Report Overview:
Total Clips (16)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Institutional Advancement (1)
Athletics (2)
Blossom Music; Music (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (8)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Students (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Architecture and Environmental Design; Institutional Advancement (1)
$5 million gift largest made to College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University (Steidl, Finn) 06/18/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton announced today a $5 million gift from John and Fonda Elliot through the family's foundation which...


Athletics (2)
Kent State coach Paul Haynes is hands-off now, but preparing for weeks to come (Haynes) 06/19/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Each week during the off-season Record-Courier staff writer Allen Moff will talk with a Kent State head coach about what's going on with the program during...

College football countdown | No. 85: Kent State 06/19/2013 USA Today Text Attachment Email

USA TODAY Sports' Paul Myerberg counts down to the start of the college football season team by team from No. 125 to No. 1. Alabama won another championship....


Blossom Music; Music (1)
Miami String Quartet, Spencer Myer open Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concerts (Robinson) 06/18/2013 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

The Miami String Quartet, Cathy Meng Robinson and Keith Robinson, have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University. The Quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
EDRA Names Winners of Great Places Awards 06/18/2013 Contract Magazine - Online Text Attachment Email

...into Union Square as a pool, plaza, and additional pathways. 2013 Place Research Award Recipient Designer: Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Kent State University Project: Pop Up City: Temporary Use Strategies for a Shrinking City An action-based research program explores ideas of...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (8)
Ohio colleges get mostly low grades from National Council on Teacher Quality (Mahony) 06/18/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...programs that were rated got fewer than three stars on the four-star scale used by the National Council on Teacher Quality. Two graduate programs at Cleveland State University and one at Kent State University got zero stars, earning them a warning symbol from the council's "Teacher Prep Review."...

Study of teacher colleges gives poor marks to state universities in Ohio (Mahony) 06/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...conducted in cooperation with U.S. News & World Report. Only four colleges and universities in the nation received four stars, the highest designation. Ohio State University's graduate program in secondary education was among them. More than 162 colleges and universities received “consumer alerts”...

National survey ranks Kent State University low in teacher training; dean disputes findings (Mahony) 06/19/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A report released Tuesday rating how effectively colleges and universities train would-be educators for the classroom gives less than favorable ratings...

KSU Defends Teaching Graduates (Mahony) 06/18/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is reacting to a U.S. News And World Report and National Council On Teacher Quality study which calls KSU and other universities...

Kent State, Cleveland State dispute preparation study from National Council on Teacher Quality (Mahony) 06/18/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...challenging and it did prepare me for the real world experiences that I had when I left," she said. Eastman is surprised by a new study that gives Kent State low marks for teacher training. The National Council on Teacher Quality ranked undergraduate and graduate education programs across...

Ohio State's training of teachers shines in national grading of programs (Mahony) 06/19/2013 Columbus Dispatch Text Attachment Email

A first-ever ranking of teacher-preparation schools puts Ohio State University at No. 1 while issuing warnings about the low quality of some of Ohio's...

(AUDIO) Ohio teacher-prep programs rank low in a new study (Mahony) 06/19/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Only Ohio State receives high rating in report by U.S. News and World Report U.S. News and World Report and the National Council on Teacher Quality...

(AUDIO) Mixed grades for Ohio's teacher prep programs (Mahony) 06/19/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Kent State disputes the rankings, but says colleges of education are working on improvements Ohio's colleges of education graduate about 6,000 new teachers...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
OUR VIEW: Freshman numbers spell success for Kent State (Lefton) 06/19/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

focusing on recruitment of talented students brings results Kent State University's bid for a competitive edge in recruiting new students is paying...


Entrepreneurship (1)
(VIDEO) This Week on Kaleidoscope - June 16, 2013 (Banks) 06/19/2013 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

CEO of Flight for the Cure Krista Jordan and her Venture Coach Stacey Banks-Houston talk about Krista's company Flight for the Cure which was established...


Students (1)
BRIEF: Prayer vigil and fundraiser tonight for missing Akron woman 06/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...Greater Faith Missionary Baptist Church, 825 E. Buchtel Ave. The event comes after about 60 people joined a search effort Saturday. Robinson, a Kent State University student, last was seen May 3, when her mother dropped her off at a Kipling Street home. The 19-year-old worked there as a private...


News Headline: $5 million gift largest made to College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University (Steidl, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University President Lester A. Lefton announced today a $5 million gift from John and Fonda Elliot through the family's foundation which will create the “Elliot Studios for Design” at the new building planned for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State. The gift also will fund endowments for The Elliot Program for Healthcare Design, The Elliot Scholars and The Elliot Professorship in Healthcare Design.

“Fonda and I are honored to be able to give back to the university that gave us the opportunity and the tools to help build our pathway to today,” John Elliot said. “If it was not for Kent State, and the school of architecture, I would not have had the foundation to develop my architectural practice and a health care company that employs more than 1,000 dedicated healthcare professionals. We would encourage other Kent State graduates to participate and foster the vision that Kent State has for the future.”

The Elliot Scholars gift will fund 10 scholarships for fulltime architecture students in any graduate degree program of Kent State's College of Architecture and Environmental Design. Awards will be designated for both Kent State domestic scholarships and Kent State global study opportunities.

The Elliot Professorship in Healthcare Design will be used to provide competitive compensation and research support for especially promising faculty members holding the rank of assistant professor, associate professor or professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State.

The Elliot Program for Healthcare Design will support a new program in Healthcare Design. Kent State's College of Architecture and Environmental Design currently has a Certificate in Healthcare Facilities and will soon be offering a Masters in Healthcare Design.

As the largest single gift ever made to the college, it will have a very real impact.

“We are thrilled with the Elliot family's decision to provide this landmark gift,” stated Douglas Steidl, dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State. “It will not only serve to enhance our new facility, but it will provide ongoing support to the students through scholarships, the addition of faculty expertise and the establishment of a new program in health care design.”

Gene Finn, Kent State's vice president of institutional advancement, is grateful for the generous support the Elliot family has shown to the university.

“The Elliots are leaders in the growing philanthropic tradition at Kent State,” Finn said. “They recognize the wonderful advances being made here, and their gift to the College of Architecture and Environmental Design is their tangible support of this agenda.”

John Elliot, who earned his bachelor of architecture degree in 1970 from Kent State, started John Elliot Associates, Architects and Planners in 1972 and began focusing on building nursing homes in 1976. Today, John and his wife, Fonda, own and operate AMFM, LLC, an 11-facility nursing home business in West Virginia. Fonda, a retired nurse, received a degree in health services administration from the West Virginia Institute of Technology, as did John. John is a licensed architect in Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland.

