Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Athletics (3)
Biological Sciences; Partnerships; Research (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Town-Gown (1)
Geography (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (1)
Safety (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Athletics (3)
Zips in Oregon for outdoor championship 06/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Track and field The University of Akron sent six competitors to the NCAA Outdoor Championship Meet at the University of Oregon, and four of them competed...

Kent State baseball: Scott Stricklin move puts focus on Mike Birkbeck (Stricklin) 06/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Scott Stricklin didn't take the first offer to leave town and run. He had received lucrative offers from a number of schools — schools with bigger budgets,...

Georgia introduces Scott Stricklin as new baseball coach (Stricklin) 06/06/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Scott Stricklin has passed up some intriguing offers to leave the Kent State baseball program in the past. But the opportunity to lead perennial Southeastern...


Biological Sciences; Partnerships; Research (1)
Public invited to Kent State University and the Holden Arboretum event 06/06/2013 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and the Holden Arboretum invite the public to a celebration of their scientific collaboration in researching soil, water and plants....


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Nursing graduates have lowest unemployment rate in study (Dzurec) 06/06/2013 Sacramento Bee - Online, The Text Attachment Email

About a month after passing his state licensing exam, Arthur Greenbank was cashing a paycheck in his field. The University of Akron (Ohio) graduate is not alone: Of all the majors that students can choose, it is nursing that offers the best chance for employment....


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Town-Gown (1)
Kent, Kent State share town-gown honor 06/06/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Representatives of the city of Kent and Kent State University were on hand Tuesday to accept the International Town-Gown Association's Larry Abernathy...


Geography (1)
Kent State students map Moore, Okla., tornado damage (Curtis) 06/06/2013 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

If you think studying geography is memorizing the capital of South Dakota, think again. Spencer Baker, a geography student at Kent State University,...


KSU at Stark (1)
THEATER 06/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

35th Annual Marilyn Bianchi Kids' Playwriting Festival — (Dobama Theatre, 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights; 216-932-3396, www.dobama.org) Performances...


KSU at Trumbull (2)
KSU Trumbull Building Getting $3.5 Million Upgrade (King) 06/05/2013 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

A longstanding building at the Kent State Trumbull campus in Champion is getting a multi-million dollar overhaul. Construction has begun on the at the Classroom/Administration...

Kent Trumbull Starts $3.5M Lecture Hall Renovations 06/05/2013 Youngstown Business Journal Text Attachment Email

WARREN, Ohio -- Construction is under way at the Trumbull Campus of Kent State University on renovations to its primary lecture hall in the classroom/administration building. The project, with a projected cost of...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Tolloty Technology Incubator will be first facility in tech park (Andrews) 06/05/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Tuscarawas Dean Gregg Andrews speaks during Tuesday's Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Tolloty Technology Incubator in the industrial...


Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (1)
One step at a time for Crestwood's top grad 06/06/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

SYDNEY FRANCE PLANS TO STUDY NURSING AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY Sydney France has always been a person who sets her goals and accomplishes them. ...


Safety (1)
VIDEO: Man to Driver: 'We are Going to Blow up KSU' 06/06/2013 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — Helen Riley thought something wasn't right when a man suddenly jumped in her cab at the Akron Canton Airport on Tuesday and insisted they...


News Headline: Zips in Oregon for outdoor championship | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Track and field

The University of Akron sent six competitors to the NCAA Outdoor Championship Meet at the University of Oregon, and four of them competed on Wednesday.

Junior Brittany Funk competed in the women's hammer throw and finished sixth with a throw of 211 feet, 8 inches.

Freshman Shawn Barber competed in the men's pole vault and also finished sixth.

Senior Brittany Cheese competed in the women's long jump and finished 10th in her flight of 12.

Sophomore Alex McCune competed in the decathlon and finished 19th out of 24 with a score of 2,950.

Basketball

Kent State University senior Chris Evans was invited to a pre-draft workout with the Sacramento Kings.

