Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Institutional Advancement (5)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (2)
History (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (1)
Recreational Services (1)
Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Work of long-time R-C photographer on display in Kent (Turner) 06/17/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...of Richard Sweet" will open Wednesday and be on display until Aug. 9 at the School of Art Gallery, located on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University. The event coincides with two other events in downtown Kent. "Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent," will take place at...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Institutional Advancement (5)
Kent State receives $5 million gift for College of Architecture and Environmental Design (Steidl) 06/18/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has received a $5 million gift from alumnus John Elliott and his wife, Fonda, through their family's foundation to create the “Elliot...

Local news briefs -- June 17 06/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE $5 million gift KENT: A Charleston, W.Va., couple has donated $5 million to Kent State University. The gift from John and...

$5 million gift for KSU architecture program (Steidl) 06/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

DONATION TO FUND SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM A $5 million gift to Kent State University's College of Architecture and Environmental Design, the largest ...

KSU Snags $5 Million Grant Featured (Steid, Finn) 06/17/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...colleges or universities celebrate major gifts in the million dollar range. It's certainly not everyday that one gift tops $5 million dollars, but Kent State University is celebrating a foundation gift from John and Fonda Elliot to create the "Elliot Studios for Design" as part of the new construction...

Charleston couple make record donation to Kent State (Steidl) 06/17/2013 Charleston Daily Mail - Online Text Attachment Email

A West Virginia nursing home owner and his wife have made a record $5 million donation to the Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design, university officials announced Monday. The donation by Charleston residents...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (2)
KSU hits freshman enrollment limit (Garcia) 06/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has hit its enrollment ceiling for new freshman at its main campus for the second time in three years. The university said...

Kent State University reaches capacity for freshman enrollment this fall (Lefton, Garcia) 06/17/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Incoming class slated to be largest, smartest first-year group yet Kent State University is on track to have its biggest and brightest group of incoming freshman ever attend its main campus this fall. The university...


History (1)
Does China have too much influence over academe in the West? (Li) 06/18/2013 InsideHigherEd.com Text Attachment Email

...for the right brain. If you can make compromises abroad, what's to prevent you from making compromises here?" Hongshan Li, a professor of history at Kent State University who has published on U.S.-China educational relations, cautioned, however, that academic collaboration is predicated on the...


Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (1)
Kent State Hotel and Conference Center officially opens its doors 06/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: The 50-seat bar and lounge area of the Kent State Hotel and Conference Center was filled with employees on Friday afternoon; rolling flatware into white napkins and opening box after box...


Recreational Services (1)
(VIDEO) Basics for Paddling the Cuyahoga River in Kent (Herpy) 06/18/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

This post is a follow-up to a piece I shared last week Last week I shared a video and story summarizing how you can kayak or canoe the stretch of the...


Students (1)
Lifeguards applauded for helping save man at Cumberland Pool in Cleveland Heights 06/18/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Heights High School; Liam Robinson, a junior at the University of Buffalo; Tyler Rudy, a sophomore at Wittenberg University; Max Hackman, a sophomore at the University of Cincinnati; and Ester Bergson, a freshman at Kent State University. "I take a tremendous amount of pride that these kids responded...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Find the mystical island of Bali-H'ai at Porthouse Theatre's 'South Pacific' (Kent) 06/18/2013 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

Nestled in the grounds of Blossom Music Center is Porthouse Theatre which is the home of Kent State University's outdoor summer theater. To kick off the 2013 summer season, Porthouse Theatre will be presenting “South Pacific” which will...


News Headline: Work of long-time R-C photographer on display in Kent (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For nearly 40 years, Richard Sweet was the "man behind the camera" for the Record-Courier, shooting thousands of photographs that would document Portage County's history.

For the first time since his death in 2005, that work will be on display for the public in Kent in three separate shows.

"A Timeless Community: Photographs of Richard Sweet" will open Wednesday and be on display until Aug. 9 at the School of Art Gallery, located on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University.

The event coincides with two other events in downtown Kent. "Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent," will take place at the Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., from July 24 through Aug. 24.

Meanwhile, the Kent Historical Society also will display more of Sweet's work at its museum at about the same time as the downtown gallery's show. "Richard Sweet: Art, Innovation and Community" will be the title of the event.

There will be a joint reception and art walk between the three events from 5 to 7 p.m. on July 25.

