Report Overview:
Total Clips (9)
Athletics (5)
Higher Education (1)
Scholarships; Students (1)
Sociology (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (5)
Kent State golf team eliminated from NCAA Championships 05/31/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University men's team posted a 13-over 293 for the second consecutive day to wrap up a disappointing NCAA Championships in Milton, Ga. The...

News & notes for KSU football team 05/31/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By STEPHANIE STORM Published: May 30, 2013 Safety Luke Wollet will be one of three Youngstown area athletes honored by the United Way at the eighth annual...

KENT STATE MEN'S GOLF TEAM TIES FOR 27TH AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS (Page) 05/31/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Record-Courier staff report MILTON, Ga. -- Kent State's dreams of challenging for a national championship one year after finishing a school-record fifth...

KSU wins fifth straight trophy 05/31/2013 Cleveland Plain Dealer Text Email

The Mid-American Conference honored Kent State on Thursday with its Reese Trophy, recognizing KSU's men's athletic program as the best of the conference...

Eric Fronczek Named Kent State Ticket Office Manager (Nielsen) 05/30/2013 Kent State University Athletics Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Eric Fronczek has joined the Kent State University Athletics Department as ticket office manager in a recent announcement made by Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen. “We are...


Higher Education (1)
Public Colleges With the Worst Graduation Rates 05/30/2013 Frugal Dad Text Attachment Email

... Graduation rate: 7.7% Undergraduates: 5,311 Pell Grant recipients: 44.7% In-State Tuition and fees: $7,000 Acceptance rate: 63.2% 3. Kent State University-East Liverpool, East Liverpool Ohio Graduation rate: 8.9% Undergraduates: 1,371 Pell Grant recipients: 51.2% In-State...


Scholarships; Students (1)
Strongsville High School alumna receives full tuition scholarship to pursue teaching degree 05/30/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Nicki Gorny, Sun News By Nicki Gorny, Sun News on May 30, 2013 at 12:00 PM, updated May 30, 2013 at 12:04 PM Allison McGhee, a sophomore at Kent State University, stands with Aikey Foundation executive director Janice Krisko and foundation treasurer Ronald Krisko after receiving her scholarship....


Sociology (1)
THE UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP OF LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE TO HOST INFO SESSION ON BACHELOR OF PARALEGAL STUDIES PROGRAM 05/30/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

...May 30 -- Lorain County Community College issued the following news release: Those interested in earning a Bachelor of Arts in Paralegal Studies from Kent State University through The University Partnership of Lorain County Community College may attend an information session from 5-7 p.m., Wednesday,...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Listening to Literature: Struggling Readers Respond to Recorded Books (Rasinski) 05/30/2013 Edutopia Text Attachment Email

...struggling readers aren't stuck with boring content, and they have the chance to learn to love literature. Education professor Timothy Rasinski, of Kent State University, in Ohio, has also seen projects in which older students record audio books themselves for kids in the younger grades. "It definitely...


News Headline: Kent State golf team eliminated from NCAA Championships | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University men's team posted a 13-over 293 for the second consecutive day to wrap up a disappointing NCAA Championships in Milton, Ga.

The Golden Flashes finished 27th in the 30-team field, finishing 26 strokes out of eighth place. The top eight teams advance to match play.

Taylor Pendrith led the Flashes, shooting a 4-over 214 for the tournament. Corey Conners shot a 5-over 215.

Basketball

Kent State University announced the nonconference schedule for its men's basketball team, highlighted by a school-record 18 home games.

Notable home games include matchups against Youngstown State (Nov. 27) and Cleveland State (Dec. 28).

Track and field

Seven members of the University of Akron team were named to the Outdoor Academic All-Mid-American Conference Team.

Kyle Cochrun, Jake Hiltner, Bjorn Johansson and Alex McCune made the men's team and Ariane Beaumont-Courteau, Gabriela Szkolnicka and Claire Lucas will represent the women.

— Beacon Journal staff report

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News Headline: News & notes for KSU football team | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By STEPHANIE STORM Published: May 30, 2013
Safety Luke Wollet will be one of three Youngstown area athletes honored by the United Way at the eighth annual Champions Among Us Dinner.

Former cornerback Josh Pleasant has started each of the last three weekends for the AFL's Chicago Rush, recording an interception, a fumble recovery and 18 tackles. Following his senior season in 2011, Pleasant had shoulder surgery and had not appeared in a game until this month.

Head Coach Paul Haynes will be the featured speaker at the Cleveland Networking Luncheon Series June 6 at the City Club of Cleveland and at an alumni networking luncheon in Baltimore, Md. June 18.

