Report Overview:
Total Clips (9)
Art, School of; Music (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Financial Aid (1)
Geography (1)
Sociology (3)
Students (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of; Music (1)
Cleveland Arts listings for June 21-27: "The Book of Mormon" at PlayhouseSquare & More 06/20/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...or playhousesquare.org. "The Book of Mormon." 7:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13 Porthouse Theatre. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 330-672-3884 or porthousetheatre.com. The picnic grounds...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Kent State University Disputes Study from National Council on Teacher Quality (Mahony) 06/21/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

The National Council on Teacher Quality ranked undergraduate and graduate education programs across the country by zero to four stars. One in seven of...


Financial Aid (1)
Student loan rate set to double unless Congress acts (Evans) 06/20/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...government-subsidized student loan rates. If no agreement is reached, interest rates on these loans will double. "It would be catastrophic to me," says Kent State University senior Shanisha Collins. Collins is one of the 7 million students who relies on a Stafford Loan from the federal government...


Geography (1)
KSU Students, Researcher To Study Colorado Wildfires (Curtis) 06/20/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...for June 22nd Colorado trip Aaron Coleman, AkronNewsNow.com In the wake of the devastating wildfires in Colorado's Black Forest, a research team from Kent State University will heading out to the area to assess the damage and conduct research. Assistant Professor of Geography at Kent State...


Sociology (3)
Candid police chief's comments spur viral Facebook page (Merryman) 06/21/2013 CNN.com Text Attachment Email

...productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions. Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are...

Candid chief spurs viral Facebook page (Merryman) 06/20/2013 KRCR-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions. Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are...

Candid chief spurs viral Facebook page (Merryman) 06/20/2013 Channel4000 Text Attachment Email

...productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions. Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are...


Students (2)
Experience pays during Miss Ohio prelims 06/20/2013 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...at a time. She entered the Miss Ohio pageant as a senior in high school. Wells, making her sixth trip to Miss Ohio, is obtaining a masters degree at Kent State University in nutrition. She wants to become a registered dietitian and work as a health correspondent for a news station or network. Her...

Experience pays during Miss Ohio prelims 06/21/2013 Chillicothe Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...at a time. She entered the Miss Ohio pageant as a senior in high school. Wells, making her sixth trip to Miss Ohio, is obtaining a masters degree at Kent State University in nutrition. She wants to become a registered dietitian and work as a health correspondent for a news station or network. Her...


News Headline: Cleveland Arts listings for June 21-27: "The Book of Mormon" at PlayhouseSquare & More | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Mark Rapp, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Wanna see what all the hype is about? Then hustle down to PlayhouseSquare and witness the comic miracle that is "The Book of Mormon," now in a limited run at the Palace Theatre, PlayhouseSquare, through Sunday, July 7. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, and 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $20-$130. Go to playhousesquare.org or call 216-241-6000. The production will conduct a lottery at the PlayhouseSquare ticket office 2 hours before each show, releasing 16 tickets for $20 apiece cash only. Andrea Simakis

Browsing the Arts calendar for Friday, Jun 21

ART -- MUSEUMS

Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday). Closes all major holidays. $7; $5, those 65 and older and students with ID; free for youth ages 17 and younger. Free admission the third Thursday of the month. Exhibit (Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell Gallery): "Danny Lyon: The Bikeriders," featuring photographs of members of the Chicago Outlaw Motorcycle Club. Through Sunday, July 21. Allen Memorial Art Museum. 87 N. Main St., Oberlin. 440-775-8665 or oberlin.edu/allenart. A strong permanent collection makes the Allen well worth a trip to Lorain County. The Weltzheimer/Johnson House (a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian House, 1948-50), 534 Morgan St., is open the first and third Sundays of the month, from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Free. Exhibit (Ripin Print Gallery): "Beyond the Surface: Text and Image in Islamic Art." Through Sunday, June 30. Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday). Closed major holidays. Free admission to the permanent collection. Admission may apply to touring exhibitions. Traveling Exhibition: "The Last Days of Pompeii: Decadence, Apocalypse, Resurrection." Organized by CMA and the J. Paul Getty Museum, features six galleries of works of art from more than 50 public and private collections in Europe and the United States, including the Louvre and the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Through Sunday, July 7. Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. 11400 Euclid Ave. 216-421-8671 or mocacleveland.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 10 p.m. Thursday). $8; $6, senior citizens; $5, students with valid ID. Free admission on the first Saturday of the month. Exhibit: "Dark Stars," featuring works by Carol Bove, Michael Byron, Annie MacDonell, R.H. Quaytman and Cerith Wyn Evans. Through Sunday, Aug. 25. ART -- GALLERIES

