Report Overview:
Total Clips (21)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; University Libraries (1)
Athletics (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Computer Science; Students (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (2)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Trumbull; Renovation at KSU (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Research (2)
Sociology (2)
Students (2)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
KSU grad begins Peace Corps service in Togo 06/24/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Ana Sigler, 24, of Tallmadge, departed for Togo June 10 to begin training as a Peace Corps environmental education volunteer. Sigler will make a difference...


Alumni; University Libraries (1)
Book Briefs: Anders to discuss science fiction 06/24/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

“Kent Reads with G.T. Anders” will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. July 10 at the Kent State University Library, First Floor. “The Tower of Babel,” a piece...


Athletics (1)
Kent State Sports Report: Golf standout Corey Conners named to PING All-America Team (Page) 06/24/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Junior Corey Conners has been named to the 2013 PING All-America Third Team after helping the Kent State men's golf team capture the Mid-American Conference...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Ohio Universities React to Low Grades in Recent Study 06/24/2013 Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

AKRON– Ohio colleges and universities are reacting to a recent study by the National Council on Teaching Quality that gives many of the state's teacher...


Computer Science; Students (1)
Grads find it's time to clean up their online acts 06/22/2013 MSN.com Text Attachment Email

...option is SimpleWash, formerly known as FaceWash, the brainchild of Camden Fuller, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, three computer science students at Kent State University. SimpleWash inspects your Facebook and Twitter accounts for comments, status updates and tags that contain potentially offensive...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (2)
HONORED: Diversity council lauds KSU official 06/24/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Kent State University, was honored with the National Diversity Council's 2013 Ohio...

Celebrations - June 23 06/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Kent State, received the 2013 Glass Ceiling Award from the National Diversity Council....


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Incoming freshman class at Kent State boasts a 3.3 GPA (Lefton, Garcia) 06/21/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Incoming freshmen to the Kent State University campus will bring impressive credentials this fall as their class boasts a 3.3 grade-point average with nearly 75 percent having...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Art review: 'Converging Visions: New Works in Fiber' at Summit Artspace 06/22/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...to embellish the piece.” Two of her pieces, however, contain no metal. They were designed by her and printed by TechStyleLAB, the Fashion School at Kent State University. A designer by profession, Mary Kapenekas is primarily interested in the manipulation of space as well as the objects within...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Kent State journalism school ranked in Top 10 (Wasbotten) 06/24/2013 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University was ranked eighth at the national Hearst Journalism Awards. Kent earned seventh-place...

Kent State journalism school ranked in Top 10 (Wasbotten) 06/21/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University was ranked eighth at the national Hearst Journalism Awards. Kent earned seventh-place for photojournalism and multimedia. ...


KSU at Trumbull; Renovation at KSU (1)
$3.5 million project will take one year (Malmsberry) 06/23/2013 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

WARREN - A large renovation and expansion project at Kent State University at Trumbull will continue next month after a successful asbestos abatement. Hively Construction of Canfield, which had the...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
GRANTS 06/24/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

The Ohio Third Frontier Commission made these grants to local organizations. • Apto Orthopaedics, Akron, $100,000 to develop a novel approach to scoliosis....


Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Oil and gas ad campaign builds industry support (Grimm) 06/23/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...things that have increased resistance to it,” said Pamela E. Grimm, associate professor and chairwoman of the Department of Marketing & Entrepreneurship at Kent State University. “Now, there's pushback from the industry itself with more marketing, communications and advertising to get people to have a...


Research (2)
Kent State gets grants to research diabetes, digestive disease 06/24/2013 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

KENT Kent State University is receiving $825,792 in federal grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The department's National...

Plate fees fund clean Lake Erie 06/23/2013 Sandusky Register - Sandusky Text Attachment Email

...program dealing with storm water runoff in the Big Creek watershed, which is in the Cleveland area. Four smaller grants also were awarded: $15,000 to Kent State for a study of bacteria that affects the harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie; $14,785 to Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center to help create...


Sociology (2)
Candid police chief's comments spur viral Facebook page (Merryman) 06/21/2013 CNN.com Text Attachment Email

...productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions. Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are...

Police chief's Facebook mocking of 'mopes' earns likes, critics (Merryman) 06/21/2013 CNNMoney.com Text Attachment Email

...productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions. Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are...


Students (2)
Miss Ohio Week winners meet with fans 06/24/2013 Mansfield News-Journal Text Attachment Email

Wells, Thoroughman sign autographs A pair of attractive young women drew a crowd of admirers Sunday afternoon at the Richland Mall. That might not...

Heather Wells crowned Miss Ohio 2013 06/22/2013 AllVoices Text Attachment Email

...broadcast live on the ABC television network. At the time of her crowning, she was the reigning Miss Montgomery County. A native of Warren, she attends Kent State University. She was a preliminary winner in both the talent and swimsuit competitions earlier in the pageant week. Her talent is dancing....


Theatre and Dance (1)
'South Pacific' will wash summer doldrums away 06/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre's production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific is a satisfying evening of theater that brings alive the emotional content of...


News Headline: KSU grad begins Peace Corps service in Togo | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ana Sigler, 24, of Tallmadge, departed for Togo June 10 to begin training as a Peace Corps environmental education volunteer. Sigler will make a difference educating students, youth groups, and other individuals about sustainable agricultural practices, conservation of forestry and marine resources and animal husbandry.

"I come from a long line of people who have worked, studied or lived abroad over the years," Sigler said. "I feel it is essential to not only my career but for my own personal strength to do this."

Sigler, a native of Cuyahoga Falls, is the daughter of William and Daun Sigler of Tallmadge and a 2007 graduate of Cuyahoga Falls High School. She graduated from Kent State University in Kent with a bachelor's degree in conservation biology in 2011. She also worked for the National Park Service on a trail crew in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and a vegetation management crew for Grand Teton National Park. She said collaborating with other people who shared similar goals while enduring sometimes-harsh conditions was a character-building experience.

"The National Park Service began to inspire me to keep aiming higher with the challenges I took on in my career," she said. "It helped build my confidence and proved to me that I could accomplish anything when it was done with true passion. I chose the Peace Corps because I wanted to take it a step higher."

