search for a grave site or body.

Ron Heineking, who was the Kent police chief in 1978, said officers walked downtown Kent in the evenings following Martins' disappearance, looking for her.

"They all had her picture, knew what she looked like," he said.

Searchers walked the banks of the Cuyahoga River and checked the area of Standing Rock, Heineking said, to no avail.

An ex-boyfriend of Martins was ruled out as a suspect after passing a polygraph, Peach said. Investigators later consulted a psychic who told them to search Towner's Woods in Franklin Township for Martins' body. That search yielded nothing, according to Record-Courier reports.

"We were never able to show, beyond a reasonable doubt, that there was criminal wrongdoing," Peach said. "No one believed" Martins would have simply left Kent to start a new life without telling anyone, he added.

The most promising development in the Martins case, which took place about two years after her disappearance, itself is wrapped in mystery.

Peach said he recalled getting a phone call from the Cuyahoga County jail approximately two years after Martins disappeared, saying that a woman named "Judy Martinez," who looked strikingly similar to Martins gave the missing woman's birth date as her own while being booked on a prostitution charge.

The woman in question was "obviously" drug-dependent, Peach said. If it was Martins, "she looked like she had aged 100 years," he said.

Martins' mother was adamant the woman was her daughter, he said. However, Martins' father "took one look at the woman and said 'That's not my daughter,'" Peach recalled.

Further adding to the mystery, Peach said "Judy Martinez" looked at the couple and told them "'Judy Martins is better off dead.'"

It was the days before standard DNA testing by law enforcement, and Martins' fingerprints were not on file because she had never been arrested, he said. Record-Courier stories from the time later reported that the woman was not Martins because dental X-rays did not match.

"We were certain the parents could ID" their own daughter, Peach said. "It seemed more like a civil case than a criminal case, but it was too coincidental for those things to have been just a strange happenstance."

Heineking said disappearances were not as publicized in 1978 as they are now. While the recent recovery of three alleged kidnapping victims in Cleveland made national news, he said police were lucky "if (Martins' disappearance) hit statewide papers."

"Back then, there was not the missing persons websites on the computer, the FBI wasn't involved in all that kind of stuff," Heineking said.

Over the years, Peach said, there have been additional inquiries into Martins' disappearance. KSU police have shared information with the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and national missing persons agencies, but much of the file on Martins had been disposed of, in part due to records retention policies.

"We really haven't kept all those things," Peach said. "It was never classified a crime, and that was before the guidelines for missing persons were established, well before we were able to keep electronic versions of records."

Investigators remain without a main suspect in Martins' disappearance. Peach said if a new lead were to come in, it would be fully investigated.

"It's just a bizarre case," he said. "To this day, it's too bizarre for me even to think of what happened … We don't know it's a crime, but it's too unusual to think that a crime wasn't involved."

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News Headline: Cleveland theater auditions for May 24 and beyond | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Mark Rapp
News OCR Text: Audition list for May 24 and beyond

Porthouse Theatre. Blossom Music Center, Cuyahoga Falls. Seeking a child actor for the role of Jerome in "South Pacific." Must look between the ages of 6 and 12; Asian or African-American descent preferred. Performances: June 13-29 with rehearsal at Kent State University beginning May 29. Send a head shot and contact information to artistic director Terri Kent at tkent@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Art, Wine Fest is Saturday Downtown | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Kent Patch
News OCR Text: Main Street Kent will host the seventh annual Masterpieces on Main Art & Wine Festival in downtown Kent on Saturday from 12 noon to 10pm. Admission to the event is free.

For $10, event goers can purchase a commemorative wine glass and three “taste” tickets to be used at their choice of the six winery tents. North Water Street will be closed from Main Street to Columbus St. and West Main Street will be closed from Franklin Ave. to Water St.

Live music will be featured all day at the Hometown Bank Plaza, with Woodsy's providing sound for the  all-day event.

