Report Overview:
Total Clips (8)
Alumni; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Athletics (4)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Financial Aid; Tuition (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
PLAY THAT 'FUNKY' MURAL (Rashid) 05/29/2013 Cleveland Business Connects Text Attachment Email

Riot Creative Imaging provides Kent State some comic relief Although there is nothing amusing about remaining competitive as a visual communications...


Athletics (4)
Around the Nation (May 28): Kent State's Toadvine named to MAC Tournament Team 05/29/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

BASEBALL KSU's Toadvine named to MAC tourney team Golden Flashes second baseman Derek Toadvine was named tor 2013 Mid-American Conference All-Tournament...

Resilient Flashes men's golf team battles back for solid first day at NCAA Championships (Page) 05/29/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Nick Scott certainly made his presence felt during his initial round at the men's golf NCAA Championships. Scott, Kent State's fifth man and the only...

On the record -- May 28: UA's Charlie Bull receives another golfing honor 05/29/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

University of Akron men's golfer Charlie Bull was named to the Division I PING All-Region Midwest team for the second season in a row on Tuesday. Bull...

KSU 11th 05/29/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

The Kent State men's golf team is in 11th place (2 over, 282), 12 strokes behind leader Arizona State after the first day of the NCAA Championships in...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Study: Nursing grads lead way in finding jobs after college (Dzurec) 05/28/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

About a month after passing his state licensing exam, Norton's Arthur Greenbank was cashing a paycheck in his field. The University of Akron grad is not alone: Of all the majors that students can choose, it is nursing that offers the best chance for employment. “I...


Financial Aid; Tuition (1)
Kent State Looks to Keep College Affordable (Lefton, Evans) 05/29/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Scholarships, financial aid a priority, president says Officials at Kent State University are looking to make college more affordable as state financial support for higher education has fallen in recent years. For...


Town-Gown (1)
South Lincoln Closure Delayed 05/29/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...due to weather. City officials initially scheduled the road to be closed for 30 days starting Tuesday for work related to the Esplanade project at Kent State University. The rain Tuesday delayed the closing, but the road is expected to close some time this week. The road will be closed...


News Headline: PLAY THAT 'FUNKY' MURAL (Rashid) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Business Connects
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Riot Creative Imaging provides Kent State some comic relief

Although there is nothing amusing about remaining competitive as a visual communications provider in Northeast Ohio, Riot Creative Imaging certainly knows how to have a good time with its displays. One of the company's latest success stories involves bringing the “funnies” to life inside Kent State University's student lounge, The Nest.

Having already created wall art for KSU, including a Fathead version of the black squirrel, Riot Creative manager David Riedel and his team were commissioned by KSU in 2012 to help transform and update the lounge, a place traditionally used as a music-listening center. Riot Creative created a full-color wall wrap to showcase the comic-strip work of KSU alums, Chuck Ayers and Tom Batiuk, the creators of Funky Winkerbean and Crankshaft. “We were told that the artists from Funky Winkerbean and Crankshaft would be creating an original comic that would be mounted with our adhesive vinyl if we signed onto the job,” Riedel says. “We took the job.”

Ayers mentioned that he wanted to frame the original artwork that would be displayed on the wall and raffle the frames off, using money generated for a scholarship fund. “I heard this,” Riedel says, “and thought, ‘Oh, my God, that's so cool.' His vision got me to thinking, ‘I'll take the $2,000 this will cost [KSU] and instead of having them pay me, I requested that they put the money in the scholarship fund.”

Although the money did not directly benefit Riot Creative, there was intrinsic value in the project, according to Riedel, including campus exposure, getting to meet the artists, and attending the grand opening. The event generated a media blitz.

The vision for the wall wrap belongs to Timeka Rashid, the assistant dean of students/director-center for student involvement at KSU. She had visited Ohio State University's new union and fell in love with its unofficial cartoon room (the campus also houses a cartoon museum).

“I stepped back and thought, ‘This is really fun. What a great way to incorporate the work of their alums.'” Rashid says. “I brought those thoughts back to my bosses.”

Soon the school was in talks with the comic strip creators, Ayers and Batiuk. “I told them I had a random idea OK'd by my bosses and would love for them to create a mural that captures student life at KSU. They agreed,” she says.

Ayers did most of the art, Riot Creative processed the sketches, and a digital graphic design company affiliated with Rashid did the coloring. Riot Creative enhanced the coloring for printing and mounted the work on the wall. “We printed the work on a 3M adhesive-backed vinyl with lamination that was installed to the wall using squeegees. It's a permanent picture that looks like a wall covering. It's like custom wallpaper, except that it's not wet on the back like wallpaper,” Riedel says.