Evans was on the All-Mid-American Conference First Team and was the only player in Division I to accumulate 180 field goals, 30 3-pointers, 125 free throws, 250 rebounds, 70 assists, 60 steals and 20 blocks last year.

Kent State University freshman forward Chris Ortiz will represent Puerto Rico this summer at the 2013 Stankovic Continental Cup in Lanzhou, China.

Ortiz's father is from Puerto Rico, which allows him to play for the country's national team under FIBA rules.

Ortiz averaged 2.1 points and 2.0 rebounds per game while battling a stress fracture in his foot.

Softball

The Akron Racers officially signed Rachele Fico, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2013 National Pro Fastpitch League Senior Draft. Fico finished her senior season at Louisiana State with a 24-13 record, a 2.34 ERA and 232 strikeouts.

Zips athletics

The University of Akron's men's basketball, women's basketball, women's cross country and women's tennis programs received a Public Recognition Award from the NCAA based on their most recent multiyear Academic Progress Rate (APR).

APR is a measure of eligibility, retention and graduation of student-athletes, and each team posted an APR in the top-10 percent of their respective sport over the last four academic years.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball: Scott Stricklin move puts focus on Mike Birkbeck (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scott Stricklin didn't take the first offer to leave town and run.

He had received lucrative offers from a number of schools — schools with bigger budgets, warmer weather and more tradition. It was a dream of his to coach in the Southeastern Conference, generally regarded as the best in the nation, and to have the ability to take a program with the resources necessary to not only reach the College World Series but to have a chance to win it year after year.

There were numerous reports that Stricklin was being heavily pursued by the University of Michigan after the Golden Flashes' run to the College World Series last summer. He turned it down, instead signing a six-year extension with KSU. There were other schools in years before that asked about him.

Then Georgia and a chance to coach in the SEC came knocking, and he decided it was time to finally pull the trigger.

“It's an opportunity that I couldn't say no to,” Stricklin told the Beacon Journal. “I stayed at Kent State for nine years, and there were people from the outside looking in who thought there were better opportunities than staying at Kent State. But this is a once-in-a-lifetime chance. It's a great position, a great job. I couldn't say no to it.

“If anyone is upset, I completely understand. But number one, you have to take care of your family, and this was the right move.”

Stricklin called all of his KSU players individually, and like second baseman Derek Toadvine said on Monday, most were understanding.

“It was very difficult, one of the hardest things I've had to do was talk to those guys,” Stricklin said. “Every single one of them understood and they wished me luck. Some were disappointed, some more than others, but it's a part of the business. They saw it was a great opportunity for me and my family and they know how loyal I am to Kent State.”

Stricklin said on Wednesday that Mike Birkbeck, currently KSU interim head coach, and assistant coach Scott Daeley have each been offered positions on his staff with Georgia. He hopes to hear from them by early next week.

The biggest question with Stricklin's move now rests with Birkbeck, Baseball America's College Baseball Assistant Coach of the Year in 2012 and known as one of the best pitching coaches in the game.

“I'm not a fool and I understand what I did at KSU, I didn't do alone,” Stricklin said. “They're in the decision-making process right now. I went through a tough time in this process, and now it's their turn.”

According to Stricklin, if Birkbeck chooses to remain with KSU and lead the program, he's the right man for the job.

“He's the best there is,” Stricklin said. “He's an outstanding coach and person. I know KSU wants to keep him and I don't blame them.”

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News Headline: Georgia introduces Scott Stricklin as new baseball coach (Stricklin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scott Stricklin has passed up some intriguing offers to leave the Kent State baseball program in the past. But the opportunity to lead perennial Southeastern Conference powerhouse Georgia was one he simply couldn't refuse.

On Wednesday, Stricklin addressed the media for the first time since officially accepting an offer to coach the Bulldogs on Monday, leaving his alma mater after nine highly successful seasons that included a dramatic run to the College World Series in 2012.