Music schedule:

12pm – Peggy and Brad
2pm – Boy = Girl
4pm – Diana Chittester
6pm – Scarlet and the Harlots
8pm – B-String Band

Local wineries participating in the event include: Wolf Creek, Troutman Vineyards, Viking Vineyards & Winery, Maize Valley Winery, Meniru Meadery, Crafted Artisan Meadery. Food will also be available for purchase from Taproot Catering.

This event is generously sponsored by: AMETEK, Downtown Gallery, Hometown Bank, Kent State University, McKay Bricker Framing & Black Squirrel Gifts, Secret Cellar, Taproot Catering, Wild Earth Outfitters, and Williams, Welser, Kratcoski & Can, LLC, and WKSU.

Proceeds from the event will benefit Main Street Kent, the non-profit organization dedicated to the revitalization of downtown Kent. 

More information can be found at mainstreetkent.org

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News Headline: Book talk: Cleveland native back with new novel | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Bradley S. Keefer.
News OCR Text: Cleveland native's new novel full of mystery and romance

Saving CeeCee Honeycutt, the 2009 debut novel by Cleveland native Beth Hoffman, was a favorite with book clubs for its heartfelt story of a Willoughby girl who is sent to live in Savannah with her flamboyant aunt, and forms alliances with the outlandish women who live in the neighborhood. Hoffman's new book, Looking for Me, should be equally popular.

Looking for Me is the story of Teddi Overman, a Kentucky girl now living in Charleston, S.C. Her happiness is dampened by her mother's disapproval, and her brother's disappearance many years before. Though Teddi owns a thriving Charleston antique and furniture restoration business, her mother dismisses her as “thirty-six years old and still a junk picker.” Teddi's success has been aided by the generosity of others, which gives the book an appealing pay-it-forward spirit.

Teddi's brother, Josh, has an almost mystical connection with nature, and she continues to hope that he will reappear, while their mother blames Teddi for his leaving. There's mystery, romance and wit in this affecting book.

Looking for Me (354 pages, hardcover) costs $27.95 from Viking. Beth Hoffman will talk about and sign her book at the new Mayfield branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library, 500 SOM Center Road, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Registration requested; call 440-473-0350.

World War II memoir

Hudson native Edgar C. Forsberg died June 11, 2011, a few days before his 91st birthday, but he lived to publish an exceptional military memoir, Communications From the Front: An Ohio Soldier in World War II. Forsberg describes his enlistment in the Ohio National Guard as a means to “a degree of control over my fate,” and writes that he was “neither an enthusiastic nor a talented soldier.” But his articulate writing shows why he was chosen for Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Ga., and why this account of Forsberg's service during the invasions of Sicily and Anzio is a valuable addition to the literature.

Communications From the Front (189 pages, softcover) costs $14.95 from online retailers. Edgar C. Forsberg became a psychiatric social worker in Vermont after the war, and retired to North Carolina.

Long-ago battle revisited

The 1862 Battle of South Mountain, near Boonsboro, Md., isn't one of the better-known events of the Civil War, but Tallmadge native Brian Matthew Jordan thinks it deserves more study. His book Unholy Sabbath: The Battle of South Mountain in History and Memory, September 14, 1862 is based on extensive research, including contemporary accounts of hand-to-hand combat, troop movements and outcome (it was the first major victory for the Army of the Potomac).

The 387-page hardcover costs $32.95 from Savas Beatie. Jordan also has written a book called Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. He is an adjunct professor of Civil War Studies at Gettysburg College.

More on Civil War

Two more books about the Civil War come from Kent State University Press: In Conflicting Memories on the “River of Death”: The Chickamauga Battlefield and the Spanish-American War, 1863-1933, Bradley S. Keefer, assistant professor of history at Kent State University's Ashtabula campus, researched the transformation of the northern Georgia battlefield into a training center for troops and later into a national military park. The 424-page hardcover costs $65.

John T. Hubbell, professor emeritus of history at Kent State, was editor of the Civil War History journal for 35 years, from 1965 to 2000, and is the editor of Conflict & Command, first in a series of four Civil War History Readers, which will compile a total of around 50 or 60 of the journal's most important articles. A second volume will be called Race & Recruitment, and Hubbell will return to edit a third installment on Abraham Lincoln. The first volume, a 365-page softcover, costs $29.95.