Seven Kent State players were recently named to Phil Steele's Preseason All-MAC Team.
First Team: RB- Dri Archer, DL- Roosevelt Nix, P- Anthony Melchiori
Second Team: S- Luke Wollet
Third Team: OL- Pat McShane
Fourth Team RB- Trayion Durham, DL- Mark Fackler

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News Headline: KENT STATE MEN'S GOLF TEAM TIES FOR 27TH AT NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/31/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Record-Courier staff report

MILTON, Ga. -- Kent State's dreams of challenging for a national championship one year after finishing a school-record fifth in the country simply never materialized at the 2013 NCAA Championships.

The Golden Flashes shot their second consecutive 13-over-par 293 in Thursday's third round at the Capital City Club's Crabapple Course and wound up tied for 27th out of 30 teams at the NCAA tourney at 28-over-par, 26 shots out eighth place. California took first at 16-under.

Kent State won a playoff last year to claim the eighth and final spot in the match-play field, but was 26 shots out of eighth this year.

"We had pretty high aspirations this year after finishing fifth in the country," veteran KSU coach Herb Page admitted. "I'm not so sure even if we finished 10th or 12th this week that it wouldn't have been a disappointment."

Junior Taylor Pendrith, the 2013 Mid-American Conference Player of the Year, led the way for Kent State. He fired his second consecutive 1-over-par 71 in Thursday's final round to finish the tournament tied for 69th individually at 4-over. Junior Corey Conners, who placed fourth at last year's NCAA Championships to earn All-American honors, shot his second straight 2-over 72 and wound up 85th at 5-over for the event.

"Our two guns (Conners and Pendrith) couldn't get it going," said Page. "They ended up hanging in there and shooting even par and a couple over. We don't make any excuses ever, but for some reason we didn't execute very well again today. It was kind of a summary of the week."

Sophomore Nick Scott, who shot a 2-under 68 while making his NCAA debut in round one, and junior Kyle Kmiecik finished 75-75 in their final two rounds. Scott was the lone player from KSU to break par in any single round.

Senior Kevin Miller, the only player in Kent State history to play in four NCAA Championships, shot a 76 in the final round but birdied his last hole.

"I'm happy for Miller," said Page. "He struggled a little bit today, but on the hardest hole, the ninth hole (Kent State started on the back 9), he ripped something in there from about 200 yards to about six feet and made birdie on his final college hole. It was very emotional watching him walk up there and to give him a big hug on the last hole of his college career."

Conners, Pendrith, Scott and Kmiecik will return for another NCAA title run next season.

"Yes, this wasn't a good week for us. But when you look at the big picture, this is a pretty fabulous program," said Page. "Everyone should be proud of these young men, how they played all year and how they represented us across the country and at a national championship."

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News Headline: KSU wins fifth straight trophy | Email

News Date: 05/31/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Mid-American Conference honored Kent State on Thursday with its Reese Trophy, recognizing KSU's men's athletic program as the best of the conference during the 2012-13 school year. Kent State has won the award five straight years, and six of the past eight. KSU won three league championships this school year: men's golf, football's East Division and the regular-season baseball title.

Miami won the Jacoby Trophy, awarded to the top women's program in the MAC.

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News Headline: Eric Fronczek Named Kent State Ticket Office Manager (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent State University Athletics
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Eric Fronczek has joined the Kent State University Athletics Department as ticket office manager in a recent announcement made by Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen.

“We are thrilled to have Eric join the Golden Flashes family,” said Nielsen. “He will bring some new ideas to the department and his experience will only benefit Kent State Athletics.”

Fronczek arrives at Kent State after spending almost two years as the ticket operations manager with the Cleveland Indians. The Uniontown, Pa., native supervised part-time ticket seller staff including scheduling, productivity reporting, labor cost reporting, training and internal and external customer service. Fronczek also managed a yearly staffing budget and assisted in managing Ticket Services overall budget.

Prior to his time in Cleveland, he spent two years with the St. Louis Blues/Scottrade Center as the ticket operations manager. He was responsible for professional client services support in the planning, organization, logistics and management of more than 120 concerts, special events and Blues games at the Scottrade Center.

Fronczek was the box office manager at Crown Center in Fayetteville, N.C., from 2007-2009, where he managed the ticket operations for all concerts and events in accordance with promoter, facility and Ticketmaster requirements. He also served as a box office assistant for Live Nation in Pittsburgh, Pa., in 2006, and was a graduate assistant in the Athletic Ticketing and Event Management office and Robert Morris University from 2004-2006.

Fronczek earned a bachelor of science degree in sport administration from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and went on to receive a master's degree in sport management from Robert Morris.

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News Headline: Public Colleges With the Worst Graduation Rates | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Frugal Dad
Contact Name: Trent (Frugal Scholar)
News OCR Text: According to a 2011 Harvard Graduate School of Education study, only 56 percent of college students actually complete four-year degrees within six years. Among the 18 developed countries in the OECD, the U.S. was dead last for the percentage of students who completed college once they started it ― even smaller, newly independent countries such as Slovakia outscored the U.S. in graduation completion.