John serves on the board of directors for the Kent State University Foundation, the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences of West Virginia, the Buckskin Council of the Boy Scouts of America, City National Bank of West Virginia, and chair of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra. Fonda currently serves on the board of directors for Charleston Area Medical Center, West Virginia's largest hospital system, the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences of West Virginia and the University of Charleston. She is a former board member for the YWCA of Charleston and was recognized as a YWCA Woman of Achievement for 2013.

John and Fonda Elliot reside in Charleston, W.Va. They have two adult sons, Andrew and Gregory. John, Fonda and their sons are officers of The Elliot Foundation, a family foundation that supports the Elliot Family Foundation Architectural Scholarship at Kent State.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State coach Paul Haynes is hands-off now, but preparing for weeks to come (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Each week during the off-season Record-Courier staff writer Allen Moff will talk with a Kent State head coach about what's going on with the program during the summer months. This week's guest is rookie football coach Paul Haynes.

Haynes said the Golden Flashes have been back on campus since the first week of June. They took part in a series of youth football camps throughout last week.

"We got a good group of kids at our camps. I can't complain," he said.

Haynes said the entire team is back on campus and most are taking summer classes. Due to NCAA rules, Haynes is not permitted to work with his players at this time.

"We're pretty much hands off right now. The strength coach (Antoine Sharp) is really the head coach right now. I think the guys are excited and working hard. We give them film study stuff on themselves and a little bit on opponents. They pretty much stay busy with strength, fitness and football intelligence."

No News

Haynes said that no new players have been brought in since spring practices, but did not rule out an addition or two before preseason camp begins.

Settling in

Haynes was asked about being a head coach for the first time after spending the past 20 years as an assistant.

"Every day is different, every day is new," he said. "You take it day by day and try to stay two days ahead of everything, which is hard to do, but you live and learn. The main focus is on the team and how can the team get better. That's my main concern."

Haynes has been busy with speaking engagements since officially taking over as head coach in early January.

Recently he's been the guest speaker at the 19th annual Robinson Memorial Hospital-Rehab Center and Sport Clinic/Record-Courier Student-Athlete of the Year banquet and at Kent State alumni events in Cleveland and Baltimore.

"I always look forward to opportunities to meet fellow alumni," said Haynes, a former star defensive back for the Flashes, who graduated in 1991. "It's a great way to share our current and past Kent State experiences."

How difficult is it to juggle so many responsibilities as a first-time head coach?

"It's difficult, but that's why you surround yourself with good people. I've done that with good assistants. You've gotta delegate some of the stuff so it's not 15 things, maybe it's five things coming by your desk. But I don't know if you ever get used to it because, again, your main focus is the team and the players. It's still about building them, still about understanding that if they weren't here, I wouldn't have a job. They are the most important thing."

Upcoming Schedule

Haynes said that all players will report for preseason camp on Aug. 1. The 2013 season opener is set for Thursday, Aug. 29, at home against Liberty -- a game that will feature a fireworks show sponsored and presented by Ametek.

Return to Top



News Headline: College football countdown | No. 85: Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: USA Today
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: USA TODAY Sports' Paul Myerberg counts down to the start of the college football season team by team from No. 125 to No. 1.

Alabama won another championship. A quarterback won the Heisman. Florida State won the ACC. Boise State won 11 games. Oregon blurred past the opposition in a BCS bowl. It was a year full of familiar moments, from the expected to the should-have-been expected. Then there was Kent State.

Prior to last season, Kent State was the lone FBS program with roots in the 20th century with a career winning percentage below .400 – it stood at .388, to be precise. Prior to last season, Kent State had not won more than six games since 1987. Prior to last season, Kent State was mired in a run of 32 non-winning seasons in 34 years.

Then came last season. The Golden Flashes didn't just go 11-3, landing double-digit wins for the first time in school history. The Flashes came within a whisper of the Bowl Championship Series, believe it or not, and would have been the underdog story to end all underdog stories – the offspring of 2006 Boise State and the team from Hoosiers. Much
happened last fall; only one thing, Kent State, was truly, utterly unexpected. Also unexpected? If the Flashes do it again in 2013.

NO. 125 TO NO. 1: College football countdown

LAST YEAR'S PREDICTION

The Golden Flashes should be a better team in the second year under Hazell, and the schedule is far weaker than it was in 2011. In addition, this does seem like the first team previewed thus far that has a genuine chance at breaking out: KSU is confident, for starters, and also loaded defensively. And the offense could take a big step forward if the line gels and either Keith solidifies his game as a senior or Fisher proves himself ready to take on the starting job. Kent State's a fairly good team, albeit one with enough question marks on offense to be considered a step behind the top teams in the East division. Is this defense good enough to carry an offensively impotent team all the way to bowl play? I don't think so, but if any MAC defense is good enough to do so, it would be Kent State's.

2012 RECAP

— In a nutshell: An unfathomably successful season. How did Kent State do it? By landing some of the finest coaching in the country – and I wouldn't argue if one wanted to call Darrell Hazell's coaching job one of the finest in FBS history, by the way. The Flashes entered last fall with confidence, having won four of five to end 2011, and immediately picked up where they left off: KSU opened with a win, lost to Kentucky and then rolled off 10 wins in a row to reach the MAC title game. Two losses followed, one after Hazell had left for Purdue, and that was that. Unexpected? Glorious? Sublime? Legendary? All of the above. It was one of the more magical seasons in college football history.

— High point: The entire winning streak. To cut that down, either a 35-23 win over then-No. 15 Rutgers – when everyone stood up and took notice – or a 28-6 win over Ohio to end the regular season; the latter moved KSU to 11-1 prior to the MAC title game.

— Low point: It was a magical season that included a 47-14 loss to Kentucky. Also, the Flashes lost to Northern Illinois in double overtime to lose out on the Orange Bowl.

— Tidbit: Hazell leaves with a winning percentage of .616, the highest in school history. His two teams combined for 10 losses, the majority of which came against premier competition. Of the 10 defeats, only two, Miami (Ohio) and Kentucky, came against non-bowl teams. The others: Alabama (12-1), NIU (11-3), Kansas State (10-3), Ohio (10-4), Temple (9-4) and Louisiana-Lafayette (9-4) in 2011 and NIU (12-2) and Arkansas State (10-3) in 2012. In total, Kent's 10 losses under Hazell came against opponents with a combined record of 79-42; if you remove Miami and Kentucky from the equation, that record improves to 73-24.

FORMER PLAYERS IN THE NFL

— 10: WR Josh Cribbs (Oakland), WR Julian Edelman (New England), TE Antonio Gates (San Diego), LB James Harrison (Cincinnati), DT Ishmaa'ily Kitchen (Cleveland), OG Josh Kline (New England), DT Daniel Muir (Kansas City), LB Monte Simmons (Indianapolis), OG Brian Winters (New York Jets), S Usama Young (Oakland).