During the first three months of her service in Togo, Sigler will complete technical, language, health and safety training while living with a host family to become fully immersed in the country's language and culture. The training and cultural exchange will prepare Sigler for her two years of service, while also allowing community members to gain a better understanding of Americans. After Sigler is sworn into service and assigned to a community, she will work on sustainable, community-driven development projects that make a difference for the people of Togo and provide Sigler with leadership and cross-cultural skills she can use throughout her career.

"I hope to learn more about various sustainable agriculture practices," she said. "I know I will be challenged in a variety ways, and I welcome this opportunity with open arms."

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News Headline: Book Briefs: Anders to discuss science fiction | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: “Kent Reads with G.T. Anders” will be held from 3
to 4 p.m. July 10 at the Kent State University Library,
First Floor. “The Tower of Babel,” a piece of literary
science fiction by local writer and Kent State alumnus
and employee G. T. Anders, explores themes of organic
vs. mechanized ways of life, ending with a powerful
indictment of our polluting society and a call for a
return to a caring and organic lifestyle.

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News Headline: Kent State Sports Report: Golf standout Corey Conners named to PING All-America Team (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Junior Corey Conners has been named to the 2013 PING All-America Third Team after helping the Kent State men's golf team capture the Mid-American Conference Tournament title and advance to the NCAA Championships this spring.

Conners, who was an Honorable Mention selection in 2012, becomes just the seventh player in the Golden Flashes' storied history to be named an All-American in multiple seasons. He also gives Kent State an All-American for the sixth consecutive year.

"This is a great honor for Corey," said KSU Director of Golf/Head Coach Herb Page. "He works so hard at improving his game and is extremely coachable. He's a great representative of our men's golf program here at Kent State. This is the second time for him. He's moving up now to third team, which is an elite group of golfers."

Conners posted a 72.07 scoring average, the sixth lowest single-season average in school history. He shot par or better in 21 of 42 rounds, and posted eight rounds in the 60s.

"Corey really became the No. 1 golfer for our team this year," said Page. "He's just so consistent and seemed to always be in contention at tournaments. And with the tough schedule we play, he was constantly going up against some of the top No. 1s in the country."

Conners captured medalist honors for the second time in his college career at the season-opening Gopher Invitational. He was one of 23 golfers in the nation selected to compete at the prestigious Western Refining Collegiate All-America Classic.

Conners placed fifth with three straight rounds in the 60s (67-67-69-203). The junior helped Kent State to its fifth consecutive MAC title, sixth consecutive NCAA Regional appearance, and fourth straight trip to the NCAA Championships in 2013.

Conners carries a 3.47 grade-point average as a mathematics major.

Next year as a senior Conners will look to join Eric Frishette (1992-94), Ben Curtis (1998-2000) and John Hahn (2009-11) as the only Kent State players to be named All-America three times during their collegiate careers. Conners and teammate Taylor Pendrith have an opportunity to join an even more exclusive group of Kent State golfers to compete at four NCAA Championships, which currently only includes departed senior Kevin Miller.

TRACK & FIELD

Several present and former Kent State athletes competed at the 2013 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships last weekend in Des Moines, Iowa.

In the Senior Division, Kim Hamilton finished fourth in the javelin with a throw of 180 feet, 11 inches. Nia Henderson placed 12th in the shot put (52-6), Aiman Scullion was 23rd in the 10,000 meters and Tony Jordanek was 11th in his heat for the 1,500 meters and did not advance to the finals.

In the Junior Division (ages 16-19), current Kent State freshman Reggie Jagers placed second in the discus with a toss of 191-6. Chanitta Westbrooks placed eighth in the 200 meters, while William Barnes was ninth in his 110-meter hurdles heat and did not advance to the finals.

Former Crestwood High School star and 2012 Olympian Bridget Franek competed in the 3,000 meter steeplechase and placed 12th (10:17.41).

MEN'S BASKETBALL

Former Kent State standout Armon Gates has been named as assistant coach at Northwestern under Chris Collins.

Gates, a native of Chicago, spent the past two years as an assistant at Loyola-Chicago.

"We're very excited to add Armon to our staff," Collins said. "He has a tremendous energy and passion for the game. He is an accomplished recruiter and was an outstanding player at Kent State, and he'll be able to lean upon his own experiences as we develop our guys. He'll be a valuable asset to our program in all areas as we move forward."

Gates was an assistant coach for the Flashes for two seasons, then spent a year as an assistant at Texas Christian under former Kent State head coach Jim Christian before moving on to Loyola.

"I'm excited to work under a head coach with the pedigree that coach Collins has, and I'm grateful to him for this wonderful opportunity," Gates said. "It's great to be able to remain in Chicago as we strive to build our recruiting footprint in the area. We look forward to keeping Big Ten-level players here to receive a great education."

Gates graduated from Kent State in 2006 after helping the Golden Flashes to an 88-42 record and three postseason appearances. Gates closed out his career tied for second in school history with 200 3-point field goals.

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News Headline: Ohio Universities React to Low Grades in Recent Study | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON– Ohio colleges and universities are reacting to a recent study by the National Council on Teaching Quality that gives many of the state's teacher education programs a low grade.

The report shows that an average of 200,000 new teachers, who barely meet the standards of becoming a good teacher, are generated each year by the majority of U.S. colleges.

Out of more than 1,000 institutions evaluated for the report, the report ranks only 608 of them.

They include Cleveland State University, Youngstown State University, Kent State University, The University of Akron and Ohio State University.

Of those schools, Ohio State was the only one given a ranking of four out of four stars for their education programs.

Ohio State University and Marietta College were among the top 10% in the nation receiving three or more stars in one or more of their programs.

All other Ohio universities on the list were given low rankings of between zero and two stars for their undergraduate programs for students preparing to teach elementary or secondary level classes.

Kent State received no ranking at all for its graduate level secondary education program.

Now the question on everyone's mind is how credible the report is, and what information is the National Council on Teaching using to assess the universities.

“This study is misleading,” said Eric Mansfield of Kent State University, adding “It fails to look at the outcomes and qualities of the students who enter into public education.”