Anderson Turner, director of galleries for the School of Art, said the focus of all events will be to celebrate Sweet's work, and not to mourn his passing.

"There have been thousands of showings of Picasso's work since his death, but we don't mourn Picasso," he said. "The purpose of showing Richard's work is not to mourn him. It's to remind us of the quality of his work."

Brenton Pahl, graduate assistant, said he and school of art students spent months combing through the thousands of Sweet's photographs made over the years. About 45 to 50 of them will be displayed in the gallery, and another 24 to 30 will be displayed downtown.

"We've tried to keep the ones with a more artistic focus here," he said. "We've saved the Portage County and Kent photos for downtown." A few of the first photos selected for the exhibit at the School of Art show feature a horse show, a top-down photo of a child, and a shot taken near a wooden roller coaster in the 1960s. Another photograph shows people watching a piece of performance art at the School of Art.

Pahl, who has only been in Kent for a few years, said he enjoyed seeing how Kent and KSU changed over the years through the photographs.

"It was cool to see all the pictures from the 1970s, and see how the landscape has changed in Kent," he said.

Turner said he met Sweet several times as he photographed events at the gallery.

"He didn't really focus on the artist part of his work," he said. "He was more into the technical side. But you could always see the artist part, and even when he was just doing the job, he did it in his own way. You can really see more of the artistic side when you look into the way he worked ... That's what's exciting to me."

Sweet, who came to KSU to study architecture, ended up getting a degree in fine arts. He started working for the R-C in 1966, when he was still a student at KSU. He became full-time photographer in 1971.

Shortly after his graduation from KSU, he took a short course in photography in Cleveland, which featured the work of world-renowned photographer Ansel Adams. That sparked his lifetime interest in photography, and Pahl noted that he could clearly see Adams' influence in Sweet's work.

Sweet retired from the R-C in 2004, and died less than a year later. He was 65.

Prior to his death, he donated his collection of photographs and negatives documenting KSU's theater productions. A collector of antique cameras, he also had donated some of the more valuable ones to the Portage County Historical Society. He and his wife, Betty, also had set up a scholarship for students at the KSU School of Art, and prints of his work will be sold at the shows to raise money for the scholarship fund.

Turner said he was in touch with Betty Sweet for months to work out the details of the exhibits.

He noted that Pahl has an interest in becoming a curator, and can use these exhibits as work experience to further his career.

"I really think Richard would have liked that," he said.

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News Headline: Kent State receives $5 million gift for College of Architecture and Environmental Design (Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has received a $5 million gift from alumnus John Elliott and his wife, Fonda, through their family's foundation to create the “Elliot Studios for Design” at a new building planned for the school's College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

The gift — the single largest ever to the college — also will fund endowments for the Elliot Program for Healthcare Design, the Elliot Scholars and the Elliot Professorship in Healthcare Design.

John Elliot earned his bachelor's degree in architecture in 1970 from Kent State. He started John Elliot Associates, Architects and Planners in 1972 and began focusing on building nursing homes in 1976. Today, the Elliotts own and operate AMFM LLC, an 11-facility nursing home business in West Virginia.

“Fonda and I are honored to be able to give back to the university that gave us the opportunity and the tools to help build our pathway to today,” John Elliot said. “If it was not for Kent State, and the school of architecture, I would not have had the foundation to develop my architectural practice and a health care company that employs more than 1,000 dedicated health care professionals.”

The Elliot Scholars gift will fund 10 scholarships for full-time architecture students in any graduate degree program of Kent State's College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Kent State said the Elliot Professorship in Healthcare Design will be used to provide competitive compensation and research support for promising faculty members holding the rank of assistant professor, associate professor or professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

The Elliot Program for Healthcare Design will support a new program in healthcare design. The college has a Certificate in Healthcare Facilities and soon be offering a master's degree in healthcare design.

“We are thrilled with the Elliot family's decision to provide this landmark gift,” Douglas Steidl, dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design, said in a news release. “It will not only serve to enhance our new facility, but it will provide ongoing support to the students through scholarships, the addition of faculty expertise and the establishment of a new program in health care design.”

The new home for the architecture program at Kent State will encompass 122,000 square feet and cost $40 million.

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- June 17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Associated Press
News OCR Text: KENT STATE

$5 million gift

KENT: A Charleston, W.Va., couple has donated $5 million to Kent State University.