ARBITRARY TOP FIVE LIST

Kent State's FBS coaching alumni

1. Nick Saban
2. Lou Holtz
3. Don Nehlen
4. Gary Pinkel
5. Jim Corrigall

COACHING

— Paul Haynes (Kent State '92), entering his first season. A former all-conference defensive back with the Golden Flashes, Haynes replaces Darrell Hazell and inherits markedly different expectations: KSU has tasted success and wants no part of drifting back into the bottom range of the MAC. At the same time, the work Hazell and his staff put over their two seasons with the program hands Haynes a wholly different level of confidence – with several key figures back from last year's team, the new coaching staff won't need to start from square one, unlike Hazell.

Haynes was a star safety for the Golden Flashes from 1987-91, sandwiching an injury-plagued 1989 campaign with four seasons in the starting lineup. His first full-time FBS coaching position came at his alma mater, in 1999, when he led the Flashes' secondary. After spending the 2000 season in the same capacity – adding the assistant head coach tag – Haynes served as the Jacksonville Jaguars' defensive quality control assistant in 2001 before returning to the FBS. He made a quick climb: Louisville in 2001, Michigan in 2002 and then off to Ohio State, where he spent six seasons under Jim Tressel and a seventh under former interim coach Luke Fickell. Haynes was Arkansas' defensive coordinator during a forgettable 2012 season.

What attracted Kent to Haynes weren't just his ties to the university, though that's a significant bonus. More than that, however, Haynes brings superb credentials as one of OSU's chief defensive assistants during the program's nearly unprecedented run of success in the Big Ten. Like Hazell before him, Haynes will allow Kent to continue its successful turn on the recruiting trail; unlike Hazell, who also came from Columbus, Haynes should have a dramatic impact on Kent's defensive efforts. He takes on a difficult task, replacing Hazell, but Haynes has the experience to maintain the Flashes' run out of the lower level of the MAC.

— Tidbit (coaching edition): Wisely, Haynes opted to retain four members of Hazell's staff: offensive coordinator Brian Rock, defensive coordinator Brian George – formerly the defensive line coach – tight ends coach and special teams coordinator Dave McMichael and safeties coach Jeff Burrows. This will help retain a degree of consistency with Kent's returning contributors. The new additions include linebackers coach Ben Needham, cornerbacks coach Amp Campbell (formerly of Western Michigan) wide receivers coach Doc Gamble, offensive line coach Shawn Clark (formerly of Purdue) and running backs coach Ted Bahhur.

PLAYERS TO WATCH

— Offense: Nothing will change dramatically on offense, thanks to Haynes' decision to retain Rock as coordinator: Kent State will remain run-based with a two-headed monster of a backfield and a paltry downfield passing game. Hey, this same mix led to 11 wins a season ago. The stars, of course, are running backs Dri Archer (1,429 yards and 18 touchdowns) and Trayion Durham (1,316 yards and 14 touchdowns), as fine a pairing as you'll find in college football. Archer's the shifty dervish of a back, able to hurt opponents as a traditional runner, a receiver or a return man; quite simply, he might be the most dangerous player in college football. Durham does the dirty work between the tackles, loosening up linemen and linebackers and opening up outside lanes for Archer and backups Anthony Meray and Julian Durden. Kent also adds a nice recruit in 210-pound freshman Roman Clay – as if this backfield needed more options.

Look for Archer's role to change somewhat as a senior. Yes, he'll continue to see 75-plus carries out of the backfield, as removing that production from the equation would be simply asinine. But he'll see more time in the slot, where Kent hopes to get Archer the ball in space – whether running intermediate routes, screen passes, as a untraditional ball-carrier or simply burning double-coverage downfield. How good can Archer be in the slot? He's an All-American wherever he plays. He joins a pretty solid receiver corps, along with sophomore Josh Boyle (28 receptions for 338 yards), junior Chris Humphrey (26 for 319) and senior Tyshon Goode, the latter back after missing all of last season due to injury. Archer gives this receiver corps a different dimension, if at the detriment of the overall running game.

It's safe to expect a decline in production from an offensive line retooling without three of last season's starters, including two the best linemen in recent school history in left tackle Brian Winters and left guard Josh Kline. The strength of this unit shifts from the outside in, where senior center Phil Huff and senior left guard Pat McShane are expected to challenge for all-conference honors. With this pair and one of sophomore Anthony Pruitt and senior Max Plunkett at right guard, Kent has the size and experience to find continued success with the interior running game. The question marks are outside, where the Flashes are leaning toward redshirt freshman Reno Rada and sophomore Jason Bitsko at left and right tackle, respectively. While each brings significant potential into the new roles, the drop in experience at tackle is extremely worrisome.

— Defense: The Flashes' defense was uncharacteristically porous last season, especially against the pass: Kent allowed 3,808 yards through the air, allowing at least 310 yards seven times, and was especially impotent against dual-threat attacks. Personnel changes are afoot on each level; when it comes to the secondary, however, change might be a good thing. The lone returning starter in the defensive backfield is senior strong safety Luke Wollet (119 tackles), though KSU does return a handful of reserves with solid game experience. Look for two to grab starting roles at cornerback, with senior Darius Polk (58 tackles) on one side and junior Dylan Farrington (28 tackles) on the other – though senior Malcom Pannell and as many as three true freshmen could make this an interesting competition during fall camp.

Any secondary that builds around Wollet will do a nice job against the run: Wollet, while occasionally out of position in coverage, is a hammer when in the box. But finding a rangy free safety to team with the senior is mandatory, so hopes are high that either senior Calvin Tiggle (34 tackles) can remain healthy or one of sophomores Jordan Italiano (23 tackles) or Keenan Stalls can step right into a substantially larger role along the back end. When KSU wants to go big in its 4-2-5 set, look for Italiano to serve as a hybrid safety-linebacker. I wouldn't expect any miracles, but recent history suggests last year's awful pass defense was an aberration, not the start of a trend.

Of greater concern, perhaps, was the decline in production from Kent's run defense. KSU allowed 1,936 yards on the ground last season, the program's worst total since 2008; even when taking into account the fact KSU played two more games than usual, the run defense was not up to its normal standard. To take a step forward, the Flashes must find an accompanying piece at nose tackle to join senior Roosevelt Nix (59 tackles, 15.0 for loss), one of the great players in program history. To be honest, putting 260-pound sophomore Nate Terhune on the nose isn't a viable option – he's best suited to be a run-stopping end, not a run-stuffing interior lineman. One doable scenario is to team Terhune with 312-pound sophomore Chris Fairchild, using Terhune as a penetrating tackle on passing downs. Getting more pressure is a point of emphasis for this new staff, which will lean on senior ends Zach Hitchens (27 tackles), Richard Gray (15 tackles, 4.5 sacks) and Mark Fackler (25 tackles, 3 interceptions) to bring heat off the corner. If given more snaps, Gray could be one of the breakout ends in the MAC.