Breakneck Gallery. 17020 Madison Ave., Lakewood. 216-767-5610 or breakneckgallery.com. 4-7 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2-8 p.m. Saturday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "The Return of Art Deck-O," featuring artwork by local artists created on skateboard decks. Opening reception: 6-10 p.m. Saturday. 06/22/13 Cleveland Artists Foundation. Beck Center for the Arts, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-227-9507 or clevelandartists.org. Program: "Pioneering Modernism: Post-Impresionism in Cleveland, 1908-13." Moderator: Marianne Berardi, Heritage Auctions. Panelists: Henry Adams, Case Western Reserve University; William Robinson, Cleveland Museum of Art; and Roger Welchans, artist-art historian. Panel Discussion: 6-8 p.m. today. 06/21/13 Hedge Gallery. 1300 West 78th St., Suite 200, Cleveland. 216-650-4201 or 78thstreetstudios.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "Surface Tension." Opening reception: 5-10 p.m. today. 06/21/13 Kent State University. Art Building, 400 Janik Drive 330-672-2192 or dept.kent.edu/art. Guest Lecturer (Room 202): Ceramic artist Julia Galloway, director of the School of Art at the University of Montana in Missoula. Lecture: 6 p.m. today. 06/21/13 Log Cabin Gallery. 1671 Main St., Peninsula. 330-657-2670 or thelogcabingallery.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday-Sunday, or by appointment. Exhibit: "The Summer Show," featuring works by 17 local artists. Opens Thursday. 06/27/13 Studio of Molly Nook. 23300 Mercantile Road, Beachwood. 330-931-9613. Art Show: Celebrating Old Friends: Works by Lee Heinen, Patti Pinkerton and Dick Reminger." Meet the Artists: 5-10 p.m. Thursday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday, June 28. Studios of Jack Richard. Jane Williams Gallery, 2250 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. 330-929-1575 or jackrichard.com. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "Etching in Glass: Works by Christopher A. Jones." Continues through June 30. Superior Hot Glass. 1588 East 40th St., Cleveland. Benefit: "Wigs for Kids," a blend of glass blowing creations and hors d'oeuvres cooked via molten glass. Meet the Artists: 5-11 p.m. Saturday. 06/22/13 Survival Kit Gallery. Third floor of 78th St. Studio, 1305 West 80th St., Cleveland. survivalkitgallery.com. By appointment and for 78th St. Studios 3rd Friday events. Exhibit: "Curious Things." Works by Douglas Max Utter, Christi Birchfield, Adrienne Slane and Nikki Woods. Opening reception: 5-11 p.m. today. 06/21/13 BOOKS -- AUTHORS

Amherst Public Library. 221 Spring St. 440-988-4230 or amherst.lib.oh.us. Program: Children author Tricia Springstubb, "Phoebe and Digger." 2 p.m. Thursday. 06/27/13 Cuyahoga County Public Library. Beachwood branch, 25501 Shaker Blvd., Beachwood. 216-831-6868 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Free. Meet the Author: Brad Ricca, "Supper Boys: The Amazing Adventures of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster," the creators of Superman. 7 p.m. Tuesday. 06/25/13 Firehouse Grille & Pub. 2768 Stark Drive, Willoughby Hills. 440-943-4983 or firehousegrilleandpub.com. Book Release Launch Party: Deanna R. Adams, "Peggy Sue Got Pregnant: A Rock & Roll Love Story." 3-7 p.m. Sunday. 06/23/13 Learned Owl Book Shop. 204 N. Main St., Hudson. 330-653-2252 or learnedowl.com. Meet the Author: Kimball C. Firestone (grandson of tire pioneer Harvey Firestone and operator of a popular Maryland restaurant), "Reflections on a Silver Spoon: How a Foodie Found Home." 1-3 p.m. Saturday. 06/22/13 Oberlin Public Library. 65 S. Main St. 440-775-4790 or oberlinpl.lib.oh.us. Program: Children author Tricia Springstubb, "Phoebe and Digger," gives a writing workshop for grades 3-6. 4 p.m. Thursday. 06/27/13 Peninsula Library. 6105 Riverview Road 330-657-2291 or peninsulalibrary.org. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. Meet the Author: Bill Nemoyten, "It All Started with a Trombone." 7 p.m. Monday. 06/24/13 Visible Voice Books. 1023 Kenilworth Ave., Cleveland. 216-961-0084 or visiblevoicebooks.com. Meet the Author: Scott Longert, "The Best They Could Be," how the Cleveland Indians became the Kings of Baseball, 1916-20."" 6 p.m. Wednesday. 06/26/13 DANCE

Dobama Theatre. 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-932-3396 or dobama.org. Performance: The Inspired Body presents "Not What I Expected .. Dances of Ages, Stages and Rages," featuring Tracy Pattison's "She Three." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. 06/21/13-06/22/13

MUSIC -- ORCHESTRAL, OPERA

Ohio Light Opera. College of Wooster's Freedlander Theatre, 329 E. University St., Wooster. 330-263-2345 or ohiolightopera.org. In repertory through Saturday, Aug. 10: "The Gondoliers," "The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein," "The Gypsy Baron," "H.M.S. Pinafore," "The King and I," "Lady, Be Good!" and "Silk Stockings." Free performance talk at 6:30 p.m. prior to Friday and Saturday evening performances. Tickets: $48; $20, students; $10, child. Check for availability. Production: Rodgers and Hammerstein's "The King and I." 2 p.m. today and Tuesday; 7:30 p.m. Saturday. 06/21/13-06/25/13