The gift from John and Fonda Elliott is the largest made to the College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

It will create the Elliot Studios for Design at the new building planned for the college and an endowment to fund scholarships and a professorship.

John Elliot earned his bachelor's degree in architecture from Kent State in 1970. Today, the couple own and operate AMFM, an 11-facility nursing home business in West Virginia.

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News Headline: $5 million gift for KSU architecture program (Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DONATION TO FUND SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

A $5 million gift to Kent
State University's College of
Architecture and Environmental
Design, the largest
donation in the program's
history, from John and Fonda
Elliot was announced by
KSU President Lester Lefton
Monday.

The gift through the family's
foundation will create
the “Elliot Studios for Design”
at the new building
planned for the College of
Architecture and Environmental
Design.

The gift also will fund endowments
for The Elliot
Program for Healthcare Design,
The Elliot Scholars
and The Elliot Professorship
in Healthcare Design.

“Fonda and I are honored
to be able to give back to
the university that gave us
the opportunity and the
tools to help build our pathway
to today,” John Elliot
said. “If it was not for Kent
State, and the school of architecture,
I would not have
had the foundation to develop
my architectural practice
and a health care company
that employs more than
1,000 dedicated health care
professionals.”

The Elliots are residents
of Charleston, W.Va., and
own and operate AMFM,
LLC, an 11-facility nursing
home business in West Virginia.

John Eliot graduated
from KSU in 1970 with a
bachelor of architecture degree.
He founded John Elliot
Associates, Architects
and Planners in 1972 and
started focusing on building
nursing homes in 1976.

The Elliot Scholars gift
will fund 10 scholarships
for full-time architecture
students in any graduate
degree program of KSU's
College of Architecture
and Environmental Design.
Awards will be designated
for both Kent State
domestic scholarships and
Kent State global study
opportunities.

The Elliot Professorship
in Healthcare Design will
be used to provide competitive
compensation and
research support for especially
promising faculty
members holding the
rank of assistant professor,
associate professor or
professor in the College
of Architecture and Environmental
Design at Kent
State.

The Elliot Program for
Healthcare Design will
support a new program in
Healthcare Design. Kent
State's College of Architecture
and Environmental
Design currently has a
certificate in Healthcare
Facilities and soon will
be offering a master's in
Healthcare Design.

“We are thrilled with
the Elliot family's decision
to provide this landmark
gift,” said Douglas
Steidl, dean of the College
of Architecture and Environmental
Design. “It will
not only serve to enhance
our new facility, but it will
provide ongoing support
to the students through
scholarships, the addition
of faculty expertise and the
establishment of a new
program in health care design.”

The new home for KSU's
architecture program will
encompass 122,000 square
feet and cost $40 million.
It is being designed by
New York-based design
firm Weiss/Manfredi, which
teamed with Clevelandbased
Richard L. Bowen
& Associates.

It will be located along
the south side of the new
Esplanade extension near
downtown Kent.

Construction is anticipated
to begin next spring
with occupancy in December
2015.

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News Headline: KSU Snags $5 Million Grant Featured (Steid, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Edward L. Esposito
News OCR Text: It's not everyday local colleges or universities celebrate major gifts in the million dollar range.

It's certainly not everyday that one gift tops $5 million dollars, but Kent State University is celebrating a foundation gift from John and Fonda Elliot to create the "Elliot Studios for Design" as part of the new construction underway at the College of Architecture and Environmental Design. Part of the grant also provides endowments aimed specifically at health care students and professors.

It's the largest single gift ever made to the college. Elliot earned his degree from KSU in 1970 and soon began designing and building, then operating, healthcare facilities and nursing homes. The couple live in Charleston, West Virginia.

(Kent State University) Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton announced today a $5 million gift from John and Fonda Elliot through the family's foundation which will create the “Elliot Studios for Design” at the new building planned for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State. The gift also will fund endowments for The Elliot Program for Healthcare Design, The Elliot Scholars and The Elliot Professorship in Healthcare Design.

“Fonda and I are honored to be able to give back to the university that gave us the opportunity and the tools to help build our pathway to today,” John Elliot said. “If it was not for Kent State, and the school of architecture, I would not have had the foundation to develop my architectural practice and a health care company that employs more than 1,000 dedicated healthcare professionals. We would encourage other Kent State graduates to participate and foster the vision that Kent State has for the future.”

