Report Overview:
Total Clips (35)
Alumni; Athletics (3)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Business (COB) (3)
Dance (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (3)
Financial Aid; KSU at Stark (2)
Hotel and Conference Center (2)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Ashtabula; Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Music (2)
Office of the Provost (1)
Regional Academic Center (1)
Students (3)
Students; Tuition (1)
Theatre and Dance (2)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics (3)
John Hahn's U.S. Open diary: I leave with no regrets 06/17/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Editor's note: Former Kent State golfer John Hahn is doing a daily diary for The Plain Dealer this week as he plays in the U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club...

Making the cut at Merion just nine holes away: John Hahn's U.S. Open Diary 06/17/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

(Editor's note: Former Kent State golfer John Hahn is doing a diary for The Plain Dealer as he plays in the U.S. Open. Hahn grew up in Hudson and graduated...

Former Kent State golfer Ben Curtis starts foundation with wife 06/17/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Former Kent State All-American golfer and current PGA touring pro Ben Curtis and his wife Candace, a Kent Roosevelt High School graduate, have developed...


Art, School of (1)
Encountering the beautifulworlds of Joseph O'Sickey 06/15/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Joseph O'Sickey's. She took his class when he was a member of the acclaimed School of Art faculty that the late Elmer Novotny, its director, brought to Kent State during his four decades at the University. I don't know a lot about painting. My maternal grandfather was a struggling artist. I remember...


Athletics (1)
Book celebrates Flashes' football 06/17/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Kent State football team authored the greatest season in school history in 2012, stunning football fans close to home and across the country with a...


Biological Sciences (1)
KSU, Holden Arboretum receive research grant (Leff) 06/14/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and the Holden Arboretum will use a recently awarded National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study the impact people have...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
7 great places that represent excellence in environmental design 06/14/2013 Building Design+Construction - BD+C - Online Text Attachment Email

...action-based research program that implements temporary projects as a means of urban reinvention. The research is part of the graduate architecture curriculum at Kent State University, encompassing design-build exercises that culminate in deployment and assessment of temporary projects. (The photo is of Hipp...


College of Business (COB) (3)
Career paths & limelight 06/17/2013 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

Education Kent State University's College of Business Administration has maintained its business and accounting accreditations from the Association...

KSU lecturer to study opportunities in Panama 06/14/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Panama is one of the top destinations for retiring U.S. baby boomers because of its climate, accessibility, cost of living and welcoming attitude. Kent State University lecturer Craig Zamary will travel to the Central American country this July to conduct research on ways U.S. companies can tap...

Launch Local Inc In Girard Ohio Makes Learning Fun for Summer Interns! 06/14/2013 PRLog Text Attachment Email

...summer. Students from 10 universities will be participating in the contest. Participating universities include, Slipper Rock University, Akron University, Kent State University, Youngstown State University, Penn State University, Capital University, Clarion University, University of...


Dance (1)
Dancers and percussionists find a rhythm together 06/14/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...Go to antaeusdance.com or call 216-486-2874. Choreographer Joan Meggitt and percussionist Bill Sallak had been colleagues in the dance department at Kent State University for several years before Meggitt had a light-bulb moment. It happened after she attended a performance by Akros Percussion Collective,...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (3)
HONORS 06/16/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

Alfreda Brown, Kent State University's vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, received the 2013 Ohio Glass Ceiling Award from the National...

Celebrations -- June 16 06/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Education Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Kent State, received the 2013 Glass Ceiling Award from the National Diversity...

KSU vice president honored by National Diversity Council (Brown) 06/17/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The National Diversity Council has named Kent State University's vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, Alfreda Brown, Ed.D., recipient of...


Financial Aid; KSU at Stark (2)
Student loan rate hike deadline looms (Pukys, Evans) 06/17/2013 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

When the University of Akron holds programs for incoming freshmen and their parents, representatives from the financial aid office talk with them about...

Student loan rate hike deadline looms (Pukys, Evans) 06/15/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

When the University of Akron holds programs for incoming freshmen and their parents, representatives from the financial aid office talk with them about government-subsidized...


Hotel and Conference Center (2)
A look at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center (with gallery) 06/14/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center opened its doors to the public Friday while the finishing touches were being added throughout the...

Kent State Hotel Opens to Guests 06/17/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

94-room, 5-story boutique hotel is latest downtown Kent redevelopment project to open The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center opened to...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
High school newspapers thriving 06/16/2013 Bulletin - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...commercial dailies and weeklies, and more than 15,000 public high schools offer a journalism or other publications class, according to a census published by Kent State University's Center for Scholastic Journalism. From classrooms in Colchester and Ledyard to Montville and Killingly, the state of high...


KSU at Ashtabula; Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (1)
Table Tennis: Eagle Scout Project Puts Benches, Picnic Table at Liberty Street Park 06/16/2013 Gazette News - Online Text Attachment Email

...High School Marching Band and member of Amboy Hose Boosters and Amboy Rifle Club, LaBounty is enrolled at the Post-Secondary Education Option through Kent State University-Ashtabula. He plans to seek a bachelor's degree, possibly at Kent Ashtabula, upon high school graduation in 2014. “I have...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
10 questions with Jewel 06/16/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Tour at the American Music Theatre on Thursday, March 14, 2013, in Lancaster, Pa. Jewel will perform at 7:30 tonight at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. On Thursday, there were about 70 tickets remaining for tonight's show. Tickets range from...


KSU Museum (1)
Paper Wigs, Anyone? 06/17/2013 BellaOnline Text Attachment Email

...County Museum of Art (LACMA) made the wigs worn by mannequins in their show called Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail, 1700–1915. From the Kent State University Museum, this article features historical hairstyles using wigs made with twisted paper on a synthetic felt wig cap This...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Kent State is flexing its tech muscles (McGimpsey; West) 06/17/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

University aims to raise millions to fund center dedicated to flexible technologies After years of talk, Kent State University has committed to creating...


Music (2)
Miami String Quartet, Spencer Myer open Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concerts (Robinson) 06/16/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

The Miami String Quartet, Cathy Meng Robinson and Keith Robinson, have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University. The Quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's...

Miami String Quartet, Spencer Myer open Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concerts (Robinson) 06/16/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

The Miami String Quartet, Cathy Meng Robinson and Keith Robinson, have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University. The Quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's...


Office of the Provost (1)
ON THE MOVE: Kent State University 06/16/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

Fashaad Crawford was named assistant provost for accreditation, assessment and learning, and Melody Tankersley was named associate provost for academic...


Regional Academic Center (1)
Bringing walkable urban thoroughfares to Twinsburg, Ohio 06/14/2013 New Urban News - Online Text Attachment Email

...character. In 2009, the city lost its largest employer — a Chrysler stamping plant — but recently gained a LEED-certified Regional Academic Center for Kent State University. The city continues to see development pressure near its historic center, and has put a number of initiatives in place to ensure...


Students (3)
Royalton Players' 'Pippin' opens June 14 in Strongsville 06/14/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Broadway, but according to Poliafico the Royalton Player?s musical is a throwback from the original ?Pippin? that won Ben Vereen his first Tony Award. Kent State University student Andy Morilak plays, sings and dances as the title character, bringing a freshness and exuberance to the role. This is...

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR SEARCH: PUBLIC INVITED SATURDAY TO HELP LOOK FOR MISSING WOMAN TAYLOR ROBINSON 06/14/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...Center, 1400 S. Arlington St. Organizers say they will canvass the Akron neighborhood and pass out fliers in an effort to locate Robinson. Robinson, a Kent State University student, last was seen May 3, when her mother dropped her off at a Kipling Street home. The 19-year-old worked there as a private...

Kent Jaycees new members for April 06/16/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Jillian Wilczewski, and Seth Tipton. Clopton is a construction manager for Metis Construction. Chang is a soon-to-be third-year architecture student at Kent State University. Wilczewski is the membership volunteer and program specialist for Girl Scouts of Northeast Ohio. Tipton is a web designer and...


Students; Tuition (1)
Americans are ambivalent about the role of government 06/16/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...sell condoms to boys of any age and blatantly advertise prescription drugs for erectile dysfunction. In 1970, when some unruly, unarmed students at Kent State University objected to their government killing people in Cambodia, their government summarily shot some of them, and Americans generally...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Now Playing Onstage - Week of 6/16/2013 06/16/2013 BroadwayWorld.com Text Attachment Email

SOUTH PACIFIC Porthouse Theatre-Kent State University 6/13-6/29/2013 Set in an island paradise during World War II, two parallel love stories are threatened by the dangers...

Summer Stages: Cleveland Area Summer Theatre 2013 06/14/2013 BroadwayWorld.com Text Attachment Email

...Cleveland Critics Circle) The Cleveland area has a full schedule of summer theatre entertainment. Here are some of the upcoming stagings: PORTHOUSE THEATRE Kent State University's summer theatre, performed on the grounds of Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, will present SOUTH PACIFIC, June 13-29,...


University Press (2)
A view from the academy 06/14/2013 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...together around four research areas: design, architecture and culture; environment, culture and sustainability; global cultures; and health and society. Kent State University Press, Indiana University Press and Temple University Press collaboratively publish ethnomusicology titles.

A view from the academy 06/14/2013 Burbank Leader - Online Text Attachment Email

...together around four research areas: design, architecture and culture; environment, culture and sustainability; global cultures; and health and society. Kent State University Press, Indiana University Press and Temple University Press collaboratively publish ethnomusicology titles.


News Headline: John Hahn's U.S. Open diary: I leave with no regrets | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Editor's note: Former Kent State golfer John Hahn is doing a daily diary for The Plain Dealer this week as he plays in the U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club outside Philadelphia. Hahn, who grew up in Hudson and graduated from KSU in 2011, is one of three former Golden Flashes in the field, joining Mackenzie Hughes (2012) and Ryan Yip (2006).

ARDMORE, Pa. -- I came into the U.S. Open with my eyes wide open.

I am leaving the same way.

When it first hit me that I had qualified for the Open, the biggest golf tournament in the world, one of the first things I decided is that I was not going to leave the Merion Golf Club with any regrets, regardless of how I play.

And, I am not.

Obviously, I wish I would have played better. I hope to play in at least 20 more Opens. But, if I don't, this week will stay with me for the rest of my life. It was an incredible experience, from the golf course to the fans to the competition to the surroundings. I heard I even got a little TV time. Just incredible. I don't know if I can explain it any better.

Another thing I was resolved to do was interact with the fans. They are the reason we are here and in my mind it is up to us to act responsibly. All the fans want is a little attention, a little love. So, I signed everything I was asked to. I talked to the fans whenever I could. I looked them in the eye and acknowledged them. I felt I accommodated everyone as best I could. Merion is a pretty intimate place and everything is magnified.

As for my career in golf, this was a valuable experience. I will learn from it and apply it. When you think about where I have been and the tournaments on the satellite tours I've been playing, and then come to compete in the U.S. Open and a place like Merion? Against the best in the world? Truly amazing. I really hope it won't be my last.

From here, I am going to play in a few more events this summer, including the Ohio Open at Westfield, and then prepare for Q-School in the fall.

The beat goes on.

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News Headline: Making the cut at Merion just nine holes away: John Hahn's U.S. Open Diary | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Editor's note: Former Kent State golfer John Hahn is doing a diary for The Plain Dealer as he plays in the U.S. Open. Hahn grew up in Hudson and graduated from KSU in 2011.

John Hahn

Special to The Plain Dealer

ARDMORE, Pa. -- I got off to a bad start but I closed with a birdie, so that was good.

I am close to making the cut in my first U.S. Open. I have nine holes to play on Saturday. The projected cut is 8-over and that's where I stand.