Mansfield said Kent State's program exceeds the state's average on 41 out of 45 areas that were assed by the Ohio Educator Assessment.

“So we know we are doing a much better job than this study indicates,” said Mansfield.

The University of Akron also believes the study is misleading.

“U.A. has a long history of consistently being recognized by national accreditation organizations such as the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and meeting state licensure program requirements,” said Associate Dean Susan Olson.

CLICK HERE for more from the National Council on Teacher Quality.

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News Headline: Grads find it's time to clean up their online acts | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: MSN.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Time for new grads to clean up their act online?

New college graduates looking for work may want to purge their social media of embarrassing hijinks that could turn off potential employers.

Rebecca Martinson and Taylor Chapman learned the hard way what happens when outrageous behavior hits the Internet and goes viral in the worst possible way.

Martinson gained notoriety when the profanity-laced email she wrote to her sorority sisters at the University of Maryland leaked online. Martinson, who later quit the sorority, made an attempt at damage control, pulling down her Facebook and Twitter accounts. By then, though, numerous websites had already captured and reposted several of her comments.

Chapman's 15 minutes of infamy came last week, when her Dunkin' Donuts rant made headlines across the web. Chapman also deleted her social media accounts, but her eight-minute tirade has been immortalized on YouTube.

These cases land on the extreme end of the spectrum, and it's where some college graduates might unfortunately find themselves just as they venture into the working world. Those Jägerbombs, the dirty joke retweeted 'round the world, the hijinks on Vine all create a social media presence that can plague these new job-seekers.

“Over 90 percent of recruiters use social networks to review candidates' backgrounds,” Dan Schawbel, author of "Promote Yourself: The New Rules For Career Success," told MSN News. “College recruiters review a student's social network accounts because they are looking to trim their piles of résumés, and that information is right in front of them at their fingertips."

“New grads think that employers can't see their information with a private profile, but they are wrong,” said Schawbel, whose consulting firm targets Gen Y clients.

There are services for new grads who need to ditch a drunken fist-pumping past in favor of a more refined future.

One option is SimpleWash, formerly known as FaceWash, the brainchild of Camden Fuller, Daniel Gur, and David Steinberg, three computer science students at Kent State University. SimpleWash inspects your Facebook and Twitter accounts for comments, status updates and tags that contain potentially offensive words. It then flags questionable content and presents it for deletion.

Options also exist to limit further damage. Secure.me monitors the content you share — posts, photos — as well as content others post about you, using a combination of language-recognition and biometrics to find and alert you to potentially compromising content.

Schawbel suggests that concerned grads take a more pro-active approach by doing the dirty work themselves.

“You can censor yourself on all of the [social] networks,” he said. “None of them are tough to clean up. It really depends on your digital footprint. When Facebook changed our profiles to the Timeline format, our privacy settings changed. I spent two days censoring everything I did in college over four years by hiding every post.”

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News Headline: HONORED: Diversity council lauds KSU official | Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Kent State University, was honored with the National Diversity Council's 2013 Ohio Glass Ceiling Award at the 2013 Ohio Women's Conference Award at the 2013 Ohio Women's Conference Award Luncheon on May 30 in Cincinnati. The award honors women who have overcome obstacles to get to the top of their profession and have made it possible for other women to do the same. Brown has been with the university since 2009. As vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion, she oversees a number of programs including the Office of Diversity Programming, Upward Bound Pre-College Program and the Women's Center.

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News Headline: Celebrations - June 23 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at Kent State, received the 2013 Glass Ceiling Award from the National Diversity Council. The award recognizes women who have overcome barriers to succeed in their professions.

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News Headline: Incoming freshman class at Kent State boasts a 3.3 GPA (Lefton, Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Incoming freshmen to the Kent State University campus will bring impressive credentials this fall as their class boasts a 3.3 grade-point average with nearly 75 percent having at least a 3.0 GPA. It's another sign of the continued commitment of high-achieving students to pursue and earn their degrees from Kent State.

The incoming class also made record commitments for enrollment and student housing and appointments with Destination Kent State, the university's summer advising and registration program for incoming freshmen and their parents. This marks the second time in three years that commitments have reached capacity by mid-June for traditional incoming freshmen attending the Kent campus.

“This shows that we're definitely on the right track to success,” said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. “Our efforts to market the university's true strengths and show new students that we're committed to delivering a world-class education are paying dividends. We also significantly increased our financial aid to help with the economic burden, so incoming freshmen know we want Kent State to be their first choice.”

With the expected enrollment increase, the university now must closely manage new freshman applications. Any new freshmen who apply or complete their applications now will be given the option to attend one of Kent State's seven regional campuses located throughout Northeast Ohio or begin attending the Kent campus in the spring of 2014. The Kent campus will continue to accept applications for transfer and upper-division students, as well as veterans.

“We've been telling incoming students and their parents all year that they should act quickly to guarantee a spot in the fall class,” said T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management.

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News Headline: Art review: 'Converging Visions: New Works in Fiber' at Summit Artspace | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sometimes the nature of an art group is as important as the reason it came together in the first place.

Contemporary Fiber Artists formed in 1994 to support and critique each other's work, to explore new techniques and to learn. Along the way, they also forged lasting friendships. The personalities and visions of the eight members complement each other, with fiber as the unifying factor.

Fiber and accoutrements, that is. Just as fiber once was the basis of their collective, now it's often only a base for their work. They've branched out into beading, sculpture, jewelry, collage and installation art.

Through July 27, their work is on view in Converging Visions: New Works in Fiber at Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., Akron.

The number of skills these women have taught themselves is truly inspiring. And every time one of them learns a new technique, she shares it with the others.

They've learned tie-dye and papermaking, beading methods and felting, artist's books and box construction. Basically, if you can attach it to cloth, they've learned how to do it.

As I was getting to know them during our interview session Wednesday, one of the members mentioned that she needed to learn how to make a cabochon jewel out of glass. A member of the group explained how to do it. Then a quick discussion on the availability of flamework classes followed.

These are gals who never saw a process they didn't want to understand and master. They are a hands-on bunch who laugh at their disasters and quietly welcome accomplishment, knowing that one success is only another step in the right direction.