The Elliot Scholars gift will fund 10 scholarships for fulltime architecture students in any graduate degree program of Kent State's College of Architecture and Environmental Design. Awards will be designated for both Kent State domestic scholarships and Kent State global study opportunities.

The Elliot Professorship in Healthcare Design will be used to provide competitive compensation and research support for especially promising faculty members holding the rank of assistant professor, associate professor or professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State.

The Elliot Program for Healthcare Design will support a new program in Healthcare Design. Kent State's College of Architecture and Environmental Design currently has a Certificate in Healthcare Facilities and will soon be offering a Masters in Healthcare Design.

As the largest single gift ever made to the college, it will have a very real impact.

“We are thrilled with the Elliot family's decision to provide this landmark gift,” stated Douglas Steidl, dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State. “It will not only serve to enhance our new facility, but it will provide ongoing support to the students through scholarships, the addition of faculty expertise and the establishment of a new program in health care design.”

Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president of institutional advancement, is grateful for the generous support the Elliot family has shown to the university.

“The Elliots are leaders in the growing philanthropic tradition at Kent State,” Finn said. “They recognize the wonderful advances being made here, and their gift to the College of Architecture and Environmental Design is their tangible support of this agenda.”

John Elliot, who earned his bachelor of architecture degree in 1970 from Kent State, started John Elliot Associates, Architects and Planners in 1972 and began focusing on building nursing homes in 1976. Today, John and his wife, Fonda, own and operate AMFM, LLC, an 11-facility nursing home business in West Virginia. Fonda, a retired nurse, received a degree in health services administration from the West Virginia Institute of Technology, as did John. John is a licensed architect in Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland.

John serves on the board of directors for the Kent State University Foundation, the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences of West Virginia, the Buckskin Council of the Boy Scouts of America, City National Bank of West Virginia, and chair of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra. Fonda currently serves on the board of directors for Charleston Area Medical Center, West Virginia's largest hospital system, the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences of West Virginia and the University of Charleston. She is a former board member for the YWCA of Charleston and was recognized as a YWCA Woman of Achievement for 2013.

John and Fonda Elliot reside in Charleston, W.Va. They have two adult sons, Andrew and Gregory. John, Fonda and their sons are officers of The Elliot Foundation, a family foundation that supports the Elliot Family Foundation Architectural Scholarship at Kent State.

Background on the new building. The new home for the architecture program at Kent State will encompass 122,000 square feet and cost $40 million. The building is being designed by New York-based design firm WEISS/MANFREDI, which teamed with Cleveland-based Richard L. Bowen & Associates. It is part of the university's campus transformation, called “Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future,” which involves the construction of new buildings, facility upgrades and establishment of dynamic, new spaces. The goal of this initiative is to create the most outstanding academic experience for students, faculty, staff, alumni and the greater community enriched by the university. It will be located along the south side of the new Kent State University Esplanade extension near downtown Kent. Construction is anticipated to begin in spring 2014 with the goal of occupancy in December 2015.

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News Headline: Charleston couple make record donation to Kent State (Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Charleston Daily Mail - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A West Virginia nursing home owner and his wife have made a record $5 million donation to the Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design, university officials announced Monday.

The donation by Charleston residents John and Fonda Elliot will be used to create the Elliot Studios for Design at a new building on the college's campus, as well as fund endowments for programs and professorships named in the couple's honor.

The Elliots own and operate AMFM, LLC, an 11-facility nursing home business in West Virginia.

John Elliot graduated with a bachelor of architecture degree from Kent State in 1970. He founded John Elliot Associates, Architects and Planners in 1972 and began focusing on building nursing homes in 1976.

"Fonda and I are honored to be able to give back to the university that gave us the opportunity and the tools to help build our pathway to today," John Elliot said. "If it was not for Kent State, and the school of architecture, I would not have had the foundation to develop my architectural practice and a health care company that employs more than 1,000 dedicated healthcare professionals."

The gift is the largest ever received by the architechural college at Kent State.

" "We are thrilled with the Elliot family's decision to provide this landmark gift," said Douglas Steidl, dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

"It will not only serve to enhance our new facility, but it will provide ongoing support to the students through scholarships, the addition of faculty expertise and the establishment of a new program in health care design," Steidl said.

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News Headline: KSU hits freshman enrollment limit (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has hit its enrollment ceiling for new freshman at its main campus for the second time in three years.