Fight for abolition

The 29th Ohio Volunteer Infantry took heavy losses in the Civil War, but they were devoted to the end of slavery, so much that they were called the “Abolition Regiment,” according to James T. Fritsch, author of The Untried Life: The 29th Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War. This huge book follows the 29th OVI from their formation in Jefferson by Congressman J.R. Giddings to their final parade in Cleveland. The 501-page softcover book costs $34.95 from Swallow Press.

Events

Cuyahoga County Public Library (Berea branch, 7 Berea Commons) — Jennie Fields, author of The Age of Desire, a novel about Edith Wharton, her affair with a journalist and her relationship with her assistant, appears from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Registration requested; call 440-234-5475.

Cuyahoga County Public Library (Mayfield branch, 500 SOM Center Road) — Toledo native Denise Fleming, author and illustrator of children's books including the Caldecott-honored In the Small, Small Pond, from which art hangs in the library's children's area, signs her work from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

Rocky River Public Library (1600 Hampton Road) — Marilou Suszko signs her book (with Laura Taxel) Cleveland's West Side Market: 100 Years and Still Cooking, 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday.

— Barbara McIntyre

Send information about books of local interest to Lynne Sherwin, Features Department, Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309 or lsherwin@thebeaconjournal.com. Event notices should be sent at least two weeks in advance.

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News Headline: Tom Rodd: Revolution, counter-revolution and making W.Va. | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: wvgazette.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872, By John Stealey, to be published by the Kent State University Press, $135, 800 pages.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- The '60s were a revolutionary time. Traditional ways of thinking and living were no longer satisfactory for many people. New thinkers and leaders arose, expressing revolutionary ideas about human rights, freedom, justice, and progress. People thought new thoughts, wrote new words, sang new songs, and spoke out and acted for social change.

The era in West Virginia is vividly portrayed in Shepherd University historian John Stealey's forthcoming book "West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872," published by the Kent State University Press.

I meant the 1860s. You knew that, right?

When the 1860s began, Virginians had a wide spectrum of ideas about how people should live and be governed. Conservative ideas emphasized guaranteeing liberty through the preservation of the rights and powers of aristocratic, property-owning interests -- while more revolutionary ideas believed that liberty required the expansion of democratic rights and powers and opportunities for all. Revolutionary ideas had always been strongest in western Virginia, and these ideas found their expression in the new laws adopted by the people who created West Virginia in 1861-63.

For example, West Virginia's founders replaced the old Virginia "county court" governmental system, dominated by wealthy interests, with a "township" system -- where ordinary people made local governmental decisions. Unfortunately, after the right to vote was restored to former Confederate West Virginians, the "revolutionary" township system did not survive the "counter-revolution" of 1872.

Other revolutionary ideas put into place by West Virginia's statemakers had more staying power. For example, Virginia law did not require that children have a right to a free public education. In Virginia, private academies served the wealthy, and the rest of the citizenry got by as they could, with no system of free public schools.

To remedy this situation, leaders like the heroic Captain Gordon Battelle of Clarksburg, a minister and school principal and statehood leader, who died in 1862 while serving in the Union Army, led the Wheeling Conventions to establish a free public educational system for all West Virginia children. And this system survived and thrived in the new state.

Another revolutionary measure with staying power was the secret ballot. Virginia law required voters to declare their votes "viva voce," (out loud and in public.) Voters were frequently pressured and even punished for their votes by the wealthy and powerful. West Virginia's founders believed in the revolutionary idea that a person's ballot choices should be counted, but not revealed; and that idea also took hold and lasted.

West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872, By John Stealey, to be published by the Kent State University Press, $135, 800 pages.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- The '60s were a revolutionary time. Traditional ways of thinking and living were no longer satisfactory for many people. New thinkers and leaders arose, expressing revolutionary ideas about human rights, freedom, justice, and progress. People thought new thoughts, wrote new words, sang new songs, and spoke out and acted for social change.
The era in West Virginia is vividly portrayed in Shepherd University historian John Stealey's forthcoming book "West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872," published by the Kent State University Press.