Four of them live in Akron, one each in Bath, Kent, Medina and Garrettsville. They are Polly Gilmore, Karen Hinkle, Mary Platis Kapenekas, Kris Kapenekas, Jean M. Evans, Jean Markowitz, Fredericka Hagerty and Kathryn Markel Levy.

This exhibit has been an inspiration to the group, and several have had breakthroughs in their work while preparing for it.

Evans is a nationally award-winning quilter who uses her drawing and painting skills to create large wall hangings that speak to everyday life, as well as fantasy and design. A retired teacher from Medina Public Schools, her strengths include making a flat surface appear multidimensional.

She has six quilts in this exhibit: Up a Tree at Three, Uptown, Autumn, Reap What You Sow, Tomato Takeover and So Sew . Only one, the small puzzle piece So Sew , is for sale.

Possessed of a bubbly personality, Gilmore is a self-described “creature of impulse with magpie instincts.” She has 28 pieces in the show including seven pins, four boxes, an artist's book and several collages.

“It's amazing the things that will catch my eye,” she said. “I'm drawn to the colors or the shapes or perhaps where it came from. I think about it and it achieves what I call critical mass in my imagination, then I begin the piece,” and she says it's curious “how often it doesn't even include the thing that actually started the whole process.

“I do a lot of hand work,” she confided. “It's cheaper than cigarettes and less fattening than food, and it's satisfying for me. My mind can wander and resolve whatever's going on in my life while I work.”

Her work is evocative, playful and never dull, much like her personality.

Mary Kapenekas has a penchant for metal shims, the kind that plumbers use to level porcelain objects. Her colleagues often tease her that her work is dangerous to touch because of all the metal points and edges sticking up.

She has 11 works in the show, nine of them made with the shims.

“I work with steel and brass shim that comes in different weights and in sheets,” she explained. “I usually embroider it to my fiber work. The metal is used primarily to embellish the piece.”

Two of her pieces, however, contain no metal. They were designed by her and printed by TechStyleLAB, the Fashion School at Kent State University.

A designer by profession, Mary Kapenekas is primarily interested in the manipulation of space as well as the objects within space. “When I design a piece, I'm more interested in the elements of design, so it's more about the composition than the related articles,” she explained.

Her new work with the KSU lab, has, more than anything she has done with the shims, tapped that impulse, and, using geometry as a controlling factor, has produced exceedingly interesting work. It's a major breakthrough, and a process she's eager to continue.

Kris Kapenekas has also had a major breakthrough in her work, but not by using the KSU lab. Mary's daughter, she usually works with social and political issues, often endangered animals. But because she also works full time, the time she can spend with her art has been limited.

Recently, however, she's discovered that if she works with only abstract or geometric shapes, using black as her motivating color, she's been able to pull off some astounding work, resulting in Homage to Robert Indiana , a black wall hanging with a bleached-out numbers amassed in its center; and Target Practice i.e. Don't Mess with Jack , another black wall hanging with bleached-out circles in a grid pattern that have been shot at by her friend Jack, a marksman.

Markowitz has also included works that could be considered breakthrough pieces. If Mondrian Were a Quilter and Windows on the World — Empty have used the grid as a powerful compositional device to the create outstanding pieces.

These women have pushed each other and themselves to keep their hands busy and make work that brings delight to us all. We should all be lucky enough to be able to do that.

The following events have been scheduled for the exhibit:

• Kris Kapenekas will hold an Arashi Shibori technique demonstration from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday.

• On July 13, Kris Kapenekas will lead a free parent-child workshop on Paste Papers from 1 to 3 p.m. This is recommended for children 4 or older with their parents or older siblings. Register in advance by emailing rhinton@akronareaarts.org or calling 330-376-8480.

• Jean Evans will demonstrate painting with acrylics on fabrics from 6:30 to 8 p.m. July 18.

Dorothy Shinn writes about art and architecture for the Akron Beacon Journal. Send information to her at the Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309-0640 or dtgshinn@att.net .

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News Headline: Kent State journalism school ranked in Top 10 (Wasbotten) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University was ranked eighth at the national Hearst Journalism Awards. Kent earned seventh-place for photojournalism and multimedia.

Often called the Pulitzers of college journalism, the Hearst awards include up to $500,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

“The results prove what we already knew — our students are some of the most respected in the nation,” said Thor Wasbotten, director of Kent's 75-year-old journalism school. “And our school provides a relevant education focused on real experiences.”

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News Headline: Kent State journalism school ranked in Top 10 (Wasbotten) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University was ranked eighth at the national Hearst Journalism Awards. Kent earned seventh-place for photojournalism and multimedia.

Often called the Pulitzers of college journalism, the Hearst awards include up to $500,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

“The results prove what we already knew — our students are some of the most respected in the nation,” said Thor Wasbotten, director of Kent's 75-year-old journalism school. “And our school provides a relevant education focused on real experiences.”

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News Headline: $3.5 million project will take one year (Malmsberry) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WARREN - A large renovation and expansion project at Kent State University at Trumbull will continue next month after a successful asbestos abatement.

Hively Construction of Canfield, which had the lowest bid out of eight submitted to the school, will expand the university's primary lecture hall and construct a new entryway to the Classroom / Administration Building.

The renovation and expansion also will include 300 theater-style seats, new audio / visual and lecture equipment, a stage with wheelchair access and climate control equipment.

Article Photos

Special to the Tribune Chronicle

This artist's rendering shows the planned interior of Lecture Hall A at Kent State at Trumbull. The renovation / expansion project will cost $3.5 million and is being completed by Hively Construction of Canfield.

The area under the new seating will function as a sales floor or storage area for the campus bookstore.

The cost of the project is $3.5 million, all of which is being paid by the university.

"There's no state of Ohio capital money involved. We are funding it through accumulated earnings over time," Kent State facilities director Randall Malmsberry said.

Starting in mid-July, two walls will be removed from the facility. The project is expected to take approximately one year.

The renovation is the last of a series of updates to the 1970 building.