"We had nine great years at Kent State, and I wouldn't trade it for the world," said Stricklin. "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity -- to be in the SEC, to be at the University of Georgia, to be in the town of Athens, a great college town. It's one of those moves that I didn't really anticipate coming up, but when it did, it was just an opportunity that me and my family just couldn't pass up."

Stricklin agreed to a six-year contract that will pay him $600,000 per year, which will make him among the highest-paid coaches in the nation. He had five years left on his contract at Kent State that was worth $300,000 annually, which he signed following the record-setting 2012 campaign and after turning down an offer from the University of Michigan.

Stricklin, 41, posted a 350-188 record at KSU, winning five Mid-American Conference regular-season crowns and five MAC Tournament titles.

"When (former KSU athletic director) Laing Kennedy gave me that opportunity to become a head coach for the first time back in the summer of 2004, I was thrilled to come back and coach at my alma mater," he said. "We had some work to do, and I felt like collectively as a group we built the program to where we wanted it to be. Getting the opportunity to be the head coach at Kent State was just a great experience."

Stricklin confirmed on Wednesday that he is attempting to take his two assistants with him to Georgia, Associate Head Coach/Pitching Coach Mike Birkbeck and Hitting Coach/Recruiting Coordinator Scott Daeley. Birkbeck is also the top candidate to take over at Kent State.

"I've offered the jobs to Mike Birkbeck and Scott Daeley down here at Georgia," said Stricklin. "The offer's on the table for them. Kent State was a team effort. We did that together, it certainly wasn't all me. Those guys did a great job, and I want them to stay with me. That's what I'm trying to do. Mike Birkbeck has some options in front of him, and he's just gotta make the decision on what he wants to do. We'll just have to wait and see what happens."

Stricklin said he hoped to have his staff finalized "within the next week."

"I hope they both decide to come with me," he added, "and if that happens, I know Kent State will find a very, very good head coach to lead that baseball program."

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News Headline: Public invited to Kent State University and the Holden Arboretum event | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and the Holden Arboretum invite the public to a celebration of their scientific collaboration in researching soil, water and plants.

The event — 2 to 5 p.m. Friday — will showcase student research and celebrate progress toward the goals of the partnership. This event is rain or shine with light refreshments served in Holden's Rhododendron Discovery Garden between 3:30 and 5 p.m.

For details and to RSVP, call Vicki McDonald at 440-602-8017.

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News Headline: Nursing graduates have lowest unemployment rate in study (Dzurec) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Sacramento Bee - Online, The
Contact Name: CAROL BILICZKY
News OCR Text: About a month after passing his state licensing exam, Arthur Greenbank was cashing a paycheck in his field.

The University of Akron (Ohio) graduate is not alone: Of all the majors that students can choose, it is nursing that offers the best chance for employment.

"I tell graduates not to worry, that they almost certainly will land a job within a few months of graduating," UA nursing administrator Cheryl Buchanan said. "If they would go to Florida or Michigan, they would find a job immediately."

Researchers at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce examined 2009 and 2010 U.S. census data to determine what college majors are most likely to lead to jobs.

"People need to pay attention to this," center director Tony Carnevale said. "It tells you that if you really want to be an architect, that's fine, but you're going to have to think more about what your plan is."

"Hard Times, College Majors, Unemployment and Earnings 2013: Not All College Degrees are Created Equal" says the unemployment rate for recent nursing graduates is 4 percent. Meanwhile, the typical unemployment rate for majors in many liberal arts fields is double that, and that of architecture and fine arts graduates is more than triple at 13.9 and 11.1 percent, respectively.

What the researchers don't know is if the graduates were working in their major. Some college majors don't have clear career paths.

That was reflected in the unemployment rates for area ethnic and civilization studies (10.1 percent) and philosophy and religious studies (10.8 percent).

Other majors, such as architecture, have suffered in the economic downturn, although their unemployment is gradually getting better, Carnevale said.