Junior DeVante' Strickland will see the field when KSU runs out of a 4-3 defense. More often than not, however, the Flashes will utilize only two linebackers: one in the middle, a linebacker asked to clean up the mess from tackle to tackle, and one on the weak side. Replacing Luke Batton will be a tough task for this defense: Batton was the perfect middle man in this defense, and it'll be next to impossible for the Flashes to replicate his production. But sophomore Matt Dellinger and senior Danny Gress have some promise, especially Dellinger, and it's easy to the loser of that competition taking over for C.J. Malauulu on the weak side. Kent also added six linebacker recruits in February, so seeing two or three of those incoming freshmen in the rotation wouldn't be a surprise.

— Special teams: Any group with Archer handling kickoffs will be worth the price of admission. How dangerous is Archer? I have no words, though I do have numbers: 34.76 yards per kickoff return, three touchdowns, dozens of broken ankles – the latter's an estimate. The Flashes lost a good one in senior kicker Freddy Cortez, however, so look for sophomore Anthony Melchiori to handle both kicking and punting duties in 2013.

POSITION(S) TO WATCH

— Quarterback: Kent State excelled last season despite getting little production from quarterback Spencer Keith, so it's not as if this offense needs a game-changer under center. The Flashes do need greater consistency and fewer turnovers, however, especially against higher-level regular-season competition like LSU, Penn State, Northern Illinois and Ball State. The search for Keith's successor has centered around two prime contenders, senior David Fisher and redshirt freshman Colin Reardon, but a third option, incoming freshman Nathan Strock, will enter the mix this summer. Whether Strock will be given an equal shot at landing the starting job depends on how quickly he can acclimate himself to this system, let alone how well Fisher and Reardon impress the staff during fall camp. Fisher was the primary backup last season, throwing for 230 yards in limited duty, and this experience, while slight, does give him a leg up in the competition. But Reardon has the better running ability, which could make him a better fit in Rock's run-heavy system. Meanwhile, in a perfect world, Strock would redshirt in 2013. One palatable option is to have Fisher and Reardon combine in a two-quarterback rotation, with Fisher's arm conducive to an uptick in the downfield passing game and Reardon a nice option as a runner.

GAME(S) TO WATCH

— Ohio: Kent won't come close to last season's 11-win total during the regular season, but if the ball bounces the Flashes' way – as it did in 2012 – the season finale against Ohio could decide the East Division. Earlier dates against Buffalo and Bowling Green will also have a big role in deciding the division's final standings. Overall, the schedule is significantly more difficult than a season ago, with crossover dates against NIU and Ball State joining non-conference games against Penn State and LSU.

SEASON BREAKDOWN & PREDICTION

— In a nutshell: Kent State's going to take a slide after last season's amazing finish, with the level of decline contingent on several factors: how KSU reacts to the coaching change; what sort of impact Haynes can have on this defense; whether the running game will remain potent with Archer seeing more time in the slot; whether the Flashes' can get more from the quarterback position; and whether the ball will continue to bounce the team's way in 2013. The latter, the least tangible of the bunch, may have the heaviest impact on Kent's final record. Can KSU catch another round of breaks under the new staff?

In my opinion, Kent will win anywhere from four to eight games. That the team has so many questions still unanswered is to blame for the wide range: KSU could be again be a MAC contender should it land the same level of production from several key spots – several key spots breaking in new starters, especially on defense and the offensive line; KSU could also slide down to four wins should it fail to recapture its 2012 form against a far more imposing schedule.

The swing games will decide the Flashes' season: Bowling Green, Western Michigan, Buffalo and Miami (Ohio). I'm penciling this team in for losses to LSU, Penn State, NIU, Ball State and Ohio – because despite last season, those opponents are more solidly built than KSU. I also think the Flashes win games against Liberty, South Alabama and Akron, meaning the above quartet dictates whether KSU again reaches the postseason or falls shy of six wins. I'm a little hesitant to lean in either direction, though I think it's more likely that KSU tops out at five wins than gets to eight victories and one of the top two spots in the East Division.

— Dream season: Eleven wins? Oh, that's easy. The Flashes take on a difficult schedule and come out at 11-1, again taking home the East Division.

— Nightmare season: Kent slides back into familiar territory: 4-8, 2-6 in the MAC.

IN CASE YOU WERE WONDERING

— Where Kent State fans hang out: Plenty of Kent State fans meet up at this MAC message board, though Kent State Insider is also an option. Beat reporter David Carducci of the Record-Courier gives plenty of KSU updates via his Twitter feed.

— All-name team nominee: QB Luke Smurthwaite.

UP NEXT

— Who is No. 84? This program has reached the postseason in five of the past six years. Over the same span, this team has three losing seasons.

2013 TEAM OVERVIEW

— Conference: MAC, East

— Location: Kent, Ohio

— Nickname: Golden Flashes

— Returning starters: 11 (6 offense, 5 defense)

— Last year's ranking: No. 98

— 2012 record: 11-3 (8-0)

— Last year's re-ranking: No. 31

— 2013 schedule:

Aug. 29 Liberty
Sept. 7 Bowling Green
Sept. 14 at LSU
Sept. 21 at Penn State
Sept. 28 at Western Michigan
Oct. 5 Northern Illinois
Oct. 12 at Ball State
Oct. 19 at South Alabama
Oct. 26 Buffalo
Nov. 2 at Akron
Nov. 12 Miami (Ohio)
Nov. 19 at Ohio

Return to Top



News Headline: Miami String Quartet, Spencer Myer open Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concerts (Robinson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Miami String Quartet and pianist Spencer Myer will open the Kent/Blossom Music Festival faculty concert series with a performance June 26 at 7:30 p.m. in Ludwig Recital Hall in the Music and Speech Building, 1325 Theatre Drive on the Kent Campus.

A six-concert subscription is $72 for adults and $60 for seniors. Call the Kent/Blossom Music Festival office at 330-672-2613 or visit www.kent.edu/blossom for details. Single tickets are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and $5 for students.

The performance will include such works as "String Quartet in F minor Op. 95" by Ludwig Van Beethoven, "String Quartet No. 9 in E-flat major Op. 117" by Dmitri Shostakovich and "Piano Quartet in A major Op. 26" by Johannes Brahms.