"It was in need of it, and we felt the time was right to do it. The seating in the lecture hall couldn't be replaced because of the style of the seating; it would not meet current building codes," Malmsberry said.

Due to the renovations, the campus bookstore, which is adjacent to the lecture hall, has been temporarily relocated to Room 132 in the Technology Building and will remain there until construction is complete.

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News Headline: GRANTS | Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Ohio Third Frontier Commission made these grants to local organizations.
• Apto Orthopaedics, Akron, $100,000 to develop a novel approach to scoliosis.
• Austen BioInnovation Institute, Akron, $49,250 to develop new designs for syringes and pipettes for low-dose drug delivery.
• Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, $50,000 to develop a faster and less expensive method of predicting outcomes from breast cancer treatments.
• Folio Photonics LLC, Pepper Pike, $100,000 to develop high-capacity optical discs to store computer data.
Kent State University, Kent, $46,527 to develop printed electronics and sensors. Also, $50,000 to develop electro-optic switches based on liquid crystals.

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News Headline: Oil and gas ad campaign builds industry support (Grimm) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You've seen the commercials that run daily on local networks and cable television throughout Ohio.

Some feature an oil and gas worker riding in an American-manufactured pickup through a bucolic community where he knows the people he lives and works around.

Another is set to rolling, progressive music with a stern, convincing voice-over that highlights the jobs and economic benefits of an expansion that occurred at U.S. Steel's Lorain plant in October 2012 to manufacture pipe for the drilling industry.

“Steel — once a symbol of America's might — now a symbol of our will,” the commercial intones. “Thanks to the energy industry, places like Lorain, Ohio, are booming again, meeting the demand for the high-quality steel our oil and natural gas industry is using in its wells to protect groundwater, create jobs and secure America's energy future.”

The ads are part of a multimillion-dollar public-relations campaign spearheaded by the American Petroleum Institute, the oil and gas industry's premier trade association, which represents more than 500 companies.

They're nothing new, of course. For years, the print, television, online and radio ads have been geared toward building grass-roots and statewide support and helping to meet a number of goals for the industry's operations in places such as Arkansas, Louisiana, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas, where shale-gas development has taken center stage.

To be sure, the advertisements that tout the economic benefits of the industry are not entirely unjustified. By its own estimate, API has said oil and gas supports more than 9.2 million jobs nationwide, contributes 7.7 percent to the U.S. economy, and generates $86 million in revenue for government each day.

But the “Energy from Shale” campaign, although it may be highly visible in newspapers and on prime time each night, is peculiar in a way. Unlike similar ad campaigns from politicians and other industries such as health care, the marketing continues to occur in off years, when a presidential election, for instance, is not front and center, or at a time when no major disaster warrants a public-relations strategy such as the kind that aired nationwide from BP after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010.

“The industry has done foolish things that have increased resistance to it,” said Pamela E. Grimm, associate professor and chairwoman of the Department of Marketing & Entrepreneurship at Kent State University. “Now, there's pushback from the industry itself with more marketing, communications and advertising to get people to have a more favorable opinion of fracking.”

If anything, the advertisements demonstrate that oil and gas is an extremely polarized topic, where any middle ground is becoming increasingly scarce as shale development ramps up and the debate about it continues to unfold.

To Shawn Bennett, Ohio spokesman for the industry outreach group Energy InDepth, the ad campaign is about creating a dialogue.

“I think the reason you're seeing this happen is because oil and gas development is getting at the forefront in Ohio,” he said. “As we continue to develop the Utica, you want to make sure the public is educated about the economic benefits and that they know it's safe.”

Energy From Shale is part of a national, growing advocacy campaign that also includes grass-roots activities, lobbying activity and educational efforts, said Carlton Carroll, an API spokesman. He added that the goal is to engage “tens of millions of voters” nationwide.

Though he would not provide the exact cost of the campaign, data at the Center for Responsive Politics shows that API already has spent more than $2 million on lobbying this year. In 2012, the organization dedicated about $7.3 million to lobbying.

“I think what they're trying to do is not about changing the minds of those who already hold strong opinions, but trying to get people who don't already have clearly formed opinions,” Grimm said. “They want to get their message in front of them that fracking is beneficial to the community and individuals.”

Grimm added that the ultimate goal, though, is most likely aimed at curbing restrictive legislation in statehouses across the country and reducing the number of constituents who lobby against the industry. In this way, the line between promotion and propaganda is blurred, she said.

“Look, if their product was so great, they wouldn't need to spend millions to say how fantastic it is,” said Julian Boggs, a state policy advocate with Environment Ohio. “When you direct that kind of money, it represents public concerns and questions about how beneficial their products really are — it gets people thinking about environmental impacts, health and safety.”

Linda Woggon, executive vice president of the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, said the ads are important, though. She said the economic benefits of the industry in Ohio cannot be ignored, and people statewide, such as those in the western part of the state where fracking is not occurring, should be aware of its impacts and how to take advantage of it.

“It's really important. I believe that this will have the largest economic impact of anything we've seen in this state in recent history,” Woggon said. “If that turns out to be the case, the public has to get its arms around this and understand it.”

Carroll said the ads will continue as part of the industry's “ongoing dialogue with policymakers and the public” for exactly that reason.

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News Headline: Kent State gets grants to research diabetes, digestive disease | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Kent State University is receiving $825,792 in federal grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The department's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases awarded $384,192 to the university for diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic research.

The department's National Institute of Mental Health awarded $441,600 to Kent State for research on stress-related diseases and conditions.

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan of Niles, D-13th, made the announcement of the grants Friday.

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News Headline: Plate fees fund clean Lake Erie | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Sandusky Register - Sandusky
Contact Name: Tom Jackson
News OCR Text: Now there's a new way to wear your love for Lake Erie on your sleeve, or at least show it off when people see your car.

The Ohio Lake Erie Commission has unveiled a new Ohio license plate.

Paying an extra $25 for a Lake Erie plate produces funding for the Lake Erie Protection Fund. The fund also accepts donations, but the vast majority of its money comes from license plate sales, said Gail Hesse, executive director of the Ohio Lake Erie Commission.

Lake Erie supporters have two ways to help the Lake Erie Protection Fund when they're buying a new plate.