In fact, only 50 to 54 percent of recent college graduates are working in their majors, Carnevale said in an interview. Only 30 percent of art graduates are, for example.

That means that some "employed" college graduates really might be working in fields once reserved for high school graduates: the proverbial English major driving a cab, for instance.

That can be an expensive outcome, given the cost of college.

"There is lots of pressure now to find out what the value of the college major is," Carnevale said.

He said that graduates with certificates in heating and air conditioning from a community college can make more than typical graduates with bachelor's degrees.

"It's all about the field of study," he said.

Buchanan, the UA nursing administrator, said all 55 of the spring 2012 nursing graduates who responded to a UA survey are working in their field or are attending graduate school.

One of those who is working is Greenbank, who landed at Akron-based Summa Health System about one month after passing his nursing boards. His odyssey to employment might have been abetted by a certification in gerontology, experience working at a nursing home and medical missions to Haiti.

"There were lots of jobs available, but there were a lot of colleges putting out students," he said.

About 20 schools and colleges offer nursing programs in Northeast Ohio alone.

Laura Dzurec, dean of the Kent State College of Nursing, said the recession has propelled some would-be retirees to stay on the job longer than they otherwise might. If the economy improves, they will retire and an even larger well will open up for new nurses - and not only in hospitals.

"The nice thing about nursing is that you can do just about anything with a nursing degree," she said. "If you want to do research, great. If you want to work with a pharmaceutical company, great. If you want to work with patients, great."

Students have heard that clarion call: Kent State turns away 20 percent of its qualified applicants every year because it doesn't have room for them.

Although nursing might be the fastest route to a paycheck, other majors can eclipse it in salary, according to the Georgetown study.

Electrical engineering ($57,000), mechanical engineering ($58,000) and civil engineering ($50,000) pay more at the start than nursing ($48,000). Same with graduate degrees: Those in nursing earn $81,000 compared with $107,000 for majors in pharmaceutical sciences and administration, $96,000 for chemistry majors and $101,000 for economics majors.

"The variation in earnings by major has increased," Carnevale said.

• Read more articles by CAROL BILICZKY

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News Headline: Kent, Kent State share town-gown honor | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Representatives of the city of Kent and Kent State University were on hand Tuesday to accept the International Town-Gown Association's Larry Abernathy Award in recognition of the city's outstanding town-gown relationship.

The downtown Kent revitalization was cited as best exemplifying "a town and university working together cohesively and promoting partnership and resources between all entities."

The award is named for the former mayor of Clemson, S.C., who had a passion for town-gown collaborative efforts. The honor was presented at the annual ITGA conference, which was held at the University of Buffalo, State University of New York.

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News Headline: Kent State students map Moore, Okla., tornado damage (Curtis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If you think studying geography is memorizing the capital of South Dakota, think again.

Spencer Baker, a geography student at Kent State University, just returned from Moore, Okla., where he helped map the destruction caused by the May 20 tornado, and waited out a second tornado, which touched down near his hotel Friday.

“A lot of my friends think of me as academically-minded until I explain the real-life applications of what I'm doing — that it's a lot more than what they learned in sixth- or seventh-grade geography,” said Baker, a graduate of Triway High School in Wayne County. “The basic comparison I like to use is in math, we don't just use an abacus or a calculator anymore — we have computers. Just like in geography we don't just use an atlas — now we have technology, which makes it fast and relevant.”

According to Baker's professor, Andrew Curtis, students who major in geography are in demand.

“G.I.S. is an emerging technology,” Curtis said, referring to geographic information systems. “For undergraduates, it's a good way to get a job. Geospatial technology is now a STEM subject. They're trying to push kids into it.”

Curtis is director of Kent State's G.I.S. Health & Hazards Lab and former director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Remote Sensing and G.I.S. for Public Health. Originally from London, Curtis taught at USC and LSU before coming to Kent last year. He is well published and recognized as an expert in the field, and was part of an academic team that used Geospatial mapping to support search and rescue operations in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

With seven video cameras strapped to the outside of their car, Curtis and Baker drove street by street through Moore, Okla., recording the devastation. They had just finished their work Friday afternoon when they heard a second tornado was nearby.