I meant the 1860s. You knew that, right?

When the 1860s began, Virginians had a wide spectrum of ideas about how people should live and be governed. Conservative ideas emphasized guaranteeing liberty through the preservation of the rights and powers of aristocratic, property-owning interests -- while more revolutionary ideas believed that liberty required the expansion of democratic rights and powers and opportunities for all. Revolutionary ideas had always been strongest in western Virginia, and these ideas found their expression in the new laws adopted by the people who created West Virginia in 1861-63.

For example, West Virginia's founders replaced the old Virginia "county court" governmental system, dominated by wealthy interests, with a "township" system -- where ordinary people made local governmental decisions. Unfortunately, after the right to vote was restored to former Confederate West Virginians, the "revolutionary" township system did not survive the "counter-revolution" of 1872.

Other revolutionary ideas put into place by West Virginia's statemakers had more staying power. For example, Virginia law did not require that children have a right to a free public education. In Virginia, private academies served the wealthy, and the rest of the citizenry got by as they could, with no system of free public schools.

To remedy this situation, leaders like the heroic Captain Gordon Battelle of Clarksburg, a minister and school principal and statehood leader, who died in 1862 while serving in the Union Army, led the Wheeling Conventions to establish a free public educational system for all West Virginia children. And this system survived and thrived in the new state.

Another revolutionary measure with staying power was the secret ballot. Virginia law required voters to declare their votes "viva voce," (out loud and in public.) Voters were frequently pressured and even punished for their votes by the wealthy and powerful. West Virginia's founders believed in the revolutionary idea that a person's ballot choices should be counted, but not revealed; and that idea also took hold and lasted.

In his lengthy exposition, Stealey often turns to the words of Granville Hall, who was the reporter for the Wheeling Conventions and the editor of the Wheeling Intelligencer. Before the Civil War, Hall's father, a Shinnston tanner, was charged criminally under Virginia law for subscribing to "seditious" anti-slavery newspapers. Hall, like Battelle, despised slavery, and he is, hands down, the intellectual and moral hero of Stealey's book.

Stealey shows how issues of race and democracy played out in the era of West Virginia's creation, and how West Virginia's state-makers -- even as many of their revolutionary ideas were being eroded -- did create lasting political rights for African-Americans; and those political rights were important in keeping West Virginia on a democratic (with a small D) path.

According to the historian David Corbin, in 1890 West Virginia did not have one African-American coal miner. By 1910, there were more than 12,000! In West Virginia, black coal miners had the same pay rate as whites; there were (segregated) public schools for the miners' children; and black men, just like white men, could hold elected officials accountable at the secret ballot box.

Not so, in the deep Southern states from where many of these black miners came from, or even next door in Virginia, where for generations black citizens (and many low-income whites, as collateral damage) were stripped of the right to vote. These states were not democracies; they were racist oligarchies.

Thank God that the new State of West Virginia did not go down that dark path. In fact, from a moral point of view, preserving political rights for African-Americans within the boundaries of the state may have been objectively the West Virginia statemakers' greatest achievement -- although, one must admit that only a few of them would agree with that assessment.

Looked at in a larger context, idealistic people like Gordon Battelle and Granville Hall laid the foundation for an enduring progressive strain in West Virginia public life -- an evolving, inclusive vision and understanding of what true liberty and justice for all is and can be.

Professor Stealey's book soon to be published by the Kent State University Press is 800 pages long, and he has been writing it for 40 years. He has diligently unearthed and documented a treasure-trove of new source material that adds immensely to our knowledge of that amazing era.

"West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872" will be an essential part of West Virginia's intellectual heritage, and the book is a monumental capstone to Stealey's already-distinguished professional legacy.

Rodd, a lawyer, is co-director of the J.R. Clifford Project.

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