The university said Monday it has closed enrollment to new freshmen, although other students — such as transfer and upper-division students — still are being accepted on the Kent campus.

About 4,500 freshmen have committed to come to the Kent campus this fall and 4,200 of them actually will show up, university spokesman Eric Mansfield said.

T. David Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment management, said the university is building enrollment by recruiting better students.

“From an enrollment management perspective, it takes years upon years,” he said. “You have to build your application pool to be more selective.”

About four years ago, KSU hired additional student recruiters and has been offering more merit-based scholarship money to the students it wants.

It offered $31 million in scholarships to freshmen applicants this fall, almost 30 percent more than the previous year. Students will accept $12 million to $13 million of that money, about $1 million more than last fall.

The strategy seemed to work: This fall, nearly 75 percent of the incoming KSU students will bring with them a grade-point average of at least 3.0, or B, according to a university media release.

KSU's success in recruiting comes amid a serious challenge for all colleges and universities statewide: The pool of high school graduates — the bread and butter of most freshman classes — is dropping.

University of Akron

Enrollment at the University of Akron dropped 3.5 percent last fall and is projected to drop another 4 percent this fall, spokeswoman Eileen Korey said.

Part of the reason for the decline is that UA is steering weaker students to community colleges, where they might have a better shot at succeeding.

Korey said 275 applicants have been directed elsewhere for the fall semester.

“We continue to have more capacity to admit students,” she said.

In addition, all colleges and universities statewide face another challenge: public unhappiness about the high cost of college and rising student debt. Nationwide, that figure totals about $1 trillion.

That means that some colleges are holding down tuition. Ohio State and University of Toledo, for example, have frozen 2013 tuition at 2012 levels. University of Cincinnati trustees will consider a similar freeze at their next meeting, which is later this month.

UA trustees will consider tuition and fees at their meeting Wednesday. Kent State trustees have not set 2013-2014 tuition and fees.

Although enrollment at the Kent campus is closed to incoming freshmen, students can enroll on the main campus next spring or the seven regional campuses this fall.

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News Headline: Kent State University reaches capacity for freshman enrollment this fall (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Incoming class slated to be largest, smartest first-year group yet

Kent State University is on track to have its biggest and brightest group of incoming freshman ever attend its main campus this fall.

The university announced Monday its capacity for first-year students at the Kent campus has been reached as approximately 4,200 freshmen have been accepted to begin classes in late August.

The downside is any freshman considering the Kent campus as an option who hasn't already applied and been accepted will be offered to attend a regional campus or wait to begin class in spring 2014.

T. David Garcia, KSU's associate vice president for enrollment management, said the news reflects a slew of firsts for KSU.

The 4,200 freshmen expected for fall 2013 is about 200 more than were accepted in fall 2012.

Applications for freshman enrollment at the Kent campus this fall were at the "highest ever recorded" with about 22,000 received, Garcia said, which is about 900 more than were received last fall.

And, the incoming group brings a cumulative 3.3 grade-point average, with nearly 75 percent having at least a 3.0. Those figures are also record highs, Garcia said, and "new territory" for the university.

"This shows that we're definitely on the right track to success," said KSU President Lester A. Lefton. "Our efforts to market the university's true strengths and show new students that we're committed to delivering a world-class education are paying dividends."

Efforts to attract "high quality" students and encourage early commitments have been goals of the enrollment office for about four years, Garcia said. Such students, he noted, have stronger retention rates and graduate sooner.

Garcia said it's too soon to determine if the school might break enrollment records again, noting total figures aren't tallied until after the first day of class.

The university broke total enrollment records in fall 2012 when 42,513 students attended schools throughout KSU's eight total campuses, including 27,706 at the Kent campus.

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News Headline: Does China have too much influence over academe in the West? (Li) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: InsideHigherEd.com
Contact Name: Elizabeth Redden
News OCR Text: Undue Influence?

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng's claim that New York University has been pressured by Chinese officials to force him out of the institution has raised broader questions about whether American academe is being unduly influenced by China's government. Even as NYU denies the specific charges raised by Chen, others say that the general problem of pressure on American universities is real and troublesome.