The good news is that I made it through that tough stretch of holes on the back, because I started my second round on the 11th hole after starting the first round on the first hole. Because of everything being pushed back we did not tee off until about 6 o'clock.

I am going to make some birdies Saturday. I am going to make the cut. I feel good. I will play well. I feel confident.

The course was a little windier today than during the first round. But, that didn't make all that much difference. I drove the ball well. I just didn't do well hitting into the greens or putting. I three-putted the 13th hole, the easiest on the course.

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News Headline: Former Kent State golfer Ben Curtis starts foundation with wife | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Kent State All-American golfer and current PGA touring pro Ben Curtis and his wife Candace, a Kent Roosevelt High School graduate, have developed a unique way to help needy youngsters in their hometown.

Ben and Candace, who currently reside in Kent along with their children Liam and Addison, have created The Ben Curtis Family Foundation "to make a positive change in the lives of children in our local communities," they said in a recent press release. "Our goal is to help meet the basic needs of children so that they can benefit from the education they are receiving."

With that goal in mind, the Curtis family is currently implementing a program called "Ben's Birdie Bags."

"We were watching a television show on hunger and it truly opened our eyes, so we started doing some research," they said. "We discovered this is a real problem in Northeast Ohio, more specifically in our hometown of Kent. Some families are forced to choose between paying bills and feeding their families. In the Kent School District alone, there are 753 kids on some sort of a subsidy lunch program -- for many this is often their only daily meal. We feel sending Birdie Bags home over long holiday weekends could make a difference for hungry children."

A "Ben's Birdie Bags" trial run was held on Memorial Day weekend and was a huge success, according to everyone involved.

"Each bag consists of three meals and two snacks, and all food will be simple enough for a five-year-old to prepare," they said. "We have teamed up with the Haymaker Farmers Market to include a $5 voucher in each bag for the families to purchase local/fresh produce on Saturday morning in downtown Kent."

Plans now are to distribute Birdie Bags at Holden Elementary on all long weekends during the upcoming school year. The first official Birdie Bags will go home Aug. 30.

"Our longterm goal is to expand this program to all five elementary schools in the district, and then roll out to other districts in Northeast Ohio," they said.

The Ben Curtis Family Foundation has applied for 501(c)3 status with the IRS and anticipates receiving approval shortly. Local businesses and members of the community that would like to help fund this program should visit the website www.BenCurtisFoundation.org.

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News Headline: Encountering the beautifulworlds of Joseph O'Sickey | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For Janet and me, the past week has been a "Joseph O'Sickey Week".

Unable to attend its opening May 1, we did visit the spectacular exhibition of his paintings at the Canton Museum of Art's, titled, "Unifying Art, Life, and Love" last Sunday.

Then, Friday evening, thanks to Tom and Jan Hatch, we attended the opening of "Joseph O'Sickey: Travels: Provence and Maine," at Cleveland's venerable Bonfoey Gallery on Euclid Avenue across from the Palace Theater. A wonderful artist in her own right, Jan is a fan of Joseph O'Sickey's. She took his class when he was a member of the acclaimed School of Art faculty that the late Elmer Novotny, its director, brought to Kent State during his four decades at the University.

I don't know a lot about painting. My maternal grandfather was a struggling artist. I remember as a youngster visiting his studio, breathing in the oils he painted with, and surveying his canvases, most of which were landscapes he hoped to sell to anyone who'd pay cash. Those memories remain very vivid so nearly three years ago after Ken Gessford, the retired Theodore Roosevelt High School art teacher, showed me a book he had collaborated on for an O'Sickey exhibition at the Butler Institute, Janet and I drove to the Butler's Warren branch to see the exhibition.

We became hooked.

Ken eventually introduced us to the master who, in his 90s, continues to paint, can charm the heck out of you with his stories, and patiently instructs those in his presence how to look at a painting.

"It's the relationships of what you see," he'd say. Janet, more visual, got it right away. I'm still not sure I do.

My focus is narrative history, which is probably why I enjoy journalism. What I did comprehend immediately was O'Sickey's love for and fascination with his beautiful wife, Algesia D'Agostino, the most important muse of his life, She's no longer living, but photographs of her as the young woman he married show her to have been drop-dead gorgeous, a model for Mademoiselle, an artist in her own right who created sculptures with her seamstress skills.

O'Sickey was a handsome young man then, an athlete who apparently had turned down an opportunity to play on a Yankees farm team, to pursue his art. The chance meeting of the fated couple in a Cleveland art gallery is well told in the recent PBS documentary about O'Sickey. It was dynamite the moment they met. She shows up in many of his paintings and even when she doesn't I feel like she's somewhere in those other paintings too, encouraging her beloved husband in his work.

There's a three-panel painting, a triptych, more than 20 feet wide mounted on a blue painted partition that greets you upon entering the O'Sickey exhibition in Canton. Visually, it's overpowering, a garden of striking colors. Just off center, Algesia sits quietly in a wicker chair, her eyes looking straight at you.

Their shared passion for good painting comes through in an anecdote told about their seeing a Matisse exhibition in France. Noticing a tear streaming down from Algesia's eye as they departed the exhibition, he asked, "something in your eye, Honey?"

"Yes," she sobbed, "Matisse."

Steven Litt, who writes about architecture and art for the Plain Dealer, mentions a Frenchness that critics and admirers have seen in O'Sickey's work. In his comments in the booklet that accompanies the Canton exhibition, he also touches on the influence of the collections of Chinese and Japanese paintings at the Cleveland Art Museum where as a youngster O'Sickey took art lessons. He taught himself calligraphy and it is evident in the bold strokes of his paintings, borders for images of incredible colors. So do the influences of the graphics, drawings, and posters he created for companies for whom he worked as a commercial artist as a young man.

Memories of the circus he would visit as a youngster are in his many paintings of caged lions, elephants, and tigers. When he commuted to jobs in Akron and, later, Kent from his then Cleveland Heights home, O'Sickey would start early to have the time to stop at area racetrack grounds to sketch horses and jockeys. A few of these are in the Canton show. There's a whimsical theme in some of the paintings and a sense of humor too. In one, William Tell is about to shoot an arrow off his own head. His well known paintings of fiery-eyed leopards embody beauty, mystery, and danger. There are paintings and sketches of people in India and of Tibetan monks inspired during the two years he was stationed in India in World War II.

Dorothy Shinn, who writes about art for the Beacon, said in her review that O'Sickey is finally getting the attention he is due. Both she and Steven Litt indicate O'Sickey has received more recognition in New York and in Europe than he has here in Northeast Ohio, his home, although the Cleveland Art Museum has one of his paintings and O'Sickey was often a winner in its May Shows.

That may be changing and I hope it is.

Last month, he received a Governor's Award from the Ohio Arts Council. It was partly a recognition that a few years ago, he donated sketchbooks to the schools of Portage County writing in an open letter to the students, "Seeing better, or seeing well, consists of spontaneously seeing relations between things. This can be done by practice. The practice consists of spontaneously drawing what is around you, what you alone see."

His encouragement and his life's work can enrich all who take the time to see and appreciate.

Laudable restoration

On another topic entirely, kudos to Rick Hawksley, the architect and former Kent Council member, who is restoring the home north of the Ravenna post office to its original look.

The home, formerly owned by Record Publishing, was built prior to the Civil War. Before Record Publishing it was the beautiful residence of the family of the late Dr. Earl Stevens, a dentist and the grandfather of my cousin, Chuck Dix.

Rick said he became interested in restoring the home during bicycle rides he and his wife, Joan, still take. Ravenna, he saw, is a treasure chest of beautiful 19th and early 20th century homes, some of them well maintained, others awaiting the loving care that knowledgeable and skilled people, like Rick, can provide.

He plans to rent the ground floor for a business and the upper floor as an apartment.

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News Headline: Book celebrates Flashes' football | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State football team authored the greatest season in school history in 2012, stunning football fans close to home and across the country with a record-setting 11-win campaign that featured a Mid-American Conference East Division championship, victory over nationally ranked Rutgers and the program's first bowl berth in 40 years.

For those interested in forever stamping those memories and more in history, the Record-Courier's book "Flashes of Brilliance: The Story of the 2012 Kent State Football Team" captures everything about the incredible season that was filled with emotion, action and suspense.

Including a personal foreword by Head Coach Darrell Hazell and an introduction by Record-Courier Publisher David Dix, the 116-page, full-color book takes readers through the season-long journey that captured the hearts of Kent State football backers far and wide.

"It was certainly a historical season, and we are excited to offer this book for anyone that wants to relive and remember it all, down to the finest details," Record-Courier Sports Editor Tom Nader said.

The book costs $10 if purchased at the Record-Courier's office in Kent, which is located at 1050 W. Main St. The cost is $15 if shipped to your home, with the price increase set to include shipping and handling fees. Please allow two to three weeks for delivery. To find the order form on www.recordpub.com, use the "Services" tab at the top of the main page.

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News Headline: KSU, Holden Arboretum receive research grant (Leff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and the Holden Arboretum will use a recently awarded National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study the impact people have on vital organisms living in places where water and land meet in Northeast Ohio.

The NSF has awarded Kent State a grant for $345,000 for a project with Holden that provides research opportunities for undergraduate students. The grant is part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, which supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the NSF.

The project, titled “REU Sites: Terrestrial-Aquatic Linkages in Urban Impacted Ecosystems” was developed by Patrick Lorch and Mark Kershner in the Department of Biological Sciences at Kent State, and Kurt Smemo, a biogeochemist at Holden.

The Holden Arboretum, located in Kirtland, Ohio, is one of the largest arboreta and botanical gardens in the country, with more than 3,600 acres of natural areas and cultivated gardens. Earlier this year, Kent State signed a memorandum of understanding with Holden outlining opportunities for collaborative research efforts.

“This is a national program funded by the NSF where students from different universities travel to whatever REU site best suits their interests,” said Laura Leff, chairwoman of the Department of Biological Sciences at Kent State. “The students apply to programs where they want to do research, so the students will come from all over.”

The research will be designed to examine how human activities such as urbanization, industry, farming, mining and recreational activities affect the way terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems interact. Students accepted into the 10-week program will receive a stipend for their work.

The three-year continuing grant took effect March 1 and will provide funding of $110,804 for 2013, and more than $234,000 over the next two years.

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News Headline: 7 great places that represent excellence in environmental design | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Building Design+Construction - BD+C - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Program celebrates professional and scholarly excellence in environmental design, with emphasis on human activity or experience.

An adaptive reuse to create LEED Platinum offices in Georgia, an Ohio park that honors veterans, and a grand national plaza are among the seven projects named winners of the 2013 Great Places Awards. The Environmental Design and Research Association recognize professional and scholarly excellence in environmental design, with special attention paid to the relationship between physical form and human activity or experience.

2013 Place Design Award Recipients

1315 Peachtree Street, Atlanta Perkins + Will

This LEED Platinum project transformed a 1986 office structure into a "living laboratory" and educational tool for sustainable design. Rigorous research was conducted in pre- and post-occupancy evaluations.

Dublin Grounds of Remembrance PLANT Architect Inc.

Located in Dublin, Ohio, this one-acre park honors the service of veterans and celebrates the city's heritage. The project examined how architecture can be used to "frame, reveal, and engage the landscape while connecting people to the site and navigating their experience of place." Designers chose not to provide a traditional monument, instead promoting the acts of walking and social gathering.

Place Planning Award Recipients

Northerly Island Park Framework Plan SmithGroupJJR and Studio Gang Architects

This plan, for an island linked to Chicago's existing lakefront Museum Campus, extends green and sustainable design principles to the waterfont in an ecologically driven plan. The framework establishes zones ranging from urban/active to natural/passive, and includes woodland and waterfront ecology.