The new design, produced by David Browning of Browning Design in Columbus, features a life ring with the words “Lake Erie” on it. Inside the life ring are birds silhouetted against the sunset and lake waves, Hesse said.

Traditionalists can still purchase the other Lake Erie design, featuring the Marblehead Lighthouse. Ohio artist Ben Richmond came up with that design.

Many folks have license plate holders on their license plates, which cover up the top and bottom of the plate. The new design has the words “Lake Erie” in the middle of the plate, making it clear how the driver feels about Ohio's best natural asset.

On Wednesday, the commission, meeting at NASA Plum Brook Station, awarded five grants from the Lake Erie Protection Fund.

The grants included $50,000 for a program dealing with storm water runoff in the Big Creek watershed, which is in the Cleveland area.

Four smaller grants also were awarded: $15,000 to Kent State for a study of bacteria that affects the harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie; $14,785 to Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center to help create sustainable redevelopment in the inner city; $11,835 to the University of Toledo, to study how restoring an urban river affects the fish population, and $15,000 for storm water reduction in the Sandusky River in the city of Bucyrus.

The annual budget for the Lake Erie Protection Fund is $200,000.

The additional $25 that's paid for a Lake Erie plate provides $15 for the fund and $10 for the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. All of that $15 goes into the fund, with no money going to pay for the commission's salaries or other activities, Hesse said.

All of the grants are for the protection and restoration of the lake, said Rian Sallee, grants coordinator for the agency. The grants pay for programs that help economic, environmental and human health in Lake Erie and the streams that flow into it, Sallee said.

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News Headline: Candid police chief's comments spur viral Facebook page (Merryman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: CNN.com
Contact Name: Matthew Casey
News OCR Text: (CNN) -- Brimfield Township Police Chief David Oliver keeps a picture of John Wayne in his office, but admits it's hard to know what the Duke would say about a self-described old-school cop using to sound off about enforcing the law in a small Ohio town.

"I'd like to think he'd appreciate that we're communicating effectively with people," Oliver said. "But have a low tolerance for nonsense."

The police chief has earned national headlines for poking fun at so-called mopes, or suspected criminals, on his department's Facebook page.

Oliver's candid comments have made it the third most viewed police department page in the United States, according to Nancy Kolb, senior program manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

With more than 64,000 likes, it trails only the New York City Police Departmentand the Boston Police Department.

"Up and at 'em. It's 65 degrees outside of the Center for Mope Studies," Oliver wrote in a typical post this week.

The chair of Brimfield's board of trustees says Oliver's teasing of criminals is in good fun, while criminal justice experts say it falls in a gray area between traditional practices and the unethical.

Oliver launched the Facebook page in 2010, after viewing a couple police department pages and deciding one would fit into his management philosophy, which is to try to run the department like a business and serve the community from within.

He and his staff of 16 full-time officers say they want social media to work for those they serve.

"If our customers are on Facebook and Twitter, we have to be there engaging them," said Oliver, who spoke by phone from Brimfield. "The more we communicate, the more we inform, the less people are suspicious of us."

'It takes away the moral high ground'

Brimfield Township is a suburb of Kent, Ohio, with a population of more than 10,000 that is growing rapidly again after being hit hard by years of economic downturn, said Mike Kostensky, the chairman of its board of trustees.

He has known Oliver for 12 years.

"Dave has such a way with words," Kostensky said. "He makes people comfortable. His office is open to anybody. I guess it's a little bit of how small town America used to be."

But not everyone sees productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions.

Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are often the most in need of its help.

"It takes away the moral high ground of whoever is supposed to be in charge," Lab said. "It's going to raise more disrespect."

Oliver disagrees.

He got the term "mope" from the 1970s police show "Kojak," and stresses his teasing of suspects is just a part of what he posts.

"A mope is a person who leeches off us and usually is engaged in criminal activity," Oliver wrote recently. "We do not believe everyone who has ever committed a crime is a mope. People change."

On June 20, the police chief likened the Brimfield police station to a ship in the U.S. Navy.

"It's 54 degrees outside of Mope-us Interruptus," he wrote in a post that also thanked World War II veterans, wished singer Lionel Richie happy birthday and quoted comedian Jay Leno.

Sometimes, Oliver details calls to police and their response.

"I think that as a society we have become desensitized," he said. "I'm trying to keep a lot of the criminal element in plain view, so we can address some of the causes and the results of the crime."

'I just don't get along well with criminals'

Lab, who doesn't use Facebook and had not viewed the Brimfield page, said now that it has gone viral, it no longer serves its intended purpose because the majority of its audience is in no way connected with Brimfield.

"It's titillating," he said of the page's surge in popularity. "It's morbid voyeurism by people in general."

Molly Merryman, associate chair of sociology in the Criminology and Justice Studies program at Kent State University, which is about 15 minutes from Brimfield, says social media plays an increased role in informing communities like Brimfield that are not connected to a major media market.

"He's been a chief for a long time and knows his community very well," she said. If the Facebook page is "an extension of the police department and has the community's blessing, then it certainly can be appropriate."

Merryman said the U.S. criminal justice system has a long history of public shaming that can be traced to the Puritans. Shaming is still commonly used in the juvenile justice system, where the goal is to make the violator recognize society's expectation for proper behavior, she said.

Oliver said that while what he posts about alleged criminals is public record, he never uses names, pictures or exact locations when discussing suspects' purported actions.

"I don't want anybody humiliated," he said. "I'm very sensitive to collateral damage by people who commit crimes and I don't want a family member suffering."

According to the FBI, in 2011, approximately one crime was reported for every 36 people living in Brimfield Township. Almost 96% of reported crimes were property crimes, of which larceny and theft made up 80%. Brimfield Township reported no murders or homicides in 2011, and a total of 12 violent crimes, half of which were rape.

A native of nearby Akron, Ohio, Oliver has spent his entire 19 years as a police officer working in Brimfield, the last nine as chief.

"I'm an inner-city kid," he said. "I did my share of running the streets. ... I don't see color. I don't see sex. I have friends of all persuasions. I just don't get along well with criminals."