“We were in a restaurant and I made a comment to our waitress that there weren't many people around. She said there was a tornado coming,” Curtis said. “In the taxi, the dispatcher said the tornado was on the ground, about one mile north of us.”

Curtis put cameras in the windowsill of his hotel room to record the blackening sky and arrival of hail.

“The wind damage was minimal — most of the damage was from flooding,” he said.

Now back in Kent, Curtis and Baker will begin “coding” the video so it can be used to create maps and find patterns. For instance, a house that was destroyed might become a black square on a map, a damaged house might be a gray square, and an undamaged house might be a white square.

“We code the information onto programs such as Google Earth and use that to further our analysis and understanding,” said Baker, who finished his bachelors degree in May and will start his graduate work this summer.

Video mapping can be used for other purposes aside from natural disasters.

“In Akron, we looked at blighted properties, and bulldozed properties, to see what affect that has on crime,” Curtis said. Last year, Curtis went to Haiti during the cholera outbreak to map standing water and other potential trouble spots.

His gut feeling is that the community of Moore will “rebound and recover” quickly.

“In part, how they recovered from the Oklahoma City bombing speaks to a resilience,” Curtis said. “Also, the amount of humor and support in the graffiti messages is an indication, and there was a lot.”

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News Headline: THEATER | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 35th Annual Marilyn Bianchi Kids' Playwriting Festival — (Dobama Theatre, 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights; 216-932-3396, www.dobama.org) Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Opening night tickets are $25. Saturday and Sunday free with priority seating tickets at $15, $7 children and students.

Beck Center for the Arts — (Studio Theater, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood; 216-521-2540, ext. 10, www.beckcenter.org) The Pitman Painters continues through July 7. 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays. $28, $25 seniors, $15 students.

Broadway in Akron — (E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall, 198 Hill St., University of Akron; 330-972-7570) The Addams Family at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and June 13. $34-$54.

Karamu House — (2355 E. 89th St., Cleveland; 216-795-7077) Crowns continues through June 16. 3 and 8 p.m. Thursdays and Sundays; 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. $25, $22 seniors, $21 students on Thursdays and Sundays; $30, $27 seniors, $26 students on Friday and Saturdays.

Kent State University at Stark — (Kent State Stark Fine Arts Theatre, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township; 330-244-3348) The Crucible, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $14, $10 students under 17 and seniors, KSU students free with ID.

PlayhouseSquare's Hanna Theatre — (2067 E. 14th St., Cleveland; 216-241-6000) Guys & Dolls continues through June 30. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sundays. $10-$67.

Weathervane Playhouse — (Founders Theater stage, 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron; 330-836-2626, www.weathervaneplayhouse.com) The Music Man opens Friday and continues through June 30. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Preview performance is 7:30 tonight, $15. Regular tickets are $25, with $21 senior tickets Thursdays and Sundays.

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News Headline: KSU Trumbull Building Getting $3.5 Million Upgrade (King) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A longstanding building at the Kent State Trumbull campus in Champion is getting a multi-million dollar overhaul.

Construction has begun on the at the Classroom/Administration building on the campus as it undergoes a $3.5 million renovation.  The project will expand the lecture hall to accommodate 300 theater-style seats and a new stage with wheelchair access as well as new climate control equipment.

“Over the last eight consecutive semesters, we have had enrollment increases so things have been going really well here at the campus. As we have continued to increase our enrollment, we are putting more money back into facilities and structures and the lecture hall was next up on the list,” said Kent State marketing coordinator Robb King.

Because of the renovations, the campus bookstore, which is adjacent to the lecture hall, has temporarily relocated to Room 132 in the Technology Building.

The project is expected to take a year to complete.

