Report Overview:
Total Clips (28)
Aeronautics (1)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (2)
Alumni; College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Anthropology (1)
Athletics (6)
Athletics; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Biological Sciences (2)
College of Business (COB); College of Undergraduate Studies; Entrepreneurship (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Geography (4)
Global Education (1)
Higher Education; Tuition (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at Trumbull (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC); Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics (1)
Five Steps to Starting a Regional Scholarship Program 06/04/2013 Business Aviation Insider - Online Text Attachment Email

...educators.” That partnering effort expanded from Ohio State to the other five aviation schools: Bowling Green State University, University of Cincinnati, Ohio University, Kent State University and Sinclair Community College. It also expanded to include Ohio business aviation leaders and members...


Alumni (1)
Author Seeks Stories From Female Abuse Survivors For Literary Debut 06/03/2013 PRLog Text Attachment Email

...Entertainment. Ryan Glen was recognized by The White House as a 2012 honoree for being an "outstanding entrepreneur” and was the first student in the history of Kent State University to have an app in the Apple app store. His highly rated “UnWord” has been downloaded in over 150 countries and used as curriculum...


Alumni; Athletics (2)
Former Kent State star John Hahn qualifies for U.S. Open 06/04/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Former Kent State standout John Hahn is going to play in the U.S. Open. Hahn, a Hudson native who turned professional last year and has been playing...

Former Kent State golfers Hahn, Hughes qualify for U.S. Open (Page) 06/04/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Former Kent State men's golfers John Hahn and Mackenzie Hughes are in the field for next week's U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club near Philadelphia. Hahn,...


Alumni; College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Helicopter lands at Kent State (Snelson) 06/04/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Medical flight team teaches nursing students about career options Dozens of Kent State University nursing students and others check out a Sikorsky S-76...


Anthropology (1)
Studies from Kent State University Describe New Findings in Primatology (Raghanti) 06/04/2013 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...axons is reduced in depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease." The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Due to the role that NPY plays in both cognition and neurodegenerative diseases, we tested the hypothesis that the density...


Athletics (6)
Scott Stricklin leaves Kent State to become head baseball coach for Georgia Bulldogs 06/04/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Success, then gone. That is not unusual at Kent State. It happened again Monday as successful KSU baseball coach Scott Stricklin was hired away by Georgia...

Kent State track: Dior Delophont breaks down barriers on her way to NCAA Championships 06/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Dior Delophont, a freshman high jumper and triple jumper, was a talented enough communicator to make a two-month transition from her home in Nancy, France,...

Kent State baseball: Stricklin to Georgia official; Birkbeck named interim head coach 06/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State and the University Georgia made the signing of Scott Stricklin as Bulldogs head coach official Monday night. In nine seasons as KSU's head...

Georgia to introduce Scott Stricklin as new baseball coach on Wednesday 06/04/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Scott Stricklin's exit from the Kent State baseball family became official on Monday when the University of Georgia announced him as their program's new...

Georgia hires Scott Stricklin from Kent State to replace David Perno as coach 06/04/2013 Washington Post Text Attachment Email

ATHENS, Ga. — Scott Stricklin, who led Kent State to five NCAA regionals and the 2012 College World Series, is taking over the Georgia program. Georgia...

UGA announces hiring of Kent State's Stricklin as new baseball coach 06/04/2013 Athens Banner-Herald Text Attachment Email

Georgia made it official on Monday. Scott Stricklin is the new head coach for the Bulldogs' baseball team after spending the last nine seasons at Kent...


Athletics; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Kent State track unites with France's fashion-driven Delophont (Rickaby) 06/04/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

About a year ago, some 4,000 miles away from Ohio in a large city in the northeastern French department of Meurth-et-Moselle called Nancy, young Dior Delophont...


Biological Sciences (2)
Data on Heredity Reported by Researchers at Kent State University 06/04/2013 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...in Mytilus mussels, which show doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria (DUI)." Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Here, we reanalyzed the published sex ratio data, using simple population genetics concepts and logistic regression. Contrary...

Researchers from Kent State University Discuss Findings in Life Science Research (Mou) 06/04/2013 Life Science Weekly Text Email

...be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments." The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge...


College of Business (COB); College of Undergraduate Studies; Entrepreneurship (1)
Akron Urban League seeks participants for Ice House entrepreneur program 06/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

“Uncle Cleve” was an unlikely entrepreneur, a black man in the 1950s segregated South who found success owning the town's ice house. His nephew, Clifton...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Med Copter Lands at Kent State 06/04/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Cleveland Clinic flight crew shows students what it's like to fly patients About 40 students in Kent State University's nursing program were treated...


Geography (4)
Kent State duo traveled to tornado-stricken Oklahoma town to survey damage (Curtis) 06/03/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - A Kent State University professor and his student are evaluating data they collected in Moore, Oklahoma in the aftermath of a massive tornado that leveled...

Kent Group Returns from Mapping Okla. Damage (Curtis) 06/03/2013 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — A Kent State professor and some of his students saw the damage created by the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma firsthand. Dr. Andrew Curtis and...

KSU researches return from storm-ravaged Oklahoma 06/04/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

A team of Kent State University researchers has returned from Oklahoma, where they collected data on tornado damage. Andrew Curtis, director of the Geographic...

VIDEO: Close call for Kent State University scientists in Oklahoma (Curtis) 06/04/2013 WOIO-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, OH (WOIO) - Dr. Andrew Curtis, Associate Professor of Geography, knows tornados. He and students at Kent State University have been studying their...


Global Education (1)
Bright Spots: May 30, 2013 (Kaykayoglu) 06/04/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Here's the latest installment of a weekly web feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community. •Kent State University...


Higher Education; Tuition (1)
Online Colleges in Ohio (OH) Ranked by Cost 06/03/2013 Frugal Dad Text Attachment Email

...Click a column to sort your school list. School Location In-State Out-of-State Akron Institute of Herzing University Akron, Ohio $10,054 $10,054 Baldwin-Wallace College Berea, Ohio $25,260 $25,260 Beckfield College Springdale, Ohio $10,692 $10,692 Bowling Green State University...


Hotel and Conference Center; Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent esplanade project nears completion (Bruder) 06/03/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: The partial closing of S. Lincoln Street on Wednesday morning marked one step closer to Kent State University's esplanade extension reaching completion. With heavy construction beginning behind Starbucks in Kent, S. Lincoln Street...


KSU at Trumbull (2)
New Facility More Than Just an Animal Shelter 06/03/2013 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Animal Welfare League board member Dr. Jeff Williams said the new facility will be more than just an animal shelter. Animal Welfare has partnered with Kent State University and students in the Veterinarian Tech program will use the complex for hands-on training as part of the two-year certification...

Vet-Tech Program at Kent State 06/03/2013 WYTV-TV Text Email

...is in Lordstown. The shelter will include a surgery area, indoor play area, and a maternity ward -- all for animals. The shelter's also partnering with Kent State on a Vet-Tech Program. The new shelter is expected to be up and running by the end of August.


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Hudson native receives award from KSU's School of Library and Info Science 06/03/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Elizabeth Miyajima of Hudson received the August Alpers Award from Kent State's School of Library and Information Science. The award is given to a recent graduate who as a student contributed the most to the school...


Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC); Town-Gown (1)
First Cub Camporall in Kent to show what being a Boy Scout is all about 06/04/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Community members can experience what life is like as a Boy Scout at the first Cub Camporall at Kent State University's Field House by Dix Stadium...


News Headline: Five Steps to Starting a Regional Scholarship Program | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Business Aviation Insider - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Mark Myers became president of the Ohio Regional Business Aviation Association (ORBAA), he identified one of his top priorities right off the bat.

“We have to have a give-back,” he said. Specifically, Myers wanted to find a way for ORBAA to make a significant contribution to the business aviation community and to Ohio.

Luckily for Myers, he had on his board of directors a Fortune 500 company flight officer named Eric Black, who was also thinking of creating a “give-back.” Black, however, had something very specific in mind. For some time, he and a colleague, both graduates of Ohio State University's flight program, had been bothered by the lack of curricula aimed specifically at business aviation.