MUSIC -- RECITALS, COMMUNITY CONCERTS

Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library. University Heights branch, 13866 Cedar Road 216-321-4700. Concert: Marjorie Connally, piano. Singalong with melodies familiar to senior citizens as well as hymns of several military services. 2 p.m. Thursday. 06/27/13 Dobama Theatre. 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-932-3396 or dobama.org. Helen Todd Voice Studio Showcase. 7 p.m. Wednesday. 06/26/13 Kent/Blossom Music Festival. Kent State University's Music & Speech Building's Ludwig Recital Hall, 1325 Theatre Drive. 330-672-2613 or dept.kent.edu/blossom. Kent/Blossom Music Festival Faculty Concert: The Miami String Quartet and pianist Spencer Myer. Works by Beethoven, Shostakovich and Brahms. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. 06/26/13 Trinity Lutheran Church. 2031 West 30th St., Cleveland. 216-321-1393 or clevelandbeckerath.org. Brownbag Concert: "The Angel's Song." Robert Myers, organ. Featuring J.S. Bach's Fugue in C major (S.547), plus works by Walther and others. 12:15 p.m. Wednesday. 06/26/13 THEATER -- PROFESSIONAL

Actors' Summit Theater. Greystone Hall, 6th Floor, 103 S. High St., Akron. 330-374-7568 or actorssummit.org. Ray Roderick and James Hindman's "The Bikinis." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Beck Center for the Arts. 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-2540 or beckcenter.org. $28, adults; $25, seniors; $17, students with ID; $10, children ages 12 and under. An additional $3 service fee per ticket at time of purchase. Studio Theater: Lee Hall's "The Pitmen Painters." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/23/13

Cain Park. Alma Theater, Lee and Superior roads, Cleveland Heights. 216-371-3000 or cainpark.com. "Smokey Joe's Cafe: The Songs of Leiber and Stoller." 7 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Cleveland Shakespeare Festival. The 16th annual outdoor season features "Measure for Measure" and "The Two Gentlemen of Vernona" at various location through Sunday, Aug. 4. Rain spaces have been secured for every venue except Wade Oval, allowing performances to proceed rain or shine. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. Details: go to cleveshakes.org. Notre Dame College. 4545 College Road, South Euclid. William Shakespeare's on the Quad: "Two Gentlemen of Verona." 7 p.m. today-Saturday. 06/21/13-06/22/13

Great Lakes Theater. Hanna Theatre, 2067 East 14th St., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or greatlakestheater.org. "Guys and Dolls." 7:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Mamai Theater Company. Ensemble Theatre, Coventry Commons, 2843 Washington Blvd., Cleveland Heights. 216-570-3403 or mamaitheatreco.org. Brendan Kennelly's translation of Euripides' "Medea." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13 Pickwick & Frolic Restaurant and Club. Frolic Cabaret, 2035 East Fourth St., Cleveland. 216-241-7425 or pickwickandfrolic.com. Murder Mystery Musical: Michael Rogaliner's "Toga Party Terror." 7:15 p.m. Saturday. 06/22/13 PlayhouseSquare. Palace Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. "The Book of Mormon." 7:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13 Porthouse Theatre. Blossom Music Center, 1145 W. Steels Corners Road, Cuyahoga Falls. 330-672-3884 or porthousetheatre.com. The picnic grounds open 90 minutes prior to curtain. Rodgers and Hammerstein's "South Pacific." 8 p.m. today-Sunday, Tuesday-Thursday. 06/21/13-06/27/13 THEATER -- COMMUNITY

Canal Fulton Players. Canal Fulton Canalway Center, 125 Tuscarawas St. 330-854-6835 or cityofcanalfulton-oh.gov. Performances on St. Helena III Canal Boat and the Canal Fulton Park Towpath. William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet." 4 and 6:30 p.m. Saturday; 4 p.m. Sunday. 06/22/13-06/23/13

Cassidy Theatre. 6200 Pearl Road, Parma Heights. 440-842-4600 or cassidytheatre.com. Cole Porter's "Anything Goes." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/23/13

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. Main Stage, 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Jon Lonoff's "Skin Deep." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. 06/21/13-06/22/13

Fine Arts Association. Corning Auditorium, 38660 Mentor Ave., Willoughby. 440-951-7500 or fineartsassociation.org. Richard Adle, Jerry Ross, George Abbott and Douglass Wallop's "Damn Yankees." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/23/13

Huntington Playhouse. 28601 Lake Road, Bay Village. 440-871-8333 or huntingtonplayhouse.com. "The Fox on the Fairway." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. 06/21/13-06/22/13

Mercury Summer Stock. Notre Dame College's Regina Hall, 4545 College Road, South Euclid. 216-771-5862 or mercurysummerstock.com. David Lindsay-Abaire and Jeanine Tesori's "Shrek, the Musical." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday, Wednesday-Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