Unified Ground: National Mall Competition, Union Square Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

This plan overlays and enriches the Union Square plaza in the nation's capital with spaces for informal activities. New features and textures respond to the underlying natural landform, daily patterns of movement, and the diverse needs and desires of the users. The plan extends the formal Mall axis to Union Square, including a pool, plaza, and additional pathways.

Place Research Award Recipient

Pop Up City: Temporary Use Strategies for a Sinking City Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Pop Up City is an action-based research program that implements temporary projects as a means of urban reinvention. The research is part of the graduate architecture curriculum at Kent State University, encompassing design-build exercises that culminate in deployment and assessment of temporary projects. (The photo is of Hipp Deck, an outdoor performance venue temporarily created at a parking deck that was once the site of the city's famous Hippodrome Theater.)

Place Book Award Recipient

"Urban Composition," by Mark Childs

This book, which addresses designers but also serves as a teaching tool for urban design, discusses how architects, landscape architects, civil engineers, public artists, city council members, and other participants can caollaborate to create environmentally sound, socially resilient, and "soul enlivening" settlements.

Placemaking Award: Providence

WaterFire Providence, a nonprofit arts organizaton, manages an evolving public art installation of music, floating fires, art, and dance along three rivers in downtown Providence. The project continually changes in response to citizen participation and ongoing expansion of the river park system.

Jurors for the 2013 Great Places Awards:

Julian Bonder, Principal, Wodiczko + Bonder

Gayle Epp, Partner, EJP Consulting

Valerie Fletcher, Executive Director, Institute for Human Centered Design

Peter M. Hourihan, LEED®AP, Principal & Director of Research, Cannon Design

Mikyoung Kim, Principal & Design Director, Mikyoung Kim Design.

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News Headline: Career paths & limelight | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

Kent State University's College of Business Administration has maintained its business and accounting accreditations from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

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News Headline: KSU lecturer to study opportunities in Panama | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Panama is one of the top destinations for retiring U.S. baby boomers because of its climate, accessibility, cost of living and welcoming attitude. Kent State University lecturer Craig Zamary will travel to the Central American country this July to conduct research on ways U.S. companies can tap into the resources that these retirees represent.

Zamary of North Lima, a faculty member in Kent State's College of Business Administration, plans to connect with both local residents and U.S. expatriates. His goal is to learn what opportunities may exist for U.S. companies and universities to utilize the knowledge and experience of U.S. citizens relocating in Panama.

Zamary is an approved Fulbright Specialist, and his monthlong research trip to Panama is a Fulbright-funded project. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government's flagship program in international educational exchange. U.S. faculty and professionals apply to join a Fulbright Roster of Specialists for a five-year term.

Other stories of interestGRADS LISTWestminster students place in business gameTCTC team wins competitionKSU, Holden Arboretum receive research grant

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News Headline: Launch Local Inc In Girard Ohio Makes Learning Fun for Summer Interns! | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New Image launch - Jun. 14, 2013 - YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio -- Launch Local: Summer Survivor Olympics

Launch Local, a promotional marketing firm in Girard, OH that specializes in creating community awareness, is hosting a contest for summer students. The contest, based on the reality television show Survivor, aims to find the best intern of the summer. Students from 10 universities will be participating in the contest. Participating universities include, Slipper Rock University, Akron University, Kent State University, Youngstown State University, Penn State University, Capital University, Clarion University, University of Mount Union and Westminster College.

Students enrolled from each college or university and is handed the opportunity to gain valuable experience in advertising, marketing, professional selling and business. Without the assistance of Jeff Probst, a student is eliminated based on their lack of determination and drive to complete specific requirements. Each intern receives a checklist with 50 tasks to earn stars based on completion. The criteria by which each intern is challenged is broken down into categories of work ethic, social media & networking, leadership skills, retention & comprehension, professional selling, business management & record keeping, and organizational communications.

The checklist is mainly to help students to expand comfort zones and gain hands on experiences. It gives them a visual of all the new skills sets they will be learning and gaining confidence in. Most important is their ability to set and reach goals, stay highly motivated and overcome negatives and obstacles. One by one the students will eliminate themselves from the contest until the top summer intern remains. The surviving intern is awarded $1,000!

However, every participating student is winning. Participants can receive course credit and valuable workplace experience for their resumes. The contest runs all summer and concludes on August 16th.

For more information visit Photo

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News Headline: Dancers and percussionists find a rhythm together | Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Rosenberg, Donald
News OCR Text: PREVIEW

AudioKinetic

What: Antaeus Dance and Akros Percussion Collective team for a program of new works.

When: 7 tonight.

Where: Westfield Insurance Studio Theatre at the Idea Center in PlayhouseSquare, 1375 Euclid Ave., Cleveland.

Tickets: Free. Go to antaeusdance.com or call 216-486-2874.

Choreographer Joan Meggitt and percussionist Bill Sallak had been colleagues in the dance department at Kent State University for several years before Meggitt had a light-bulb moment. It happened after she attended a performance by Akros Percussion Collective, in which Sallak is a member.

“I was so literally moved by the music,” says Meggitt. “I said to Bill, 'Why didn't I think of this before? Let's do a collaboration of music and dance.' ”

Thus was born “AudioKinetic,” a program teaming Antaeus Dance, Meggitt's contemporary company, and Akros. They'll perform together for the first time tonight at the Idea Center in PlayhouseSquare.

Meggitt began devising the program after listening to a number of Akros recordings. With Antaeus, she largely focuses on movement ideas to create atmosphere. Working in a new way with Akros, she found the process of being led by the music to be fascinating.

“It's such a delight, because the music is so complex,” she says. “There's always something for me to hold onto and tease out.

“I have music training and a pretty decent ear, so I'm always attuned to the music. But I don't think I've let it guide me in quite the way I have this time around. Rather than tone and personality, I'm really looking at rhythm.”

The rhythms and colors will be provided tonight by a number of 20th-century or living composers: John Luther Adams, Javier Alvarez, John Cage, Thierry De May, Stuart Saunders Smith and Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Sallak says he and Meggitt “became artistically sympatico pretty quickly. We're both interested in things that are a little more abstract, out, a little less narrative.”

The musicians of Akros will be arrayed in various locations during tonight's concert. For “Temazcal,” set to music by Alvarez, Sallak will be the soloist in front of four dancers. In “idiorrhythmic,” performed to Smith's “Winter Taps,” Sherri Mills will dance amid two vibraphones placed stage left and right, just off center.

Along with the pieces choreographed by Meggitt, Akros will perform several works on its own, including Stockhausen's rarely played “Musik im Bauch” – or “Music in the Belly.” Created as the result of a dream, the score centers around an enormous mannequin with the head of a bird and a chest in which three music boxes reside. The musicians pull the music boxes out, learn the songs and play them.

“It's not really a clear narrative,” says Sallak. “It's not like the mannequin is our god and we're learning from it. It's much more mysterious.”

As is usually the case where percussion ensembles are concerned, Akros will bring along a potpourri of equipment to fulfill the varied requirements of the program's music. For example, John Cage's “Second Construction” – the oldest piece, from 1939, in Akros' repertoire – includes such novel instruments as oxen bells, glass wind chimes and temple bowls.

Meggitt uses the Cage score in “when light feet power the moment,” a solo for Heather Koniz.

“It has highly complex rhythms and lots of different kinds of sounds,” says Meggit. “I'm sometimes choosing accents where there are accents, sometimes bringing a different instrumentation forward through the accents.

“That has been really delightful, exciting and a lot of work. It allows the music to inform the dancing.”

Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer.

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News Headline: HONORS | Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alfreda Brown, Kent State University's vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, received the 2013 Ohio Glass Ceiling Award from the National Diversity Council. The award recognizes women who have overcome barriers to climb to the top in their professions and made it possible for others to follow in their footsteps.

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News Headline: Celebrations -- June 16 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Kent State, received the 2013 Glass Ceiling Award from the National Diversity Council. The award recognizes women who have overcome barriers to succeed in their professions.

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News Headline: KSU vice president honored by National Diversity Council (Brown) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The National Diversity Council has named Kent State University's vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, Alfreda Brown, Ed.D., recipient of the 2013 Ohio Glass Ceiling Award. The award recognizes women who have overcome barriers to climb to the top in their professions and also have made it possible for others to follow in their footsteps.

Brown was selected for her leadership, excellence and accomplishments, and was awarded at the 2013 Ohio Women's Conference Award Luncheon in Cincinnati on May 30.

The National Diversity Council, established in 2008, champions diversity and inclusion nationwide, and is the first non-profit organization to bring together private, public and non-profit sectors to discuss the benefits of a multicultural environment.

"I am elated," Brown said. "I realize that 'breaking the glass ceiling' is something that most professional women strive for - to be at the top of their careers and breaking through barriers that were once closed to most women. Becoming a vice president is truly a barrier breaker for me, first as a person of color, and secondly, as a woman in higher education. There aren't a lot of us. Women are still a minority in many top positions."

Brown joined KSU in 2009, heading the university's Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. In her role, she oversees KSU's diversity and inclusion programs, which include the Office of Diversity Programming, Office of Planning and Diversity Assessment, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Center, Student Multicultural Center, Women's Center and Upward Bound Pre-College Programs. She is a strong advocate for strategic planning and outcomes-based assessments to facilitate fact-based decision making and the constant improvement of diversity initiatives.

She encourages women to never give up on their desire to excel, and to be ready to watch, learn and engage within their circles.

"I totally believe a woman can accomplish anything, and believing that will give her a head start toward finding how to tap into her greatness," Brown said. "Women have to know how to build important relationships that connect them to the people they need to know, including those who believe in their capabilities because relationships increase visibility."

Brown is a member of several organizations, including the National Association for Diversity Officers in Higher Education, American Council on Education Ohio Women's Network, Our Lady of the Elms Board of Trustees, Kent League of Women Voters and Kent City Schools Steering Committee. She also is involved with the Rochester Black Women's Leadership Forum.

Brown holds a bachelor's degree from Roberts Wesleyan College, a master's from the Rochester Institute of Technology and a doctoral degree from Nova Southeastern University.

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News Headline: Student loan rate hike deadline looms (Pukys, Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When the University of Akron holds programs for incoming freshmen and their parents, representatives from the financial aid office talk with them about government-subsidized student loans.

Sometimes parents and students ask questions about repayment plans, said Michelle Ellis, executive director of student financial aid. But they usually don't ask how much the loans will cost.

Senators are gridlocked on legislation that would stop the interest rate for new subsidized Stafford student loans from doubling from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on July 1. But even as the deadline looms, local university officials and students don't seem too worried.

“The impact is not immediate,” Ellis said.

‘THE HOUSE HAS PROVIDED A SOLUTION'

Under the College Cost Reduction and Access Act passed in 2007, the interest rate for the subsidized Stafford loan was dropped over four years from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent in 2011. In 2012, Congress passed a one-year extension to keep the need-based student loan interest rates at 3.4 percent, but the measure expires next month.

For an undergraduate student who borrows the maximum amount — $23,000 — during his or her years in school and plans to pay off the subsidized loan over 10 years, the hike would mean an extra $4,600 in interest, according to the finaid.org loan calculator.

Last month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a Republican-supported bill that would link interest rates to the 10-year U.S. Treasury note, plus 2.5 percentage points, and funnel savings back to the Treasury. The interest rate for Stafford loans would be capped at 8.5 percent.

U.S. Rep. Bob Gibbs, R-Lakeville, through a spokeswoman, said the House bill keeps rates from rising to “an uncontrollable level” and saves the government money.