“As we found our pathways within the industry itself, we were basically educated by the industry,” Black explained. “For us to graduate from a four- or five-year program without any specific knowledge about the business aviation end of the industry was a travesty,” he added.

Little did Black or Myers know at the time, but they were taking the first step toward establishing the Ohio Regional Business Aviation Association Collegiate Scholarship.

Step One: Identify the Need

Both Myers and Black said realizing that none of the six universities in Ohio offering four-year degrees in aviation offered much in the way of business aviation education was an “aha moment.” But the problem was bigger than a simple lack of educational offerings, said Black. Not only did students – and even some faculty members – have almost no knowledge of business aviation, many had the wrong idea of what the industry is all about, he said. “That's typically where we had to start: correcting misperceptions,” he explained.

Step Two: Form Partnerships

Black said he and his colleague mulled over how best to attack the twin problems of little working knowledge and misperceptions about business aviation. They decided to start by going back to Ohio State University themselves.

“We went back as guest speakers in the classroom and addressed some of these topics,” Black said. “We also began forming partnerships with the educators.”

That partnering effort expanded from Ohio State to the other five aviation schools: Bowling Green State University, University of Cincinnati, Ohio University, Kent State University and Sinclair Community College. It also expanded to include Ohio business aviation leaders and members of the NBAA Business Aviation Roundtable, Black noted.

ORBAA was ideally set up to create these partnerships. In 2008, Ohio business aviation leaders had formed the Business Aviation Collaborative of Ohio (BACO), aimed at better preparing students for aviation careers. ORBAA and OBAC merged in 2011. With that move, Myers said, came an organization with existing relationships within the collegiate community, as well as a connection with state officials who could facilitate the expansion of business aviation education.

Step Three: Promote It

Once the network of relationships dedicated to enhancing business aviation awareness among college students was established, Black said the next task was to create a way to involve the students themselves.

“Mark Myers said he wanted a deliverable: our first scholarship. This was kind of the pinnacle of what we were trying to do, because it was of direct benefit to the students, but it had a lot of meaning underpinning the whole thing,” said Black.

Step Four: Fund It

Using a portion of the funds derived from its Ohio Business Aviation Training Stand-Down (OBATS) events, ORBAA created a $5,000 scholarship competition and spread the word through its relationships with the colleges.

“OBAC decided they would take 25 percent of the net proceeds from their events (which are pay-to-play and sponsored events) and apply those proceeds toward scholarships,” Myers said.

Step Five: Award the Scholarship

The criteria for entrants were not complicated:

U.S. citizenship would be required

Entrants had to be sophomores, juniors or seniors enrolled in an Ohio collegiate aviation program that is a member of the University Aviation Association

Applicants would be required to provide proof of private pilot or higher FAA airman certificate

Applicants would need to provide a current resume (two pages maximum)

Applicants would need to provide a copy of their transcripts showing coursework consistent with their aviation career goals

A recommendation letter from the aviation program at the applicant's school would need to be included with each application

Applicants would be required to write a one-page, typed essay explaining why business aviation is an important pathway for their careers

The entries had to be submitted by Jan. 25, 2013. Dozens of students from across Ohio applied.

And the Winner Is...

Bowling Green State University Aviation Studies Major Brian Finley won the competition. Finley, a senior with a 3.7 grade point average (GPA), has already started steeping himself in business aviation by working as an aircraft dispatch intern and a line-service intern.

“It is impressive to see what the [business aviation] industry has created,” said Finley. “The companies, workforce and economic impact are tremendous, and [I have a] passion for this industry. And now, thanks to ORBAA, I am a little closer to my dream of being a future leader in the business aviation community in Ohio.”

Perhaps even more important was the interest the scholarship program stirred among aviation students in Ohio, said Black. “The larger benefit of the whole thing is there's actually meat under the surface of that scholarship. There's actually meaning to all students, because you can only benefit one, maybe several, students with a scholarship program. But we set up an education initiative that affects the curricula and all the students.”

Other Success Stories

“It is extremely satisfying to me to see groups like ORBAA initiating this effort to reach out to our young folks to bring them into a rewarding aviation career,” said NBAA Director of Regional Programs Steve Hadley, who explained that helping develop programs such as ORBAA's scholarship effort has become a personal mission. “It is an effort that not only helps the individual student but also their communities which benefit from their future career work in business aviation.”

Local and regional business aviation groups from around the country collectively raise millions of dollars for scholarships, Hadley said. Among them:

Chicago Area Business Aviation Association

Colorado Aviation Business Association

Friends of Trenton Mercer Airport

Georgia Business Aviation Association

Long Island Business Aviation Association

Love Field Pilots Association

North Texas Business Aviation Association

Partnership for Corporate Aviation Training

St. Louis Business Aviation Association

San Antonio Business Aviation Association

Waco Aviation Alliance

West Michigan Business Aviation Association

Westchester Aviation Association

Many, said Hadley, combine their scholarship offerings with mentoring and internship programs.

Find more information on how regional business aviation organizations can help develop new talent within the industry at the NBAA Business Aviation Regional Groups Library site.

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News Headline: Author Seeks Stories From Female Abuse Survivors For Literary Debut | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Author/Entertainment Entreprenuer, - Jun. 3, 2013 - Entertainment Entrepreneur, is seeking 1-2 page testimonials from women who have survived mentally and/or physically abusive relationships for potential inclusion in the “true stories” section of his upcoming debut novel “Abused by the Thought of Leaving”.

The book's main character is Winter Mildred, an abused woman who blames herself for her husband's erratic behavior. Throughout the story she finds herself becoming more and more immune to his verbal, mental, and physical abuse but discovers that it is the thought of leaving that abuses her the most.

Ryan Glen is best known for his hugely successful word game apps “UnWord” and “Word Palooza” as well as his world recognized mobile development company “G&G Games”, which is an extension of his production company Ryan Glen Entertainment.

Ryan Glen was recognized by The White House as a 2012 honoree for being an "outstanding entrepreneur” and was the first student in the history of Kent State University to have an app in the Apple app store. His highly rated “UnWord” has been downloaded in over 150 countries and used as curriculum in schools across the United States and China.

Ryan Glen has a large Twitter and physical fan base and is well respected in the entertainment and entrepreneurial arena. In 2012, his success and popularity garnered him an invitation to be a panelist at casting director Robi Reed's Merge Summit, a gathering of the entertainment industry's elite. Ryan Glen also regularly lectures and/or mentors students at various academic institutions in the United States.

Ryan Glen is a former recipient of the "Volunteer of the Year" award by Contact Kid's Magazine and was invited to guest co-host ABC's “Good Morning America”. He has been interviewed on NBC and featured on the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN). He has also been profiled in over four-dozen features by some of the world's most recognized TV, radio, magazine, print, and social media outlets. In addition to his aforementioned accomplishments, Ryan Glen is a singer/songwriter and poet.

Like the main character in Ryan Glen's novel, there are thousands of women who feel stuck in an abusive relationship for one reason or another. And thus, Ryan Glen encourages survivors to submit their stories (in RTF or PDF format), describing their journey to freedom and survival to IMadeItOut@Gmail.Com.

Ryan Glen and his team will read over all of the submissions and include some of the most intriguing entries in a section of the book titled “This is How I Made It Out”. His hope is that the stories from real women will help encourage others to gain the strength necessary to break free from abusive relationships.

Ryan Glen's social networking contact information is as follows:

Twitter @IAm_Unstoppable Photo

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News Headline: Former Kent State star John Hahn qualifies for U.S. Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Kent State standout John Hahn is going to play in the U.S. Open.

Hahn, a Hudson native who turned professional last year and has been playing on satellite tours in North Carolina, Florida and Nevada, earned one of the qualifying spots in the U.S. Open sectional qualifying tournament on Monday at the Ritz-Carlton Members Golf Club in Bradenton, Fla.

Hahn, a three-time Mid-American Conference player of the year, shot rounds of 65-71 for a 36-hole total of 136. He finished second to Kevin Phelan, from Ireland, and will play in his first U.S. Open when it is played at the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa., June 13-16.