The reaction? “Great — and immediate,” Riedel says. “Though the Riot name is not on it anywhere, the project gave us more pull around the KSU executives. The president heard that we donated it, which led to great feedback.”

Adds Rashid, “Riot Creative Imaging was great at really hearing what we wanted as a campus and working to provide us with just that. We now have plans for them to work on our office now.”

Riot Creative Imaging has come a long way since 1972, when it was known as family-owned Lakeside Blueprint. It changed names to eBlueprint in 2001. By 2003 Riedel had joined the company. eBlueprint was bought by California-based American Reprographics Corp. (ARC) in 2009.

Riot Creative Imaging, located on East 36th Street and Carnegie Avenue, is now a brand of the 200-location ARC, which primarily services the architecture, engineering, and construction marketplaces. ARC chose Cleveland to be one of its 13 supercenters, which arms Riedel's staff with the best equipment. “We were in the running against Pittsburgh, Chicago, Columbus, and Cincinnati,” he says. “We service local clientele, and we also service ARC centers in the area – as far as Virginia, Indiana, Illinois, all of Ohio, and part of Pennsylvania. We have made ourselves a national footprint, as we all have basically the same equipment and color management software. Our color printing output in Cleveland should look the same as a project done in L.A.”

Riot Creative Imaging sales have steadily increased at an average rate of 30 percent since 2003. Riedel says the company cannot always beat the pricing of its competitors, “but our stuff will look better than theirs. It's important in this industry to know your competitors. Someone else may have the fastest machines, but they may sacrifice quality. Every project we run gets quality-controlled by a manager before going out the door.”

Other recent local projects completed or in the works for Riot Creative Imaging include signage and marketing collateral for NGKF, Westfield mall projects, and work for Proforma in Valley View.

Riot Creative Imaging also is starting to venture into corporate event planning. Riedel says the company is equipped to service larger catering companies and vendors who may have a need for wrapping floors and walls at their events or even vehicles. “Much of what we do is removable, so we can help caterers who may need temporary wraps,” he says.

The greatest challenge in 2013 is one most companies would welcome in a down economy. “Our flatbed printer is only so fast,” Riedel says. “It's my busiest printer. It's hard to get a job in edgewise. Sometimes we have to come in with alternative solutions.”

For more information: riotcolor.com

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News Headline: Around the Nation (May 28): Kent State's Toadvine named to MAC Tournament Team | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BASEBALL

KSU's Toadvine named to MAC tourney team

Golden Flashes second baseman Derek Toadvine was named tor 2013 Mid-American Conference All-Tournament Team.

The junior batted a team-high .471 with eight hits and five runs scored in four games during tournament play. Toadvine also led the team with a .550 on-base percentage and six stolen bases. He walked once and was hit by a pitch twice while only striking out two times to help those numbers.

Toadvine picked up a hit in every game during the tournament, including two three-hit performances with three stolen bases in each of Kent State's wins. As a starter at second base all four games, he did not commit an error while registering five putouts and 15 assists.

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News Headline: Resilient Flashes men's golf team battles back for solid first day at NCAA Championships (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nick Scott certainly made his presence felt during his initial round at the men's golf NCAA Championships.

Scott, Kent State's fifth man and the only player in the lineup who was not a part of last year's record-setting fifth-place squad, fired a team-best 2-under-par 68 on Tuesday on the Capital City Club's 7,319-yard, par-70 Crabapple Course to help put the Golden Flashes in solid position after round one.

Kent State shot a 2-over 282 and rests in 11th place in the 30-team field, just three shots behind seventh-place Texas and Oklahoma. The top-eight teams after Thursday's third round will advance to the match play portion of the NCAA Championships to compete for the national title.

While his teammates struggled in the early portion of the round, Scott birdied holes 4, 6, 7 and 10 before bogeying hole Nos. 16 and 17 to shoot a 68 that was good for ninth place individually.

"He saved the day for us really," said veteran KSU coach Herb Page. "What a great day he had."

The sophomore had not broken 74 in Kent State's last two tournaments.

"I felt pretty good all day," said Scott. "Along with the birdies, I made two big par putts, a 40-footer on No. 8 and a 20-footer at No. 9 that really kept the round going. The putter was rolling really well. On the birdies, I just hit it close and made a lot of four- and five-footers. I had a really good time."

Scott's teammates recovered from the rough start, as the 23rd-ranked Flashes collectively were 4-under on the final 14 holes.