Resident ensemble of KBMF, the Miami String Quartet features Benny Kim and Cathy Meng Robinson on violin, Scott Lee on viola and Keith Robinson on cello. Two of the members of The Miami String Quartet, Cathy Meng Robinson and Keith Robinson, have been artists-in-residence since 2004 at the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University. The Quartet has performed extensively all over the United States and Europe, including recent appearances at the Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and its own concert series in Palm Beach, Florida.

Myer was the gold medalist of the 2008 New Orleans International Piano Competition. In 2012, he also began performing with cellist Adrian Daurov as the Daurov/Myer Duo.

"This is a highly-anticipated, high-energy concert with some of the best offerings from the greatest composers from the classical, romantic and modern eras," said Keith Robinson, who also serves as the co-artistic director of the Kent/Blossom Music Festival.

Pianist Spencer Myer's involvement in Kent/Blossom Music began in 2007. He has performed as a soloist with ensembles including The Cleveland Orchestra, and has appeared with New York City's Park Avenue Chamber Symphony, the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra, among others.

The Miami String Quartet is the resident ensemble at the Kent/Blossom Music Festival. The group has also appeared at Chamber Music Northwest, Mostly Mozart, the Brevard Festival, Rutgers Summerfest and the Virginia Arts Festival.

Return to Top



News Headline: EDRA Names Winners of Great Places Awards | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Contract Magazine - Online
Contact Name: Holly O'Dell
News OCR Text: The Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) has named seven projects in architecture, planning, landscape architecture, and urban design as winners of the 2013 Great Places Awards. The awards program recognizes excellence in environmental design and pays special attention to the relationship between physical form and human activity.

The recipients are:

2013 Place Design Award Recipients

Designer: Perkins+Will

Project: 1315 Peachtree Street, Atlanta (pictured; photo by Eduard Hueber)

Perkins+Will transformed a 1986 office building into a “living laboratory” and educational tool for sustainable design. Awarded with LEED Platinum status in 2010, the project serves as an example of how design can contribute to the healthy growth and development of its inhabitants.

Designer: PLANT Architect Inc.

Project: Dublin Grounds of Remembrance, Dublin, Ohio

This one-acre park honors the service of veterans and revitalizes the city's heritage settlement. PLANT Architect examined how architecture can be used to frame and engage the landscape while connecting people to the site and navigating their experience. In lieu of a traditional monument, the plan promotes the act of walking and social gathering.

2013 Place Planning Award Recipients

Designers: SmithGroupJJR, Inc. and Studio Gang Architects

Project: Northerly Island Park Framework Plan, Chicago

This plan embraces Chicago's tenet of unfettered public access to the lakefront while extending the city's sustainable design principles to the waterfront in a more environmentally sound way. The framework establishes four major zones transitioning from urban/active to natural/passive use, and from woodland to waterfront ecology.

Designer: Gustafson Guthrie Nichol

Project: Unified Ground: National Mall Competition, Union Square, Washington, D.C.

Gustafson Guthrie Nichol aims to enrich Union Square's plaza with spaces for informal activities, features that respond to the underlying natural landform of the site, the day-to-day patterns of movement through the nation's capital, and the diverse wants and needs of visitors. The plan extends the formal axis of the mall into Union Square as a pool, plaza, and additional pathways.

2013 Place Research Award Recipient

Designer: Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Kent State University

Project: Pop Up City: Temporary Use Strategies for a Shrinking City

An action-based research program explores ideas of urban reinvention through temporary projects. The team's research has been integrated into the graduate architecture curriculum at Kent State through design/build exercises that culminate in the deployment and evaluation of temporary projects.

2013 Place Book Award Recipient

Urban Composition by Mark C. Childs explores the question: “How can civil designers – architects, landscape architects, civil engineers, public artists, city council members, and others – collaborate in the collective work of creating environmentally sound, socially resilient, and soul-enlivening settlements?”

Placemaking Award: Providence

This award is a special recognition of the transformation of an environment over a number of years. The project from WaterFire Providence, a non-profit arts organization, comprises an evolving public art installation of music, floating fires, art, and dance along three rivers in downtown Providence, Rhode Island. The installation continuously morphs in response to grass-roots participation from residents and the ongoing expansion of the river park system.

The awards jury included Julian Bonder, principal, Wodiczko + Bonder; Gayle Epp, partner, EJP Consulting; Valerie Fletcher, executive director, Institute for Human Centered Design; Peter M. Hourihan, LEED AP, principal, and director of research, Cannon Design; and Mikyoung Kim, principal and design director, Mikyoung Kim Design.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ohio colleges get mostly low grades from National Council on Teacher Quality (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Edith Starzyk
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A controversial national report released Tuesday says that colleges and universities across the country are doing a terrible job of preparing their students to be teachers.

That was true in Ohio as well, where almost all the programs that were rated got fewer than three stars on the four-star scale used by the National Council on Teacher Quality.

Two graduate programs at Cleveland State University and one at Kent State University got zero stars, earning them a warning symbol from the council's "Teacher Prep Review."

Ohio State University, however, was at the top of the charts for its graduate programs for elementary and high school teachers.

Critics of the review say that it comes from an advocacy group biased against traditional schools of education and its design provides a poor measure of how well they're doing. Many private colleges – including all but a handful in Ohio – declined to provide the requested information because of their concerns.

But Kate Walsh, head of the Washington, D.C.-based council, said her group is hardly alone in finding the current way of educating teachers to be fundamentally flawed.

"Our strategy here is to create a consumer tool," she said. "The only way to really drive change is to use an informed consumer."

The report looked at 1,130 schools across the country but got enough information to calculate ratings for only 608 of them.

Walsh said the study used measurable standards to gauge how students are selected for teacher programs, how well they're prepared for teaching various subjects and how much practice they get before their first day on the job. "The results were dismal," she said.

The academic requirements for entering a school of education are often lower than what's needed to play on college athletic teams, she added. Prospective teachers don't get the knowledge and skills they need to be successful. And their student teaching experience is usually valuable only if they "lucked out and happened to get a great mentor."

Cheryl Achterberg, dean of Ohio State's education college, was pleased with its high ratings -- 3 1/2 stars for the graduate program for elementary teachers and a rare four stars for the graduate program for high school teachers. But she wasn't exactly sure how the calculations were done.

"We submitted a lot of paperwork," she said. "They extracted whatever they extracted using methods we really don't know yet."

Achterberg added that the faculty has been hard at work for the past three years to completely rewrite the curriculum and coordinate across classes so that every course "relates to producing a great teacher."

Kent State's programs got one or two stars but none for the graduate program for high school teachers. That program has gotten positive feedback from the students and the teachers who supervise their student teaching, said Daniel Mahony, the education dean.

"We have issues with a lot of the standards they used because they're so rigidly applied," he said. For example, the council may have required 30 hours of certain courses, but a school would get no credit for requiring 29 hours.