Hahn was the medalist in the local qualifier, held at Beechmont Country Club on May 6, when he shot a 2-under 69 to advance to the sectional qualifying stage.

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News Headline: Former Kent State golfers Hahn, Hughes qualify for U.S. Open (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Kent State men's golfers John Hahn and Mackenzie Hughes are in the field for next week's U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club near Philadelphia.

Hahn, a 2011 graduate of KSU and Hudson native, earned a spot to play in his first national championship by finishing second at the Bradenton, Fla., sectional qualifier on Monday, shooting rounds of 65 and 71 for an 8-under-par total at the Ritz-Carlton Members Golf Club.

Hughes, a 2012 KSU graduate from Charlotte, N.C., won a playoff to capture one of just two spots available at the St. Louis sectional. Hughes shot 72 in the first round, then carded a 1-under 70 at Old Warson Country Club to finish at even-par and reach the playoff with Travis Johns of Oswego, Ill.

Just five days earlier, Hughes was in Atlanta watching Kent State play in the NCAA Championships. At the time, he had no idea he would even play in the sectional qualifier.

"He spent the day with us in Atlanta on Thursday, went out to dinner with us, then drove back home to Charlotte," said Kent State men's golf head coach Herb Page. "Then on Friday, he got a call from the USGA saying he got in as an alternate. And a few days later, he's in the U.S. Open.

"Mackenzie is just one year removed from college and John Hahn is just two years removed. They are hard working young men chasing their dream, and I couldn't be happier for them," Page said.

Hahn and Hughes were 2-of-6 former and current Kent State golfers who attempted to qualify for the U.S. Open on Monday. The Columbus regional included 2003 British Open champion and 2000 graduate Ben Curtis and current Golden Flashes junior Corey Conners. Both missed qualifying in a field filled with big names from the PGA Tour. Kent State freshman Ryan Troyer and 2006 graduate Ryan Yip both played in the Springfield sectional.

The U.S. Open will be held at famed Merion Golf Club June 13-16.

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News Headline: Helicopter lands at Kent State (Snelson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Medical flight team teaches nursing students about career options

Dozens of Kent State University nursing students and others check out a Sikorsky S-76 medical helicopter that flew in from the Cleveland Clinic to campus on Monday. Cleveveland clinic crew lets students hop on board for close-up look at medical chopper

To see more photos, visit www.recordpub.com. Medical flight team teaches nursing students about career options

Erin Stefanik wasn't aware of the
wide variety of career options available
for a graduate with a nursing degree.
So when a team from the Cleveland
Clinic flew in a Sikorsky S-76 medical
helicopter to Kent State University
Monday, it was a unique experience
for her and dozens of other students
to get a hands-on lesson on the life of
a flight nurse.
“I just always thought there was
bedside nursing before I got into the
program,” said Stefanik, a 29-year old
senior in the Accelerated Nursing
Program. “Now I know there's community
health nursing, home health,
research, case management — I had
no idea there were so many aspects.”
Stefanik then gestured to the medical
helicopter that landed on the
green of the KSU track near Henderson
Hall.
“Now that would be a pretty cool
job,” she said.
Cathy Snelson, an associate lecturer
in KSU's College of Nursing and
mentor for students in the Accelerated
Nursing Program, organized the
chopper's appearance after a variety
of her students expressed an interest
in learning more about flight nursing.
She said last time a medical helicopter
was flown in for students was in 1999
or 2000. Monday's event drew nearly
four dozen students, several KSU faculty
and some curious children.
“I think it also allows them to appreciate
the multi-disciplinary role
here,” Snelson said. “We've got skilled
pilots as well as health care professionals
on board. It broadens their
experience to see this whole process.”
Acute Nurse Practitioner Ellen Prewitt,
a KSU alumna and Cleveland
Clinic flight nurse who helped bring
the helicopter to campus, spent several
years as a registered nurse before
taking her first flight with Summa
Health Systems and “got hooked.”
Nurse Practitioner Mike
Kaffel, a flight nurse in his
first year with the Cleveland
Clinic, said when it
comes to helping patients
in the sky, “You get used
to it, but it takes a while.”
He pointed out the helicopter
he treats patients
in has only about 4 feet of
headroom and is usually
pretty loud and either particularly
hot or cold — but
the more extreme and unconventional
conditions for
treating patients compared
with those of a traditional
emergency room setting is
what drew him to the job.
“You're trained to use
your five senses, but unfortunately,
you're compromised
on many of your
senses because of what's
going on, so you have to
rely on the few you can
use,” Prewitt said. “It's a
challenge.”
Kaffel said many students
ask the same questions
about flight nursing
including how easy it is to
administer care to a patient
while strapped in to
the helicopter.
“It's a lot different when
you see it in person versus
watching it on TV or seeing
pictures or just reading
about it,” Kaffel said.
“It really comes to life for
them when you bring the
helicopter out to them.”
A flight nurse team usually
includes only four people
— two pilots and two
health care professionals.
“The crew is really small;
I thought there would be
more people on board,”
said Pete Araps, a 26-yearold
senior in the Accelerated
Nursing Program. “It's
basically a doctor and a
nurse keeping that person
alive until they get (to the
hospital). So you have to
know your stuff. If something
goes wrong, what
are you going to do? You
can't call on someone else
for backup.”
Araps and his friend
Chad Crouch, a 26-yearold
senior in the Accelerated
Nursing Program, both
said they were intrigued by
the experience and were
surprised the chopper appearances
for nursing students
aren't more common.
“This is really good experience
to see the helicopter
land and talk to the people
that do this day in and day
out,” Crouch said.
For Araps, the overall experience
has encouraged
him to pursue a career in
the field of flight nursing.
“Seeing this is a great
motivator to, if you really
want to do this, go into
critical care,” Araps said.

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News Headline: Studies from Kent State University Describe New Findings in Primatology (Raghanti) | Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 JUN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Primatology have been presented. According to news reporting originating in Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "We examined the distribution of neurons immunoreactive for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the posterior part of the superior temporal cortex (Brodmann's area 22 or area Tpt) of humans and nonhuman haplorrhine primates. NPY has been implicated in learning and memory and the density of NPY-expressing cortical neurons and axons is reduced in depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Due to the role that NPY plays in both cognition and neurodegenerative diseases, we tested the hypothesis that the density of cortical and interstitial neurons expressing NPY was increased in humans relative to other primate species. The study sample included great apes (chimpanzee and gorilla), Old World monkeys (pigtailed macaque, moor macaque, and baboon) and New World monkeys (squirrel monkey and capuchin). Stereologic methods were used to estimate the density of NPY-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons in layers I-VI of area Tpt and the subjacent white matter. Adjacent Nissl-stained sections were used to calculate local densities of all neurons. The ratio of NPY-ir neurons to total neurons within area Tpt and the total density of NPY-ir neurons within the white matter were compared among species. Overall, NPY-ir neurons represented only an average of 0.006% of the total neuron population. While there were significant differences among species, phylogenetic trends in NPY-ir neuron distributions were not observed and humans did not differ from other primates."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "However, variation among species warrants further investigation into the distribution of this neuromodulator system."

For more information on this research see: Neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex of humans and other haplorrhine primates. American Journal of Primatology, 2013;75(5):415-24. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; American Journal of Primatology - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1098-2345)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.A. Raghanti, Dept. of Anthropology and School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Copyright © 2013 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Scott Stricklin leaves Kent State to become head baseball coach for Georgia Bulldogs | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Success, then gone. That is not unusual at Kent State. It happened again Monday as successful KSU baseball coach Scott Stricklin was hired away by Georgia to turn that SEC baseball program around.

"It happened pretty quick," Stricklin, 41, said by phone Monday evening from the back of his chauffeured ride. "But I can't talk right. I'm on the Atlanta highway right now. I can't talk until Wednesday as that is when the press conference will be."