Chen, a lawyer and critic of China's family planning policies whose escape from house arrest to the U.S. Embassy in 2012 provoked a diplomatic crisis, maintains that the Chinese government has exerted “great, unrelenting pressure” on NYU with the objective of complicating his ability to make a living and engage in human rights advocacy. The New York Times has reported that Chen was frustrated by what he perceived as NYU's efforts to manage his advocacy, including a (failed) attempt to dissuade him from traveling to Washington last August, a trip on which his two NYU translators refused to cooperate with an interviewer from Radio Free Asia.

NYU has denied the allegations, stating that the fellowship was only ever intended to be for one year (as in fact is common for scholar rescue fellowships, which are typically one to two years in duration). During that year, NYU says, it provided Chen with housing, food, and insurance, as well as other benefits including specially arranged tutorials in law, English lessons, and translation services. The university also provided a "select list" of Chen's media interviews and public appearances to counter the allegation that his advocacy-related activities were restrained. "Mr. Chen's fellowship at NYU and its conclusion have had nothing to do with the Chinese government,” John Beckman, the university's spokesman, said in a statement.

Jerome Cohen, a NYU law professor who assisted Chen in arranging the fellowship, has also defended the university, telling Foreign Policy that he has seen no evidence of Chinese government interference in this instance. "You shouldn't bite the hand that feeds you," Cohen added.

The details regarding Chen's fellowship at NYU therefore remain in dispute. But some China scholars say that Chen's broader point about the substantial influence the Chinese government wields over American academe is worth noting -- regardless of the details of his situation. In the statement he released to the media (available in full on The Wall Street Journal website), Chen wrote: “The work of the Chinese Communists within academic circles in the United States is far greater than what people imagine, and some scholars have no option but to hold themselves back. Academic independence and academic freedom in the United States are being greatly threatened by a totalitarian regime.”

“I think that's basically right,” said Perry Link, a professor at the University of California at Riverside who is among the China scholars who have been blacklisted from obtaining visas to conduct research in China. Link did say, however, that the words "greatly threatened" seemed to him a little over the top. “It is a big problem, and it's a long-term problem, and it's a subtle problem. It's gotten dramatized in the last few days as a university kicking out a blind human rights lawyer at the behest of a totalitarian government." (Chen is blind.) "This is spectacular, almost Hollywood-ized, but that's not the way it works. The influence problem is pervasive and serious but it doesn't happen that way.”

“It happens when scholars are induced, whether for fear of not getting visas or because of the lure of getting money, to censor themselves and not raise questions that they otherwise would raise and to speak using words that they know would be acceptable in Beijing rather than words they would view as being more accurate,” said Link, who noted, for example, that the massacre in Tiananmen Square (a subject of his own research) is frequently described by scholars as an “event” or “incident” or even by a Chinese word meaning "tempest in a teapot."

“Chen is absolutely right when he says that the Chinese government has influenced intellectual freedom in the West," said Maochun Yu, a professor of history at the United States Naval Academy. "On the other hand, this is not NYU's problem. It's a larger problem."

"A lot of American universities want to have broader contact with China in terms of academic exchange, in terms of getting more Chinese students to pay full tuition to American campuses. They want to keep the Chinese government in good graces. They don't want to offend the Chinese government," Yu said, noting, for example, that a university with a joint academic program with a Chinese university would "know better" than to invite the Dalai Lama to give a talk. (Here's one cautionary tale: after the University of Calgary granted the Dalai Lama an honorary degree, the Chinese Ministry of Education removed the Canadian institution from its approved universities list for more than a year, as The Calgary Herald has reported.)

At the same time, Yu said that "sometimes you never know whether you might or might not offend the Chinese government. That's why the unknowing would impose even greater censorship. You would take a minimum risk and the best way to take a minimum risk is not to do anything that might be remotely considered risky."

"A large part of this is that a university just does not want to jeopardize its access,” said June Teufel Dreyer, a professor of political science at the University of Miami. “Universities are really concerned to give their students an international education and China is regarded, perhaps erroneously and perhaps prematurely, as a country we really need to get to know a lot better because of the way its economy is growing and because of the influence it has on the environment. So you don't want to be shut off from China and you want your students to have these experiences with Chinese students and of learning the Chinese language and if you see that jeopardized by something you don't have to do anyway – [i.e.,] extending this dissident's stay -- you're probably going to decide in the direction of not extending his stay. We don't have to assume evil here. I don't think anybody gets to be president of a university or provost or dean without being somewhat political, and political people are going to weigh options and probably decide it's the better part of wisdom to not extend that appointment.”