Mahony said a report on teacher preparation from the Ohio Board of Regents, released in January, provides prospective teachers and employers with a much better gauge because it focuses on outcomes instead of policies.

"I've been here five years and I'm comfortable in saying those who go through our program are happy with it and do very well," he said. "For me, the proof of the quality of our program is in the graduates."

Jenny Cappuzzello is one of them. The Salem native graduated last year and just finished her first year of teaching fourth grade in the Mount Healthy district near Cincinnati.

"The people I work with told me I don't act like a first-year teacher, and others I know who went to Kent have heard the same thing," she said."

Cleveland State got one and two stars for its undergraduate programs but none for its two graduate programs. One of them, which prepares teachers for urban high schools, has won national awards, said Brian Yusko, an associate dean in the education college.

"We hold that program in high esteem," he said. "It's shocking that it would come out with significant weaknesses."

Yusko said he's still trying to figure out the reasons behind the low ratings, but he thinks at least part of the problem was the way questions were posed in the survey of schools.

"We responded the best we could," he said. "But the questions were not getting to the full picture of what we do in our programs, and there was no opportunity to add to that."

Return to Top



News Headline: Study of teacher colleges gives poor marks to state universities in Ohio (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Doug Livingston
News OCR Text: Universities and colleges were the subject of criticism Tuesday when the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) issued a report suggesting that most Ohio colleges have failed to prepare first-year teachers for the classroom.

The same could be said about teacher colleges nationally, according to the report from the conservative research group, which has drawn much criticism from the education community.

Teacher colleges annually produce 200,000 first-year teachers who in turn educate 1.5 million children.

NCTQ's Teacher Prep Review used course syllabi, student-teacher programs, admissions standards and other criteria to rank 1,130 higher education institutions on a four-star grading system.

However, the report authors acknowledged only 114 colleges cooperated fully, and in many cases the study was conducted short of the data that had been requested.

NCTQ is affiliated with the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a charter-school advocate and critic of public schools, and the study was conducted in cooperation with U.S. News & World Report.

Only four colleges and universities in the nation received four stars, the highest designation. Ohio State University's graduate program in secondary education was among them.

More than 162 colleges and universities received “consumer alerts” and no stars, among them Kent State University's graduate program in secondary education and Cleveland State University's graduate programs in elementary and secondary education.

That low designation, according to the report's authors, is meant to drive prospective students away from those programs.

“You would do better to spend your time and your dollars in a program that has a higher rating,” said Kate Walsh, NCTQ president.

The University of Akron ranked in the middle with most other Ohio public universities.

“With this data, we are setting in place market forces that will spur underachieving programs to recognize their shortcomings and adopt methods used by the high scorers. At the same time, the review serves as a consumer guide for aspiring teachers in selecting a superior preparation program and for principals and superintendents in their recruitment efforts,” the report's authors wrote.

The study is the latest — and touted as the most expansive — attempt to evaluate and rank teachers and education programs, a controversial and often politically charged topic.

The NCTQ study met with opposition from higher learning institutions at the outset, some of which resisted and argued that there already were reputable organizations conducting studies. Some also questioned whether NCTQ had an agenda.

The report repeatedly mentions failed public records requests, legal action taken to procure data and working around noncooperative campus officials by asking college students to retrieve syllabi. Private schools were the least forthcoming.

Outspoken critic

One of the early critics of the study was education historian Diane Ravitch, who wrote that she was a board member of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute (TBF) when it created NCTQ.

“TBF established NCTQ as a new entity to promote alternative certification and to break the power of the hated [education] schools,” she wrote in her education blog.

“Conservatives, and I was one, did not like teacher training institutions. We thought they were too touchy-feely, too concerned about self-esteem and social justice and not concerned enough with basic skills and academics,” Ravitch said.

EduVentures, another higher education data and consulting research organization, said NCTQ's report would “seek to change the way that teachers are trained, licensed, hired, and fired.”

“The combination of flawed research methods and the potential for negative media exposure has caused a number of leaders of teacher training institutions around the country to be concerned about the potential impact that the forthcoming release of the National Review could have on public perceptions of program quality.”

Kent State response

“The biggest issue is that the report largely reports on the inputs instead of the outcomes,” said Dan Mahony, dean of the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State.

Outcomes include how graduates perform in the classrooms, and those are available in Ohio. However, because outcomes weren't universally available in all states, those were omitted.

Mahony said some standards used by NCTQ are irrelevant when asking the most important question: “Are we producing better teachers?”

For example, KSU's education program was docked points because the 2.75 GPA required for admission fell below NCTQ's 3.0 GPA benchmark. That doesn't matter, though, because KSU education graduates average a 3.44 GPA by the time they complete the program, Mahony said.

“Our proof is always in the quality of our graduates, which this report ignores completely.”

Walsh, however, asserts that the proof is in the program and programs must improve. Too many teachers reach the classroom unprepared.

“Right now, in this country, good training happens too often by happenstance,” she said.

Confusion on grading

Ohio State University is one of only four programs nationwide that received a top rating, but according to a study by the Ohio Board of Regents, education majors at seven other Ohio public universities were more likely to pass a state-administered teaching license test.

This and other data that measure teachers in the workforce were omitted from the NCTQ study.

State officials in charge of overseeing Ohio's post-secondary programs acknowledged the NCTQ report with a mixed response.

“We are aware that the teacher preparation programs in Ohio are not where they need to be, but we are glad to see some Ohio schools ranking among the top-rated programs,” Chancellor John Carey said. “The Ohio Board of Regents has been working with the Ohio Department of Education in a cross-agency collaborative effort to review teacher preparation issues and ultimately make recommendations for improvements.”

Return to Top



News Headline: National survey ranks Kent State University low in teacher training; dean disputes findings (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A report released Tuesday rating how effectively colleges and universities train would-be educators for the classroom gives less than favorable ratings to the education programs at Kent State University, in addition to the programs at a majority of institutions across the state and country.

The review, conducted by the National Council on Teacher Quality, is a highly critical assessment of teacher-training programs at U.S. colleges, measured by their admission standards, training and value. More than 1,000 programs were surveyed for the review.

"Through an exhaustive and unprecedented examination of how these schools operate, the review finds they have become an industry of mediocrity, churning out first-year teachers with classroom management skills and content knowledge inadequate to thrive in classrooms," the report states.

Using a four-star scale to assess ratings, the review gives only one of KSU's programs a rating of two stars -- its undergraduate secondary program -- while every other program is ranked at one star or below.

Dan Mahony, KSU's dean of the College of Education, Health and Human Services, rebuked the report as inaccurate in multiple ways.