He leaves behind a somewhat stunned administration that rolled out the red carpet for Stricklin and the program after the 2012 baseball season, when the Golden Flashes won the Mid-American Conference regular season title and the MAC Tournament, then advanced through the NCAA baseball tournament to the College World Series. He departs with a 350-188 slate including four straight MAC East titles, and a string of four straight NCAA appearances that was snapped this season.

Stricklin is the latest Kent coach to parlay success into a job at a higher-paying job with another program, joining a string of KSU basketball coaches, and just last winter football coach Darrell Hazell after a championship season.

"That happens," Kent Athletic Director Joel Nielsen said. "It's understandable, but it is unfortunate."

The search now turns to Stricklin's replacement and the focus lasers in on successful pitching coach Mike Birkbeck, who no doubt has a standing offer not only for the KSU job, but also to join Stricklin at Georgia.

"It's something he and I have had conversations about the last couple of days," Nielsen said. "We'll keep talking. Whoever we get, it's going to be very important to find someone to maintain both the on- and off-field success, which is a key part of the culture of the Kent State baseball program."

Stricklin, a two-time All-MAC catcher for the Golden Flashes, had 30 players taken in the Major League Baseball draft.

"We are thrilled to have Scott leading our baseball program," said Georgia Athletic Director Greg McGarity in a statement. "Scott has excelled in every phase of his career as a student athlete at Kent State, in professional baseball, as an assistant coach at Vanderbilt and Georgia Tech and as a head coach at Kent State for the past nine years. At every step of the search process, his name was consistently mentioned as a tremendous candidate, and we are so happy to have Scott provide the leadership and direction for our program."

Stricklin was an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Georgia Tech under former KSU head coach Danny Hall, and he started his coaching career in 1998 as a volunteer coach for the Yellow Jackets.

Stricklin was a 23rd-round draft pick of the Minnesota Twins in 1993, played five seasons of professional baseball and reached the Class AAA level with the Twins.

Stricklin graduated with a degree in marketing from Kent State in 1995.

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News Headline: Kent State track: Dior Delophont breaks down barriers on her way to NCAA Championships | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dior Delophont, a freshman high jumper and triple jumper, was a talented enough communicator to make a two-month transition from her home in Nancy, France, to Kent State. It was in part aided by her grasp of the English language, which was rough but already passable with the expected roughness around the edges.

It was also partially aided by assistant coach Phil Rickaby, an Australian who in the past was thrown head-first into the same language barrier Delophont had to break through if she wanted to achieve her goal of participating in track and field while also studying fashion, which she's now doing at KSU.

One speaking with a heavy French accent, one with a not-as-noticeable-but-still-evident Australian drawl, the two have churned their versions of the English language together and found a level of understanding and teaching that's worked right from the beginning.

“I needed time to speak, but that's all right,” Delophont said. “Fortunately, I was a good student and could communicate, though sometimes it'd be a bit odd. Maybe after the first semester, I could understand everybody.”

Being a former international student and coach who had experience working with students from other areas of the world, Rickaby was prepared.

“I had worked with Diana Dumitrescu, a Romanian athlete, and it taught me to be patient and learn to communicate with an athlete that's from an international area,” he said. “You have to learn how to rephrase certain things in order to make it understandable. Dior and I were able to do that fairly quickly.”

In the meeting of worlds in different hemispheres, student became teacher.

“The exciting thing about Dior is I get a French perspective on track and field,” Rickaby said. “When I'm teaching her, sometimes, even if she doesn't realize it, the way she talks about something in an event teaches me. The cool thing is she's always had such fantastic results and maintained herself very maturely. We try to work on our communication and developing a better coaching relationship, and it's worked.”

An ease for the communication came quickly. The food in America, according to Delophont, is another story. That's been the biggest hurdle to clear for a KSU high jumper who's topped some impressive heights — and odds — during her first year stateside.

“The hardest part of coming here was the food because that's just something you're used to,” Delophont said. “I'm not sure what my favorites are, I have so many so I'm not sure. But here, it's not the same as French food. There are dishes, like with tomato sauce, that are similar, but I like the French way.”

Rickaby added, half jokingly, “Well, she loves French bread.”

Great food or not, she's winning. Delophont is already a two-time All-American for the indoor competitions that ran in March and recently qualified for the Division I NCAA outdoor championships, to be held Wednesday through Saturday in Eugene, Ore., in the high jump and triple jump.

Delophont was a member of two youth national teams while in France but wanted a better opportunity to participate in track and study fashion. Kent State, which has the No. 3 fashion program in the country according to Fashionista. com, was a perfect fit.

She got in touch with Rickaby, who happened to have already had a trip to London planned at the time, and he added a detour to Nancy, near the German border, to speak with Delophont around Christmas 2011. A few weeks later, she was a Golden Flash.

She now has a chance to again become a two-time All-American (the top eight finishers at both the indoor and outdoor championships earn All-America honors).

Delophont has had a decorated first year and could again place in the top eight in two events. The bigger surprise might be that she finds a food she likes out in Oregon.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball: Stricklin to Georgia official; Birkbeck named interim head coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State and the University Georgia made the signing of Scott Stricklin as Bulldogs head coach official Monday night.

In nine seasons as KSU's head coach, Stricklin led the Golden Flashes to five Mid-American Conference regular season and five tournament championships, including one College World Series appearance that included a win over No. 1 seeded Florida, in 2012.

“My family and I are excited to be Georgia Bulldogs,” Stricklin said in a press release from Georgia. “It's been a dream to coach in the Southeastern Conference, and I look forward to moving my family to Athens… I want to thank current Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen and former athletic director Laing Kennedy for the confidence and support they showed for the Kent State baseball program the last nine years.”

Associate Head Coach Mike Birkbeck has been named interim head coach, per a release from Kent State. Birkbeck has been with the Golden Flashes for 17 seasons acting primarily as the architect behind KSU's strong pitching staffs year after year. Birkbeck says that he has interest in the head coaching position but is keeping his options open at this time, including a possible reunion with Stricklin at Georgia.

“I'm interested in several scenarios that are in play,” Birkbeck told the Beacon Journal Monday night. “Scott has expressed interest in me, yes.”

When asked if there were other scenarios in the works besides those two, Birkbeck said “Not as I sit here right now, no.”

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News Headline: Georgia to introduce Scott Stricklin as new baseball coach on Wednesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scott Stricklin's exit from the Kent State baseball family became official on Monday when the University of Georgia announced him as their program's new leader through a press release.

Stricklin remains in Ohio, however, and is planned to be introduced to the media in a Wednesday afternoon press conference.

Stricklin spent nine seasons as the Golden Flashes' head coach, posting a record of 350-188 and reaching the pinnacle of his career to this point by guiding KSU into the College World Series in 2012 -- the only time in school history. He was also a three-time MAC Coach of the Year and led the team to five MAC Tournament titles.

"I'd like to thank Scott for his leadership in our baseball program," Kent State Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen said in a Monday press release. "While our accomplishments on the field are well-known, the commitment from Scott and our student-athletes from an academic perspective is unmatched and recognized nationally. I wish Scott, Cheri and the kids nothing but the best."

Through the 2012 season, KSU's baseball team was one of only 16 public schools in the nation to register a perfect score of 1,000 for three straight seasons in the NCAA's APR report.

In a press release by the University of Georgia, Stricklin said:

"My family and I are excited to be Georgia Bulldogs. It's been a dream to coach in the Southeastern Conference, and I look forward to moving my family to Athens and getting started on the recruiting trail and building on the tradition of Georgia baseball. I feel the Georgia Bulldogs can be a power in the SEC and a national power. I want to thank (Georgia athletic director) Greg McGarity for giving me this opportunity. Also, I want to thank current Kent State athletic director Joel Nielsen and former athletic director Laing Kennedy for the confidence and support they showed for the Kent State baseball program over the last nine years."

Stricklin had signed a contract extension last season worth $300,000 annually. He will now replace David Perno, who recently resigned after 12 seasons with the Bulldogs and reportedly was paid $450,000 last season.

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News Headline: Georgia hires Scott Stricklin from Kent State to replace David Perno as coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Washington Post
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ATHENS, Ga. — Scott Stricklin, who led Kent State to five NCAA regionals and the 2012 College World Series, is taking over the Georgia program.

Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity on Monday named Stricklin to replace David Perno, who resigned last month.

.The 41-year-old Stricklin was 350-188 during nine seasons at Kent State, his alma mater. He led the program to five Mid-American Conference titles.

Stricklin had 30 players drafted. His players also excelled in academics, recording perfect 1,000 scores in the NCAA's Academic Performance Rate (APR) report from 2010-12.

Stricklin is a former assistant at Georgia Tech and Vanderbilt.

Georgia made three College World Series appearances under Perno but had losing records in Southeastern Conference games three of the last four years. It finished last in the SEC at 7-20 this season.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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News Headline: UGA announces hiring of Kent State's Stricklin as new baseball coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Athens Banner-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Georgia made it official on Monday.
Scott Stricklin is the new head coach for the Bulldogs' baseball team after spending the last nine seasons at Kent State, Georgia athletic director Greg McGarity announced.
Stricklin was a Georgia Tech and Vanderbilt assistant before moving back to his alma mater at Kent State and now replaces David Perno, who resigned last month. Stricklin will be formally introduced at a press conference Wednesday afternoon.
“My family and I are excited to be Georgia Bulldogs,” Stricklin said in a news release. “It's been a dream to coach in the Southeastern Conference and I look forward to moving my family to Athens and getting started on the recruiting trail and building on the tradition of Georgia baseball. I feel the Georgia Bulldogs can be a power in the SEC and a national power.”
Stricklin, 41, had a 350-188 record at Kent State, winning five Mid-American Conference regular-season titles and five MAC tournament titles in nine seasons. In 2012, he led Kent State to its first College World Series appearance and the first trip to Omaha for a MAC team in 36 years. Kent State eliminated Florida in the 2012 College World Series and was one of the last five teams remaining.
“We are thrilled to have Scott leading our baseball program,” said McGarity, who on Monday deferred further comment until the formal news conference Wednesday. “Scott has excelled in every phase of his career as a student-athlete at Kent State, in professional baseball, as an assistant coach at Vanderbilt and Georgia Tech, and as a head coach at Kent State for the past nine years. At ever step of the search process, his name was consistently mentioned as a tremendous candidate, and we are so happy to have scott provide the leadership and direction for our program.”
Stricklin was an assistant and recruiting coordinator at Vanderbilt in 2000 and 2001. He was an assistant and recruiting coordinator at Georgia Tech in 2002-05 and was with the team when Georgia beat Georgia Tech in the 2004 NCAA super regional at Georgia Tech.
Stricklin was a two-time All-MAC catcher at Kent State. He played professionally in the Minnesota Twins organization and reached as high as Triple-A.
Georgia comes off of a 21-32 season and went 7-20 in the SEC. The Bulldogs went to the College World Series three times between 2004 and 2008 under Perno but have missed the NCAA regionals three times in the last four years.

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News Headline: Kent State track unites with France's fashion-driven Delophont (Rickaby) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About a year ago, some 4,000 miles away from Ohio in a large city in the northeastern French department of Meurth-et-Moselle called Nancy, young Dior Delophont made a bold decision that she knew would drastically alter the course of her life.

The French track and field sensation made up her mind that she was going to attend a Division-I college in the United States.

That choice spurned a series of events that ultimately brought Delophont and Kent State University together for an improbable marriage that has truly been a blessing for both parties.

After leading the Golden Flashes to titles at the 2013 Mid-American Conference indoor and outdoor championships, Delophont will bring a remarkable freshman season to a close this week by participating in the high jump and triple jump at the NCAA Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Oregon. She will be joined in Eugene by fellow Flashes freshmen Danniel Thomas (women's discus, shot put) and Reggie Jagers (men's discus), along with sophomore Matthias Tayala (men's hammer throw).

Delophont has already earned All-American honors in both the high jump and triple jump during the indoor season and captured five MAC titles while collecting Most Valuable Performer accolades at both the conference indoor and outdoor meets during a stunningly successful freshman campaign.

Hard to believe, but Delophont is convinced that Kent State had done just as much for her as she has for the university's track and field program.

"I found everything I wanted (at Kent State)," said a smiling Delophont. "It has turned out perfect."

MAJOR MOVE

Delophont really had no idea where she was going to go to school in the United States, but she did know what she was looking for.

"I wanted to come to the U.S., because I wanted to study and practice (track and field) at the same time, which is hard to do in France cause you don't have campuses," said Delophont. "I wanted to come to the U.S., but I also wanted to do the studies I love. I wanted to do fashion.

"I looked for the best fashion school I could find that also had a Division I track and field team, so I found Kent."

Kent State assistant coach Phil Rickaby, who guides KSU's jumpers, remembers receiving the lead on Delophont.

"We were contacted through the school of fashion that there was a young lady interested in fashion, who was also a track and field athlete," said Rickaby.

Similar leads are constantly passed on to coaches and the vast majority never pan out. But after checking on Delophont, Rickaby and the rest of the KSU coaching staff were stunned by what they saw.

"When we first saw the numbers we were like, no, this can't be right," said Rickaby. "This girl's really good."

Delophont placed fifth in the high jump at the 2012 IAAF Junior World Championships and has represented France in 10 international competitions.

"I think (KSU assistant coach Steven Rajewsky) initially contacted Dior, then I happened to be taking a vacation to visit family in London, so I went over to France and met her family," said Rickaby.

A few months later, Delophont made the 4,000-mile, eight-hour trek from France to Kent for the first time as an excited and eager, yet admittedly scared, 17-year-old young lady.

"Since I'm from France, I could not visit the campus, so I was prepared to jump into something I didn't know," said Delophont. "The (college atmosphere) is totally new, like (I would see) in movies. It was just about discovering for me. I arrived early with the international students, so I had a couple days to first just discover everything, just see things. My roommate (hurdler Taylor Farquhar of Canada) helped me through the process. She was explaining things to me, cause at the beginning of course I could not speak well.

"I was really surprised by how nice everyone was. It really helped."

INSTANT IMPACT

While settling in off the track, Delophont also had to adapt to life as a Division-I athlete in America at the same time.

"You never know (what's going to happen) when you change your coach. Techniques are different, especially when you're in another country, and people have other habits," said Delophont. "But it's worked out well. I'm happy."

No one knows how difficult it can be for international students as freshmen then Rickaby, who came to Kent State from Australia and wound up earning four MAC titles in the triple jump and javelin.

"It's a huge adjustment," said Rickaby. "I was an international student-athlete here, so I knew how tough it was as a freshman to adjust socially, emotionally, physically. It's a lot on a young girl and Dior came in when she was 17. A lot of internationals come out at 18 or 19. She handled it really well considering that.

"You can never predict how well a freshman can do regardless of what they've done before, but I think she's gone above and beyond our expectations."

Delophont made quite a splash in her first MAC meet, sweeping the jumps at the indoor championships to help the Flashes roll up a meet-record 175 points. She was named the Most Valuable Performer, and admittedly, had no idea what was going on when her name was called.

"The indoor season was perfect. I didn't expect it to be that perfect," she said. "My goal was to make MACs and just make the most points I could, but then I didn't imagine I could win three events. I was just happy, surprised. I told my coach back home and he was really happy, too.

"Then I went to the national championships and I knew I was already doing something great. I just let it happen. I trained well here so I could have good results."

Delophont finished fifth in the high jump on day one at the NCAA Indoor Championships in Arkansas, clearing 6 feet, 1 1/2 inches, then added another fifth-place effort the following day in the triple jump with a leap of 43-8 that ranks second in KSU history.

"We felt that she had the ability to qualify for nationals in the high jump and potentially the triple jump if things went well. But to come out and be an All-American in both events was rather surprising, but fantastic at the same time," said Rickaby. "To do that well on two separate days, it's just such a hard thing to do, a hard accomplishment. While we believed Dior could do it, it's a different level, the NCAA (meet). She handled herself very well and the results speak for themselves."