“The House has provided a solution for the Senate to act on,” he said via email.

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said through a spokeswoman that the cost of student loans is uncertain, and he doesn't want to see a solution that adds to the government's debt.

“We must have a long-term fix that brings certainty and predictability to student interest rates so that people are prepared to make this valuable and worthwhile investment,” he said via email.

Democratic senators, however, have proposed a bill to halt the loan interest rate increase for two years, in an effort to give Congress time to implement more sweeping changes to address student debt.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, was not available to provide comment, according to his office.

‘THEY WON'T DO THAT TO THE STUDENTS'

Pamela Pustay, director of financial aid at Malone University, said close to 93 percent of students at the college rely on some form of the subsidized Stafford loan. So far, though, she

hasn't received any inquiries about interest rates.

She said, having been through this situation before, she expects Congress to act at the last minute. And until July 1, she's not going to send out communication to students about the potential hike.

“I don't want them to panic,” she said.

Gail Pukys, assistant director of student financial aid at Kent State University at Stark campus, said she doesn't know what will happen with student loans but commented that legislators debate interest rates yearly.

“I hope when all the dust settles they won't do that to the students,” she said.

On Friday, several students attending Kent State University at Stark who have taken out subsidized loans weren't aware the interest rate might double. But they got upset when they heard about it.

Brentt Keller, 24, is a second-year student studying biotechnology. He said students shouldn't have the mentality that they don't need to worry about paying off their loans now. There's no guarantee they'll find employment after they graduate, he said. That's why he's working during school.

“I'm trying my best to save money,” he said.

Mark Evans, Kent State University director of student financial aid, said 23,000 students across the university's campuses received a subsidized loan last year.

He crunched the numbers and learned, for a student who has $10,000 in loans to pay off over 10 years, the difference between a 3.4 percent interest rate and a 6.8 percent interest rate is about $16 a month, according to the loan calculator at finaid.org.

Evans said he doesn't want to see a plan that keeps the interest rate at 3.4 percent by cutting other student financial programs, such as work-study. But he remains hopeful legislators will agree on a solution to keep student costs down.

“I think that there has been a lot more discussion and energy put into addressing the concern at this point and time than a year ago,” he said.

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News Headline: Student loan rate hike deadline looms (Pukys, Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When the University of Akron holds programs for incoming freshmen and their parents, representatives from the financial aid office talk with them about government-subsidized student loans.

Sometimes parents and students ask questions about repayment plans, said Michelle Ellis, executive director of student financial aid. But they usually don?t ask how much the loans will cost.

Senators are gridlocked on legislation that would stop the interest rate for new subsidized Stafford student loans from doubling from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on July 1. But even as the deadline looms, local university officials and students don?t seem too worried. ?The impact is not immediate,? Ellis said. ?THE HOUSE HAS PROVIDED A SOLUTION? Under the College Cost Reduction and Access Act passed in 2007, the interest rate for the subsidized Stafford loan was dropped over four years from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent in 2011. In 2012, Congress passed a one-year extension to keep the need-based student loan interest rates at 3.4 percent, but the measure expires next month.

For an undergraduate student who borrows the maximum amount ? $23,000 ? during his or her years in school and plans to pay off the subsidized loan over 10 years, the hike would mean an extra $4,600 in interest, according to the finaid.org loan calculator.

Last month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a Republican-supported bill that would link interest rates to the 10-year U.S. Treasury note, plus 2.5 percentage points, and funnel savings back to the Treasury. The interest rate for Stafford loans would be capped at 8.5 percent.

U.S. Rep. Bob Gibbs, R-Lakeville, through a spokeswoman, said the House bill keeps rates from rising to ?an uncontrollable level? and saves the government money. ?The House has provided a solution for the Senate to act on,? he said via email. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said through a spokeswoman that the cost of student loans is uncertain, and he doesn?t want to see a solution that adds to the government?s debt. ?We must have a long-term fix that brings certainty and predictability to student interest rates so that people are prepared to make this valuable and worthwhile investment,? he said via email. Democratic senators, however, have proposed a bill to halt the loan interest rate increase for two years, in an effort to give Congress time to implement more sweeping changes to address student debt.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, was not available to provide comment, according to his office.

When the University of Akron holds programs for incoming freshmen and their parents, representatives from the financial aid office talk with them about government-subsidized student loans.

Sometimes parents and students ask questions about repayment plans, said Michelle Ellis, executive director of student financial aid. But they usually don?t ask how much the loans will cost.

Senators are gridlocked on legislation that would stop the interest rate for new subsidized Stafford student loans from doubling from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent on July 1. But even as the deadline looms, local university officials and students don?t seem too worried. ?The impact is not immediate,? Ellis said. ?THE HOUSE HAS PROVIDED A SOLUTION? Under the College Cost Reduction and Access Act passed in 2007, the interest rate for the subsidized Stafford loan was dropped over four years from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent in 2011. In 2012, Congress passed a one-year extension to keep the need-based student loan interest rates at 3.4 percent, but the measure expires next month.

For an undergraduate student who borrows the maximum amount ? $23,000 ? during his or her years in school and plans to pay off the subsidized loan over 10 years, the hike would mean an extra $4,600 in interest, according to the finaid.org loan calculator.

Last month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a Republican-supported bill that would link interest rates to the 10-year U.S. Treasury note, plus 2.5 percentage points, and funnel savings back to the Treasury. The interest rate for Stafford loans would be capped at 8.5 percent.

U.S. Rep. Bob Gibbs, R-Lakeville, through a spokeswoman, said the House bill keeps rates from rising to ?an uncontrollable level? and saves the government money. ?The House has provided a solution for the Senate to act on,? he said via email. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said through a spokeswoman that the cost of student loans is uncertain, and he doesn?t want to see a solution that adds to the government?s debt. ?We must have a long-term fix that brings certainty and predictability to student interest rates so that people are prepared to make this valuable and worthwhile investment,? he said via email. Democratic senators, however, have proposed a bill to halt the loan interest rate increase for two years, in an effort to give Congress time to implement more sweeping changes to address student debt.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, was not available to provide comment, according to his office. ?THEY WON?T DO THAT TO THE STUDENTS? Pamela Pustay, director of financial aid at Malone University, said close to 93 percent of students at the college rely on some form of the subsidized Stafford loan. So far, though, she hasn?t received any inquiries about interest rates.

She said, having been through this situation before, she expects Congress to act at the last minute. And until July 1, she?s not going to send out communication to students about the potential hike. ?I don't want them to panic,? she said. Gail Pukys, assistant director of student financial aid at Kent State University at Stark campus, said she doesn?t know what will happen with student loans but commented that legislators debate interest rates yearly. ?I hope when all the dust settles they won?t do that to the students,? she said. On Friday, several students attending Kent State University at Stark who have taken out subsidized loans weren?t aware the interest rate might double. But they got upset when they heard about it.

Brentt Keller, 24, is a second-year student studying biotechnology. He said students shouldn?t have the mentality that they don?t need to worry about paying off their loans now. There?s no guarantee they?ll find employment after they graduate, he said. That?s why he?s working during school. ?I?m trying my best to save money,? he said. Mark Evans, Kent State University director of student financial aid, said 23,000 students across the university?s campuses received a subsidized loan last year.

He crunched the numbers and learned, for a student who has $10,000 in loans to pay off over 10 years, the difference between a 3.4 percent interest rate and a 6.8 percent interest rate is about $16 a month, according to the loan calculator at finaid.org.

Evans said he doesn?t want to see a plan that keeps the interest rate at 3.4 percent by cutting other student financial programs, such as work-study. But he remains hopeful legislators will agree on a solution to keep student costs down. ?I think that there has been a lot more discussion and energy put into addressing the concern at this point and time than a year ago,? he said. Reach Alison at 330-580-8312 or alison.matas@cantonrep.com.

On Twitter: @amatasREP

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News Headline: A look at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center (with gallery) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Kyle McDonald and Lisa Scalfaro | Record-Courier
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center opened its doors to the public Friday while the finishing touches were being added throughout the $16 million project at the intersection of Haymaker Parkway and East Erie Street in downtown Kent.

About 10 guests were booked to spend the first night in the hotel, general manager Michael Riccio said.

The hotel has 94 boutique-style guest rooms, a presidential suite with a furnished outdoor patio overlooking Haymaker Parkway toward the KSU Esplanade, a restaurant called "Zenas" after Kent patriarch Zenas Kent, a lounge, an indoor saltwater swimming pool and hot tub, a workout facility, a 24-hour business center and 5,000 square feet of event space including a ballroom and an executive boardroom.

Room rates are $139 per night, while the current rate for the presidential suite is $250 per night.

Visit www.recordpub.com to see more photos.

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News Headline: Kent State Hotel Opens to Guests | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 94-room, 5-story boutique hotel is latest downtown Kent redevelopment project to open

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center opened to the public today via a soft opening.

The boutique hotel at 215 S. DePeyster St. features 94 rooms spread on the top four floors with special conference areas and a presidential suite, which features a private balcony overlooking the Esplanade connection to campus.

The first floor includes a 50-seat bar and lounge and the 300-seat conference center, which has its own separate entrance off Erie Street near PARTA's Kent Central Gateway transit center and parking garage.

The Riley Hotel Group, based in Medina, OH, will operate the hotel and runs several in Northeast Ohio.

Michael Riccio, of the Riley Hotel Group, said just 10 people are staying in the hotel on its first night, as they didn't want to advertise the opening night publicly until they were sure of the opening date and all the last-minute details were squared away.

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News Headline: High school newspapers thriving | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Bulletin - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In a small room off the Bacon Academy library, an experiment in new media is taking shape.

Since September, senior Bernie Dennler, co-editor-in-chief of the Colchester high school's Bacon Courier scholastic newspaper, has been a regular presence on YouTube and a closed circuit television broadcast that delivers original, school-focused reporting to the Bacon community several times a week.

Since the Courier only comes out once a quarter, the multimedia endeavor helps fill the news hole.

"I really like storytelling from a people perspective, so going into the school newspaper was a natural fit for me," said Dennler, an aspiring radio broadcaster who will be attending Fordham University this fall.

Dennler organized the project as an independent study program and hopes to see it grow in popularity in subsequent years.

According to a 2011 report, Dennler's involvement in youth journalism puts him in good company.

Nationally, there are nearly 50 percent more high school newspapers than commercial dailies and weeklies, and more than 15,000 public high schools offer a journalism or other publications class, according to a census published by Kent State University's Center for Scholastic Journalism.

From classrooms in Colchester and Ledyard to Montville and Killingly, the state of high school journalism in Eastern Connecticut is strong as well, playing an important role not only by developing media-literate adolescents, but also by providing administrators and other officials with insight into the issues that matter for students.

"We want conversation around those topics," said Jason Daly, assistant principal at Montville High School, where The Chieftain is published. "We definitely see it as an important part of the fabric of the school."

Marina Hendricks, communications director and coordinator of youth programs for the American Press Institute, said offering journalism at the high school level does more than give budding reporters a start to their careers.

"Involvement in student media programs can build a lot of the 21st-century skills that are so important for success, not only if a student wants to be a journalist, but also just a media-literate, civically engaged adult," she said. "As they work on projects, write their stories, develop them with photographs and video, lay them out and post them online, they're also practicing all of these digital skills everyone needs to have."

A 2008 study by the Newspaper Association of America showed students involved in high school journalism posted better grade point averages in every subject than their peers, and did better on the ACT college readiness assessment.