"The problem is really with the way the study is set up from the very beginning," Mahony said. "It's entirely focused on input -- things like what's in the syllabus and the selectivity measures used -- as opposed to things we think are important, which are the outcomes."

The review does not give an across-the-board assessment of the programs at the 20 Ohio schools it looks at, though it gives a glimpse at a minimum of two programs offered by each.

The University of Akron was given one star for its undergraduate elementary program, 2.5 stars for its undergraduate secondary program and two stars for its graduate secondary program.

Elsewhere, Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, was ranked two stars for its undergraduate elementary program. At Bowling Green State University, the review ranked the undergraduate elementary program at 1.5 stars. Ohio University was given 1.5 stars for its undergraduate elementary program.

The only Ohio college to receive favorable marks by the review is Ohio State University, with its graduate elementary program rated at 3.5 stars and its graduate secondary program rated at four stars.

The review urges increasing the standards for accepting students into teacher preparation programs, making it more difficult for prospective students to be accepted, as well as teaching them the most effective standards once they're in.

The ratings are given based on criteria set by The National Council on Teacher Quality, such as having a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

KSU's minimum GPA for its graduate education programs is 2.75, docking its rating in the review. However, Mahony pointed out that a the average GPA for incoming students is between 3.3 and 3.4, and the average GPA of graduating teacher candidates is about 3.5.

"They have to focus on outcome data," he said, noting that the criteria in the review is set by the NCTQ "I don't know how you can assess a program when you don't talk to anyone who graduated from it, anybody who employs people from those programs or look at how well the students in the classrooms of our graduates are performing."

The full study can be found on the web at www.nctq.org/dmsStage/Teacher_Prep_Review_2013_Report

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU Defends Teaching Graduates (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Larry States
News OCR Text: Kent State University is reacting to a U.S. News And World Report and National Council On Teacher Quality study which calls KSU and other universities "an industry of mediocrity" that turns out teachers ill-prepared to work in elementary and high school classrooms. Kent State's education program received a grade of poor on the national report card.

But KSU Dean of the College Of Education, Health and Human Services, Dan Mahony says the report ignores real-life results.

Mahony tells AkronNewsNow " If you look at the data that's out there, the outcome data which we think is obviously the most critical thing, you'll find the program is rated very highly. The other thing I think that's important for us is the positive word of mouth about our program, and the quality of our graduates."

Mahony says the University is getting positive feedback from those who are hiring KSU Education graduates " If you're talking to school principals, superintendents or teachers about where they should go for an undergraduate or graduate degree in education I feel very confident that we'll be mentioned all the time, and I don't think any of that's going to change because some outside group decided to evaluate us poorly," says Mahony.

" I wasn't surprised because I understand the criteria they were using and the approach they were using was flawed. Their whole approach is focusing on inputs and not on outcomes, which is really where assessment used to be. Now the focus is more on outcomes. I looked at a lot of their criteria and we don't necessarily meet their criteria, but it's because we're not really focused on meeting their criteria. We're focused on meeting the criteria of our profession. So In knew there were inconsistencies there. So it wasn't totally shocking that they ended up with the review that they did."

Dan Mahony says several other quality universities saw their education training programs also rated poorly by the National Council On Teaching Quality.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State, Cleveland State dispute preparation study from National Council on Teacher Quality (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Deb Lee
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - First grade teacher Angela Eastman is so satisfied with the school where she earned her undergraduate degree that she's back working on a master's.

"I found that the program here was challenging and it did prepare me for the real world experiences that I had when I left," she said.

Eastman is surprised by a new study that gives Kent State low marks for teacher training.

The National Council on Teacher Quality ranked undergraduate and graduate education programs across the country by zero to four stars.  One in seven of those programs, including graduate programs at Kent State and Cleveland State received less than one star. Both schools question the report's methodology.

"It's very focused on inputs, what's in the syllabus, what's in the student teaching manual and not focused on outcomes," said Daniel Mahony, Dean of Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services.

"Can our graduates teach well? Do they have an impact on student learning? Are they satisfied with their experiences in the program? What do people say, superintendents and principals, about our graduates and their preparation? That's the data that we really focus a lot of our time and attention on,” Mahoney said.

At Cleveland State University, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Brian Yusko agrees that there's a problem with the study's methodology. He said it only used partial data.

What's more, the graduate education program, which was rated so low in the study, has won national awards from several organizations.

"It's worrisome for us," he said.

Of more than 600 schools surveyed, only four programs earned four stars: Ohio State, Furman University in South Carolina, and Lipscomb and Vanderbilt, both in Tennessee.

Cleveland State intends to formally register objections to its ratings with the National Council on Teacher Quality.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ohio State's training of teachers shines in national grading of programs (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A first-ever ranking of teacher-preparation schools puts Ohio State University at No. 1 while issuing warnings about the low quality of some of Ohio's other institutions.

Ohio State's graduate-education programs are the only ones in the nation to be highly rated for preparing both elementary and secondary schoolteachers. Only four colleges nationwide earned the top four-star rating for such programs in the stingingly critical report released yesterday on the more than 1,100 teacher-training programs nationwide.

The report by the National Council on Teacher Quality is the first to grade and rank teacher colleges. “Teacher Prep Review” was published yesterday in partnership with U.S. News and World Report. The results were widely disputed by critics, who found fault with the methods.

Fewer than 10 percent of rated programs earned at least three stars on the four-star scale.

The goal is “to drive reform in the market,” said Kate Walsh, president of the council, which is based in Washington, D.C., and describes itself as a nonpartisan group that pushes for policy changes to increase the number of effective teachers.

Researchers reviewed admission standards, course information, student-teaching data and surveys. The report concludes that aspiring teachers are unprepared, it's far too easy to get into teaching colleges, the schools fail to teach reading instruction well, and student-teaching experiences often are worthless.

The American Federation of Teachers called the four-star rating system and best-of list a “gimmick” that won't help improve schools of education. Some university officials said the council didn't use the most up-to-date information about programs. Others said the report unfairly measured the quality of students coming in and written course descriptions instead of how well-prepared graduates are.

“This is not a deep look at programs at a level that anybody should be satisfied by,” Walsh agreed. But, “we have scratched an inch deep into the surface of these programs, and just going that deep we find fundamental flaws and weaknesses.”

Some, including Dan Mahony, the education-college dean at Kent State University, said the council started with a bias against the very programs it sought to study. Kent State was among Ohio's poorly-rated teacher-training schools. Undergraduate programs there and at Akron, Ashland, Cincinnati, Cleveland State, Ohio Dominican and Wright State each received one star.

Cleveland State's and Kent State's graduate programs for teachers at secondary schools, such as high schools, received no stars, which the report labels a “consumer alert,” meaning students are less likely to get their money's worth.