Recent Congressional reports and stories in the news media would lead you to believe that such poor graduation rates are occurring due to the proliferation of for-profit institutions. But that is not necessarily the case. While one force behind such disappointing statistics are America's for-profit schools — which have garnered plenty of media attention for being “dropout factories” that send students out into the workforce with major debt and few skills — there are a number of four-year public universities, funded in part by taxpayer dollars, which have graduation rates that are just as bad ― or worse ― as their for-profit counterparts.



College dropouts tend to be male, and give reasons such as cost, not feeling prepared, and not being able to juggle family, school and jobs, according to the Harvard study. An American Institutes for Research report published in 2011 estimated that college dropouts cost the nation $4.5 billion in lost earnings and taxes.



Several four-year public universities, funded largely by taxpayer dollars, whether through appropriation or financial aid, have graduation rates that are just as bad ― or worse ― as their for-profit counterparts. As surprising as this may sound, it is indicative of problems in the American system of higher education, as a whole.



Calculating college graduation rates isn't an exact science – the data look at the number of incoming Bachelor's degree-seeking students who graduate within six years, and dropouts include students who transfer to other schools. Still, the high number of dropouts is concerning. Using calculations from the Chronicle of Higher Education for the 2010 year (the latest data available), the following list represents the 10 four-year accredited, public universities with the worst graduation rates.



1. Southern University at New Orleans, Louisiana
Graduation rate: 4%
Undergraduates: 2,590
Median SAT score: 715
Pell Grant recipients: 75.8%
In-State Tuition and fees: $3,906
Acceptance rate: 48.4%



2. University of the District of Columbia, Washington D.C
Graduation rate: 7.7%
Undergraduates: 5,311
Pell Grant recipients: 44.7%
In-State Tuition and fees: $7,000
Acceptance rate: 63.2%



3. Kent State University-East Liverpool, East Liverpool Ohio
Graduation rate: 8.9%
Undergraduates: 1,371
Pell Grant recipients: 51.2%
In-State Tuition and fees: $5,288
Acceptance rate: 88.7%



4. Rogers State University, Claremore Oklahoma
Graduation rate: 11.5%
Undergraduates: 4,486
Median SAT score: 930
Pell Grant recipients: 40.5%
In-State Tuition and fees: $4,820
Acceptance rate: 50.4%



5. Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas
Graduation rate: 13.3%
Undergraduates: 6,964
Median SAT score: 796
Pell Grant recipients: 69.4%
In-state tuition and fees: $7,312
Acceptance rate: 36.4%



6. Ohio University Southern Campus, Ironton, Ohio
Graduation rate: 13.7%
Undergraduates: 2,199
Pell Grant recipients: 49.7%
In-State Tuition and fees: $4,956
Acceptance rate: 85.1%



7. Kent State University-Tuscarawas, Ohio
Graduation rate: 13.9%
Undergraduates: 2,774
Pell Grant recipients: 51%
In-State Tuition and fees: $5,288
Acceptance rate: 88.7%



8. Purdue University North Central, Indiana
Graduation rate: 14%
Undergraduates: 4,542
Median SAT score: 949
Pell Grant recipients: 31.6%
In-State Tuition and fees: $6,704
Acceptance rate: 87.1%



9. Cameron University, Lawton, Oklahoma
Graduation rate: 14.1%
Undergraduates: 5,860
Pell Grant recipients: 38.9%
In-State Tuition and fees: $4,590
Acceptance rate: 99.7%



10. Ohio University at Chillicothe
Graduation rate: 15.6%
Undergraduates: 2,558
Pell Grant recipients: 46.7%
In-State Tuition and fees: $4,956
Acceptance rate: 85.1%



In comparison, the University of Phoenix — the largest for-profit university, as well as the largest university by enrollment in the U.S. — has a graduation rate that hovers around 16 percent. The study offers no reason why Ohio, in particular, seems to have such a dropout problem. One issue could simply be a matter of the economy, with Ohio suffering a large number of job losses during the economic downturn. This may have resulted in people going (back) to college but for one reason or another — return to work, lack of resources or interest — did not continue their education.



The post Public Colleges With the Worst Graduation Rates appeared first on Frugal Dad.

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News Headline: Strongsville High School alumna receives full tuition scholarship to pursue teaching degree | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Nicki Gorny
News OCR Text: Nicki Gorny, Sun News By Nicki Gorny, Sun News

on May 30, 2013 at 12:00 PM, updated May 30, 2013 at 12:04 PM

Allison McGhee, a sophomore at Kent State University, stands with Aikey Foundation executive director Janice Krisko and foundation treasurer Ronald Krisko after receiving her scholarship.