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News Headline: Kent Trumbull Starts $3.5M Lecture Hall Renovations | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Youngstown Business Journal
Contact Name: Tyler Clark Consulting.
News OCR Text: WARREN, Ohio -- Construction is under way at the Trumbull Campus of Kent State University on renovations to its primary lecture hall in the classroom/administration building.

The project, with a projected cost of $3.5 million, is expected to last a year or so and will expand the lecture hall to 300 seats.

The renovations include new theater-style seating, new audio/visual and lecture equipment (including projection, sound and Wi-Fi), a new stage with wheelchair access as well as new heating, ventilation and air-conditioning climate control equipment.

In addition, the area under the new seating will be able to be used as a sales floor or storage area for the campus bookstore, officials said. To reach the 300-seat target, the rear (north) and side (west) walls of the hall will be removed and replaced by the creation of a new entry.

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News Headline: Tolloty Technology Incubator will be first facility in tech park (Andrews) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Tuscarawas Dean Gregg Andrews speaks during Tuesday's Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Tolloty Technology Incubator in the industrial park.

Although being constructed in traditional bricks and mortar fashion, the Tolloty Technology Incubator is being built for the future of Tuscarawas County.

The $5.4 million facility will be the gateway into the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Park on Tech Park Drive in New Philadelphia. The complex's location off University Drive NE is considered ideal because it is near the Kent State University at Tuscarawas campus and Buckeye Career Center.

“This has the potential to be an economic game changer for our county and region,” Commissioner Kerry Metzger said during Tuesday's groundbreaking ceremony nearby. He was among 10 speakers addressing the crowd of about 130 people.

He said that for years, area leaders have talked about the need to develop strategies to enhance economic development opportunities and to create jobs. That included retaining and helping existing companies to expand to attract new companies and to develop new and emerging businesses and industry.

Metzger said that although efforts have been made, he considers the latter portion “has been our weakest link for economic development in Tuscarawas County.”

He said the Tolloty Technology Incubator “has the potential to change that from our weakest link, to our strongest link. The facility will allow new ideas, new products and services to be nurtured in an environment which will allow them to grow, succeed and hatch into what we hope will be a growing, thriving business in Tuscarawas County.”

He said that commissioners hope that when companies are ready to leave the incubator, they'll build within the tech park.

He also hopes that it will provide jobs and a means of stopping “brain drain,” the loss of college graduates who must leave the area to find work in high-tech fields.

THE VISION

The tech park formed from the vision of Kent State-Tuscarawas Dean Gregg Andrews and Heinz Stucki, who was then the executive director of the Tuscarawas County Community Improvement Corp. They collaborated on the Knowledge Based Economic Development strategy, or KBED. Andrews recalled that it wasn't intended as giving up on traditional jobs — “this would be another tool in the economic tool belt of Tuscarawas County.”

The CIC will manage the incubator in partnership with Kent State-Tuscarawas, which owns the facility.

“As envisioned, the Tolloty Technology Incubator will cultivate and nurture technology-based entrepreneurship and stimulate the regional economy through new business development, business expansion and creation of high-tech, high-skill jobs,” Andrews said Tuesday. “... its resources and services will support the development of a wide range of technology-based companies. By nurturing innovative ideas into ongoing business enterprises, the incubator can spawn the growth of new technology-based businesses in our county, as well as new product development, product improvement and innovation for existing businesses.”

STUDENTS, CLIENTS

Andrews said the incubator also will provide academic opportunities for campus students, especially engineering and business majors through internship and co-op opportunities “as a forum for them to investigate and launch their own enterprises and eventually graduate to new facilities within the” tech park.

A paved road, water, sewer and natural gas lines, electricity and Broadband access are all in place. Not all of the 170-acre site can be developed, so those areas will be used for green space and ponds. A total of 109 acres can be developed.

The CIC and the Kent State Tuscarawas Small Business Development Center will be the first two clients in the incubator, which has a capacity of about 70 people.