NYU is more deeply invested in China than most: its campus in Shanghai is slated to open this fall. The campus was first announced in March 2011 and it received final approval from the Chinese Ministry of Education last October -- after Chen's fellowship began. University administrators have expressed their commitment to academic freedom at the Shanghai campus, a joint venture with East China Normal University.

However, Cary Nelson, the past president of the American Association of University Professors and a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, said that academic freedom as it exists in the U.S. simply doesn't exist in China. (For proof of that, consider recent news of a list of seven topics that Chinese university professors have been instructed not to discuss -- topics including mistakes of the Communist Party and civil rights.)

"Engaging in compromised educational enterprises in China – and I think these are compromised educational enterprises fueled by money and potential for profit – you pay a price back home and that price will increase over time,” Nelson said. “It's not as if people can sustain two entirely different value systems as if one were for the left brain and one for the right brain. If you can make compromises abroad, what's to prevent you from making compromises here?"

Hongshan Li, a professor of history at Kent State University who has published on U.S.-China educational relations, cautioned, however, that academic collaboration is predicated on the act of influence. “Educational exchange by definition is basically two sides wanting to share their values and their systems, their ways of doing things, so influencing the other is a part of it -- whether you like it or not,” said Li. "In the end it will probably depend on which side will provide a system that will be more willingly accepted by students.”

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News Headline: Kent State Hotel and Conference Center officially opens its doors | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The 50-seat bar and lounge area of the Kent State Hotel and Conference Center was filled with employees on Friday afternoon; rolling flatware into white napkins and opening box after box as downtown Kent's newest landmark opened for business.

The lobby's decadent seating area already had guests waiting with luggage as patrons were taking tours of the completed $16 million project. The hotel features 94 boutique-style guest rooms with a presidential suite that has an outdoor patio overlooking Haymaker Parkway towards Kent State's new Esplanade extension.

Sage Culley, Sales & Catering Manager of the hotel, said that the staff expects to host mostly corporate clientele Sunday through Thursday, and is hoping to draw the community toward the facility that features “Zenas” restaurant, an indoor swimming pool and hot tub, workout facility and a 24-hour business center.

The hotel is booking into 2014 and conference spaces are already being reserved, while a 150-person wedding reception is scheduled for July 26. The hotel also features 5,000 square feet of event space including a ballroom, an executive boardroom and 300-seat conference center.

“Now that you see it all together, you see what the vision was,” Culley said. “Everyone has said that it's modern elegance, but it's still homey. It's not that push-off modern where it's so sleek you don't want to sit on anything. It really has a comfortable feel to it.”

The hotel is part of the town-gown collaboration between the city of Kent and Kent State University. The Kent State Hotel & Conference Center required an easier access to campus, which the esplanade creates. Both projects depended on the other to be completed. Cindy Sherman, Director of Sales, noted that with ongoing development in downtown continuing to build the city's commercial presence, the impact of the new facilities will benefit the entire community.

“Now companies have places where they can host visitors they are doing business with or if they want to have lunch or do interviews,” Sherman said. “The whole city will benefit from it. We can now host events and concerts that were going to other cities before, because there was not enough hotel space down here.”

Both Culley and Sherman have been working behind-the-scenes for several weeks --unloading trucks, breaking down cardboard boxes and watching as the project went from steel girders to an imposing structure in downtown Kent.

“We have always said that we want to give white tablecloth service, without the white tablecloth,” Culley said. “The esplanade dumps out, basically right on our doorstep. We couldn't have asked for a better welcome. On the other side, here we are in Acorn Alley with all of the wonderful, new construction. We are really sort of in the heart of it. “

A grand opening ceremony has been scheduled for Oct. 4, but details have not come together on the events that will take place.

“I'm excited to hear what's going to happen,” Culley said. “I know it's going to be big, but I don't know how big.”

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Basics for Paddling the Cuyahoga River in Kent (Herpy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This post is a follow-up to a piece I shared last week

Last week I shared a video and story summarizing how you can kayak or canoe the stretch of the Cuyahoga River from River Bend Park into downtown Kent.

While great fun, this stretch of the river can pose some hazards to beginner paddlers and should be approached with extreme caution.