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News Headline: Table Tennis: Eagle Scout Project Puts Benches, Picnic Table at Liberty Street Park | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gazette News - Online
Contact Name: Martha Sorohan
News OCR Text: Tennis players at Conneaut's Liberty Street Park may be taking a few more breaks this season, thanks to a new picnic table and benches installed adjacent to the tennis courts by James LaBounty for his Eagle Scout project.

A ten-year member of Boy Scout Troop 34, LaBounty did not have to look far when considering a project to earn Boy Scouting's highest award.

“I was on my way to a Boy Scout meeting one week and looking at the people at the park, the kids playing tennis, and I saw there was just one picnic table, and it was in bad shape,” said LaBounty, entering his senior year at Conneaut High School.

Realizing that putting in a new table and a bench or two by the tennis courts would meet the Eagle Scout project requirement that it benefit the community, LaBounty contacted Public Works Director Bob Mannion, who put him in touch with his assistant, John Falcone.

Falcone provided a diagram of Liberty Street Park to show what could be accommodated.

“The city measured to make sure they could get the riding mower between the benches,” LaBounty said.

Once Boy Scout leadership accepted the project, LaBounty was off and running.

Using Internet research, LaBounty found a good-quality galvanized steel table, made in the USA, at an affordable price through Global Industrial. It met the approval of the Public Works Department.

Over the winter, LaBounty sent out donation letters to about 100 local businesses, and received about $2,000 in donations from one-fourth of them.

Once the weather began to break, the physical labor could begin.

LaBounty and his helpers -- troop members and family -- got to work. They began at Liberty Street park early one Saturday morning with an augur, courtesy of Woody Runnion of North Kingsville, and began drilling holes three to four feet deep to accommodate 18-inch tubes for the benches and picnic table.

The most difficult part of the project, LaBounty said, was hand-mixing 50 bags of cement. Cement was donated by Home Depot and Busy Beaver; Lowe's offered a discount.

Pouring the cement took about three days.

“It was cold, but there was no precipitation,” LaBounty said. “If it had dropped below freezing, we'd have had to add calcium.”

LaBounty's mother, Brenda, said they used a wheelbarrow and big jugs of water from  First United Congregational Church of Christ, the troop meeting place. Park neighbors Sam and Terica Ford offered use of their garden hose.

The tedious process of moistening, mixing, and spreading the mixture into three 2-x4 wooden frames was lightened by a donation of pizza from J.D.'s.

LaBounty said that installing the table was slightly easier than the benches because of a concrete pad that held the old, weathered and warped table.

“But we still had to drill down because the new table was heavier,” he said.

Then they discovered that the brackets for the new picnic table were off by a few inches.

“We were supposed to have dug four circles for the table, but we ended up digging more, requiring more concrete and smoothing out,” LaBounty said.

“And they weren't supposed to, but some Boy Scouts wrote in the wet cement,” he added

With the most difficult tasks behind them, the Scouts were able to remove the benches and table from their three-day storage location in the back of a pick-up truck and put them together.

The 49-hour project was finished March 8.

On May 19, LaBounty's project was accepted by a panel of area Boy Scout leadership. Sometime this summer, LaBounty will earn his Eagle Scout award at a Court of Honor.

Doug Hedrick, Conneaut High School tennis coach and Ward 1 Councilman, saw LaBounty in the store and thanked him for adding the benches to the park, saying it's nice that tennis players have a place to sit. He also mentioned it at a City Council meeting.

Though LaBounty is not a tennis player, he understands.

“We go by on Main Street a lot and see the tennis players,” he said.

In retrospect, LaBounty learned a lot about responsibility.

“The biggest issue was the funding,” he said. “ It took a lot of time in the winter, when it was cold. Mixing the concrete was the hardest part.”

A clarinet-player in the Conneaut High School Marching Band and member of Amboy Hose Boosters and Amboy Rifle Club, LaBounty is enrolled at the Post-Secondary Education Option through Kent State University-Ashtabula. He plans to seek a bachelor's degree, possibly at Kent Ashtabula, upon high school graduation in 2014.

“I have no idea what I want to study,” he said. “There are just too many things to list.”

The son of Paul and Brenda LaBounty, LaBounty has a 15-year-old brother, Tim, also a member of Troop 34. Scout leader is Carl Hall.

LaBounty's interest in Scouting was sparked at a young age when a recruiter came to the schools.

“It was always fun,” he said. “I like aquatics -- the canoeing, kayaking, and swimming, and the Boy Scout camps.”

LaBounty has camped the last four years at Camp Beaumont in Rock Creek and volunteered with his troop at the D-Day Event at Township Park.

Troop 34 is always looking for new members, he said. Meetings are 7 to 8:30 p.m. Mondays year-round at First UCC, Main & Buffalo Streets.

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News Headline: 10 questions with Jewel | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Singer-songwriter Jewel performs on her Greatest Hits Tour at the American Music Theatre on Thursday, March 14, 2013, in Lancaster, Pa.

Jewel will perform at 7:30 tonight at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. On Thursday, there were about 70 tickets remaining for tonight's show. Tickets range from $46 to $66. They can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open today beginning at 8 a.m.

1. What can the audience expect when they come see your show tonight?

My shows are solo-acoustic, so it's just me and my guitars — both electric and acoustic. I want the audience to feel like we are sitting in their living room together swapping stories and songs. Every performance has a bit of an element of surprise to it since I take requests and share my stories throughout the show. I learned from my dad to read the room, so I never do set lists but always try to make sure the hits find their way into the show — as well as a yodel or two.

2. You've been in this business for a long time, and you are still so young. Is it as much fun now to perform as it was earlier in your career?

Performing never gets old to me. My fans have been so great to me over the years and have allowed me to make a living doing what I love to do. I've been on stage since I was 6 years old and have literally seen the world as a performer. The biggest difference now is that I can tour with my toddler Kase. That has been a big change of pace! I go to bed on rock and roll hours and wake up on mom hours. The road is challenging but so much fun!

3. It's interesting that you've covered different types of music. You had such success with your debut album but have ventured into music for children and have done country, too. Does this keep things fresh?

I think of making music as painting with colors that move you. Who says you always have to paint with red? It's exciting and interesting to allow my music to evolve along with my life. I find that at the heart of it all I'm a storyteller and a songwriter. From there music takes a life of its own. I do my best to always serve the song — whatever radio format that it may end up being played on.

Jewel will perform at 7:30 tonight at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. On Thursday, there were about 70 tickets remaining for tonight's show. Tickets range from $46 to $66. They can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open today beginning at 8 a.m.

1. What can the audience expect when they come see your show tonight?

My shows are solo-acoustic, so it's just me and my guitars — both electric and acoustic. I want the audience to feel like we are sitting in their living room together swapping stories and songs. Every performance has a bit of an element of surprise to it since I take requests and share my stories throughout the show. I learned from my dad to read the room, so I never do set lists but always try to make sure the hits find their way into the show — as well as a yodel or two.

2. You've been in this business for a long time, and you are still so young. Is it as much fun now to perform as it was earlier in your career?

Performing never gets old to me. My fans have been so great to me over the years and have allowed me to make a living doing what I love to do. I've been on stage since I was 6 years old and have literally seen the world as a performer. The biggest difference now is that I can tour with my toddler Kase. That has been a big change of pace! I go to bed on rock and roll hours and wake up on mom hours. The road is challenging but so much fun!

3. It's interesting that you've covered different types of music. You had such success with your debut album but have ventured into music for children and have done country, too. Does this keep things fresh?

I think of making music as painting with colors that move you. Who says you always have to paint with red? It's exciting and interesting to allow my music to evolve along with my life. I find that at the heart of it all I'm a storyteller and a songwriter. From there music takes a life of its own. I do my best to always serve the song — whatever radio format that it may end up being played on.

4. You have so many great songs. Is there one that you like the most ... or one that when you were finished writing it you thought would really take off?

Gosh I could never pick a favorite! If I had to narrow down one song that stands out — the first one I ever wrote was “Who Will Save Your Soul.” I wrote it when I was 16 while hitchhiking to Mexico on spring break one year. I busked across the country paying my train fare as I went along, writing and singing this one song. I only knew a few chords at the time and couldn't go out of order so the song just kept getting longer and longer. It's amazing to me that a few years later it became my first single and I actually was hearing it on the radio.

5. I read where you opened for artists like Bob Dylan, Neil Young and Merle Haggard. I know that would have to be a great opportunity. What do you think was most valuable about the chance to work with them?

Dylan, Young, Haggard really took me under their wings and encouraged me to be myself and not chase trends. It was such a fragile time in my career and I wasn't a success by any means and each in their own way nurtured and believed in me enough to not only invite me to tour with them but to mentor me along the way.

6. Any other artists that may have influenced you?

Cole Porter was a big influence on me. I love that he wrote both the music and the lyrics. He had a clever turn of phrase but never took himself too seriously. He was willing to have a sense of humor.

7. When you first started out with your music, could you ever have imagined it would take you to where you are today?

Every day I pinch myself. I should have ended up a statistic and I lucked out. I am fortunate I had people along the way — some complete strangers — who showed me kindness at dark hours and that I had writing and music to comfort me.

8. What would be your advice for people trying to break into the music business today? It has to be much different than it was when you first started out.

I think it is very different but still the same in that nothing replaces hard work and talent. Lucky people are actually very hard workers who put themselves in the way of opportunity. Be the best at what you do and master your craft.

9. What do you think was the biggest factor in getting your career going?

I had years of performing under my belt when I walked into the coffee shop in San Diego looking for a place to start playing my music. I was desperate for money and that was the only thing I knew to do. If the music and the words hadn't moved people I would have gone nowhere fast. But luckily it did. And I had the good fortune to have fans do the work for me — one played a demo on the local radio station which attracted record labels and the rest is history. But it started with one fan and it is still all about the fans.

10. You've written books and recently did the June Carter Cash movie. Anything else you would like to try?

I'd love to do more acting. I may also work on a record of standards because I love that style of music and it suits my voice well. The future is bright — we will see.

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News Headline: Paper Wigs, Anyone? | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: BellaOnline
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When it comes to wigs, paper is definitely not the first material that comes to mind. But in the hands of creative people (yes, that includes you!), paper can be transformed into artificial hair that can range from whimsically cute to stunningly regal to awesomely avant-garde.

Paper wigs are usually more decorative than functional, and are primarily a form of paper sculpting. Used mainly on mannequins, the wigs can be seen in exhibits of historical clothing, completing the look of the figures on display, and take the place of conventional wigs because they are cheaper to produce. You'll also see these wigs in the display windows of some fashion boutiques.

Paper wigs are made either directly on the mannequin by gluing the parts of the wig right onto the figure, or are made like real wigs, in which case the “hair” is attached to a removable wig cap.

The first kind is great if you'd rather just show off your masterpiece than actually wear it. For a neat conversation piece, take a mannequin head, top it off with a paper wig, and display it in your craft room. Or scale things down and make a paper wig for an artist's dummy or an antique porcelain doll.

The removable wig, on the other hand, can be stored and reused – which means you can make a paper wig that you can actually wear in play or to a costume party!

If you like the idea of making and wearing your own paper tresses, then check out the following tutorials. Note that these are external links and are not part of BellaOnline.com.

This tutorial explains how the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) made the wigs worn by mannequins in their show called Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail, 1700–1915.

From the Kent State University Museum, this article features historical hairstyles using wigs made with twisted paper on a synthetic felt wig cap

This article from Martha Stewart shows you how to use ordinary household items to create a paper wig for Halloween.

To learn how make the non-removable kind of paper wig for display purposes, check out the following:

This tutorial from the Powerhouse Museum is a good place to start learning how to make wigs for mannequins.