Allison McGhee has a goal. And thanks to a full college tuition scholarship, she now has the funds to make it happen.

McGhee, a 2012 alumna of Strongsville High School who will start her second year at Kent State University in the fall, is the 2013 recipient of the Ruth M. Aikey Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship provides full, four-year tuition to a local student pursuing an early or middle childhood education major at Kent.

For McGhee, being a teacher has been a goal since she was in the first grade. Her program at Kent, early childhood education, will qualify her to teach kindergarten through third grade.

“I want to be the teacher that makes an impact,” she said.

Students remember the teachers who spend time to explain difficult math problems for example, she said, adding that her goal is to help young students “succeed with confidence.”

The Aikey Foundation scholarship will save her financial concerns and allow her to focus on her grades, she said. Although several scholarships from the city as well as a state bowling scholarship helped her afford her first year's tuition, these will not extend to the rest of her time at Kent.

That's why the Aikey Foundation scholarship comes at a good time, she said.

“It was an honor to be picked,” she said.

McGhee was the only recipient of the scholarship this year. In addition to living in one of several local cities, recipients of the award must have a demonstrated financial need and strong academic record.

Although she's only taken a few education classes so far, McGhee said she has enjoyed her program at Kent and is looking forward to working in schools next spring.

A recent visit to Brook Park Memorial Elementary School, where her grandmother works as secretary and her aunt serves as PTA president, to shadow a first-grade class confirmed to McGhee that she had chosen the right career path.

“I walked into the school and I just knew that was my passion,” she said.

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News Headline: THE UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP OF LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE TO HOST INFO SESSION ON BACHELOR OF PARALEGAL STUDIES PROGRAM | Email

News Date: 05/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ELYRIA, Ohio, May 30 -- Lorain County Community College issued the following news release:

Those interested in earning a Bachelor of Arts in Paralegal Studies from Kent State University through The University Partnership of Lorain County Community College may attend an information session from 5-7 p.m., Wednesday, June 26 in room 115 of the University Center building on the LCCC campus.

The Paralegal Studies program educates students in all areas of law and is approved by the American Bar Association.Kent State University faculty and advisors will be available at the information session to share information about the program.

To register for the information session, call the University Partnership office at (440) 366-4949 or register online at www.lorainccc.edu/upevents.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright © 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Listening to Literature: Struggling Readers Respond to Recorded Books (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Edutopia
Contact Name: Grace Rubenstein
News OCR Text: Teachers find that audio books are sound reading tools.

Teachers find that audio books are sound reading tools.

Credit: Veer

Abbie Root, a fifth-grade teacher at Brookside Elementary School, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, started the year with only six of her twenty-seven students reading at grade level. She and itinerant reading specialist Janise Cole tried a new approach: Using recorded books from Pacific Learning's New Heights program, they asked children to listen to the text on tape while following along on paper, and repeat the exercise until they could read each story on their own. Between November and April, the number of grade-level readers in Root's class doubled, and, as she said then, "We still have six weeks of school left."

Root attributes much of the progress to the audio books and believes the tool would benefit her strong readers, too -- and teachers across the country are drawing the same conclusion. At J. T. Henley Middle School, in Albemarle County, Virginia, teacher Pat Harder (a member of The George Lucas Educational Foundation's National Advisory Board), uses audio books to expose students to text that's beyond their reading ability but that challenges their vocabulary and comprehension. That way, struggling readers aren't stuck with boring content, and they have the chance to learn to love literature.

Education professor Timothy Rasinski, of Kent State University, in Ohio, has also seen projects in which older students record audio books themselves for kids in the younger grades. "It definitely works," says Rasinski, who puts audio books in the same category as other forms of assisted reading. "There have been studies that looked at captioned television or just reading with a parent. Across the board, it seems to have wonderful potential for helping kids."

A perk of audio books is their accessibility -- an attribute that has everything to do with the Internet and its accompanying boom in audio technology. With a click, educators can download a book for multiple students to hear, either digitally or by burning the narrative onto a CD. For instance, Audible.com, a massive clearinghouse for digital audio, hosts an education section where visitors can download audible children's books, textbook supplements, newspaper articles, speeches, and SparkNotes, Barnes & Noble's online version of CliffsNotes.

Denise Johnson, assistant professor of reading education at the College of William and Mary, cautions in the Web-based journal Reading Online that audio books are not for every student. They're too fast or slow for some, and too cumbersome for those who prefer to read only on paper. She adds, though, that the technology can introduce children to new genres, cultivate critical listening, and highlight the humor in text, among other benefits. Johnson writes, "Understanding the message, thinking critically about the content, using imagination, and making connections are at the heart of what it means to be a reader and why kids learn to love books."

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