My friend Dave Herpy, the outdoor adventure coordinator for Kent State University and a certified ACA River Kayaking Instructor Trainer reminded me of the potential dangers and shared the YouTube video featured in this article about the basics for kayaking whitewater rapids — some of which you'll experience in this section of the river.

“I've seen a lot of near misses on this section, so it's important for folks to understand what they're getting themselves into before attempting to paddle this section,” Herpy said.

Kent State offers a variety of whitewater paddling classes you can take to learn the basics and advance your skills.

Watch the video for the basics to safe paddling, and check out the links below for more information about safe kayaking.

Glossary of Basic Paddling Terms
Beginners Guide to Kayak Equipment Terminology

To view video, please click on link:
http://kent.patch.com/groups/editors-picks/p/basics-for-paddling-the-cuyahoga-river-in-kent

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News Headline: Lifeguards applauded for helping save man at Cumberland Pool in Cleveland Heights | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Brian Byrne, Sun News
News OCR Text: The 56-year-old was discovered conscious but unresponsive and with labored breathing in the locker room at 2:30 p.m. June 13, Assistant Commissioner for Parks and Recreation Chris Kendel said. The staff initiated its emergency action plan, and the man was given CPR while 911 was called.

EMTs were able to get the man breathing on his own on the way to University Hospital. Kendel said he was told over the weekend that the man had been placed into a medically induced coma, but was expected to live.

"What they did saved this man's life," Fire Chief Dave Freeman said of the lifeguards.

The lifeguards receiving proclamations from council were: Julian Gilbert, a senior at Heights High School; Liam Robinson, a junior at the University of Buffalo; Tyler Rudy, a sophomore at Wittenberg University; Max Hackman, a sophomore at the University of Cincinnati; and Ester Bergson, a freshman at Kent State University.

"I take a tremendous amount of pride that these kids responded the way they did, implemented their training in a calm manner and gave him a fighting chance," Kendel said.

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News Headline: Find the mystical island of Bali-H'ai at Porthouse Theatre's 'South Pacific' (Kent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Mark Horning
News OCR Text: Nestled in the grounds of Blossom Music Center is Porthouse Theatre which is the home of Kent State University's outdoor summer theater. To kick off the 2013 summer season, Porthouse Theatre will be presenting “South Pacific” which will run through June 29, 2013.

“South Pacific” is directed by artistic director Terri Kent and has a cast of 25 three of whom are members of the Actors' Equity Association*. Rohn Thomas* will play George Brackett, opposite Kaishawn Thomas (Rohn Thomas and Terri Kent's daughter) as Liat. Kayce Cummings* will play Nellie Forbush, and Greg Violand* will assume the role of Emile de Becque.

It is the story a group of servicemen stuck on a far flung island in the Pacific during World War II. Is war and prejudice more powerful than love? Two couples try to answer that question over the course of the song filled production.

“Although it opened on Broadway in 1949, the themes still haunt us today,” Kent said. “There are indeed lighter moments in the play, but at its heart it takes a serious look at prejudices and racism. The score is gorgeous and the transformation of Nellie Forbush, the main character, is inspiring.”

The musical, based on James Michener's Pulitzer Prize-winning book “Tales of the South Pacific,” features music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and the book by Oscar Hammerstein II and Joshua Logan. The show's score includes songs such as “Some Enchanted Evening,” “I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair,” “This Nearly Was Mine” and “There is Nothin' Like a Dame.”

This production includes costume design by Suzy Campbell, choreography by MaryAnn Black, scenic design by Benjamin Needham and lighting design by Jakyung Seo.

“South Pacific” performances will be held June 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 at 8 p.m. and June 16 and 23 at 2 p.m. Porthouse Theatre is located on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Next on the agenda for Porthouse Theatre is the musical “Working,” based on the book by Studs Terkel and adapted by Stephen Schwart and Nina Faso, July 4 through 20. The final show of the Porthouse 2013 season will be “Fiddler on the Roof,” running July 25 through August 11.

Subscriptions for all three shows on the 2013 Porthouse season are available: Gold Center $75-90, Adult Left and Right Center $66-81, Senior Left and Right Center $57-81, Student Left and Right Center $45-54.

Single tickets will go on sale after May 21, 2013. Single tickets are $32-38 for adults, $26-35 for seniors and $17-21 for students. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds to enjoy the beautiful surroundings of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which is located next to the theatre grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers, based on availability. There also is a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Additional picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

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