Delophont picked up right where she left off in the outdoor season, leading Kent State to its fourth consecutive MAC outdoor crown by winning the triple jump and high jump at the conference meet. She has enjoyed winning for her teammates as much as winning for herself.

"I really love the team spirit," she said. "I think that helped me a lot, especially in the indoor season. That was the first time I competed for your colors, your team and your teammates. I really loved it. It just helps me a lot to have people cheering for me and cheering for the others. I love cheering."

CONTRIBUTORS FROM NEAR AND FAR

The Flashes track and field program has certainly had plenty to cheer about this season thanks to a nice blend of local and long-distance athletes.

They have several stars from just around the block like Garfield's C.J. Carlisle, Akron's Shanequa Williams and Stow's Michael Heller, who was named Most Outstanding Track Athlete at the MAC outdoor meet after winning the 5,000 and the 10,000 meters. They also have a pair of standouts from Jamaica in Ann Marie Duffus and Thomas, along with Delophont from France.

"It's funny when you look at it," said Rickaby, referring to KSU's four qualifiers for the NCAA Outdoor Championships. "On the women's side, we have a girl from Jamaica (Thomas) and a girl from France (Delophont) going. On the men's side, we have a guy from Youngstown (Tayala) and a guy from Solon (Jagers). We've got three local kids and two internationals. We're just trying to develop a full, all-around program. We like the diversity that comes with the international kids and the kids from different states, and we also love the home-grown kids from Ohio.

"I think that's what's really helping our program develop. We've made a pretty good name for ourselves and kids want to see what Kent State's all about."

Delophont has certainly been thrilled with everything the university has provided.

"It's been really good," said Delophont. "I really love the school of fashion. It opened my mind to see other ways of teaching, other ways of dressing. That's really interesting to me."

Delophont will have plenty of intriguing stories to tell family and friends back in France about her experiences at Kent State University once the track season ends this weekend. But first she plans to bring her incredible freshman season to a close with a strong showing at the NCAA Championships.

"I'm a competitor, so on the track I'm just gonna do everything I can," said Delophont. "I'm just gonna give it everything I've got, like usual."

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News Headline: Data on Heredity Reported by Researchers at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 JUN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Heredity. According to news reporting out of Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Large variations in offspring sex ratio have been reported in Mytilus mussels, which show doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria (DUI)."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Here, we reanalyzed the published sex ratio data, using simple population genetics concepts and logistic regression. Contrary to previous studies that detected only maternal effects, we found both paternal and maternal effects on the offspring sex ratio."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "We propose that sex in Mytilus is controlled by a pair of nuclear sex ratio alleles expressed in the mother and by minor sex-determining genes inherited from the father and also possibly from the mother."

For more information on this research see: Population Genetics of Sex Determination in Mytilus Mussels: Reanalyses and a Model. Journal of Heredity, 2013;104(3):380-385. Journal of Heredity can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press Inc, Journals Dept, 2001 Evans Rd, Cary, NC 27513, USA. (Oxford University Press - www.oup.com/; Journal of Heredity - jhered.oxfordjournals.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Yusa, Kent State University, Dept. of Biol Sci, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Genetics, Heredity, United States, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Researchers from Kent State University Discuss Findings in Life Science Research (Mou) | Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Life Science Weekly
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 JUN 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Life Science Research. According to news reporting from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems."

For more information on this research see: Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie. Plos One, 2013;8(4):e61890. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X. Mou, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, United States.

Copyright © 2013 Life Science Weekly via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Akron Urban League seeks participants for Ice House entrepreneur program | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “Uncle Cleve” was an unlikely entrepreneur, a black man in the 1950s segregated South who found success owning the town's ice house.

His nephew, Clifton Taulbert, drew on life lessons learned from “Uncle Cleve” to write Who Owns the Ice House? which explores what “mindset” makes for successful entrepreneurs.

Now, the Akron Urban League, with a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, is offering would-be business owners a 16-week Ice House Entrepreneurship Program.

It's based on the principles that Clifton Taulbert says empower success.

The course, which begins in August, includes classroom presentations, online lessons and video interviews with successful entrepreneurs. The Kauffman Foundation of Missouri, inspired by the book, funded development of the course.

The Ice House course is not the traditional nuts-and-bolts class for those wanting to begin a business, Akron Urban League officials say.

“This isn't about the mechanics of owning a business,” said Sheri Myricks, Urban League director of marketing. “It's not about teaching someone how to manage your staff, your Quickbooks [accounting software] and how do you do your taxes.”

Rather, Myricks said, “What this course is going to focus on is, ‘Do you have entrepreneurship in your head and in your heart, and you do you understand the principles of professionalism and the dedication and the hard work' ” needed to become a successful entrepreneur.

Ramona Culver, a manicurist who wants to start her own “traveling nail technician” business, attended the Urban League's first offering of the Ice House course that wrapped up earlier this year.

“I don't want to have to depend on other people for my income,” Culver said, explaining she has a second job providing counseling at a nonprofit and her hours at that agency have been cut.

She also envisions helping to provide employment to other nail technicians.

Culver, an Akron resident, said she learned through the course that “your ideas can actually become reality ... [the course] teaches you about how you can make choices and the right kind of choices ... it teaches you how as an entrepreneur you see problems as an opportunity.”

Assignments including testing her idea in “the real world” by talking to nail salons and a bank.

Culver said she has yet to write a business plan, but she's been taking courses focusing on nail care and selling nail-care products.

The Knight Foundation is supporting bringing the course to more local residents through a $60,000 grant to the Urban League's Minority Business Development Center.

“This grant will allow the Akron Urban League to engage Akron's talent into an entrepreneurial mindset that they otherwise wouldn't have access to,” said Jennifer Thomas, Akron program director for the Knight Foundation.

The Knight Foundation, headquartered in Miami, awards grants for various nonprofit efforts in communities where the Knight brothers owned newspapers, including the Beacon Journal.

Separately, Kent State University has joined forces with the Kauffman Foundation to offer the Ice House program this fall.

Incoming freshmen at the Kent campus will read Who Owns the Ice House? co-authored by Gary Schoeniger, as this year's assigned “Common Reading Book.” The freshmen also will be able to take a three-credit course focusing on the Ice House Entrepreneurship Program.

In Akron, the Urban League's course begins Aug. 5 and costs $150.

For more information, and to sign up for the program, call the Urban League's Minority Business Development Center at 234-542-4149.

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News Headline: Med Copter Lands at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland Clinic flight crew shows students what it's like to fly patients

About 40 students in Kent State University's nursing program were treated to a special visit Monday from one of the Cleveland Clinic Critical Care Transport medical helicopters.

Ellen Prewitt, a Kent State alumna and member of the flight crew, spoke to nursing students about her job before the helicopter landed at the running track behind Henderson Hall to give students a chance to chat with the flight crew and snap photos inside the chopper.

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News Headline: Kent State duo traveled to tornado-stricken Oklahoma town to survey damage (Curtis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Kristin Volk
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - A Kent State University professor and his student are evaluating data they collected in Moore, Oklahoma in the aftermath of a massive tornado that leveled much of the Oklahoma City suburb last week.

“In this particular neighborhood, there's a lot of complete damage,” said Dr. Andrew Curtis, a KSU geography professor referring to video he and his student took in Moore. “But now as you move slightly out, you see some of the homes have actually got less.”

The pair traveled to the area Thursday to survey the damage using high-tech tiny cameras that attached to their car. The cameras captured video and data that will then be used to map the amount of damage in each area.

“As a person, you want to do everything that you can to help those people,” said Spencer Baker, a Kent State geography graduate student who traveled with Curtis to Moore. “But academically, you can look at it as something that's very important.”

Baker and Curtis spent three days in the area capturing hours of footage that revealed extensive devastation.

“It's one thing to see homes damaged and know that people lost a lot, but when you've lost family, I feel like you've lost everything,” said Baker, who got emotional when describing what he witnessed first-hand.

While it was Baker's first trip to a grief-stricken area, it was not a new experience for Curtis. Curtis has surveyed damage in places like New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and Joplin, Missouri following a massive tornado that tore through the city two years ago.