Current CIC Executive Director Gary Little said he is continually providing information and talking to potential clients, including through the SBDC.

“We will seek entrepreneurs, researchers and developers starting or expanding businesses in the science, technology, engineering and other high-tech fields,” Little said.

INTEREST BUILDS

He said he looks forward to the incubator being vibrant “with the energy of creative minds developing new computer applications, conducting research and testing in the wet lab, and partnerships and collaborations between companies and researchers in the incubator and faculty and students at Kent State-Tuscarawas.”

“We're starting to get a few more calls now,” Little said. “Now that we've had the groundbreaking event and construction is moving ahead, we will put our advertising into full gear. We do expect to easily come up with companies for the facility.”

The SBDC provides consulting, and financial and business plan assistance services.

Andrews said the campus can help “foster innovative entrepreneurship through the Tuscarawas Regional Technology Accelerator; our Reeves Foundation Center for Advanced Technology and Workforce Development for research, prototyping and new equipment training; our engineering and research faculty; and access to our university library, which is a Federal Depository Library,” the only one on a regional campus among 56 in Ohio with the prestigious designation.

CIC President Bill Harding called the incubator a “visionary, status quo-changing project.”

IN MEMORY OF GENE TOLLOTY

He said the organization “wanted to honor the memory of Gene Tolloty for his many years of service to the CIC and Tuscarawas County.” Civic leader Eugene Tolloty of Uhrichsville died at age 81 on April 21, 2006.

When Harding asked the about 20 members of the Tolloty family at the event to stand, they were applauded by the audience.

Stucki, who retired in 2007 as executive director of the CIC, said it was a privilege to serve under nine CIC presidents, and in his opinion “Gene Tolloty was unquestionably the most dedicated to Tuscarawas County. I'm pleased to see this lasting and visible honor is taking place.”

Frank Rose, chairman of Tuscarawas County University Branch District Board of Trustees, said it's “gratifying to see” construction underway on “a facility that will be a vital addition to the university and will transform the job opportunities in our region.”

He said the board's support demonstrates its confidence in the future of the tech park.

After hearing the speakers, attended walked to the nearby construction site. A trackhoe climbed a steep mound, using its claw bucket to release 400 hidden balloons in Kent State colors, blue and gold.

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News Headline: One step at a time for Crestwood's top grad | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SYDNEY FRANCE PLANS TO STUDY NURSING AT KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Sydney France has always
been a person who
sets her goals and accomplishes
them.

But the family motto
of the Crestwood High
School valedictorian has
kept her grounded.

“My Dad has always said, ‘Don't
breathe tomorrow's air,' ” she said. She
said John France meant that she and
her older brother shouldn't be so worried
about the future that they forget to
enjoy the present.

France will begin her studies at Kent
State University with 53 credit hours,
thanks to 2 1/2 years of post-secondary
education. She said she took one postsecondary
class in her sophomore year
and by her junior and senior years, she
was at KSU full-time.

“I like the independent way the program
runs,” she said. “I've always been
a self-motivated person.”

She will still have three years of schooling
to get her nursing degree because of
clinicals, but will be able to take a lighter
load of classes. She will be a junior by
her second semester.

Despite the fact that she hasn't physically
attended Crestwood for more
than two years, France said she wasn't
surprised to be the school's valedictorian.

“I knew I had good grades,” she said.
“And it's something I've always wanted
to do.”

Her father, she said,
was salutatorian of Crestwood's
Class of 1979. She
and her brother, Michael,
a 2011 graduate of Crestwood,
live with their father.
Her mother, Karen Gerl,
lives in Beachwood.

After her classes at
KSU ended, France and
her mother took a mother-
daughter cruise. They
traveled to the Virgin Islands,
Antigua, the Bahamas
and Tortola.

“It was so much fun,”
she said, adding that she
hadn't been on a cruise
since childhood and
couldn't remember most
of it. “I want to travel the
world. One step at a time,
right?”