Senior Kevin Miller's round was emblematic of the rest of the Kent State team's comeback. After opening with double-bogey and playing the first four holes at 3-over, Miller battled back to shoot a 71 that was highlighted by back-to-back birdies to close at 17 and 18.

"I didn't hit the greatest drive on 17, but hit as good a second shot as I could out of the fairway bunker and made a 30-foot putt," said Miller, who is playing in the NCAA Championships for the fourth consecutive year. "Then, I hit my drive into the left trees and hit as good a shot as I did all day, a rescue shot to four feet and made birdie.

"My day was typical of how we've been playing for a few tournaments now. If we just get started fast in round two, we'll be better off, but it was a good job by our guys in round one to grind it out," Miller said.

Junior All-American Corey Conners also shot 71 with what Page called his "C-game," while 2013 Mid-American Conference Player of the Year Taylor Pendrith was one shot back at 2-over (72).

"Just a typical Kent State day; real shaky coming out of the gate, but we fought our way back," said Page. "The easiest part of the golf course is the first four or five holes, but we made a double-bogey and a couple of bogeys early and just didn't get our engines going. But then when we got to the hard part of the golf course, we played awesome. We didn't hurt ourselves today."

Arizona State leads by by four shots over Georgia Tech after shooting 10-under 270 on Tuesday.

Scott will be the first Kent State player to tee off in today's second round at 1:10 p.m. on hole 10.

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News Headline: On the record -- May 28: UA's Charlie Bull receives another golfing honor | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University of Akron men's golfer Charlie Bull was named to the Division I PING All-Region Midwest team for the second season in a row on Tuesday.

Bull is one of 155 student-athletes across six regions named to the All-Region Midwest team as selected by the Golf Coaches Association of America.

Bull made his second NCAA Regional Championship appearance last week and had perhaps his best season as a collegiate golfer.

Bull had 10 top 25 finishes in 12 events and won his first collegiate tournament at the Kenny Perry Invitational in October. Bull now holds the school record for career scoring average (73.59) and is fifth all time in Akron history after recording a 73.15 scoring average this season.

Baseball

Kent State junior Derek Toadvine was named to the 2013 Mid-American Conference All-Tournament team Sunday. Toadvine batted .471 with eight hits and five runs scored in four games during the tournament. Toadvine hit safely in every game including two three-hit games and did not make an error in the field.

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News Headline: KSU 11th | Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State men's golf team is in 11th place (2 over, 282), 12 strokes behind leader Arizona State after the first day of the NCAA Championships in Atlanta.

ASU's John Rahm was the medalist, carding a 9-under 61 on the Capital City Club's Crabapple Course.

Kent State's Nicholas Scott (2-under 68) is tied for eighth with 11 others.

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News Headline: Study: Nursing grads lead way in finding jobs after college (Dzurec) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/28/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Carol Biliczky
News OCR Text: About a month after passing his state licensing exam, Norton's Arthur Greenbank was cashing a paycheck in his field.

The University of Akron grad is not alone: Of all the majors that students can choose, it is nursing that offers the best chance for employment.

“I tell graduates not to worry, that they almost certainly will land a job within a few months of graduating,” UA nursing administrator Cheryl Buchanan said. “If they would go to Florida or Michigan, they would find a job immediately.”

Researchers at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce examined 2009 and 2010 U.S. census data to determine what college majors are most likely to lead to jobs.

“People need to pay attention to this,” center director Tony Carnevale said. “It tells you that if you really want to be an architect, that's fine, but you're going to have to think more about what your plan is.”

Hard Times, College Majors, Unemployment and Earnings 2013: Not All College Degrees are Created Equal says the unemployment rate for recent nursing grads is 4 percent. Meanwhile, the typical unemployment rate for majors in many liberal arts fields is double that, and that of architecture and fine arts grads, more than triple at 13.9 and 11.1 percent, respectively.

What the researchers don't know is if the graduates were working in their major. Some college majors don't have clear career paths.

That was reflected in the unemployment rates for area ethnic and civilization studies (10.1 percent) and philosophy and religious studies (10.8 percent).

Other majors, such as architecture, have suffered in the economic downturn, although their unemployment is gradually getting better, Carnevale said.

In fact, only 50 to 54 percent of recent college graduates are working in their majors, Carnevale said in an interview. Only 30 percent of art graduates are, for example.

That means that some “employed” college graduates really might be working in fields once reserved for high school graduates: the proverbial English major driving a cab, for instance.