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News Headline: Police chief's Facebook mocking of 'mopes' earns likes, critics (Merryman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: CNNMoney.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (CNN) -- Brimfield Township Police Chief David Oliver keeps a picture of John Wayne in his office, but admits it's hard to know what the Duke would say about a self-described old-school cop using Facebook to sound off about enforcing the law in a small Ohio town.

"I'd like to think he'd appreciate that we're communicating effectively with people," Oliver said. "But have a low tolerance for nonsense."

The police chief has earned national headlines for poking fun at so-called mopes, or suspected criminals, on his department's Facebook page.

Oliver's candid comments have made it the third most viewed police department page in the United States, according to Nancy Kolb, senior program manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

With more than 64,000 likes, it trails only the New York City Police Department and the Boston Police Department.

"Up and at 'em. It's 65 degrees outside of the Center for Mope Studies," Oliver wrote in a typical post this week.

The chair of Brimfield's board of trustees says Oliver's teasing of criminals is in good fun, while criminal justice experts say it falls in a gray area between traditional practices and the unethical.

Oliver launched the Facebook page in 2010, after viewing a couple police department pages and deciding one would fit into his management philosophy, which is to try to run the department like a business and serve the community from within.

He and his staff of 16 full-time officers say they want social media to work for those they serve.

"If our customers are on Facebook and Twitter, we have to be there engaging them," said Oliver, who spoke by phone from Brimfield. "The more we communicate, the more we inform, the less people are suspicious of us."

'It takes away the moral high ground'

Brimfield Township is a suburb of Kent, Ohio, with a population of more than 10,000 that is growing rapidly again after being hit hard by years of economic downturn, said Mike Kostensky, the chairman of its board of trustees.

He has known Oliver for 12 years.

"Dave has such a way with words," Kostensky said. "He makes people comfortable. His office is open to anybody. I guess it's a little bit of how small town America used to be."

But not everyone sees productive humor in Oliver's Facebook discussions.

Steven Lab, a professor of criminal justice and chairman of the Department of Human Services at Bowling Green State University, says Oliver's posts only deepen the divide between authorities and people who are suspicious of the system, but are often the most in need of its help.

"It takes away the moral high ground of whoever is supposed to be in charge," Lab said. "It's going to raise more disrespect."

Oliver disagrees.

He got the term "mope" from the 1970s police show "Kojak," and stresses his teasing of suspects is just a part of what he posts.

"A mope is a person who leeches off us and usually is engaged in criminal activity," Oliver wrote recently. "We do not believe everyone who has ever committed a crime is a mope. People change."

On June 20, the police chief likened the Brimfield police station to a ship in the U.S. Navy.

"It's 54 degrees outside of Mope-us Interruptus," he wrote in a post that also thanked World War II veterans, wished singer Lionel Richie happy birthday and quoted comedian Jay Leno.

Sometimes, Oliver details calls to police and their response.

"I think that as a society we have become desensitized," he said. "I'm trying to keep a lot of the criminal element in plain view, so we can address some of the causes and the results of the crime."

'I just don't get along well with criminals'

Lab, who doesn't use Facebook and had not viewed the Brimfield page, said now that it has gone viral, it no longer serves its intended purpose because the majority of its audience is in no way connected with Brimfield.

"It's titillating," he said of the page's surge in popularity. "It's morbid voyeurism by people in general."

Molly Merryman, associate chair of sociology in the Criminology and Justice Studies program at Kent State University, which is about 15 minutes from Brimfield, says social media plays an increased role in informing communities like Brimfield that are not connected to a major media market.

"He's been a chief for a long time and knows his community very well," she said. If the Facebook page is "an extension of the police department and has the community's blessing, then it certainly can be appropriate."

Merryman said the U.S. criminal justice system has a long history of public shaming that can be traced to the Puritans. Shaming is still commonly used in the juvenile justice system, where the goal is to make the violator recognize society's expectation for proper behavior, she said.

Oliver said that while what he posts about alleged criminals is public record, he never uses names, pictures or exact locations when discussing suspects' purported actions.

"I don't want anybody humiliated," he said. "I'm very sensitive to collateral damage by people who commit crimes and I don't want a family member suffering."

According to the FBI, in 2011, approximately one crime was reported for every 36 people living in Brimfield Township. Almost 96% of reported crimes were property crimes, of which larceny and theft made up 80%. Brimfield Township reported no murders or homicides in 2011, and a total of 12 violent crimes, half of which were rape.

A native of nearby Akron, Ohio, Oliver has spent his entire 19 years as a police officer working in Brimfield, the last nine as chief.

"I'm an inner-city kid," he said. "I did my share of running the streets. ... I don't see color. I don't see sex. I have friends of all persuasions. I just don't get along well with criminals."

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News Headline: Miss Ohio Week winners meet with fans | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wells, Thoroughman sign autographs

A pair of attractive young women drew a crowd of admirers Sunday afternoon at the Richland Mall.

That might not have been anything new, but what set Heather Wells and Olivia Thoroughman apart wasn't their looks so much as their self-confidence and poise, traits that helped them win the titles of Miss Ohio and Miss Ohio Outstanding Teen, respectively, last week.

Wells and Thoroughman were at the mall signing autographs and posing for photographs with fans both young and old during a publicity appearance less than 12 hours after Wells won the Miss Ohio crown Saturday night, topping off Mansfield's annual week of pageant activities.

Wells admitted Sunday that she was operating on just four hours of sleep.

“I'm getting used to that. You just don't get as much sleep as you want. I'm definitely tapping into my sleep bank,” she said.

Wells will need to start saving up some more, as the Miss America pageant, in which she will compete as the Buckeye State's representative, is less than three months away, on Sept. 15 in Atlantic City, N.J.

“It's definitely a whirlwind. I signed the contract earlier this morning, and we're starting to already get into Miss America paperwork and all of the fun planning stuff for that. It's going very fast,” she said.

Last week's pageant marked Wells' sixth trip to Mansfield for the Miss Ohio Pageant.

“I started competing in 2007 in the Miss America program. It was my first year of eligibility, I was a senior in high school. It's been a long road,” she said.