New Africa Theatre. East 71st Street and Kinsman Road, Cleveland. Staged Reading: Mary Weems' "MEAT: The Imperial Avenue Tragedy." 6 p.m. Saturday. 06/22/13 North Canton Playhouse. Main Stage, 525 Seventh St. 330-494-1613 or northcantonplayhouse.com. "Evil Dead, the Musical." 8 p.m. today-Sunday and Thursday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Olde Towne Hall Theatre. At Black Dog Pub and Eatery, 36040 Sugar Ridge Road, North Ridgeville. Piano Bar & Cabaret Night, featuring Bryan Bird. 6 p.m. Saturday. 06/22/13 Rabbit Run Barn Theater. 5648 Chapel Road, Madison. 440-428-5913 or rabbitrunonline.org/events. "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." 8 p.m. today-Sunday and Thursday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Royalton Players. Altenheim Community Center, 18533 Shurmer Road, Strongsville. 440-877-0009 or royaltonplayers.com. "Pippin." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 3 p.m. Sunday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Rubber City Shakespeare Company. University of Akron's Schrank Hall South, Room 145, 240 Carroll St., Akron. 419-951-5000 or rubbercityshakes.weebly.com. William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. 06/27/13 Straw Hat Theatre. Ashtabula Arts Center, 2928 West 13th St., Ashtabula. 440-964-3396 or ashartscenter.org. "A Funny thing Happened on the Way to the Forum." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. 06/21/13-06/22/13

Weathervane Playhouse. 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron. 330-836-2626 or weathervaneplayhouse.com. Meredith Willson's "The Music Man." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Thursday. 06/21/13-06/27/13

Western Reserve Playhouse. 3326 Everett Road, Bath. 330-620-7314 or westernreserveplayhouse.org. Ron Hill's "House for Sale." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. 06/21/13-06/22/13

Workshop Players Theatre-in-the-Round. 44820 Middle Ridge Road, Amherst. 440-988-5613 or workshopplayers.com. Ernest Thompson's "On Golden Pond." 8 p.m. Thursday. 06/27/13 AUDITIONS

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News Headline: Kent State University Disputes Study from National Council on Teacher Quality (Mahony) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The National Council on Teacher Quality ranked undergraduate and graduate education programs across the country by zero to four stars. One in seven of those programs, including graduate programs at Kent State, received less than one star.

First grade teacher Angela Eastman is so satisfied with the school where she earned her undergraduate degree that she's back working on a master's.

"I found that the program here was challenging and it did prepare me for the real world experiences that I had when I left," she said in a story posted by our partners at NewsNet5.com.

Eastman is surprised by a new study that gives Kent State low marks for teacher training.

The National Council on Teacher Quality ranked undergraduate and graduate education programs across the country by zero to four stars. One in seven of those programs, including graduate programs at Kent State and Cleveland State received less than one star. Both schools question the report's methodology.

"It's very focused on inputs, what's in the syllabus, what's in the student teaching manual and not focused on outcomes," said Daniel Mahony, Dean of Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services.

"Can our graduates teach well? Do they have an impact on student learning? Are they satisfied with their experiences in the program? What do people say, superintendents and principals, about our graduates and their preparation? That's the data that we really focus a lot of our time and attention on,” Mahoney said.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH A VIDEO THAT ACCOMPANIES THE STORY: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/education/Kent-State-Cleveland-State-dispute-preparation-study-from-National-Council-on-Teacher-Quality

At Cleveland State University, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Brian Yusko agrees that there's a problem with the study's methodology. He said it only used partial data.

What's more, the graduate education program, which was rated so low in the study, has won national awards from several organizations.

"It's worrisome for us," he said.

Of more than 600 schools surveyed, only four programs earned four stars: Ohio State, Furman University in South Carolina, and Lipscomb and Vanderbilt, both in Tennessee.

Cleveland State intends to formally register objections to its ratings with the National Council on Teacher Quality.

Read the story on Channel 5 here: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/education/Kent-State-Cleveland-State-dispute-preparation-study-from-National-Council-on-Teacher-Quality

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News Headline: Student loan rate set to double unless Congress acts (Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WKYC Web Staff

A deadline looms large for college students across the country.

Congress has until July 1 to end their standoff over government-subsidized student loan rates.

If no agreement is reached, interest rates on these loans will double.

"It would be catastrophic to me," says Kent State University senior Shanisha Collins.

Collins is one of the 7 million students who relies on a Stafford Loan from the federal government to help her pay for college.

The possible rate increase weighs heavily on her.

"It would be hard for me to try and pay it back," she says.

Unless Congress acts by July 1, the interest rate on subsidized federal direct loans will increase from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent, affecting students who are either starting or continuing their education this fall.

"We were in this position a year ago, and at the eleventh hour, Congress did act to postpone it another year," says Mark Evans, director of financial aid at Kent State University.

So far, Congress has been unable to agree on a plan. Legislation that passed in the House last month failed in the Senate.

Inaction has costly consequences for students.

The rate increase means that 7 million borrowers would owe $1,000 more for each of year college over the life of the loan.

Students like Shanisha Collins are hopeful a resolution will be reached.

"It's going to have an impact on us now and our future generations trying to go to college," she says.

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News Headline: KSU Students, Researcher To Study Colorado Wildfires (Curtis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Aaron Coleman
News OCR Text: Written by Aaron Coleman

Rate this item

Field Data collected for June 22nd Colorado trip Aaron Coleman, AkronNewsNow.com

In the wake of the devastating wildfires in Colorado's Black Forest, a research team from Kent State University will heading out to the area to assess the damage and conduct research.

Assistant Professor of Geography at Kent State Dr. Jackie Curtis explains how the two-person team will do their research on post-wildfire neighborhood recovery.

"Our focus is on the Waldo Canyon Fire," she says. "It started last year around June 23, so this will be the one year anniversary of that fire."