That can be an expensive outcome, given the cost of college.

“There is lots of pressure now to find out what the value of the college major is,” Carnevale said.

He said that graduates with certificates in heating and air conditioning from a community college can make more than typical graduates with bachelor's degrees.

“It's all about the field of study,” he said.

Buchanan, the UA nursing administrator, said all 55 of the spring 2012 nursing graduates who responded to a UA survey are working in their field or are attending graduate school.

One of those who is working is Greenbank, who landed at Summa about one month after passing his nursing boards. His odyssey to employment might have been abetted by a certification in gerontology, experience working at a nursing home and medical missions to Haiti.

“There were lots of jobs available, but there were a lot of colleges putting out students,” he said.

About 20 schools and colleges offer nursing programs in Northeast Ohio alone.

Laura Dzurec, dean of the Kent State College of Nursing, said Northeast Ohio is in the midst of a 20-year shortage of nurses, although the recession has propelled some would-be retirees to stay on the job longer than they otherwise might. If the economy improves, they will retire and an even larger well will open up for new nurses — and not only in hospitals.

“The nice thing about nursing is that you can do just about anything with a nursing degree,” she said. “If you want to do research, great. If you want to work with a pharmaceutical company, great. If you want to work with patients, great.”

Students have heard that clarion call: Kent State turns away 20 percent of its qualified applicants every year because it doesn't have room for them.

Although nursing might be the fastest route to a paycheck, other majors can eclipse it in salary, according to the Georgetown study.

Electrical engineering ($57,000), mechanical engineering ($58,000) and civil engineering ($50,000) pay more at the start than nursing ($48,000). Same with graduate degrees: Those in nursing earn $81,000 compared with $107,000 for majors in pharmaceutical sciences and administration, $96,000 for chemistry majors and $101,000 for economics majors.

“The variation in earnings by major has increased,” Carnevale said.

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News Headline: Kent State Looks to Keep College Affordable (Lefton, Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Fredmonsky, Matt
News OCR Text: Scholarships, financial aid a priority, president says

Officials at Kent State University are looking to make college more affordable as state financial support for higher education has fallen in recent years.

For last fall's freshman class, Kent State offered millions more in financial aid than the previous year.

Kent State President Lester Lefton said finances have proven a major hurdle to higher education for middle income families.

"The problem we've got is the great recession has hit low and middle income families very hard and they haven't recovered yet," Lefton told the university's board of trustees this month.

For the 2013 freshman class, Kent State offered $46 million in financial aid. That's $9 million more than the previous year.

"It's our top funding priority," Lefton said. "As we go out and look for money, the number one thing we look for money for is student scholarships."

Thanks to Kent State's financial aid programs 83 percent of freshmen in the 2012 class didn't pay the full tuition "sticker price," which for Ohio students in the 2012-2013 school year was $9,672.

According to the university, 50 percent of students paid less than $5,700 and 25 percent of students paid less than $2,700.

About 10 percent of students pay no tuition thanks to financial aid, according to Kent State.

Mark Evans, director of student financial aid at Kent State, said financial support has benefitted students with GPAs ranging from 3.0 to 4.0.

"We've had great success," Evans said.

Lefton said the university also is adding staff in its financial aid department to hlep students find more financial aid resources and working to keep students on a four-year graduation path to help keep their educational costs at a minimum.

The university's regional campuses also offer bachelor's degrees at a lower cost, Lefton added.

State support for higher education, per student, has fallen by 28 percent since 2008, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Yet Kent State's tuition remains low and ranks seventh among Ohio's 14 public universities, Lefton said.

"We've kept tuition changes relatively low," he said. "I think we're doing a better job than" other schools around the country.

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News Headline: South Lincoln Closure Delayed | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Fredmonsky, Matt
News OCR Text: Rain postponed closure of road scheduled to start Tuesday

Tuesday's planned closure of South Lincoln Street has been delayed due to weather.

City officials initially scheduled the road to be closed for 30 days starting Tuesday for work related to the Esplanade project at Kent State University.

The rain Tuesday delayed the closing, but the road is expected to close some time this week.

The road will be closed from East Main Street to Hilltop Drive. The road was originally scheduled to reopen Friday, June 28.

Workers will be installing the brick work for the pedestrian pathway in the South Lincoln Street roadway so the path can continue its march from Kent State, through the neighborhood west of campus and up to the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

Both city and university officials anticipate the path will open in July.

This section of the Esplanade includes sites for the new Kent State College of Architecture and Environmental Design and the Wick Poetry Center.

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