Wells, 23, a native of Warren, is working toward her master's degree in nutrition at Kent State University. She intends on becoming a dietitian and working as a broadcast health correspondent.

Last week's events in Mansfield represented Thoroughman's second pageant, and she won her crown Wednesday so by Sunday she had had a little more sleep than Wells. The Miss America Outstanding Teen Pageant, however, is coming up fast, on Aug. 9 in Orlando, Fla.

“I start preparing for that I guess right when I get home, but I'm ready,” said Thoroughman, 17, a native of Portsmouth.

For her platform, Thoroughman chose to focus on heart health.

“I'm from Scioto County, which was recently ranked the unhealthiest county in the state (by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation). Heart health is something that's very important to my school's community,” Thoroughman said.

“My best friend lost her dad a couple years ago to a heart attack, and he was our football coach so that was a really big blow to the community. One of the main figures in our baseball program passed away from a heart attack. I wanted to help make a change.”

Wells' platform is focused on divorce recovery for youth.

“My parents were divorced when I was only 2 years old. Divorce can be hard on a family, but it's also really hard on children,” she said.

“I struggled with divorce, and I know a lot of kids do, so I wanted to start a program where children could overcome those obstacles and better understand what divorce really means.”

For Wells, however, getting involved in the Miss America pageant program has helped her grow as a teenager and young woman, and she recommends the experience to others.

“I would tell her to start as soon as she can. I learned as I went along, but I also had the opportunity to win so much scholarship money by doing so,” she said. “Because I competed for so long I've built so many close relationships with everyone here, all of the girls, the chaperones, the people that make the program happen.

“I would tell her to stay true to herself and never let anyone change her because that's what really kept me going, being who I was and always staying Heather.”

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News Headline: Heather Wells crowned Miss Ohio 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: AllVoices
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Heather Wells was crowned Miss Ohio 2013 on Saturday in Mansfield, the Miss America Organization reported.

She will represent Ohio at the Miss America Pageant, scheduled for September in Atlantic City.

The final evening of pageantry and the crowning of a new Miss America will be broadcast live on the ABC television network.

At the time of her crowning, she was the reigning Miss Montgomery County.

A native of Warren, she attends Kent State University.

She was a preliminary winner in both the talent and swimsuit competitions earlier in the pageant week. Her talent is dancing.

Wells pageant platform is Divorce Recovery for Youth.

She was a contestant at the Miss Ohio 2012 pageant after winning the title of Miss Miami Valley.

Wells is "obtaining a masters degree at Kent State University in nutrition," according to the Chillicothe Gazette. "She wants to become a registered dietitian and work as a health correspondent for a news station or network."

"This program provides unique opportunities for young women to win financial assistance in the form of scholarship awards, thereby helping achieve their education goals," according to state pageant officials.

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News Headline: 'South Pacific' will wash summer doldrums away | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre's production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific is a satisfying evening of theater that brings alive the emotional content of the American classic.

Leading the way is Equity actor Greg Violand with his soaring vocals as middle-aged French planter Emile, who creates a romantic chemistry with beauty Kayce Cummings as young nurse Nellie Forbush. Equity actress Cummings' singing is as lovely as a lark. The Kent State graduate has been a longtime favorite at Porthouse, having played Maria in The Sound of Music, Annie in Annie Get Your Gun and Marian in The Music Man in recent years.

Cummings, cute and sexy in a red polka dot swimsuit as Nellie, swears off Emile during the song I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair, and forcefully makes her character's panicky prejudice come alive later in the story.

Director Terri Kent has assembled a strong male ensemble of sailors for this show, a couple of whom dazzle with back handsprings and other acrobatics in the fun-loving Honey Bun.

MaryAnn Black's choreography is on the simpler side for this show, but the men shine in back-to-back comic favorites Bloody Mary and There Is Nothin' Like a Dame.

Chief among them is Tim Welsh as the scheming ne'er-do-well Luther Billis, who pulls out all the stops dancing in drag in a grass skirt, belly hanging over, in Honeybun.

Comic actor Welsh makes it clear that for all his wheeling and dealing, Billis has a real heart.

The age difference between Nellie and Emile plays out believably with Cummings and Violand, a longtime Northeast Ohio actor who's making his Porthouse debut.

This leading man, whose character dares to love again, creates a tear-inducing climax with his heartbroken number This Nearly Was Mine.

With such a famously lush score, it's odd that this production features just two upright pianos on a platform above the stage. As excellent as pianists Jonathan Swoboda and Jennifer Korecki are, this choice comes across as a less-than-desirable cost-cutting move.

For the music of Richard Rodgers, nothing can compare to the richness of a full live orchestra.

This romantic musical, which opened on Broadway in 1949, tells parallel love stories about couples from different worlds who meet in the South Pacific during World War II. They are Emile and Nellie and Lt. Joseph Cable and Liat.

Jake Wood, a recent graduate of Oakland University in Michigan, is dashing as Cable and Kaishawn Thomas, daughter of director Kent and actor Rohn Thomas, is lovely as lovestruck Polynesian girl Liat.

Adding a wonderful seductiveness to the whole story is Colleen Longshaw as Bloody Mary, who makes a small fortune selling souvenirs to soldiers and opens their eyes to many of the islands' charms.

For the youngest kids in the show, 12-year-old Mia Knight does nicely as Emile's daughter Ngana but 6-year-old Nicolas Bustamente's vocal abilities are not well matched to hers as Jerome.

Also adding humor to the show is Rohn Thomas as Capt. George Brackett, who has a funny bit going with Cable about the powers of attraction that a middle-aged man possesses.

In this production, nearly all of the Polynesian characters are played by African-American actors, which works well.

That's why it's too much of a stretch when six Caucasian actors who normally play nurses jump in as a chorus of native girls for the Bali Ha'i reprise.

An attractive set by Ben Needham creates map images of the South Pacific as a backdrop and on each side of the stage. Verbiage from classified war documents also adorns the stage floor.

Bamboo-looking set doors and railings as well as spiffy military costumes, set against the colorful fabrics of Bloody Mary, all help to create an exotic world of yesteryear into which audience members may enjoy a summer's evening escape.

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