She said after she finishes
her bachelor's degree,
she may decide to pursue
other options, such as becoming
a nurse practitioner.

“I like the medical field,”
she said. “But I didn't want
to spend 10 years of my life
in school to become a doctor.
So I decided on nursing.
It's a good start for
whatever I do later on.”

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News Headline: VIDEO: Man to Driver: 'We are Going to Blow up KSU' | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Helen Riley thought something wasn't right when a man suddenly jumped in her cab at the Akron Canton Airport on Tuesday and insisted they leave immediately.

“He just hopped in the car and he started screaming and yelling that he needed to get off the property — that he got kicked out, and I just felt really uncomfortable and didn't want to go,” said Riley.

“He hit the roof, the ceiling and was yelling, and that's when I looked over at Misty and said, ‘I'm very uncomfortable and I don't want to take him,' ” said Riley.

Although Riley was first in line for the next fare, her friend and co-worker Misty Smead offered to take the man instead.

“I was standing outside her car and she looked at me and grabbed my arm and I just knew that she was not comfortable with the situation. So I said to Helen, ‘You do not have to take him if you don't want to; I will take him for you,' ” said Smead.

The man, identified as Louis Koleszar, 58, of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, got in Smead's cab. Smead said he wanted to go to a theater and then asked to go to Kent State University.

“Once we got onto I-77, he started talking about the Twin Towers, the bombings. He's on his third phase of his mission; he was just babbling; he was making a lot of phone calls,” said Smead.

And then the conversation became even more troubling.

“He said, ‘We are on our way to go bomb Kent State University,' and that's when I immediately started taping from my other cell phone,” said Smead, who managed to make a phone call to her dispatcher Jimmy Williams, using a company code word.

“The code means I'm in trouble, you know, call the police this could go badly,” said Williams.

“So I told her to turn on your recorder in your car. I will tell the Portage County Sheriff where she was going,” he added.

Smead left the line open on one of her two cell phones so that Williams could hear what was happening inside the cab. A second cell phone on the center console in the car was recording everything at the same time.

“I could hear the guy in the background just talking; it sounded like he was talking in tongues, but one of the things he had said was, you know, about 9/11; they blew up the towers. He said, ‘Next, we need to blow up the U.N.,' ” said Williams.

“As I was coming up on the exit, I don't know what made me say, ‘Sir, we're getting ready to get off; we are almost there.' That's when he grabbed me from the back seat,” Smead explained, saying Koleszar wrapped his arm around her neck telling her she needed to keep going.

“I forget the exact wording: ‘You are not getting off here, keep going,' ” said Smead, who says she managed to stay calm the entire time.

“For some reason, I just giggled and I just said to him, ‘Honey, what do you say we just get off at this exit, smoke a cigarette and have a cup of coffee here at the Cracker Barrel,' because I wanted the cops to hear where I was so they knew my location,” said Smead.

“He let go of my neck, calm, like nothing ever happened,” she told Fox 8 News.

“I thought, a weapon. Does he have a weapon? I did not know. All I could think about is how to get him out of that car; that's all I could think about,” said Smead.

Soon after they got to the restaurant, authorities arrived and arrested Koleszar and charged him with making false alarms, a felony of the third degree.

Koleszar appeared before Portage County Judge Kevin Poland on Wednesday, who ordered him held on a $75,000 bond.

Investigators with the Portage County Sheriff's Office say Koleszar was originally from Portage County but had been living in Oregon and Colorado.

He was believed to have returned home because of the death of a family member.

Lt. Gregory Johnson of the Portage County Sheriff's Office said authorities did not find a bomb, but have to treat the threat seriously.

Both investigators and a spokesman for Kent State University could not say what ties, if any, Koleszar might have to Kent State that would have made him want to threaten the school.

The University plans to privately congratulate Smead and Williams for the way they handled the incident.

CLICK HERE for extended coverage on this story.

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2013/06/05/man-to-driver-we-are-going-to-blow-up-ksu/

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