Here's a quick overview of how to create artificial hair for exhibits, from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM) Museum in Los Angeles.

Need more inspiration? Then check out these links:

Probably the most widely shared link on paper wigs, Paper-Cut-Project's gallery on paper wigs showcases the amazing work of Atlanta-based artists Amy Flurry and Nikki Nye.

Artist Jeff Rudell was commissioned by Tiffany and Company to create some paper wigs for their Fifth Avenue shop. The whimsical hair pieces feature a bird, a violin, and a ship.

Fashion designer Donna Tsui's work on display at the Brooklyn Museum's American High Style Exhibition. The photos aren't that sharp, but it offers a number of ideas for short hairstyles.

Worn Through interviews Sophia Gan and Mela Hoyt-Heydon, the geniuses behind the wigs in LACMA's Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail, 1700–1915. They provide an interesting glimpse into all the skill and time that went into the making of the wigs, which were an intentionally low-profile but essential part of the exhibit.

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News Headline: Kent State is flexing its tech muscles (McGimpsey; West) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University aims to raise millions to fund center dedicated to flexible technologies

After years of talk, Kent State University has committed to creating a multimillion-dollar center tasked with helping local flexible electronics companies become so good at launching and manufacturing products that the industry can't help but gravitate toward Northeast Ohio.

Kent State also is ramping up the amount of research it does related to flexible technologies, though it hasn't yet raised what could end up being tens of millions of dollars to fund what's called the Technology Commercialization Center. One way or another, though, the project will go forward, according to W. Grant McGimpsey and John West, who are leading the effort for Kent State.

Why so confident? Not only are Drs. McGimpsey and West excited about the effort, but so are many of the potential partners Kent State is assembling to join the center — big companies, small companies, nonprofits and other colleges.

“When you get people who are excited about it, things happen,” said Dr. McGimpsey, who is vice president of research and sponsored programs at Kent State.

The plan is in flux, but one thing is certain: The center will be decentralized.

The center likely would buy equipment that companies could use to master relatively new methods of manufacturing flexible electronic products. Those methods rely more on printing presses and less on assembly lines to produce thin electronic components that bend but don't break and fit most any shape.

But many of the center's resources wouldn't be confined to a specific building.

For instance, the center could connect companies with center members that could provide product development, design and manufacturing services. Plus, partner colleges could provide training for the industry. That collaboration could mean producing more engineers with expertise related to polymers and liquid crystals or training people to work with those materials in clean rooms.

The center also aims to build relationships with investors interested in backing flexible electronics companies. It could even start its own investment fund.

But Drs. McGimpsey and West won't make those decisions alone.

“It really needs to be driven by industry,” Dr. McGimpsey said.

Finishing what they started

The Technology Commercialization Center would build off an existing alliance called FlexMatters, a group of more than a dozen local companies that create and use flexible electronic products. Its members include large companies such as American Greetings and GE Lighting, as well as younger companies developing flexible technologies, such as Kent Displays and AlphaMicron.

FlexMatters focuses mostly on long-term strategic planning and political advocacy related to flexible electronics. By contrast, the Technology Commercialization Center will help companies go from idea to prototype to full-on manufacturing, said Dr. West, who helped local technology advocacy group NorTech launch FlexMatters in 2006.

Relatively few companies have the expertise needed to make flexible electronic products on a large scale, said Dr. West, Trustees Research Professor at Kent State. However, local companies are starting to develop that know-how.

For instance, Kent Displays has developed machinery that can print the flexible liquid crystal displays that go into its popular Boogie Board, an electronic writing tablet that lets a user erase what he or she has written with the press of a button. But even Kent Displays is still trying to improve the manufacturing process.

If Northeast Ohio can build up enough of that product development and manufacturing expertise, other participants in the sector will be drawn to the region, Dr. West maintains. That's what happened with glass liquid crystal displays: Kent State invented much of the early technology, but companies in Asia ended up masteringthe manufacturing process. Now they own that industry.

“Woe be to us if we don't do this,” he said.

Matters of money

The center has a small amount of seed money from the university, but it will need more. One potential source is the Ohio Third Frontier Program, which just launched a $50 million initiative that aims to give a few big grants — in the $10 million to $25 million range — to high-tech projects that could have a transformative impact on the state.

Kent State is strongly considering applying for that money, which would require the university and its partners to put up a lot of their own cash. For instance, if they got a $10 million grant, they'd need to throw in $20 million, and in-kind contributions wouldn't count toward the total.

The center also could apply for smaller grants from the National Science Foundation and regional foundations, Dr. McGimpsey said. He wouldn't release the names of partners interested in joining the center because they haven't made formal commitments, but he did say Kent State is working with NorTech and two other tech-focused economic development nonprofits, JumpStart Inc. and BioEnterprise Corp., both of Cleveland.

The university wants the center eventually to be able to support itself, through service fees and other sources of revenue, Dr. McGimpsey said.

“The center has to have a sustainable business model. There needs to be a way for the center to generate supporting revenue on a continuing basis,” he said.

Assembling the pieces

While preparing to launch the center, Kent State also is doubling down on research related to flexible electronics.

Last August, the university hired two faculty members who specialize in research related to flexible electronics for biomedical products. Besides spending $1 million to get their research teams off the ground, the university also spent $3 million to build a 3,000-square-foot laboratory dedicated to its new “bioFLEX” initiative, a brand Kent State just started using to promote its research related to flexible biomedical products, Dr. McGimpsey said. There's growing demand for implantable electronics that can conform to the shape of the body, he said.

“The body is a flexible device itself,” he noted.

Kent State also created the “flexPV” brand to promote the growing amount of research it does related to flexible photovoltaics. The university over the past two years has spent $1.2 million to cover the startup costs for three new researchers who focus on organic photovoltaics. Carbon-based organic PV solar cells are cheaper to make, and their flexibility gives them versatility. However, they aren't as efficient as silicon-based solar cells, and they don't last as long, said Dr. McGimpsey, one of 11 Kent State researchers working to solve those problems.

That research is intended to generate ideas that could be turned into products by members of the Technology Commercialization Center.

Kent State's effort to recruit those members isn't starting from square one, given the number of local companies already involved with the FlexMatters initiative, according to Byron Clayton, vice president of cluster acceleration for NorTech.

“We already have a lot of the pieces in place,” he said. “It's a matter of bringing them together and funding them.”

Even so, it will take a long time for the center to generate lots of new products, companies and jobs, Dr. West said. He encourages those following the center's progress to be patient: The market for flexible electronics eventually will be huge, he said. And if Northeast Ohio can master the product development and manufacturing processes now, it will own that market, he said.

“I'm not sure what's going to happen in the next two or three years,” he said. “I know it's going to happen in the next 20.”

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News Headline: Miami String Quartet, Spencer Myer open Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concerts (Robinson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Miami String Quartet and pianist Spencer Myer will open the Kent/Blossom Music Festival faculty concert series with a performance June 26 at 7:30 p.m. in Ludwig Recital Hall in the Music and Speech Building, 1325 Theatre Drive on the Kent Campus.

A six-concert subscription is $72 for adults and $60 for seniors. Call the Kent/Blossom Music Festival office at 330-672-2613 or visit www.kent.edu/blossom for details. Single tickets are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and $5 for students.

The performance will include such works as "String Quartet in F minor Op. 95" by Ludwig Van Beethoven, "String Quartet No. 9 in E-flat major Op. 117" by Dmitri Shostakovich and "Piano Quartet in A major Op. 26" by Johannes Brahms.

Resident ensemble of KBMF, the Miami String Quartet features Benny Kim and Cathy Meng Robinson on violin, Scott Lee on viola and Keith Robinson on cello. Two of the members of The Miami String Quartet, Cathy Meng Robinson and Keith Robinson, have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University. The Quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and its own concert series in Palm Beach, Florida.

Myer was the gold medalist of the 2008 New Orleans International Piano Competition. In 2012, he also began performing with cellist Adrian Daurov as the Daurov/Myer Duo.

"This is a highly-anticipated, high-energy concert with some of the best offerings from the greatest composers from the classical, romantic and modern eras," said Keith Robinson, who also serves as the co-artistic director of the Kent/Blossom Music Festival.

Pianist Spencer Myer's involvement in Kent/Blossom Music began in 2007. He has performed as a soloist with ensembles including The Cleveland Orchestra, and has appeared with New York City's Park Avenue Chamber Symphony, the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra, among others.

The Miami String Quartet is the resident ensemble at the Kent/Blossom Music Festival. The group has also appeared at Chamber Music Northwest, Mostly Mozart, the Brevard Festival, Rutgers Summerfest and the Virginia Arts Festival.

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News Headline: Miami String Quartet, Spencer Myer open Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concerts (Robinson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Miami String Quartet and pianist Spencer Myer will open the Kent/Blossom Music Festival faculty concert series with a performance June 26 at 7:30 p.m. in Ludwig Recital Hall in the Music and Speech Building, 1325 Theatre Drive on the Kent Campus.

A six-concert subscription is $72 for adults and $60 for seniors. Call the Kent/Blossom Music Festival office at 330-672-2613 or visit www.kent.edu/blossom for details. Single tickets are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and $5 for students.

The performance will include such works as "String Quartet in F minor Op. 95" by Ludwig Van Beethoven, "String Quartet No. 9 in E-flat major Op. 117" by Dmitri Shostakovich and "Piano Quartet in A major Op. 26" by Johannes Brahms.

Resident ensemble of KBMF, the Miami String Quartet features Benny Kim and Cathy Meng Robinson on violin, Scott Lee on viola and Keith Robinson on cello. Two of the members of The Miami String Quartet, Cathy Meng Robinson and Keith Robinson, have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University. The Quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and its own concert series in Palm Beach, Florida.

Myer was the gold medalist of the 2008 New Orleans International Piano Competition. In 2012, he also began performing with cellist Adrian Daurov as the Daurov/Myer Duo.

"This is a highly-anticipated, high-energy concert with some of the best offerings from the greatest composers from the classical, romantic and modern eras," said Keith Robinson, who also serves as the co-artistic director of the Kent/Blossom Music Festival.

Pianist Spencer Myer's involvement in Kent/Blossom Music began in 2007. He has performed as a soloist with ensembles including The Cleveland Orchestra, and has appeared with New York City's Park Avenue Chamber Symphony, the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra, among others.

The Miami String Quartet is the resident ensemble at the Kent/Blossom Music Festival. The group has also appeared at Chamber Music Northwest, Mostly Mozart, the Brevard Festival, Rutgers Summerfest and the Virginia Arts Festival.

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News Headline: ON THE MOVE: Kent State University | Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fashaad Crawford was named assistant provost for accreditation, assessment and learning, and Melody Tankersley was named associate provost for academic affairs.

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News Headline: Bringing walkable urban thoroughfares to Twinsburg, Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: New Urban News - Online
Contact Name: Robert Steuteville
News OCR Text: On April 26, CNU hosted a technical assistance workshop aimed at guiding future development and design in the City of Twinsburg, Ohio, and highlighting the Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares manual as a tool for achieving that vision. The workshop was led by CNU President John Norquist, Board Member Marcy McInelly, and transportation engineer Lucy Gibson of Dubois & King in Vermont, and put on with the support of numerous others.

The City of Twinsburg is currently in the process of updating its Comprehensive Plan. The city is seeking recommendations to serve as a basis for redevelopment of its city center and several key corridors, emphasizing walkability and preservation of historic character.

In 2009, the city lost its largest employer — a Chrysler stamping plant — but recently gained a LEED-certified Regional Academic Center for Kent State University. The city continues to see development pressure near its historic center, and has put a number of initiatives in place to ensure that future development is livable, sustainable, and adds value.