Kent State grad students Andrea Szell and Rachel Will will be leaving for Colorado Saturday and will return to Ohio Monday.

(from left to right Andrea Szell and Rachel Will holding the cameras they will be using to collect data in Colorado Photo Credit Aaron Coleman, AkronNewsNow.com)

"We went out there six months ago after the fire to look at recovery, so now our grad students will be going out there to see what's happened after a year."

Szell says the video cameras she and Rachel will be using this upcoming weekend will be used not only to collect data, but also analyze post disaster environments as it relates to stress.

"When we get out in the field, we take two cameras on each side of the car, we mount them on the car and we navigate through the study area road by road," she says.

"We then take the spatial video data of each street in the neighborhood."

The pair will be using spacial video for the Waldo Canyon Fire Project, which is the second of two trips primarily used for data collection, but with the Black Forest fire occuring in the same vicinity, they will collect damage data on it as well.

Szell says she's looking forward to the trip.

"We're really excited about the trip and I think we'll be getting so much more out of this trip then we've expected when we actually planned the trip before the Black Forest Fires happened."

As of Thursday, the fire is reportedly 95 percent contained and has claimed nearly 500 structures and two lives.

The Waldo Canyon Fire Project is funded by the University of Colorado's Natural Hazards Center.

Rachel Will says the spatial video used to collect data from the disaster sites in Colorado this weekend will aid her research into health concerns of residents as well as damage from the wildfires.

"They are a very powerful tool to help analyze post-disaster recovery," she explained.

"I think it will be a interesting project and a real eye-opening experience."

Szell says she will serve as the navigator this weekend while Rachel drives the vehicle.

Both Szell and Will say this "hands on" real-world experience will be a benefit to them as they continue along both their academic and professional paths.

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News Headline: Candid police chief's comments spur viral Facebook page (Merryman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: CNN.com
Contact Name: Matthew Casey
News OCR Text: (CNN) -- Brimfield Township Police Chief David Oliver keeps a picture of John Wayne in his office, but admits it's hard to know what the Duke would say about a self-described old-school cop using to sound off about enforcing the law in a small Ohio town.

"I'd like to think he'd appreciate that we're communicating effectively with people," Oliver said. "But have a low tolerance for nonsense."

The police chief has earned national headlines for poking fun at so-called mopes, or suspected criminals, on his department's Facebook page.

Oliver's candid comments have made it the third most viewed police department page in the United States, according to Nancy Kolb, senior program manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

With more than 64,000 likes, it trails only the New York City Police Departmentand the Boston Police Department.

"Up and at 'em. It's 65 degrees outside of the Center for Mope Studies," Oliver wrote in a typical post this week.

The chair of Brimfield's board of trustees says Oliver's teasing of criminals is in good fun, while criminal justice experts say it falls in a gray area between traditional practices and the unethical.

Oliver launched the Facebook page in 2010, after viewing a couple police department pages and deciding one would fit into his management philosophy, which is to try to run the department like a business and serve the community from within.

He and his staff of 16 full-time officers say they want social media to work for those they serve.

"If our customers are on Facebook and Twitter, we have to be there engaging them," said Oliver, who spoke by phone from Brimfield. "The more we communicate, the more we inform, the less people are suspicious of us."

'It takes away the moral high ground'

Brimfield Township is a suburb of Kent, Ohio, with a population of more than 10,000 that is growing rapidly again after being hit hard by years of economic downturn, said Mike Kostensky, the chairman of its board of trustees.

He has known Oliver for 12 years.

"Dave has such a way with words," Kostensky said. "He makes people comfortable. His office is open to anybody. I guess it's a little bit of how small town America used to be."

But not everyone sees productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions.

Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are often the most in need of its help.

"It takes away the moral high ground of whoever is supposed to be in charge," Lab said. "It's going to raise more disrespect."

Oliver disagrees.

He got the term "mope" from the 1970s police show "Kojak," and stresses his teasing of suspects is just a part of what he posts.

"A mope is a person who leeches off us and usually is engaged in criminal activity," Oliver wrote recently. "We do not believe everyone who has ever committed a crime is a mope. People change."

On June 20, the police chief likened the Brimfield police station to a ship in the U.S. Navy.

"It's 54 degrees outside of Mope-us Interruptus," he wrote in a post that also thanked World War II veterans, wished singer Lionel Richie happy birthday and quoted comedian Jay Leno.

Sometimes, Oliver details calls to police and their response.

"I think that as a society we have become desensitized," he said. "I'm trying to keep a lot of the criminal element in plain view, so we can address some of the causes and the results of the crime."

'I just don't get along well with criminals'

Lab, who doesn't use Facebook and had not viewed the Brimfield page, said now that it has gone viral, it no longer serves its intended purpose because the majority of its audience is in no way connected with Brimfield.

"It's titillating," he said of the page's surge in popularity. "It's morbid voyeurism by people in general."

Molly Merryman, associate chair of sociology in the Criminology and Justice Studies program at Kent State University, which is about 15 minutes from Brimfield, says social media plays an increased role in informing communities like Brimfield that are not connected to a major media market.

"He's been a chief for a long time and knows his community very well," she said. If the Facebook page is "an extension of the police department and has the community's blessing, then it certainly can be appropriate."