“Joplin, it was just extensive,” said Curtis. “You began at one end, and you went for four or five miles, pretty much anything in that path was gone.”

The difference in Moore, according to Curtis, was that there were pockets of extensive devastation combined with areas that didn't get hit as hard.

Curtis said the data collected from Moore will be given to city as well as to federal agencies for research and educational purposes.

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News Headline: Kent Group Returns from Mapping Okla. Damage (Curtis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Darcie Loreno
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — A Kent State professor and some of his students saw the damage created by the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma firsthand.

Dr. Andrew Curtis and his group returned home from Oklahoma Sunday. They were there to collect data, shoot video and conduct computer mapping of the EF5 twister damage from a few weeks ago in Moore.

They went street to street, carefully charting the damage in each area.

“From this data, we can start to see which buildings managed to survive better than surrounding buildings, so that's going to help us in terms of identifying what aspects of a tornado-hit neighborhood actually fare better, and which fare worse,” said Curtis.

The team will then check areas again in six months to see how they are recovering. Curtis and his team were in Oklahoma for Friday's latest round of deadly tornadoes.

For extended coverage on the Oklahoma tornadoes, click here.

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News Headline: KSU researches return from storm-ravaged Oklahoma | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A team of Kent State University researchers has returned from Oklahoma, where they collected data on tornado damage. Andrew Curtis, director of the Geographic Information Systems Health and Hazards Lab, says his team used a car equipped with seven cameras and a GPS to create video of the damage connected to a map. This allows researchers to track the severity of damage by location. The team originally went to Oklahoma to investigate the tornado that hit Moore, and was in Oklahoma City when fresh tornadoes hit there Saturday night.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Close call for Kent State University scientists in Oklahoma (Curtis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OH (WOIO) - Dr. Andrew Curtis, Associate Professor of Geography, knows tornados.

He and students at Kent State University have been studying their aftermath with a high tech series of camera and data analysis.

It's video encoded with coordinates, or "mobile mapping" similar to Google Earth. They then analyze it with a Geographic Information System and go back months later to track progress.

"It's a way to look at the amount of damage on a fine scale but then afterwards we use that as a baseline to start to look at recovery going forward," said Curtis.

The scientist used the technology in Joplin Missouri, November 2012. When they surveyed the aftermath of that infamous tornado that wiped out miles and miles of everything in it's path.

But last week when the team was in Moore, Oklahoma surveying the sickening devastation and loss, they nearly became statistics themselves. They took cover in their hotel room and captured video as the sky darkened from daylight to dark in a matter of minutes. The Warning was issued that another tornado was rolling in. That's when they hunkered down with the rest of the hotel guests.

"We thought we were going to be hit and then we were just basically waiting to see what would happen," said Curtis.

Turns out the tornado missed their hotel. The damage was limited to wind and rain damage.

"This was interesting because it was the first time I've actually been in a tornado warning situation where you thought it was going to hit you," added Curtis.

Being in the thick of it themselves, and seeing the resiliency of the people who live in Oklahoma, these researchers are thinking even more now about how they can use that "Geospacial Technology" to learn how to warn potential victims sooner.

Copyright 2013 WOIO.

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News Headline: Bright Spots: May 30, 2013 (Kaykayoglu) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Here's the latest installment of a weekly web feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community.

Kent State University announced that eight of its professors will teach at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, this summer as part of a partnership between both universities.

The three-week intensive summer session, known as International Course Weeks, will run from June 30 to July 21, according to Kent State.

“Twenty-five universities around the world were selected to participate in the Sichuan University program,” said Ediz Kaykayoglu, assistant director for education abroad in Kent State's Office of Global Education, in a statement. “Professors from each university who are interested apply, and then Sichuan University makes its choices.”

The Kent State team includes George F Bigham III, lecturer in the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology; Pratim Datta, associate professor, Department of Management and Information Systems; Rozell R. Duncan, assistant professor, and Nichole Egbert, associate professor, both from the School of Communication Studies.

Others include Shawn Fitzgerald, director, School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration; David Hughes, professor, College of Architecture and Environmental Design; Julia Levashina, assistant professor, Department of Management and Information Systems; and Phillip Wang, associate professor, College of Education, Health and Human Services.

Mr. Kaykayoglu said the eight professors will have the opportunity to not only represent Kent State in China, but also impact the students there.

“It is important to our international programs, and it also will enhance our education-abroad programs,” he said.

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News Headline: Online Colleges in Ohio (OH) Ranked by Cost | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Frugal Dad
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Search for a school Location School Size Large Medium Small Degrees Offered Undergrad Certificate Associates Bachelors Masters PhDs Percent Admitted

Colleges and universities across Ohio that offer online programs charge a median tuition of $10,282 per year. In recent years, the median tuition has increased. This change in tuition was about 15.4%. The median tuition per annum was $8,907 at these online Ohio schools in 2007.

The range of tuition at online schools in Ohio offering programs from least to most affordable is shown in the following chart:

Tuition Level Number of Schools

Cheapest 9

Low cost 10

Average cost 11

Most expensive 13

Tuition of more than $15,525 annually is charged by the most expensive online colleges. But, per annum tuition at the cheapest colleges and universities is in the range of $2,556 to $4,140. The least costly accredited online schools are located in Columbus, Dayton, Mansfield, Perrysburg, and Springfield.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Master of Science in Engineering Management

Master of Science in Nursing in Advanced Public Health Nursing

Associate of Arts and Science in Criminal Justice

Associate of Arts and Science in Health Information Technology

Associate of Applied Business in Accounting

Master of Science in Nursing in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Education - Early Childhood Education

Bachelor of Science in Advanced Technological Education

Master of Education in Curriculum and Teaching

In 2011, an estimated 18% of graduates from online colleges across Ohio earned credentials from these cheap programs. This represents 41,097 of the 228,506 graduates from around Ohio. From 2006 to 2011, the percentage of graduates from the most inexpensive online colleges and universities has increased. Also, the number of graduates has increased by 6,754 graduates each year.

Tuition ranging from $4,313 to $9,603 yearly is charged by other somewhat more expensive schools. A reported 10 of the 43 online schools with programs in Ohio charge tuition in this range.

A reported 125,634 students earned their degrees and certificates from these affordable online programs in 2011. This is 55% of the state's graduates. The number of graduates from these colleges and universities was only 69,382 students, a short 5 years earlier, in 2006. Therefore, the number of students graduating from these reasonably priced online colleges has increased by 81%.

Read More

Featured Online Schools: Click to get more info

Pro Tip!

You can now easily sort your school list to find the right school for you in just a few simple clicks!

Click a column to sort your school list.

School Location In-State Out-of-State

Akron Institute of Herzing University Akron, Ohio $10,054 $10,054

Baldwin-Wallace College Berea, Ohio $25,260 $25,260

Beckfield College Springdale, Ohio $10,692 $10,692

Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, Ohio $8,322 $15,630

Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio $37,300 $37,300

Cedarville University Cedarville, Ohio $23,500 $23,500

Chancellor University Cleveland, Ohio $9,750 $9,750

Clark State Community College Springfield, Ohio $2,556 $5,112

Cleveland State University Cleveland, Ohio $8,466 $11,387

Columbus State Community College Columbus, Ohio $2,844 $6,300

Cuyahoga Community College District Cleveland, Ohio $3,354 $6,868

Fortis College Centerville, Ohio $10,282 $10,282

Hondros College Westerville, Ohio $15,525 $15,525

ITT Technical Institute Dayton, Ohio $17,748 $17,748

ITT Technical Institute Hilliard, Ohio $17,748 $17,748

ITT Technical Institute Warrensville Heights, Ohio $17,748 $17,748

ITT Technical Institute Maumee, Ohio $17,748 $17,748

James A Rhodes State College Lima, Ohio $4,313 $8,627

Kent State University Kent, Ohio $9,030 $16,990

Kettering College of Medical Arts Kettering, Ohio $8,784 $8,784

Frugal Dad's Cheap College Finder

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News Headline: Kent esplanade project nears completion (Bruder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The partial closing of S. Lincoln Street on Wednesday morning marked one step closer to Kent State University's esplanade extension reaching completion.