Director of Community Planning and Development Larry Finch commented: “[The workshop] was one of timely importance to the city and to others in our region. The CNU staff and their consultants provided a great introduction to the subject and encouraged the attendees to look at streets in a more holistic, inclusive, and context sensitive manner. The afternoon work group sessions encouraged creative ideas that will be considered as we proceed through the process of developing the City's comprehensive plan.”

The Twinsburg workshop was funded in part by the US EPA's Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities Program, via a grant to the Project for Public Spaces (PPS). CNU provided assistance as part of their Partnership in Livability Solutions. Materials from the workshop will be made available at www.cnu.org/streets/twinsburg.

Note: This article appears in the June 2013 issue of Better! Cities & Towns.

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News Headline: Royalton Players' 'Pippin' opens June 14 in Strongsville | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The idea to present the show on the Royalton Players stage actually began with the production?s music director, Scott Maynard, who was part of the cast while performing it at the Cassidy Theater?s Youth Theater in Parma Heights when he was 10. ?It was a show that I remember well and I remember having a lot of fun in the production,? said Maynard, who also serves as vice president of the community theater.

A revised version of the production can currently be seen on Broadway, but according to Poliafico the Royalton Player?s musical is a throwback from the original ?Pippin? that won Ben Vereen his first Tony Award.

Kent State University student Andy Morilak plays, sings and dances as the title character, bringing a freshness and exuberance to the role. This is Morilak?s fourth appearance on the Royalton Players stage after debuting last year in the theater?s original production of ?War: An All Too Real Christmas Story.? The master of ceremonies, also known as the Leading Player, for the musical is graduating Strongsville High School student Sarah Lawson, who appeared last summer in the theater?s production of ?Love, Sex and I.R.S.? and last fall in the dramatic ?Steel Magnolias.? Portraying Pippin?s father, King Charlemagne, is Jonathan S. Short, who was last seen on the Royalton Players stage in the musical ?Big.? Violet Pennza is Berthe, Pippin?s grandmother brings her boisterous energy to the role. Pennza was last seen on the Royalton Players stage in April in several roles in the mysterious thriller ?Sorry, Wrong Number.? Also in the production are Luka Guzina as Lewis, the self-centered step-brother to Pippin; Maggie Adler as Catherine, the young widow that Pippin meets along his path to self-discovery; and Cory Lawson, as Theo, Maggie?s young son. Assisting the Leading Player on stage is a fun-loving and energetic troupe known as the Band of Players. They include Eric Maynard, AnnMelissa Husel, Emma Mitchem, Tiffany Delemater, Noah Campbell, Caleb Alvarado, Mariah Alvarado and Matt Black. Guzina, Adler and Lawson also assist as part of the fun-loving group.

Technical director for the production is Mary Manos Mitchem and Assistant Director/Stage Manager is Katie Morilak. Choreographers for the show are Sarah Lawson and Alexis Mitchem. Assistant stage managers are Matt Black and Mariah Alvarado. Assisting with props and box office duties are Nancy Settle and Della Rich.

The musical is being held at the Altenheim Community Center, 18533 Shurmer Road, Strongsville. Performances are at 8 p.m. June 14, 15, 21, 22, 27 and 28 and 3 p.m. June 16, 23 and 30. The June 27 performance will be a buy one ticket, get one for free event.

Ticket prices are $14 for adults and $12 for students and seniors at all performances. Reservations are recommended, but not required. For ticket reservations please call the Royalton Players Box Office at 440-877-0009 and leave your name and phone number.

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News Headline: VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR SEARCH: PUBLIC INVITED SATURDAY TO HELP LOOK FOR MISSING WOMAN TAYLOR ROBINSON | Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A search effort is scheduled for Saturday to help Akron police find Taylor Robinson, who has been missing nearly six weeks.

The public is asked to join in the search, which will begin at 2 p.m. at Arlington Plaza Shopping Center, 1400 S. Arlington St.

Organizers say they will canvass the Akron neighborhood and pass out fliers in an effort to locate Robinson.

Robinson, a Kent State University student, last was seen May 3, when her mother dropped her off at a Kipling Street home. The 19-year-old worked there as a private health-care provider.

When her mother returned the next morning, Robinson was not at the home. Only her coat and shoes remained at the house. Neither her relatives nor police believe Robinson willingly left the area without contacting her mother or another family member.

Akron police and the FBI have been involved in the investigation.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Akron police at 330-375-2490. Anonymous tips can be left at http://ci.akron.oh.us/ASP/tip.html.

Information also can be provided anonymously by calling Summit County Crimestoppers at 330-434-COPS (2677). Tipsters might qualify for a cash reward.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Kent Jaycees new members for April | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Jaycees recently accepted four new members.

New members are: Marcel Clopton, Jing-Shin (Derek) Chang, Jillian Wilczewski, and Seth Tipton. Clopton is a construction manager for Metis Construction. Chang is a soon-to-be third-year architecture student at Kent State University. Wilczewski is the membership volunteer and program specialist for Girl Scouts of Northeast Ohio. Tipton is a web designer and developer for Boondock Walker and a KSU alumnus.

The Kent Jaycees are a chapter of the United States Junior Chamber which is an affiliate organization to Junior Chamber International. Jaycees strive to develop young leaders through community involvement. Members must be between the ages of 18 and 4

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News Headline: Americans are ambivalent about the role of government | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "We talk about a representative government; but what a monster of a government is that where the noblest faculties of the mind, and the whole heart, are not represented. ... The only government that I recognize -- and it matters not how few are at the head of it, or how small its army -- is that power that establishes justice in the land, never that which establishes injustice."

Henry David Thoreau: A Plea for Captain John Brown, 1859

"My tax dollars shouldn't pay for that - the government should pay for that."

Caller to Sen. John Glenn's office, 1996

The vast majority of Americans are ambivalent, if not downright schizophrenic about government. They expect government to provide law and order, build highways and repair bridges, kill selected foreigners in wars and shoot students who protest those wars. They want government to find terrorists and kill them, but believe that private ownership of guns is the only way to prevent mass shootings. They call abortion murder and want government to regulate women's reproductive behaviors, but train young soldiers to kill living, breathing persons: "The Spirit of the Bayonet is to Kill, Kill, Kill"

American men don't want 15 year old girls to buy morning-after pills but cheerfully sell condoms to boys of any age and blatantly advertise prescription drugs for erectile dysfunction.

In 1970, when some unruly, unarmed students at Kent State University objected to their government killing people in Cambodia, their government summarily shot some of them, and Americans generally said "Yeah, they should have shot more of them."

In 1993 federal law enforcement agencies raided the compound of the Branch Davidian in Waco, Texas, suspecting them of converting legal rifles into illegal automatic machine guns. Four ATF officers died; six weeks later fire destroyed the compound and killed 80 adults and children. Twenty years later Americans still are divided about whether it was a government massacre or a suicide by religious extremists.

In 2012, a youth with assault weapons and no visible connection to any political, ideological or religious organization slaughtered 20 little children in Newtown. Most Americans said "Yes, we want background checks and a ban on assault weapons." But a small wealthy subset of citizens and corporate persons said, "No, the government must not infringe our rights to own assault weapons and buy guns without background checks." Congress listened to those who made the larger campaign contributions, and the public gave up.

In 2013, a pair of young men learned to make deadly bombs out of fireworks and household items, and set them off at the Boston Marathon. When one bomber survived, we might have expected gun owners to form posses and go after him, but we let government do it. Law enforcement responded by effectively declaring martial law, forcing the gun-lovers to stay indoors while government professionals tracked down the bomber -- an action that probably saved many lives.

Americans want our children protected by child labor laws, but we don't mind if children in poor nations work 13-hour days, are sold as sex slaves, or are conscripted into armies. We believe in safe workplaces, but encourage trade that allows a thousand workers to be crushed in an unsafe building in Bangladesh.

We want peace in the Middle East, but our government supports Israel in maintaining an undeclared arsenal of perhaps 200 nuclear bombs, in threatening Iran, and in oppressing and killing Palestinians.

In April this year the Young Democratic Socialists (YDS) at Kent State organized a protest, primarily using social media, against tuition hikes of 46 percent in the past 10 years. Over three-quarters of KSU graduates have student loans, with an average debt close to $30,000. Our government lets banks borrow money at 0.75 percent and wants to charge young people 6.8 percent on their student loans.

Why can't we all watch the Bradley Manning court-martial on C-Span? If the charge is that government secrets have (already) been revealed, where's the harm in showing them to us? Let us see the evidence of damage done by WikiLeaks. Who is the "enemy" we are being defended against?

This week, we've been outraged to learn that the NSA has been sweeping up phone call data on all of us without any basis for suspicion.

Now what? If Kent State students got out and protested against the abuses at Guantanamo Bay; against targeting humans with drones, against spying on citizens without due process, or against spending the majority our nation's wealth on wars, killing and torture, should state and federal governments go after them with water cannon and pepper spray? Should the CIA send in drones? Or should NRA members just bring their assault weapons to blow them to bits?

Despite (or perhaps because of) our confused intentions, our nation's wars -- on terror, on other nations, on drugs -- have become primarily giant siphons to transfer public money to private corporations. We are more mired than ever in killing and torture, in the corporatization of wars and public services, and the destruction of the ecosystems on which our lives depend .

Can we use "our noblest faculties of the mind and heart" to take charge of our government and make it work to establish justice in the land? Or do we let the purveyors of war, terror and destruction, and the big banks and multinational corporations take charge of us?

Before joining Sen. John Glenn's Washington staff in 1985, Caroline Arnold served 10 years on the Kent Board of Education.

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News Headline: Now Playing Onstage - Week of 6/16/2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: BroadwayWorld.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SOUTH PACIFIC
Porthouse Theatre-Kent State University

6/13-6/29/2013

Set in an island paradise during World War II, two parallel love stories are threatened by the dangers of prejudice and war. Nellie, a spunky nurse from Arkansas, falls in love with a mature French planter, Emile. Nellie learns that the mother of his children was an island native and, unable to turn her back on the prejudices with which she was raised, refuses Emile's proposal of marriage. Meanwhile, the strapping Lt. Joe Cable denies himself the fulfillment of a future with an innocent Tonkinese girl with whom he's fallen in love out of the same fears that haunt Nellie. When Emile is recruited to accompany Joe on a dangerous mission that claims Joe's life, Nellie realizes that life is too short not to seize her own chance for happiness, thus confronting and conquering her prejudices.Music by Rodgers, Richard; Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II ; Book by Oscar Hammerstein II & Joshua Logan ; Adapted from the Pulitzer Prize winning novel

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News Headline: Summer Stages: Cleveland Area Summer Theatre 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: BroadwayWorld.com
Contact Name: Roy Berko
News OCR Text: (Member, American Theatre Critics Association and Cleveland Critics Circle) The Cleveland area has a full schedule of summer theatre entertainment. Here are some of the upcoming stagings: PORTHOUSE THEATRE Kent State University's summer theatre, performed on the grounds of Blossom Music Center in Cuyahoga Falls, will present SOUTH PACIFIC, June 13-29, WORKING, July 4-20, FIDDLER ON THE ROOF, July 25-August 11. Curtain time is 8 PM Tuesdays through Saturdays and 2 PM Sundays. The picnic grounds open 90 minutes prior to curtain time. For tickets call 330-672-3884 or go online to http://dept.kent.edu/theatre/porthouse/index.html MERCURY SUMMER STOCK Mercury Summer Theatre, which performs at Notre Dame College in South Euclid,will offer SHREK (June 4-29), RAGTIME (July 5-20) and PETER PAN THE MUSICAL (August 2-17). For tickets go online to http://www.mercurysummerstock.com or call 216-771-5862. CAIN PARK Cain Park, located in Cleveland Heights, produces a musical play each season. This year's offering is SMOKEY JOE'S CAFÉ, a review highlighting the songs of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stroller. The show runs from June 13-30 in the Alma Theatre. For the $15 tickets call 216-371-3000 or go to http://www.cainpark.com BLANK CANVAS Pat Ciamacco's little theatre that "could and does" presents TWELVE ANGRY MEN, July 12-27, and FRANKIE AND JOHNNY IN THE CLAIR DE LUNE from August 23 through September 7 at their near Westside location, 1305 West 78th Street, Suite 211, Cleveland. Get directions to the theatre on the website. Once you arrive at the site, go around the first building to find the entrance and then follow the signs to the second floor acting space. For tickets and directions go to http://www.blankcanvastheatre.com MAMAI THEATRE COMPANY The area's newest professional theatre, in residence at Ensemble Theatre in the former Coventry Elementary School at 2843 Washington Boulevard in Cleveland Heights, presents the U.S. premiere of Brendan Kennelly's translation of Euripides' MEDEA, June 13-30 and David Mamet's BOSTON MARRIAGE, July 18-August 4. For tickets go to http://www.mamaitheatreco.org/home/buy-tickets-subscirbe Cleveland Play House Award-winning actor, playwright and concert pianist Hershey Felder returns to Cleveland Play House with his latest composer creation, MAESTRO: Leonard Bernstein from July 17 to August 4 at the Allen Theatre. For tickets call 216-241-6000 or go to www.clevelandplayhouse.com BECK CENTER THE PITMEN PAINTERS A new play by the Tony Award-winning writer of Billy Elliot is based on a triumphant true story about a group of miners in Northern England who take an art appreciation class and build an astonishing body of work that makes them the unlikeliest of art-world sensations. It runs from May 31 through July 7. MONTY PYTHON'S SPAMALOT The outrageous musical comedy lovingly ripped off from the cult classic motion picture MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL with music by Eric Idle, runs from July 12 through August 18, 2013. For tickets: 216-521-2540 or http://www.beckcenter.org ACTORS' SUMMIT THE BIKINIS, Roderick and Hindman's musical review about first love and endless summer, centers on a girl-group which reunites for a concert to sing such favorites as "Heat Wave," "It's Raining Men," and "I Will Survive." Running: June 20 through July 21 (no July 4 performance). Tickets: 330-374-7568 or go to www.actorssummit.org OBERLIN SUMMER THEATER FESTIVAL The Festival's 2013 season will include: THE DIARY OF Anne Frank by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett; William Shakespeare's comedy TWELFTH NIGHT; and, Moss Hart's insider's view of Broadway, LIGHT UP THE SKY in rotating repertory from June 28 through August 3 in Oberlin's air conditioned Hall Auditorium on State Route 58 at 511, between the Oberlin Inn and the Allen Memorial Art Museum. For tickets call 440-775-8169.

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News Headline: A view from the academy | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Tom Mullaney Illustration by Robert Neubecker
News OCR Text: When the Association of American University Presses meets in Boston this week, William Sisler, Harvard Press' director, promises a host of "learned parties." The celebration, however, masks a multitude of challenges facing scholarly publishers, threatening the survival of some during a time of profound transition.

Scholarly publishers operate at a remove from trade publishing's hurly-burly. You generally won't find their books at Barnes and Noble or on a New York Times best-seller list. Yet these presses play a vital role as disseminators of new and ancient knowledge. Without the volumes by immortal authors, thinkers and artists that academic presses publish, our global understanding of human affairs would be unimaginably poorer.

"We add a lot of diversity to the ecology of publishing," said Douglas Armato, director of the University of Minnesota Press.

Confronting crises is nothing new for the 131 members of the association, all but 19 of which are affiliated with universities (non-university members include the Brookings Institution, the International Monetary Fund, art museums and historical societies). Press directors say they have been weathering significant changes for three decades.

The 1980s brought a crisis with monographs, works of highly specialized content having limited appeal.

"You used to be able to sell 2,000 monographs where you now sell about 400, and 1,000 is a best-seller," says Sisler, a veteran of more than 30 years.

The 1990s saw the advent of the Internet and the first wave of digital disruption. Commercial publishers also invaded, snatching control of scientific journals out of scholarly publishers' hands.

For-profit commercial publishers, such as Elsevier, went on a buying spree, scooping up about 1,500 financially strapped, digitally challenged scientific journals and then raising prices exponentially. Journal subscriptions that once cost about $100 to $200 a year were soon priced as high as $1,000.

That outsized jump in serial costs has put a continuing strain on campus library budgets. An Association of Research Libraries study covering 1986 to 2011 shows library expenses for monographs rising 71 percent while the cost of journals jumped 402 percent.

Libraries, at one time, were a press' leading customer. That situation has shifted dramatically. Minnesota's Armato reports that 57 percent of his sales now are to the retail market and less than 20 percent to libraries. Today's top buyer for all 11 presses Printers Row surveyed is Amazon.

Publishers had barely caught their breath at the loss of those two sizable revenue streams when the e-book tsunami hit. By 2008, large publishers had made major investments toward digital conversion.

Many new titles now appear in print and e-book formats, but smaller presses still struggle to go digital, a move demanded by the market. Apart from the University of Chicago Press, where digital sales are expected to yield 16 percent in revenue this year, all other presses remain well below 10 percent, with Harvard at 6 percent.

Morris Philipson, the esteemed director of the University of Chicago Press from 1967 to 2000, coined a classic characterization of university publishing. Philipson, who died in 2011, once said, "If I were in this business as a business, I wouldn't be in this business."

It's love of books, not profit maximization, that motivates university publishers and editors. "The caliber of the books we publish gives me the greatest satisfaction," says Harvard's Sisler. "It's all about the books. We don't publish ephemera."

Given the challenges, directors have succeeded in keeping bankruptcy at bay. Collectively, presses even managed to post a 10 percent sales growth over the past decade, Armato said.

Shifting conditions have forced directors to be more nimble and innovative. Peter Berkery, the association's new executive director who formerly was with Oxford University Press, describes today's directors as "130 scrappy entrepreneurs."

The University of Chicago Press, the nation's largest academic press, runs in the black, a rare distinction owing to profitable journals and a distribution division for other publishers. Garrett Kiely, press director, says its 400 yearly titles and 50 journals generate $40 million in revenue.

Across the industry, academic presses have crafted a host of new strategies to meet the changing landscape of books. To replace lost monograph and journal sales, presses now rely on more paperbound and e-book offerings, an increased emphasis on reprinting all or some of their backlist (Harvard's backlist accounts for two-thirds of its sales) and doubling or tripling prices on more specialized, hardbound editions.

Because 80 percent of all titles are in the humanities and social sciences, university presses have a deep investment in the liberal arts. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has funded a number of press initiatives to bolster the humanities. Cornell has Signale, a series of new English-language manuscripts of German literature plus translations of key German-language texts.

Minnesota has Quadrant, an initiative that brings university faculty and visiting fellows together around four research areas: design, architecture and culture; environment, culture and sustainability; global cultures; and health and society. Kent State University Press, Indiana University Press and Temple University Press collaboratively publish ethnomusicology titles.

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News Headline: A view from the academy | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Burbank Leader - Online
Contact Name: Tom Mullaney Illustration by Robert Neubecker
News OCR Text: As university presses gather, we look at their challenges in a changing world

When the Association of American University Presses meets in Boston this week, William Sisler, Harvard Press' director, promises a host of "learned parties." The celebration, however, masks a multitude of challenges facing scholarly publishers, threatening the survival of some during a time of profound transition.

Scholarly publishers operate at a remove from trade publishing's hurly-burly. You generally won't find their books at Barnes and Noble or on a New York Times best-seller list. Yet these presses play a vital role as disseminators of new and ancient knowledge. Without the volumes by immortal authors, thinkers and artists that academic presses publish, our global understanding of human affairs would be unimaginably poorer.

"We add a lot of diversity to the ecology of publishing," said Douglas Armato, director of the University of Minnesota Press.

Confronting crises is nothing new for the 131 members of the association, all but 19 of which are affiliated with universities (non-university members include the Brookings Institution, the International Monetary Fund, art museums and historical societies). Press directors say they have been weathering significant changes for three decades.

The 1980s brought a crisis with monographs, works of highly specialized content having limited appeal.

"You used to be able to sell 2,000 monographs where you now sell about 400, and 1,000 is a best-seller," says Sisler, a veteran of more than 30 years.

The 1990s saw the advent of the Internet and the first wave of digital disruption. Commercial publishers also invaded, snatching control of scientific journals out of scholarly publishers' hands.

For-profit commercial publishers, such as Elsevier, went on a buying spree, scooping up about 1,500 financially strapped, digitally challenged scientific journals and then raising prices exponentially. Journal subscriptions that once cost about $100 to $200 a year were soon priced as high as $1,000.

That outsized jump in serial costs has put a continuing strain on campus library budgets. An Association of Research Libraries study covering 1986 to 2011 shows library expenses for monographs rising 71 percent while the cost of journals jumped 402 percent.

Libraries, at one time, were a press' leading customer. That situation has shifted dramatically. Minnesota's Armato reports that 57 percent of his sales now are to the retail market and less than 20 percent to libraries. Today's top buyer for all 11 presses Printers Row surveyed is Amazon.

Publishers had barely caught their breath at the loss of those two sizable revenue streams when the e-book tsunami hit. By 2008, large publishers had made major investments toward digital conversion.

Many new titles now appear in print and e-book formats, but smaller presses still struggle to go digital, a move demanded by the market. Apart from the University of Chicago Press, where digital sales are expected to yield 16 percent in revenue this year, all other presses remain well below 10 percent, with Harvard at 6 percent.

Morris Philipson, the esteemed director of the University of Chicago Press from 1967 to 2000, coined a classic characterization of university publishing. Philipson, who died in 2011, once said, "If I were in this business as a business, I wouldn't be in this business."

It's love of books, not profit maximization, that motivates university publishers and editors. "The caliber of the books we publish gives me the greatest satisfaction," says Harvard's Sisler. "It's all about the books. We don't publish ephemera."

Given the challenges, directors have succeeded in keeping bankruptcy at bay. Collectively, presses even managed to post a 10 percent sales growth over the past decade, Armato said.

Shifting conditions have forced directors to be more nimble and innovative. Peter Berkery, the association's new executive director who formerly was with Oxford University Press, describes today's directors as "130 scrappy entrepreneurs."

The University of Chicago Press, the nation's largest academic press, runs in the black, a rare distinction owing to profitable journals and a distribution division for other publishers. Garrett Kiely, press director, says its 400 yearly titles and 50 journals generate $40 million in revenue.

Across the industry, academic presses have crafted a host of new strategies to meet the changing landscape of books. To replace lost monograph and journal sales, presses now rely on more paperbound and e-book offerings, an increased emphasis on reprinting all or some of their backlist (Harvard's backlist accounts for two-thirds of its sales) and doubling or tripling prices on more specialized, hardbound editions.

Because 80 percent of all titles are in the humanities and social sciences, university presses have a deep investment in the liberal arts. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has funded a number of press initiatives to bolster the humanities. Cornell has Signale, a series of new English-language manuscripts of German literature plus translations of key German-language texts.

Minnesota has Quadrant, an initiative that brings university faculty and visiting fellows together around four research areas: design, architecture and culture; environment, culture and sustainability; global cultures; and health and society. Kent State University Press, Indiana University Press and Temple University Press collaboratively publish ethnomusicology titles.

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