Merryman said the U.S. criminal justice system has a long history of public shaming that can be traced to the Puritans. Shaming is still commonly used in the juvenile justice system, where the goal is to make the violator recognize society's expectation for proper behavior, she said.

Oliver said that while what he posts about alleged criminals is public record, he never uses names, pictures or exact locations when discussing suspects' purported actions.

"I don't want anybody humiliated," he said. "I'm very sensitive to collateral damage by people who commit crimes and I don't want a family member suffering."

According to the FBI, in 2011, approximately one crime was reported for every 36 people living in Brimfield Township. Almost 96% of reported crimes were property crimes, of which larceny and theft made up 80%. Brimfield Township reported no murders or homicides in 2011, and a total of 12 violent crimes, half of which were rape.

A native of nearby Akron, Ohio, Oliver has spent his entire 19 years as a police officer working in Brimfield, the last nine as chief.

"I'm an inner-city kid," he said. "I did my share of running the streets. ... I don't see color. I don't see sex. I have friends of all persuasions. I just don't get along well with criminals."

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News Headline: Candid chief spurs viral Facebook page (Merryman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: KRCR-TV - Online
Contact Name: Matthew Casey CNN
News OCR Text: Brimfield Township Police Chief David Oliver keeps a picture of John Wayne in his office, but admits it's hard to know what the Duke would say about a self-described old-school cop using Facebook to sound off about enforcing the law in a small Ohio town.

"I'd like to think he'd appreciate that we're communicating effectively with people," Oliver said. "But have a low tolerance for nonsense."

The police chief has earned national headlines for poking fun at so-called mopes, or suspected criminals, on his department's Facebook page.

Oliver's candid comments have made it the third most viewed police department page in the United States, according to Nancy Kolb, senior program manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

With more than 64,000 likes, it trails only the New York City Police Department and the Boston Police Department.

"Up and at 'em. It's 65 degrees outside of the Center for Mope Studies," Oliver wrote in a typical post this week.

The chair of Brimfield's board of trustees says Oliver's teasing of criminals is in good fun, while criminal justice experts say it falls in a gray area between traditional practices and the unethical.

Oliver launched the Facebook page in 2010, after viewing a couple police department pages and deciding one would fit into his management philosophy, which is to try to run the department like a business and serve the community from within.

He and his staff of 16 full-time officers say they want social media to work for those they serve.

"If our customers are on Facebook and Twitter, we have to be there engaging them," said Oliver, who spoke by phone from Brimfield. "The more we communicate, the more we inform, the less people are suspicious of us."

'It takes away the moral high ground'

Brimfield Township is a suburb of Kent, Ohio, with a population of more than 10,000 that is growing rapidly again after being hit hard by years of economic downturn, said Mike Kostensky, the chairman of its board of trustees.

He has known Oliver for 12 years.

"Dave has such a way with words," Kostensky said. "He makes people comfortable. His office is open to anybody. I guess it's a little bit of how small town America used to be."

But not everyone sees productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions.

Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are often the most in need of its help.

"It takes away the moral high ground of whoever is supposed to be in charge," Lab said. "It's going to raise more disrespect."

Oliver disagrees.

He got the term "mope" from the 1970s police show "Kojak," and stresses his teasing of suspects is just a part of what he posts.

"A mope is a person who leeches off us and usually is engaged in criminal activity," Oliver wrote recently. "We do not believe everyone who has ever committed a crime is a mope. People change."

On June 20, the police chief likened the Brimfield police station to a ship in the U.S. Navy.

"It's 54 degrees outside of Mope-us Interruptus," he wrote in a post that also thanked World War II veterans, wished singer Lionel Richie happy birthday and quoted comedian Jay Leno.

Sometimes, Oliver details calls to police and their response.

"I think that as a society we have become desensitized," he said. "I'm trying to keep a lot of the criminal element in plain view, so we can address some of the causes and the results of the crime."

'I just don't get along well with criminals'

Lab, who doesn't use Facebook and had not viewed the Brimfield page, said now that it has gone viral, it no longer serves its intended purpose because the majority of its audience is in no way connected with Brimfield.

"It's titillating," he said of the page's surge in popularity. "It's morbid voyeurism by people in general."

Molly Merryman, associate chair of sociology in the Criminology and Justice Studies program at Kent State University, which is about 15 minutes from Brimfield, says social media plays an increased role in informing communities like Brimfield that are not connected to a major media market.

"He's been a chief for a long time and knows his community very well," she said. If the Facebook page is "an extension of the police department and has the community's blessing, then it certainly can be appropriate."

Merryman said the U.S. criminal justice system has a long history of public shaming that can be traced to the Puritans. Shaming is still commonly used in the juvenile justice system, where the goal is to make the violator recognize society's expectation for proper behavior, she said.

Oliver said that while what he posts about alleged criminals is public record, he never uses names, pictures or exact locations when discussing suspects' purported actions.

"I don't want anybody humiliated," he said. "I'm very sensitive to collateral damage by people who commit crimes and I don't want a family member suffering."

According to the FBI, in 2011, approximately one crime was reported for every 36 people living in Brimfield Township. Almost 96% of reported crimes were property crimes, of which larceny and theft made up 80%. Brimfield Township reported no murders or homicides in 2011, and a total of 12 violent crimes, half of which were rape.

A native of nearby Akron, Ohio, Oliver has spent his entire 19 years as a police officer working in Brimfield, the last nine as chief.

"I'm an inner-city kid," he said. "I did my share of running the streets. ... I don't see color. I don't see sex. I have friends of all persuasions. I just don't get along well with criminals."

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News Headline: Candid chief spurs viral Facebook page (Merryman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Channel4000
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Brimfield Township Police Chief David Oliver keeps a picture of John Wayne in his office, but admits it's hard to know what the Duke would say about a self-described old-school cop using Facebook to sound off about enforcing the law in a small Ohio town.

"I'd like to think he'd appreciate that we're communicating effectively with people," Oliver said. "But have a low tolerance for nonsense."

The police chief has earned national headlines for poking fun at so-called mopes, or suspected criminals, on his department's Facebook page.

Oliver's candid comments have made it the third most viewed police department page in the United States, according to Nancy Kolb, senior program manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

With more than 64,000 likes, it trails only the New York City Police Department and the Boston Police Department.

"Up and at 'em. It's 65 degrees outside of the Center for Mope Studies," Oliver wrote in a typical post this week.

The chair of Brimfield's board of trustees says Oliver's teasing of criminals is in good fun, while criminal justice experts say it falls in a gray area between traditional practices and the unethical.

Oliver launched the Facebook page in 2010, after viewing a couple police department pages and deciding one would fit into his management philosophy, which is to try to run the department like a business and serve the community from within.

He and his staff of 16 full-time officers say they want social media to work for those they serve.

"If our customers are on Facebook and Twitter, we have to be there engaging them," said Oliver, who spoke by phone from Brimfield. "The more we communicate, the more we inform, the less people are suspicious of us."

'It takes away the moral high ground'

Brimfield Township is a suburb of Kent, Ohio, with a population of more than 10,000 that is growing rapidly again after being hit hard by years of economic downturn, said Mike Kostensky, the chairman of its board of trustees.

He has known Oliver for 12 years.

"Dave has such a way with words," Kostensky said. "He makes people comfortable. His office is open to anybody. I guess it's a little bit of how small town America used to be."

But not everyone sees productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions.

Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are often the most in need of its help.

"It takes away the moral high ground of whoever is supposed to be in charge," Lab said. "It's going to raise more disrespect."

Oliver disagrees.

He got the term "mope" from the 1970s police show "Kojak," and stresses his teasing of suspects is just a part of what he posts.

"A mope is a person who leeches off us and usually is engaged in criminal activity," Oliver wrote recently. "We do not believe everyone who has ever committed a crime is a mope. People change."

On June 20, the police chief likened the Brimfield police station to a ship in the U.S. Navy.

"It's 54 degrees outside of Mope-us Interruptus," he wrote in a post that also thanked World War II veterans, wished singer Lionel Richie happy birthday and quoted comedian Jay Leno.

Sometimes, Oliver details calls to police and their response.

"I think that as a society we have become desensitized," he said. "I'm trying to keep a lot of the criminal element in plain view, so we can address some of the causes and the results of the crime."

'I just don't get along well with criminals'

Lab, who doesn't use Facebook and had not viewed the Brimfield page, said now that it has gone viral, it no longer serves its intended purpose because the majority of its audience is in no way connected with Brimfield.

"It's titillating," he said of the page's surge in popularity. "It's morbid voyeurism by people in general."

Molly Merryman, associate chair of sociology in the Criminology and Justice Studies program at Kent State University, which is about 15 minutes from Brimfield, says social media plays an increased role in informing communities like Brimfield that are not connected to a major media market.

"He's been a chief for a long time and knows his community very well," she said. If the Facebook page is "an extension of the police department and has the community's blessing, then it certainly can be appropriate."

Merryman said the U.S. criminal justice system has a long history of public shaming that can be traced to the Puritans. Shaming is still commonly used in the juvenile justice system, where the goal is to make the violator recognize society's expectation for proper behavior, she said.

Oliver said that while what he posts about alleged criminals is public record, he never uses names, pictures or exact locations when discussing suspects' purported actions.

"I don't want anybody humiliated," he said. "I'm very sensitive to collateral damage by people who commit crimes and I don't want a family member suffering."

According to the FBI, in 2011, approximately one crime was reported for every 36 people living in Brimfield Township. Almost 96% of reported crimes were property crimes, of which larceny and theft made up 80%. Brimfield Township reported no murders or homicides in 2011, and a total of 12 violent crimes, half of which were rape.

A native of nearby Akron, Ohio, Oliver has spent his entire 19 years as a police officer working in Brimfield, the last nine as chief.

"I'm an inner-city kid," he said. "I did my share of running the streets. ... I don't see color. I don't see sex. I have friends of all persuasions. I just don't get along well with criminals."

Return to Top



News Headline: Experience pays during Miss Ohio prelims | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two pageant veterans win preliminary awards Thursday night

Miss Ohio preliminaries - Thursday: Cayla Hellwarth won preliminary talent Thursday and Heather Wells won preliminary swimsuit at Miss Ohio Scholarship Program at the Renaissance Theatre. Video by Lou Whitmire

Written by Lou Whitmire News Journal

Miss Montgomery County Heather Wells (facing) and Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth won Thursday's preliminary swimsuit and talent portion respectively. / Jason J. Molyet/News Journal

Miss Montgomery County Heather Wells won Thursday's preliminary swimsuit competition and Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth won the talent portion. / Jason J. Molyet/News Journal

Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth won the talent portion of Thursday night's preliminary round of the Miss Ohio Scholarship Program at the Renaissance Theatre. / Jason J. Molyet/News Journal

MANSFIELD — Two Miss Ohio pageant veterans — Miss Montgomery County Heather Wells and Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth — walked away with preliminary awards Thursday night.

Wells, 23, of Warren, wowed the judges at the Renaissance Theatre with her two-piece red swimsuit. She won $500 for the preliminary award, sponsored by Richland Bank.

After the show, Wells said she loves distance running and plans to run a half marathon and then a marathon someday. She runs about four miles at a time. She entered the Miss Ohio pageant as a senior in high school.

Wells, making her sixth trip to Miss Ohio, is obtaining a masters degree at Kent State University in nutrition. She wants to become a registered dietitian and work as a health correspondent for a news station or network. Her platform is “Divorce Recovery for Youth.”

Making her fourth trip to the Miss Ohio stage, Hellwarth, 22, of Celina, an opera singer, sang “Con Te Partiro.” She also won $500 for the preliminary talent award, sponsored by Richland Bank. She also garnered the awarded given to a contestant who raises the most money for the Children’s Miracle Network.

Since she was a little girl, Hellwarth said she has had a passion for opera music.

Hellwarth is a graduate of The Ohio State University with a bachelor of science in marketing and international business and she holds a minor in Italian.

Her platform is: Help Sustain Life — The American Red Cross.

During the Miss Ohio show, themed “Legends,” Miss Ohio sponsor Graham Automall was inducted into the Miss Ohio Hall of Fame and Miss Ohio contestant Cecili Weber was awarded a $300 Theresa Ann Wagner Commitment to Excellence Award.

The final night of preliminary competition is tonight at 7:30 p.m.

A swimsuit and talent winner will be selected each night. Saturday’s finale will begin at 7:30 p.m. and end with the crowning of a new Miss Ohio. Twenty-three contestants are competing for the crown.

Performers entertained the crowd with songs including “Juke Box Hero” and “I Love Rock and Roll.”

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News Headline: Experience pays during Miss Ohio prelims | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chillicothe Gazette - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two pageant veterans win preliminary awards Thursday night

Miss Ohio preliminaries - Thursday: Cayla Hellwarth won preliminary talent Thursday and Heather Wells won preliminary swimsuit at Miss Ohio Scholarship Program at the Renaissance Theatre. Video by Lou Whitmire

Written by Lou Whitmire News Journal

Miss Montgomery County Heather Wells (facing) and Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth won Thursday's preliminary swimsuit and talent portion respectively. / Jason J. Molyet/News Journal

Miss Montgomery County Heather Wells won Thursday's preliminary swimsuit competition and Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth won the talent portion. / Jason J. Molyet/News Journal

Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth won the talent portion of Thursday night's preliminary round of the Miss Ohio Scholarship Program at the Renaissance Theatre. / Jason J. Molyet/News Journal

MANSFIELD — Two Miss Ohio pageant veterans — Miss Montgomery County Heather Wells and Miss Miami Valley Cayla Hellwarth — walked away with preliminary awards Thursday night.

Wells, 23, of Warren, wowed the judges at the Renaissance Theatre with her two-piece red swimsuit. She won $500 for the preliminary award, sponsored by Richland Bank.

After the show, Wells said she loves distance running and plans to run a half marathon and then a marathon someday. She runs about four miles at a time. She entered the Miss Ohio pageant as a senior in high school.

Wells, making her sixth trip to Miss Ohio, is obtaining a masters degree at Kent State University in nutrition. She wants to become a registered dietitian and work as a health correspondent for a news station or network. Her platform is “Divorce Recovery for Youth.”

Making her fourth trip to the Miss Ohio stage, Hellwarth, 22, of Celina, an opera singer, sang “Con Te Partiro.” She also won $500 for the preliminary talent award, sponsored by Richland Bank. She also garnered the award given to a contestant who raises the most money for the Children’s Miracle Network.

Since she was a little girl, Hellwarth said she has had a passion for opera music.

Hellwarth is a graduate of The Ohio State University with a bachelor of science in marketing and international business and she holds a minor in Italian.

Her platform is: “Help Sustain Life — The American Red Cross.”

During the Miss Ohio show, themed “Legends,” Miss Ohio sponsor Graham Automall was inducted into the Miss Ohio Hall of Fame and Miss Ohio contestant Cecili Weber was awarded a $300 Theresa Ann Wagner Commitment to Excellence Award.

The final night of preliminary competition is tonight at 7:30 p.m.

A swimsuit and talent winner will be selected each night. Saturday’s finale will begin at 7:30 p.m. and end with the crowning of a new Miss Ohio. Twenty-three contestants are competing for the crown.

Performers entertained the crowd with songs including “Juke Box Hero” and “I Love Rock and Roll.”

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