With heavy construction beginning behind Starbucks in Kent, S. Lincoln Street has finally closed from E. Main Street to Hilltop Drive. The road closure is expected to last exactly 30 days, but the result will be a connection between Kent State's main campus and downtown--a project that has been in the works for nearly 30 years.

According to Jim Bowling, City Engineer, the creation of Haymaker Parkway in 1973 had a negative impact on the city's infrastructure. While the new road allowed for easier access towards Kent's campus, roadways and fencing separated the student population from life in downtown Kent.

“It was noticed and recognized, apparently in the 80s, that this is problematic,” Bowling said. “There have been studies since then to find ways to eliminate that separation. In my opinion, it is extremely important and we have been looking at this for three decades.”

The esplanade expansion, a $3.4 million project that is expected to be completed in late July, was made possible by the cooperation between the university, the city of Kent, PARTA and the new patrons downtown.

The Kent State Hotel & Conference Center required an easier access to campus, which the esplanade creates. Also, the new businesses in Acorn Alley asked for a hotel and parking deck to accommodate visitors. The work of Kent State and the city of Kent has made each project a reality. The PARTA Kent Central Gateway makes public transportation accessible, while the parking deck will accommodate the city's new visitors.

“The esplanade was a key component, like the others,” Bowling said. “Though not the largest in cost, it was essential in finishing the development.”

With the expansion, Kent State's esplanade will begin at the Liquid Crystal Institute and will end near Haymaker Parkway and Depeyster Street. The city has made sidewalks adjacent to the project, as well as the new streetlight at the intersection of Haymaker and Depeyster. All of these additions will combine to make walking from Kent State's campus into the downtown area a more comfortable experience.

The project did not always seem destined to come to fruition. The university dealt with several zoning issues over the years, conducted studies on how to make campus more accessible and spent $10 million on real-estate acquisitions.

According to Michael Bruder, executive director of facility planning and design at Kent State, university officials imagine visitors traveling down Haymaker Parkway toward E. Main Street, and being able to enjoy Fashion Museum and other campus landmarks as they stroll down the new esplanade extension.

“People are very excited,” Bruder said. “It helps overall with our ability to attract students. I think it will improve their experience while they are here on campus and it allows us to attract and recruit top-notch faculty and researchers from around the country as well.”

Toward the end of the extension will be a 100-yard ‘urban park,' which Bruder said will eventually hold outdoor events, but for now, the university pictures the park being a recreational break for students and citizens.

Bruder said that the close-working relationship between the city of Kent and the university has been necessary for the project's success and cited college towns such as Ann Arbor, Mich., Columbus, Ohio and Blacksburg, Va.

“There is really a positive, symbiotic relationship between the two and as a institution, we could not do what we do without the support of the city,” Bruder said. “I think the university contributes a bit to the well being overall of the city. I think the really successful college towns work together well to make sure there's good planning, traffic movement, pedestrian movement and that all of those things work well together.”

As the major planning has come to a close and construction reaching its final stages, Bowling said both business owners and visitors are excited for the prospect of finally connecting the campus to downtown.

“The excitement in downtown is palpable when you talk to business owners and visitors who come into town that have not been here in decades,” Bowling said. “For me personally, this is still the middle of the construction. We are on the tail end, but it's enjoyable to be discussing landscaping and things like that instead of larger items. It's a good finishing touch to the overall downtown.”

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News Headline: New Facility More Than Just an Animal Shelter | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Animal Welfare League of Trumbull County broke ground on a new facility Monday.

The $4.5 million project is being constructed at the site of the former ThunderPlex at 812 Youngstown-Kingsville Road in Vienna. A total renovation is planned for the 41,000 square foot building.

“This building was just a shell. We met with our architect and we could do whatever we wanted,” said fundraising campaign co-chair Karyn Covelli. “This building was a perfect location because we didn't have to remove any structures; we basically built underneath the ceiling.”

Much of the ground work for the renovations began in January, now electric work, plumbing and finishing touches are being put on the facility.

Animal Welfare League board member Dr. Jeff Williams said the new facility will be more than just an animal shelter. Animal Welfare has partnered with Kent State University and students in the Veterinarian Tech program will use the complex for hands-on training as part of the two-year certification program.

The space will be used for all aspects of animal care and boarding as well as space set aside for a retail shop, educational area, maternity ward, and animal training services.

Williams said a public dog park will also be constructed at the new location and will be included in the Trumbull County Metroparks. A meeting room with a kitchen will also be available for community and private events.

“It's a dream that's come true. It's going to be more than just an animal shelter,” said volunteer Brent Mager. “It's all being done with donations and it's going to be a vast community effort.”

Construction should be complete sometime in August.

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News Headline: Vet-Tech Program at Kent State | Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: WYTV-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Animal Welfare League of Trumbull County will soon be moving into a new -- and much larger facility. Ground was broken today for the new Animal Welfare location at the former ThunderPlex building on Route 1-93 in Vienna, near Squaw Creek Country Club. The current facility is in Lordstown. The shelter will include a surgery area, indoor play area, and a maternity ward -- all for animals. The shelter's also partnering with Kent State on a Vet-Tech Program. The new shelter is expected to be up and running by the end of August.

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News Headline: Hudson native receives award from KSU's School of Library and Info Science | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Elizabeth Miyajima of Hudson received the August Alpers Award from Kent State's School of Library and Information Science.

The award is given to a recent graduate who as a student contributed the most to the school while maintaining a good grade-point average. Miyajima also was inducted into the KSU chapter of Beta Phi Mu, the international honor society for library and information professionals.

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News Headline: First Cub Camporall in Kent to show what being a Boy Scout is all about | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Community members
can experience what life is
like as a Boy Scout at the
first Cub Camporall at Kent
State University's Field
House by Dix Stadium Friday
and Saturday.
“When people think
about scouting, they think
of scouting and it's walking
an old lady across the
street,” said Ken Focazio,
district commissioner of the
Boy Scouts of America Seneca
District. “Do we still do
that? Of course, we try to
do a good deed every day.
That's the goal. But there's
a lot more to scouting.”
The two-day event is to
give the community the
chance to learn more about
scouting while having fun,
Focazio said.
“This is a great opportunity
to answer that question,
‘You know I always wanted
to learn more about scouting'
and this is the place to
do it,” Focazio said. “You'll
definitely get a great idea
because there's going to be
boy scouts out there leading
events for the public. There
will be cub scouts participating,
and there will be a
lot of adults out there that
can share with you their experience
with scouting.”
Focazio has been organizing
the event for more
than a year and said the biggest
issue with planning the
event was finding a location
with the facilities to house
a few hundred people until
KSU provided the field
house free of charge.
Focazio said they hope to
see 200 to 300 people attend
the event.
The cost for cubs and
their families for both Friday
night and Saturday is
$8 per person, and the costs
for any guests for Saturday,
which includes the lunch,
is $5 per person. If someone
just wants to attend
the Saturday events without
having lunch, there is no
charge, Focazio said.
On Friday night. Focazio
said the university's
ROTC will help the boys
build model rockets that
they will shoot off during
lunch on Saturday.
There will be six events on
Saturday, three from 9 a.m.
to noon and three from 1 to
4 p.m. with lunch in between.
Focazio said the events
include an American Indian
dance troupe from Boy
Scout Troop 74 in Akron,
a tour of Kent State's solar
facility, a nature walk, a
rope bridge, a demonstration
of how to set up and
break down of a tent and
a local Civil War group to
show what life was like during
that time.
“There's fun for sure involved,
but also there's a lot
of it that has to educating
and training and teaching
boys,” Focazio said.
People can still register
for the events on Saturday
beginning at 7:30 a.m. to
make sure people have time
to join one of three groups
for each session.
State Rep. Kathleen
Clyde and the mayors of
Kent and Ravenna are
scheduled to attend the
event and show their support,
Focazio said. The mayors
will start off the events
Saturday by speaking at
8:30 a.m.

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