Mahony said he hopes prospective students will look beyond the council's report.

“There's always that concern ... that people will just take it as being accurate,” he said. “Our proof is in the quality of the graduates in our program.”

Brian Yusko, associate dean of academic affairs in the College of Education and Human Services at Cleveland State, said the council's checklist-style survey was poorly designed and the researchers didn't welcome follow-up talks.

The result was that the program labeled a “consumer alert” is the same one that recently was nationally recognized by other groups as one of the best.

Even OSU officials were perplexed by the data methods and procedures, though grateful for the top grades and the effort to study teacher-program curriculum.

“It's the first of its kind,” said Cheryl Achterberg, dean of the College of Education and Human Ecology. “I do think what they've done is a good contribution.”

Marietta College and Ohio Northern were named to the “honor roll” for earning three stars for their undergraduate programs for teachers in secondary schools.

The state does its own reviews of the 50-some teacher-preparation programs in Ohio at both public and private colleges and universities. For the 2010-11 school year, Central State University was the only college deemed ineffective. Of 28 graduates, only 21 percent passed the test required to get a teaching license.

The full report, including school rankings, is at nctq.org.

Return to Top



News Headline: (AUDIO) Ohio teacher-prep programs rank low in a new study (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Only Ohio State receives high rating in report by U.S. News and World Report

U.S. News and World Report and the National Council on Teacher Quality today released a report on how well our colleges and universities are training future teachers.

Most Ohio education programs did poorly. The University of Akron, University of Toledo and Kent State University received very low grades for most of their teacher training programs.

WKSU's Vivian Goodman spoke with Kent State Education Program Dean Dan Mahony about the low rankings. Mahony says the report focuses too much on course work and syllabi.

"It's really inconsistent with all the data we look at," Mahony says. "I think the problem with the report and the review is it's all based on inputs and not on outcomes. Our goal is to prepare good teachers who have an impact on students, none of which the review looks at at all."

This is the first national review by the council. It also did studies in Texas and Illinois and most programs there received low rankings, Mahony says. He thinks low scores are common because the reviewers use data that supports their assumptions that programs are bad.

"We look at the outcome data," Mahony says. "When you look at surveys of our graduates, we are very high, well above the state average, on almost every single item they ask about. If you look at the value-added scores of students in the classrooms of our graduates, we again are above the state averages on that. Any of the outcome data that we look at we do very, very well. There really isn't any consistency between what they have as their criteria and the outcomes."

One Ohio university ranks well. Ohio State University had the only graduate secondary education program to earn four out of four stars.

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/35933

Return to Top



News Headline: (AUDIO) Mixed grades for Ohio's teacher prep programs (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State disputes the rankings, but says colleges of education are working on improvements

Ohio's colleges of education graduate about 6,000 new teachers each year. Now a new report says many of those colleges aren't doing a good job of preparing teachers for the classroom. StateImpact Ohio's Molly Bloom reports.

Ohio State University is one of just four colleges of education nationwide who's teacher prep programs earned the highest possible grade from the report by National Council on Teacher Quality.

Marietta College and Ohio Northern University also got high marks.

But the report says some teacher ed programs at Kent State University and Cleveland State University do a poor job of preparing future teachers.

Leaders of those schools dispute those ratings.

Dan Mahony leads the college of education at Kent State University and heads Ohio's association of deans of public colleges of education. He says the council's ratings don't look at how well graduates perform in the classroom.

“And if you talk to the people who graduated from our programs, they would give you a far different assessment of how well prepared they were when they went into their first teaching job than the ratings that you would get from NCTQ.”

Still, Mahony says Ohio colleges of education are already working together to improve, and are in talks with legislators about changes, such as making colleges of education more selective.

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/35938

Return to Top



News Headline: OUR VIEW: Freshman numbers spell success for Kent State (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: focusing on recruitment of talented students brings results

Kent State University's bid for a competitive edge in recruiting new students is paying off.

For the second time in three years, freshman enrollment has reached capacity levels, with 4,200 students set to begin their college career at Kent in August. And, according to university officials, the incoming members of the Class of 2017 have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.3, with more than 75 percent with a 3.0 GPA or better.

That's a solid indication that a key element of Kent State's recruitment strategy -- focusing on top-notch students and giving them an incentive to choose Kent -- is working. A big draw, in a time when college tuition continues to rise, is a boost in merit-based scholarships for freshmen applicants -- Kent offered $31 million in scholarships this year, an increase of about 30 percent over last year. Students with sound academic credentials responded to the offer.

Applications for freshman enrollment this fall were the highest ever recorded, with 22,000 seeking entry, according to university officials. The 4,200 who settled on Kent represent an increase of about 200 over last year's incoming class. Making the numbers more impressive is the fact that demographics are proving more challenging for universities as the number of potential college students drops.

Under President Lester Lefton, Kent State has stressed academic excellence and focused on becoming a world-class institution of higher learning -- a lofty goal to be sure, but not an unattainable one. Getting talented students to consider Kent State, and providing them with incentives to enroll there, is part of the strategy for nurturing a strong enrollment.

"This shows we're definitely on the right track," Lefton observed Monday when the enrollment statistics were announced.

He's right. The word is out about Kent State: It has a lot to offer -- and more than 4,000 young people are looking forward to finding that out for themselves.

Return to Top



News Headline: (VIDEO) This Week on Kaleidoscope - June 16, 2013 (Banks) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CEO of Flight for the Cure Krista Jordan and her Venture Coach Stacey Banks-Houston talk about Krista's company Flight for the Cure which was established to sell Krista's handmade products. Part of the proceeds from the sales are donated for cancer research. For more information log on to http://www.flight4thecure.com

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/about_us/this-week-on-kaleidoscope---june-16-2013

Return to Top



News Headline: BRIEF: Prayer vigil and fundraiser tonight for missing Akron woman | Email

News Date: 06/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: June 18--A fundraiser and prayer vigil will be held tonight for Taylor Robinson, an Akron woman who has been missing for more than a month.

The vigil starts at 7 p.m. at the Greater Faith Missionary Baptist Church, 825 E. Buchtel Ave.

The event comes after about 60 people joined a search effort Saturday.

Robinson, a Kent State University student, last was seen May 3, when her mother dropped her off at a Kipling Street home. The 19-year-old worked there as a private health-care provider.

When her mother returned the next morning, Robinson was not at the home. Only her coat and shoes remained at the house.

Akron police and the FBI have been involved in the investigation.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Akron police at 330-375-2490. Anonymous tips can be left at http://ci.akron.oh.us/ASP/tip.html.

Information also can be provided anonymously by calling Summit County Crimestoppers at 330-434-COPS (2677). Tipsters might qualify for a cash reward.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus