Report Overview:
Total Clips (35)
Accounting; Students (2)
Aeronautics (1)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Theatre and Dance (2)
Biology; Students (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (10)
College of the Arts (CotA); Office of the President; Theatre and Dance (1)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Experiential Education and Civic Engagement (1)
Epidemiology and Biostatistics (1)
Geography; University Press (1)
Higher Education; Tuition (3)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Political Science (1)
Psychology (1)
Students (3)
Theatre and Dance (2)
University Archives and Special Collections (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Accounting; Students (2)
Kent State senior, Stow native receives first place honor from Ohio Society of CPAs 07/14/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

STOW: Kent State senior Lauren Romick of Stow received a $3,000 first-place honor as the 2013 Scholarship Day award recipient from the Ohio Society of CPAs....

Stow student Lauren Romick receives Ohio CPA Scholarship Day Award 07/13/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University senior accounting major Lauren Romick of Stow received a $3,000 first-place honor as the 2013 Scholarship Day award recipient...


Aeronautics (1)
VIDEO: KSU aeronautics professor discusses recent Asiana Airlines crash (Mangrum) 07/13/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...pilots called for the landing to be aborted. Seconds later, the Boeing 777 hit a seawall, then crash landed. We spoke with Professor of Aeronautics at Kent State University, Dr. Richard Mangrum, about the investigation. Click here to view video: http://www.wkyc.com/news/national/306421/22/KSU-aeronautics-professor-discusses-recent-Asiana-Airlines-crash


Alumni (1)
Five questions with Steve Byrne, star of 'Sullivan & Son' 07/13/2013 DFW.com Text Attachment Email

...accident that he could be funny for a living. “I had never even been to a comedy club until I worked at one,” Byrne recalls. “I finished college in Ohio at Kent State and moved to New York. I walked up and down Broadway, to all the different restaurants, looking for a job.” He wound up working as a...


Alumni; Theatre and Dance (2)
Porthouse cast put on polished, energetic 'Working' 07/13/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

All of these and more are portrayed in the musical "Working," which opened July 4 at Porthouse Theatre. The musical is based on the book by Studs Terkel, who conducted a series of interviews with workers. Jim Weaver directed and...

Porthouse cast put on polished, energetic 'Working' 07/13/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

All of these and more are portrayed in the musical "Working," which opened July 4 at Porthouse Theatre. The musical is based on the book by Studs Terkel, who conducted a series of interviews with workers. Jim Weaver directed and...


Biology; Students (1)
MacArthur Beach State Park interns gain valuable work experience 07/13/2013 Palm Beach Post - Online Text Attachment Email

...Samantha Grote and Jessica Stuczynski to spend their summer internships. The 21-year-old college seniors — Grote of Decatur, Ind., is a student at Purdue University, and Stuczynski of Stow, Ohio, attends Kent State University — are biology majors who hope to pursue careers studying and...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (10)
Study links heavy cellphone use with poor fitness levels (Barkley, Lepp) 07/15/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

People who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health. A new study by researchers...

Glued to Your Cell Phone? Research Suggests It May Reduce Your Physical Activity and Fitness 07/15/2013 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

A new study out of kent state this morning.. On physical fitness and your smart phone. And it found college students.. Who reported the highest cellphone use .. Were...

High smartphone use appears to be linked to poor fitness (Barkley, Lepp) 07/12/2013 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

Staying fit has been shown to be vitally important for overall good health in body and mind. In a news release in July 10, 2013, Kent State University reported, Glued to Your Cell Phone? Research Suggests It May Reduce Your Physical Activity and Fitness. Researchers Jacob Barkley...

Is your smartphone making you fat and lazy? (Lepp) 07/13/2013 Chicago Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...television and Internet connected computers, the difference is that cell phones fit in our pockets and purses and are with us wherever we go," wrote the Kent State University researchers. "Thus, they provide an ever-present invitation to 'sit and play.'" The study began with a random survey of 305...

Want to get fit? Throw your cell phone 07/13/2013 Yahoo! India Text Attachment Email

New York, July 11 (ANI): Spending too much time with mobile phones can harm your health, a new research has revealed. The study conducted by Kent State University found that students, who spent lot of time on their phone- up to 14 hours each day- were less fit than those spending about...

Is your smartphone turning you into a slug? 07/15/2013 KTAR-AM - Online Text Attachment Email

The hyper-connected possibilities of texting and tweeting, sending pictures, watching videos, surfing the Web and emailing back and forth is cutting into...

From Our Blogs 07/14/2013 Los Angeles Times Text Email

...television and Internet connected computers, the difference is that cellphones fit in our pockets and purses and are with us wherever we go," wrote the Kent State University researchers. "Thus, they provide an ever-present invitation to 'sit and play.' " Authors found that heavy smartphone users...

Ditch cell phone to stay fit: Survey 07/13/2013 The Economic Times Online Edition Text Attachment Email

...your fitness and physical activity. High cell phone use is associated with poor fitness in college students, a new study has found. Researchers from Kent State University in US were interested in the relationship between smartphones and fitness levels because, unlike the television, phones are...

New Cause for Inactivity and Poor Fitness 07/13/2013 KTLA News at 6 PM - KTLA-TV Text Attachment Email

Researchers at kent state have discovered a new cause for inactivity and poor fitness especially among college students. They say the problem is the smart phone...

Smartphones adversely affecting your fitness: Study 07/13/2013 Times of India Text Attachment Email

...study claims that smartphones are also responsible for lowered fitness level among users. Faculty members of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University, Dr Jacob Barkley and Dr Andrew Lepp conducted a study to see how smartphone usage affects the exercise levels in college students....


College of the Arts (CotA); Office of the President; Theatre and Dance (1)
Hudson Cable TV Program Schedule: July 15 - 21, 2013 07/14/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Morgan Foundation building with interviews of some of the artists, hosted by Brenda Schneider. The show continues through Sept. 3. The July "BRAVO! Kent State Arts" features Janice Lessman Moss, KSU Professor of Crafts/Textile Arts, describing KSU's weaving program; Jim Weaver, director at Porthouse...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Experiential Education and Civic Engagement (1)
HONORED: KSU recognized for hunger program 07/13/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

Kent State University has been named to the 2013 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest honor that a college or university...


Epidemiology and Biostatistics (1)
Spirometry boosts influenza vaccination in COPD (Zullo) 07/14/2013 Medwire News Text Attachment Email

...critical component of care associated with increased vaccination rates and therefore can impact influenza-related exacerbations,” say authors Melissa Zullo (Kent State University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) and colleagues. Using data on 16,309 COPD patients taken from the 2011 US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance...


Geography; University Press (1)
Deadly storm claimed 38 lives (Schmidlin) 07/14/2013 Cincinnati Enquirer - Online Text Attachment Email

...hour, which would be phenomenal. Thomas Schmidlin, who co-authored Thunder in the Heartland: A Chronicle of Outstanding Weather Events in Ohio (1996; Kent State University Press) with his wife, Jeanne Appelhans Schmidlin, said the storm was likely a derecho, a widespread, long-lived windstorm or...


Higher Education; Tuition (3)
Aultman College of Nursing lone Stark school not raising tuition 07/13/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...students,? Leggett said. Aultman is the only Stark County college not raising tuition for the 2013-14 school year, but some schools also froze their rates. Ohio State University will hold steady, as will Wayne College in Orrville, a satellite of the University of Akron. A 1.5 percent increase...

Aultman College of Nursing lone Stark school not raising tuition 07/13/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...students,” Leggett said. Aultman is the only Stark County college not raising tuition for the 2013-14 school year, but some schools also froze their rates. Ohio State University will hold steady, as will Wayne College in Orrville, a satellite of the University of Akron. A 1.5 percent increase...

Aultman College of Nursing lone Stark school not raising tuition 07/13/2013 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...students,” Leggett said. Aultman is the only Stark County college not raising tuition for the 2013-14 school year, but some schools also froze their rates. Ohio State University will hold steady, as will Wayne College in Orrville, a satellite of the University of Akron. A 1.5 percent increase...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Business notebook 07/13/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication finished eighth in the overall national championship of the Hearst Journalism...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Results of ELO manganese study released 07/15/2013 Morning Journal News Text Attachment Email

EAST LIVERPOOL - Results of a health study regarding the effects of airborne manganese on local residents indicate that those exposed to the mineral are...


KSU at Stark (1)
Football Celebration at its Best! 07/15/2013 State Journal-Register Text Attachment Email

The Pro Football Hall of Fame is kickin' it at this year's enshrinement festival. 50 year celebration! Many come from far away and just around the corner...


Political Science (1)
True Democrats Don't Bankroll Juntas (Stacher) 07/15/2013 New York Times, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — THE military's coup in Egypt has placed the American political establishment in a bind. Many observers insist that the Obama administration...


Psychology (1)
Why bisexuals stay in the closet 07/14/2013 Los Angeles Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...people who are gay, lesbian or straight: Bisexual women are more likely to binge drink and suffer depression, a George Mason University study found. A Kent State University study of bisexual women found that they were more likely than straight or lesbian women to harm themselves or endure suicidal...


Students (3)
Cabaret to benefit Salem theater 07/14/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...What SCT Has Done for Me,” a musical cabaret by SCT alumni. Proceeds will benefit the theater. Director is Salem native Connor Bezeredi, a junior in Youngstown State University's musical-theater department. “We all see this as a way to give back to SCT and help ensure that the institution continues...

College campuses among BDS battleground 07/12/2013 Cleveland Jewish News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Palestine solidarity organizations, the International Socialist Organization chapters in Cincinnati, Columbus and Toledo and pro-Palestinian groups at Kent State University, The Ohio State University, University of Toledo and Oberlin College endorsed the letter. The letter stated that the investment,...

Pro-Palestinian groups press Ohio to pull Israel Bonds investment 07/15/2013 JNS.org Text Attachment Email

(Cleveland Jewish News/JNS.org) Seventeen pro-Palestinian organizations from around Ohio signed an open letter demanding that the state of Ohio pull its...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Now Playing Onstage in Cleveland - Week of 7/14/2013 07/14/2013 BroadwayWorld.com Text Attachment Email

SOUTH PACIFIC Porthouse Theatre-Kent State University 6/13-8/10/2013 South PacificSet in an island paradise during World War II, two parallel love stories are threatened by...

Theater review: 'Working' at Porthouse 07/15/2013 Enjoy Ohio.com Text Attachment Email

The musical Working, playing at Porthouse Theatre, explores the concept of work and what a variety of jobs mean to human beings, whether they're a source...


University Archives and Special Collections (1)
Outfest: 'Big Joy' Directors Stephen Silha and Eric Slade Talk About Capturing the Spirit of Poet and Filmmaker James Broughton 07/14/2013 indieWIRE Text Attachment Email

...a good poet. So what does it mean to live poetically? What is the personal life? How does that play into his work? James Broughton, 1940s Bob Lopez/Kent State University Broughton Archives Obviously you have to tread delicately when you're talking with the family members, but there's one moment...


News Headline: Kent State senior, Stow native receives first place honor from Ohio Society of CPAs | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: STOW:
Kent State senior Lauren Romick of Stow received a $3,000 first-place honor as the 2013 Scholarship Day award recipient from the Ohio Society of CPAs. She is an accounting major.

Return to Top



News Headline: Stow student Lauren Romick receives Ohio CPA Scholarship Day Award | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University senior accounting major Lauren Romick of Stow received a $3,000 first-place honor as the 2013 Scholarship Day award recipient from the Ohio Society of CPAs. Several accounting students in Ohio competed for the award.

"I was very surprised but excited when they announced my name as the winner," Romick said. "I could not believe that I had won."

Each participant in the 2013 Scholarship Day previously won a $2,000 award from the Ohio CPA Foundation's annual statewide scholarship program. This award made participants eligible to compete at the 2013 Scholarship Day.

"It's a great honor that Lauren was invited to the Scholarship Day, and I think she represents Kent State University very well," said Linda Zucca, chair of Kent State's Department of Accounting.

Zucca has known Romick since she came on campus as a freshman. Zucca says Romick is very active in student organizations and serves as a First Year Experience instructor, assisting first-year students through their transition to a collegiate atmosphere and the larger academic community.

Romick learned of the scholarship from the OSCPA student ambassador, informing Kent State's Accounting Association about the scholarship application.

The students received a set of potential questions the judges may ask, and Romick researched each question thoroughly, spending a month preparing for the OSCPA event.

Each student was interviewed by four individual judges. Once the four interviews were completed, the judges formed a panel to interview each student.

"I really enjoyed speaking with the judges and professionals about their experiences with the accounting profession," Romick said. "They each had an interesting perspective on the OSCPA and the opportunities and services it had to offer students and professionals."

"It's a great accomplishment," Zucca said. "She worked very hard to get this award. It shows how good our students are here at Kent State."

Romick is currently an audit intern at Deloitte. After graduation, she plans to start a career as an auditor in public accounting in the Cleveland area.

Return to Top



News Headline: VIDEO: KSU aeronautics professor discusses recent Asiana Airlines crash (Mangrum) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland -- With the recent plane crash of the Asiana Airlines flight in San Francisco there has been speculation about what caused the crash.

The National Transportation Safety Board says the cockpit voice recorder shows two pilots called for the landing to be aborted. Seconds later, the Boeing 777 hit a seawall, then crash landed.

We spoke with Professor of Aeronautics at Kent State University, Dr. Richard Mangrum, about the investigation.

Click here to view video: http://www.wkyc.com/news/national/306421/22/KSU-aeronautics-professor-discusses-recent-Asiana-Airlines-crash

Return to Top



News Headline: Five questions with Steve Byrne, star of 'Sullivan & Son' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: DFW.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Steve Byrne

Truth be told, a career in comedy is something Steve Byrne, a stand-up comedian-turned-sitcom star, never planned on. The half-Korean, half-Irish star of Sullivan & Son, in its second season on TBS, discovered almost by accident that he could be funny for a living. “I had never even been to a comedy club until I worked at one,” Byrne recalls. “I finished college in Ohio at Kent State and moved to New York. I walked up and down Broadway, to all the different restaurants, looking for a job.”

He wound up working as a member of the wait staff at the legendary Caroline's Comedy Club. Four months later, he summoned up the courage to step onstage. “The minute I did it, I knew that's what I was going to do the rest of my life,” he says. “Fifteen years later, here I am.” So while a new episode of Sullivan & Son plays at 9 p.m. Thursday, the Sullivan & Son Comedy Tour brings Byrne and three co-stars (Ahmed Ahmed, Owen Benjamin and Roy Wood Jr.) to the Addison Improv for shows this week.

1How similar are you to your TV character, Steve Sullivan, a lawyer-turned-Pittsburgh bar owner?

I'm pretty much in step with Steve Sullivan. I'm not sure I'm as patient with friends or family, but I think I have the same moral compass. All of the characters, actually, are part of my personality. When I wrote the original pilot — prior to Rob Long stepping in and making it 100 times funnier — all of the characters were just different voices of my stand-up.

2So there's no dark side of your personality that you're keeping concealed?

I'm waiting until probably Season 6 until I pull back the curtain and reveal my true Charlie Sheen side.

3When did you discover that you had the power to make people laugh?

I had moved from New Jersey to Pittsburgh. I was in junior high school. I realized, “I've got to make new friends. I don't know anybody.” So I started goofing off and joking around and got attention and became friends with a lot of folks. It spiraled from there.

4What compelled you to make the move from stand-up to sitcom?

I was a guy who toured the country 50 weeks a year, living out of a suitcase. I had a great professional life but no personal life. I ultimately wanted a life that matters. I wanted to be around friends and family. I wanted to have a place that was home to me, because home was just hotel rooms and 8-ounce bottles of shampoo. That was the core of it.

5What's the hardest part of making a sitcom? The producing side, the writing side or the acting?

I've yet to discover the most difficult part. Every day is a blessing. Christine Ebersole co-star] said it best. She said: “Every day I'm here, I just feel like I'm fishing. When I go to work, I just tell everybody I'm going fishing.” That's the way I feel.

Return to Top



News Headline: Porthouse cast put on polished, energetic 'Working' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: All of these and more are portrayed in the musical "Working," which opened July 4 at Porthouse Theatre.

The musical is based on the book by Studs Terkel, who conducted a series of interviews with workers. Jim Weaver directed and choreographed this production, with musical direction by Adam Howard. Porthouse's version of "Working" is the 2010 updated version, which includes vignettes of 26 people at their jobs. The musical not only goes into the work they do, but, in a couple of the songs such as "If I Could've Been," "Fathers and Sons," and "Something To Point To," also goes into their dreams and desires.

The characters and songs offer a cross-section of Americana, from the stay-at-home mom to the firefighter, to the young man at his first job, to the retiree. There are some comic moments, such as with the UPS man, the waitress and the mason. Most of the moments are more serious: the millworkers lamenting the physical toil and the dangerous heat, the teacher lamenting on how to teach today's children, the cleaning woman who vows her daughter will not be the next generation of cleaners. There are also modern-day acknowledgements to today's economy, with several characters expressing grudging gratitude that they have a job, and brief comments from someone recently laid off of his job. Each character and each song is superbly done by Porthouse's 12-member Young Professional Company. Members include Jessica Benson, Tee Boyich, Shamara Costa, Brianna DeRosa, Danielle Dorfman, Emily Hubbard, Michael Glaven, Mark Warren Goins, Joshua C. Gordon, Sam Rohloff, Tim Welsh and Jake Wood.

"I've read the books [Studs Terkel] wrote," said Margaret Chesler of Shaker Heights, who attended the July 6 show. "They interesting thing about this play is that it was [originally] written when the economy was good. This goes into the additional pressures facing employees now, with their fears of losing their jobs. This play will be timeless."

Mark Baskt of South Euclid said he came for his 60th birthday.

"I am so impressed at the level of talent that Porthouse puts together," Baskt said of the performance. "The acting is tremendous and the singing was crisp and sharp. I go to the Broadway series at Playhouse Square, and this is on that level. I'm a very proud alumnus of Kent State after seeing this. If this is an undiscovered gem for anyone, they need to discover it."

Ticket information

"Working" runs through July 20. Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Single tickets are $32-38 for adults, $26-35 for seniors and $17-21 for students. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds to enjoy the beautiful surroundings of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which is located next to the theatre grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There also is a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Many picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

Special for military

Porthouse Theatre invites all active members of the military, veterans, and their families to enjoy "Working" at 20 percent off regular-priced tickets on July 17.

Next on stage

Porthouse will close its 2013 summer season with "Fiddler on the Roof," which runs July 25 through Aug. 11.

Return to Top



News Headline: Porthouse cast put on polished, energetic 'Working' | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: All of these and more are portrayed in the musical "Working," which opened July 4 at Porthouse Theatre.

The musical is based on the book by Studs Terkel, who conducted a series of interviews with workers. Jim Weaver directed and choreographed this production, with musical direction by Adam Howard. Porthouse's version of "Working" is the 2010 updated version, which includes vignettes of 26 people at their jobs. The musical not only goes into the work they do, but, in a couple of the songs such as "If I Could've Been," "Fathers and Sons," and "Something To Point To," also goes into their dreams and desires.

The characters and songs offer a cross-section of Americana, from the stay-at-home mom to the firefighter, to the young man at his first job, to the retiree. There are some comic moments, such as with the UPS man, the waitress and the mason. Most of the moments are more serious: the millworkers lamenting the physical toil and the dangerous heat, the teacher lamenting on how to teach today's children, the cleaning woman who vows her daughter will not be the next generation of cleaners. There are also modern-day acknowledgements to today's economy, with several characters expressing grudging gratitude that they have a job, and brief comments from someone recently laid off of his job. Each character and each song is superbly done by Porthouse's 12-member Young Professional Company. Members include Jessica Benson, Tee Boyich, Shamara Costa, Brianna DeRosa, Danielle Dorfman, Emily Hubbard, Michael Glaven, Mark Warren Goins, Joshua C. Gordon, Sam Rohloff, Tim Welsh and Jake Wood.

"I've read the books [Studs Terkel] wrote," said Margaret Chesler of Shaker Heights, who attended the July 6 show. "They interesting thing about this play is that it was [originally] written when the economy was good. This goes into the additional pressures facing employees now, with their fears of losing their jobs. This play will be timeless."

Mark Baskt of South Euclid said he came for his 60th birthday.

"I am so impressed at the level of talent that Porthouse puts together," Baskt said of the performance. "The acting is tremendous and the singing was crisp and sharp. I go to the Broadway series at Playhouse Square, and this is on that level. I'm a very proud alumnus of Kent State after seeing this. If this is an undiscovered gem for anyone, they need to discover it."

Ticket information

"Working" runs through July 20. Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

Single tickets are $32-38 for adults, $26-35 for seniors and $17-21 for students. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds to enjoy the beautiful surroundings of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which is located next to the theatre grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There also is a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Many picnic tables are available for everyone's enjoyment at no cost.

Special for military

Porthouse Theatre invites all active members of the military, veterans, and their families to enjoy "Working" at 20 percent off regular-priced tickets on July 17.

Next on stage

Porthouse will close its 2013 summer season with "Fiddler on the Roof," which runs July 25 through Aug. 11.

Return to Top



News Headline: MacArthur Beach State Park interns gain valuable work experience | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Palm Beach Post - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With its 438 acres of pristine coastal land between the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Worth Lagoon, John D. MacArthur Beach State Park seemed the most logical place for Samantha Grote and Jessica Stuczynski to spend their summer internships.

The 21-year-old college seniors — Grote of Decatur, Ind., is a student at Purdue University, and Stuczynski of Stow, Ohio, attends Kent State University — are biology majors who hope to pursue careers studying and working with exotic animals.

Return to Top



News Headline: Study links heavy cellphone use with poor fitness levels (Barkley, Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: People who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health.

A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy cellphone use and reduced fitness levels among college students.

Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob E. Barkley, associate professors in Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, found college students who reported the highest cellphone use — averaging 14 hours a day — were less fit than those who used the devices less often.

“There's no ‘phone potato' term, but maybe there should be,” Barkley said. “We're just scratching the surface here. I don't think they think about the consequences of sitting and playing with your phone.”

Brent Gray Jr. 19, of Cincinnati, admits he would likely be a “phone junkie” if he didn't train as a member of the University of Akron's track team.

The first thing he does when he wakes up is check his phone for texts and updates from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vine and Snapchat, all popular social media apps. He estimates he spends at least 12 hours each day using his iPhone.

“Without my phone, I don't think I'd know what to do with myself,” he said. “Without my phone, I'd be disconnected from the world.”

Though he stays physically active through track, Gray said he understands how people's lives could become consumed with their smartphones.

“Two hours could go by and you don't even know it,” he said.

Lepp and Barkley decided to conduct the study to see whether using cellphones — despite their portability — shared the same ties to inactivity as playing traditional video games and watching TV.

“There's been evidence that those types of behaviors that are defined as sedentary are inversely related to fitness,” Barkley said. “The phones now, especially the smartphones, offer access to all those behaviors we have defined as sedentary.”

The researchers surveyed more than 300 Kent State students about their cellphone use and broke them into three categories: low users who averaged 101 minutes daily, moderate users averaging 283 minutes and high users averaging 840 minutes.

Activities that counted toward the total include making calls, texting, sending or reading emails, playing games, surfing the Internet, watching videos and using social media. Listening to music wasn't included.

Students were given a test similar to a stress test to measure cardio­respiratory fitness.

“If you were someone who used the phone a lot,” Barkley said, “you were less fit.”

One explanation: Frequent cellphone users were more likely to report missing out on physical activities such as walking, running, swimming, working out or playing basketball, soccer, football, lacrosse or racquetball to use their devices.

“I think that high cellphone use could be indicative of a broader array of sedentary behaviors,” Barkley said.

Results were published recently by the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Brandon Schillig, 22, of North Canton. said he tries to find a balance when it comes to his new iPhone. The University of Akron senior estimates he uses the smartphone several hours a day.

“Everything is at the palm of my hand,” he said. “It's ridiculous. It's definitely addicting.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Glued to Your Cell Phone? Research Suggests It May Reduce Your Physical Activity and Fitness | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study out of kent state this morning.. On physical fitness and your smart phone. And it found college students.. Who reported the highest cellphone use .. Were less fit than those who used the devices less. The researchers say there is no term yet like: "phone potato".. But does admit there should be.

Return to Top



News Headline: High smartphone use appears to be linked to poor fitness (Barkley, Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Harold Mandel
News OCR Text: Staying fit has been shown to be vitally important for overall good health in body and mind. In a news release in July 10, 2013, Kent State University reported, Glued to Your Cell Phone? Research Suggests It May Reduce Your Physical Activity and Fitness. Researchers Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, who are faculty members in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University, have linked high cell phone use to poor fitness in college students.

Barkley and Lepp became interested in the relationship which exists between smartphones and fitness levels because, unlike the television, phones are small and portable, which should make it possible to use them while doing physical activity. However, the researchers found that despite the mobility of smartphones, high use contributed to a sedentary lifestyle for some subjects.

The researchers found that students who spent excessive amounts of time on their cell phones, for as much as 14 hours per day, were not as fit as those who averaged a little more than 90 minutes of cell phone use on a daily basis. The researchers have said that their findings suggest that cell phone use may be able to help gauge a person's risk for a multitude of health issues which are related to an inactive lifestyle.

This study has been published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. It appears that a lot of cell phone use may disrupt physical activity and undermine cardiorespiratory fitness, just like traditional sedentary behaviors have been found to do. It has been found that high frequency cell phone use can disrupt leisure time physical activity and promote sedentary behaviors.

Also, relatively high levels of cell phone use may serve as a marker for a broader pattern of leisure time sedentary behaviors such as watching television, playing video games and using the computer, which are independent of cell phone use. This negative association which has been found between cell phone use and fitness deserves further attention as cardiorespiratory fitness is a good indicator of an individual's risk for a number of health concerns.

If you want to live a healthy and long life it therefore would be wise to remember not to replace daily exercise with more time on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and surfing for Google, Yahoo and MSN News while also texting and talking on the phone. Although these and other Internet activities actually appear to have a great deal to offer for your social, career and intellectual development, while also offering interesting games and other forms of entertainment, nevertheless these benefits may very well be lost if you do not also stay fit.

Return to Top



News Headline: Is your smartphone making you fat and lazy? (Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chicago Tribune - Online
Contact Name: Monte Morin
News OCR Text: Were you planning on running this morning, but wasted too much time reading Twitter messages on your iPhone? When you do make it to the gym, do people give you the evil eye because you sit on a weight machine and text with a friend?

If you answered yes to either question, you may be turning into a "hyper-connected" couch potato.

According to a study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, frequent cell phone users were far more likely to forego or disrupt physical exercise and scored lower on fitness assessments than peers who used cell phones less frequently.

Though the compact size and mobility of smartphones would seem to facilitate physical activity, the ever-present lure of e-mail, text messages, Facebook, Twitter, games, Pinterest, Instagram, surfing the web, sharing photographs or talking with friends and family is having the opposite effect for some.

"While cell phones provide many of the same temptations as television and Internet connected computers, the difference is that cell phones fit in our pockets and purses and are with us wherever we go," wrote the Kent State University researchers. "Thus, they provide an ever-present invitation to 'sit and play.'"

The study began with a random survey of 305 college students, who were each asked about their cell phone usage, according to lead author Andrew Lepp, an associate professor of recreation, parks and tourism management, and his colleagues.

Students who logged just over 90 minutes a day were considered low-frequency users; those who averaged about 5 hours a day were considered moderate users. Students who spent up to 14 hours on their phone were considered heavy users.

In the second phase of the study, 49 of the surveyed students were randomly selected for physical examination. The students ran on a treadmill until they were exhausted, to determine their cardio-respiratory fitness, and they had their body fat content measured.

Authors found that heavy smartphone users were more inclined toward sedentary behavior than light users. The heavy users also had lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness than those with lower use.

Study subjects reported that heavy usage had negative effects on their activity level.

"Now that I have switched to the iPhone, I would say it definitely decreases my physical activity, because before I just had a Blackberry," one heavy user told researchers. "Now, if I'm bored, I can just download whatever I want and just sit there and play."

Another heavy user agreed.

"One of my friends called me during my workout, and like, I haven't talked to her in a while and I had to tell her a lot of stuff. So it kind of distracted me from my workout," the study subject told authors.

Interestingly, students who fell into the low phone-usage category said the devices made them more active, because they were able to coordinate recreational pursuits with friends.

However, once they were engaged in a physical activity, the low-use subjects were more like to shut off their phone or put it aside.

Return to Top



News Headline: Want to get fit? Throw your cell phone | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! India
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New York, July 11 (ANI): Spending too much time with mobile phones can harm your health, a new research has revealed.

The study conducted by Kent State University found that students, who spent lot of time on their phone- up to 14 hours each day- were less fit than those spending about 1 and a half hour a day, New York Daily News reported.

The report also said that people, who spent more time on their mobile devices, were more likely to engage in other sedentary forms of entertainment, like playing video games or watching films.

The authors wrote that the possibility that cell phone use could encourage physical activity among people who use it heavily while disrupting physical activity and encouraging sedentary activity among high-frequency users may help explain the significant negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness identified in the study.

The study has been published online in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. (ANI)

Return to Top



News Headline: Is your smartphone turning you into a slug? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: KTAR-AM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The hyper-connected possibilities of texting and tweeting, sending pictures, watching videos, surfing the Web and emailing back and forth is cutting into gym time and physical activity, perhaps with real consequences, according to a new study led by researchers at Kent State University.

The researchers from Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, thought that phones, unlike television, might not contribute to less physical activity because they are so portable and could be used during activities. Instead the study, published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, found cell phone use significantly and negatively disrupted physical activity and heart fitness across ages, genders and even body sizes. Interviews offered several explanations for the relationship, it said.

Researchers checked fitness level and body composition and found that students who spent large amounts of time on cell phones were less fit.

"First, high frequency users were more likely than low frequency users to report forgoing opportunities for physical activity in order to use their cell phones for sedentary behaviors," according to the study. "Second, low frequency users were more likely to report being connected to active peer groups through their cell phones and to cite this as a motivation for physical activity. Third, high levels of cell phone use indicated a broader pattern of sedentary behaviors apart from cell phone use, such as watching television."

"Interestingly, students who fell into the low phone-usage category said the devices made them more active, because they were able to coordinate recreational pursuits with friends," wrote Monte Morin on the Los Angeles Times Science Now blog. "However, once they were engaged in a physical activity, the low-use subjects were more like to shut off their phone or put it aside."

The study is not the first to figure out that a smartphone can be a distraction.

"But despite its name, a smartphone also can provide hour upon hour of dumb and mindless entertainment — a cartoon cat passes gas, a bouncing ball bounces among other bouncing balls, and triangular yellow birds smash into chattering monkeys. For hours on end," laments The Sentinel's editor, Jackie Kaczmarek. "I've come to the realization that, sad to say, this technology hasn't made me any smarter. If anything, it's given me a lazy brain."

In the 2013 Mobile Consumer Habits study conducted for Jumio by Harris Interactive last month, questions put to 1,102 smartphone-using adults showed that "we get separation anxiety if we are away from our smartphones," as ZDNet's Eileen Brown put it. Nearly three-fourths of respondents (72 percent) said they are usually within five feet of their smartphones.

Among other places those surveyed said they use their smartphones: At the movies (35 percent), during a dinner date (33 percent), at a child's or school event (32 percent), in a place of worship (19 percent) and in the shower (12 percent).

"This study throws up some interesting data and is very much in line with the FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) culture study findings released earlier this week. Can we actually take a break from our connected lives? Can we bear to be separated from our devices?" Brown wonders.

Harvard researchers also studied the impact of devices on behavior.

"Many of us spend hours each day interacting with our electronic devices. In professional settings we often use them to be efficient and productive. We may, however, lose sight of the impact the device itself has on our behavior and as a result be less effective," the Harvard paper says, according to an article on CNET. "We suggest that some time before going into a meeting, and obviously also during it, you put your cell phone away."

Return to Top



News Headline: From Our Blogs | Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times
Contact Name: Sanders, Edmund
News OCR Text: SCIENCE NOW

Smartphones lead to inactivity

Were you planning on running this morning, but wasted too much time reading Twitter messages on your iPhone? When you do make it to the gym, do people give you the evil eye because you sit on a weight machine and text with a friend?

If you answered yes to either question, you may be turning into a "hyper-connected" couch potato.

According to a study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, frequent cellphone users were far more likely to forego or disrupt physical exercise and scored lower on fitness assessments than peers who used cellphones less frequently.

Though the compact size and mobility of smartphones would seem to facilitate physical activity, the ever-present lure of e-mail, text messages, Facebook, Twitter, games, Pinterest, Instagram, surfing the web, sharing photographs or talking with friends and family is having the opposite effect for some.

"While cellphones provide many of the same temptations as television and Internet connected computers, the difference is that cellphones fit in our pockets and purses and are with us wherever we go," wrote the Kent State University researchers. "Thus, they provide an ever-present invitation to 'sit and play.' "

Authors found that heavy smartphone users were more inclined toward sedentary behavior than light users. The heavy users also had lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness than those with lower use.

Study subjects reported that heavy usage had negative effects on their activity level.

Return to Top



News Headline: Ditch cell phone to stay fit: Survey | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: The Economic Times Online Edition
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WASHINGTON: Glued to your cell phone? It may reduce your fitness and physical activity. High cell phone use is associated with poor fitness in college students, a new study has found.

Researchers from Kent State University in US were interested in the relationship between smartphones and fitness levels because, unlike the television, phones are small and portable, therefore making it possible to use them while doing physical activity.

They found that despite the phone's mobility, high use contributed to a sedentary lifestyle for some subjects.

More than 300 college students from the Midwest were surveyed on their cell phone usage and activity level. Of those students, 49 had their fitness level and body composition tested.

The researchers' results showed that students who spent large amounts of time on their cell phones - as much as 14 hours per day - were less fit than those who averaged a little more than 90 minutes of cell phone use daily.

The study is believed to be the first to assess the relationship between cell phone use and fitness level among any population.

Researchers Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, faculty members in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at the University concluded that their findings suggest that cell phone use may be able to gauge a person's risk for a multitude of health issues related to an inactive lifestyle.

The study was published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Return to Top



News Headline: New Cause for Inactivity and Poor Fitness | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: KTLA News at 6 PM - KTLA-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers at kent state have discovered a new cause for inactivity and poor fitness especially among college students. They say the problem is the smart phone because despite its mobility, it opens more options than a blackberry and some students spend as many as 14 hours a day on their smart phone and are at risk for poor health because of inactivity. No excuse. You could be on the stationary bike at the same time. Something tells me you have done that.

Return to Top



News Headline: Smartphones adversely affecting your fitness: Study | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times of India
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW DELHI: Smartphones have been amongst the biggest technological revolutions of the past decade, bringing emails, calls, internet and entertainment into your pockets. However, a recent study claims that smartphones are also responsible for lowered fitness level among users.

Faculty members of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University, Dr Jacob Barkley and Dr Andrew Lepp conducted a study to see how smartphone usage affects the exercise levels in college students. Unlike television, smartphones are small and portable, making it possible to use them while doing little physical activity.

The two researchers surveyed over 300 college students from the US Midwest regarding their smartphone usage and exercise level. Of the sample group, 49 were selected for fitness level and body composition tests. The results showed that those who spent large amounts of time on their phones - as high as 14 hours a day - were less fit than those who used the handsets under 90 minutes daily.

A student who participated in the study said, "Now that I have switched to the iPhone I would say it definitely decreases my physical activity because before I just had a Blackberry, so I didn't have much stuff on it. But now, if I'm bored, I can just download whatever I want."

This is said to be the first study that evaluates the relationship between smartphones and fitness level of users. It has appeared in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Return to Top



News Headline: Hudson Cable TV Program Schedule: July 15 - 21, 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HCTV presents Western Reserve Academy Archivist & Hudson Historian Tom Vince as he compares Abraham Lincoln and John Brown and the striking similarities between the two abolitionist activists.

Starting Wednesday evening, HCTV features the current Hudson Society of Artists show in the gallery of the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation building with interviews of some of the artists, hosted by Brenda Schneider. The show continues through Sept. 3.

The July "BRAVO! Kent State Arts" features Janice Lessman Moss, KSU Professor of Crafts/Textile Arts, describing KSU's weaving program; Jim Weaver, director at Porthouse Theater, talks about "Working: The Musical;" and Dr. Lester Lefton, President of Kent State University, shares his passion for photography and the arts.

"Good Day in Hudson" celebrates its 13th anniversary on HCTV with a visit from Hudson's mayor, William A. Currin and Tracy Chevalier, author of "The Last Runaway." Also, Liz Murphy keeps us up to date about what's "Happening in Hudson."

Music From The Buckeye State presents a recent concert from the Kent/Blossom Music Festival featuring the music of Beethoven and Brahms performed by students of the Festival who are visiting Kent State from across the nation.

The Hudson Summer Music Festival concert by The Coastliners is featured on HCTV this week. The group's repertoire includes ballads, standards, country and everything in between.

"The Weirdness Really Bad Movie" presents "The Hitch-Hiker" (1953) directed by Ida Lupino. The host segments were taped at Lenny's Collision Center.

"Half Hour to Health" with Dr. Bob DeMaria examines concussions and brain trauma.

Hudson Rotary Club presents Mike Lewis, Ben Rexroad and Gail Royster discussing Rotary's participation in various Avenues of Service.

"Clip Frames" explores the latest digital techniques in video production.

This week, The City Club of Cleveland features "Collateral Sanctions: Removing Obstacles for Returning Citizens."

Monday, July 15

10 a.m. City Club: Sanctions

11 a.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

Noon Rotary: Service

1 p.m. Organic Lawn Care

2 p.m. Millionaires' Row

3:30 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

4 p.m. The Coastliners

6 p.m. Rotary: Service

7 p.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

8 p.m. Buckeye Music

9 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

10 p.m. HGC: Monarchs

11 p.m. Time to Cook

11:30 p.m. NWoods Cooking

Tuesday, July 16

7 a.m. The Coastliners

9 a.m. Metroparks: Why Orgnic?

10 a.m. Time to Cook

10:30 a.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

11 a.m. HGC: Monarchs

Noon Vince: Lincoln & Brown

1 p.m. Buckeye Music

2 p.m. Book Chat: Flower

2:30 p.m. Half Hour to Health

3 p.m. Clip Frames

3:30 p.m. NWoods Cooking

4 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

5 p.m. City Club: Sanctions

6 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

6:30 p.m. Half Hour to Health

7 p.m. The Coastliners

9 p.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

10 p.m. Organic Lawn Care

11 p.m. NWoods Cooking

11:30 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

Wednesday, July 17

7 a.m. Buckeye Music

8 a.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

9 a.m. Book Chat: Flower

9:30 a.m. Half Hour to Health

10 a.m. City Club: Sanctions

11 a.m. Metroparks: Why Organic?

Noon The Coastliners

2 p.m. Polka Time

3 p.m. Organic Lawn Care

4 p.m. Joy on the Journey

4:30 p.m. Buckeye Music

5:30 p.m. HGC: Monarchs

6:30 p.m. Millionaires' Row

8 p.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

8:30 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

9 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

10 p.m. Rotary: Service

11 p.m. City Club: Sanctions

7 a.m. City Club: Sanctions

8 a.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

9 a.m. HGC: Monarchs

10 a.m. NWoods Cooking

10:30 a.m. Half Hour to Health

11 a.m. Buckeye Music

Noon Millionaires' Row

1:30 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

2 p.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

2:30 p.m. City Club: Sanctions

3:30 p.m. Half Hour to Health

4 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

5 p.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

6 p.m. HGC: Monarchs

7 p.m. Metroparks: Why Organic?

8 p.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

8:30 p.m. Time to Cook

9 p.m. The Coastliners

11 p.m. Buckeye Music

Friday, July 19

7 a.m. Organic Lawn Care

8 a.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

8:30 a.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

9 a.m. Polka Time

10 a.m. The Coastliners

Noon Rotary: Service

1 p.m. Metroparks: Why Organic?

2 p.m. HGC: Monarchs

3 p.m. Buckeye Music

4 p.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

5 p.m. City Club: Sanctions

6 p.m. NWoods Cooking

6:30 p.m. Clip Frames

7 p.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

7:30 p.m. Millionaires' Row

9 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

10 p.m. The 1/2 Hour Show

10:30 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

11 p.m. HGC: Monarchs

Saturday, July 20

7 a.m. The Coastliners

9 a.m. Time to Cook

9:30 a.m. Half Hour to Health

10 a.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

11 a.m. City Club: Sanctions

Noon Vince: Lincoln & Brown

1 p.m. Organic Lawn Care

2 p.m. HGC: Monarchs

3 p.m. Millionaires' Row

4:30 p.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

5 p.m. Buckeye Music

6 p.m. Joy on the Journey

6:30 p.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

7 p.m. The Coastliners

9 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

10 p.m. The 1/2 Hour Show

10:30 p.m. Really Bad Movie

Sunday, July 21

7 a.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

8 a.m. Community of St. John

9 a.m. NWoods Cooking

9:30 a.m. BRAVO! KSU Arts

10 a.m. Buckeye Music

11 a.m. MCM: Hudson Artists

11:30 a.m. FCC: 11:59

Noon First Congregational

1 p.m. Gloria Dei Lutheran

2:30 p.m. Joy on the Journey

3 p.m. The Coastliners

5 p.m. Buckeye Music

6 p.m. Rotary: Service

7 p.m. Polka Time

8 p.m. Vince: Lincoln & Brown

9 p.m. Good Day in Hudson

10 p.m. The 1/2 Hour Show

10:30 p.m. City Club: Sanctions

Return to Top



News Headline: HONORED: KSU recognized for hunger program | Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has been named to the 2013 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest honor that a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement. The university was recognized for its Campus Kitchen project, which recovers food from events and cafeterias and prepared hot food for those in need in the community.

Return to Top



News Headline: Spirometry boosts influenza vaccination in COPD (Zullo) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Medwire News
Contact Name: Kirsty Oswald, medwireNews Reporter
News OCR Text: medwireNews: Increasing the use of spirometry could help increase the rate of influenza vaccination among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), say researchers.

Their study, published in PLoS One, shows that patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by spirometry were nearly one-third more likely to have had the vaccination – which is deemed essential for COPD patients – in the previous year.

“This research provides evidence that a breathing test is a critical component of care associated with increased vaccination rates and therefore can impact influenza-related exacerbations,” say authors Melissa Zullo (Kent State University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) and colleagues.

Using data on 16,309 COPD patients taken from the 2011 US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, the authors found that 49% had received an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months – well below the national target of 90% for high-risk individuals and the over 65s.

But among the 13,201 (78%) patients who had undergone a breathing test, this rate was still significantly higher, at 53% compared with 36% among patients who had not undergone the testing. In adjusted analyses, this equated to a 31% greater likelihood for influenza vaccine among spirometry-tested patients.

The researchers say that their study adds to growing evidence that rates of vaccination are low among COPD patients but that it is the first to suggest spirometry as a means to improve this.

However, they caution that spirometry alone would not bring the vaccination rate close to the desired 90%. There are multiple barriers to vaccination among COPD patients which could include the perception of low risk, the fear of side effects, and the fear of contracting influenza. Additionally, some patients, and indeed physicians, express concern that the vaccine could trigger exacerbations prior to the development of immunity.

Given that up to 36% of COPD exacerbations are thought to be attributable to influenza and the proven efficacy of the vaccination in their prevention, “every effort should be made to ensure adults with COPD receive the influenza vaccine,” the authors conclude.

Return to Top



News Headline: Deadly storm claimed 38 lives (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cincinnati Enquirer - Online
Contact Name: Sara Gadzala
News OCR Text: It was 98 years ago this month when one of the deadliest storms in Greater Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky history ripped through the region, killing a total of 38, demolishing thousands of homes and businesses and causing untold millions in damage.

Dubbed the Tornado of 1915, the Big Blow or even a hurricane by some, it was never officially listed as a tornado by the National Weather Service. But because of its severity, it is still referred to as such locally.

Widespread destruction was reported in communities stretching from Bellevue, Newport, Ludlow and Erlanger to Delhi Township, West End, Downtown and Terrace Park.

In Northern Kentucky alone, three were killed and damage was estimated at more than $3 million.

Violent winds and storms swept in after 9 p.m. Roofs were blown off, buildings collapsed, church steeples toppled, windows shattered, trees uprooted, power lines downed and street cars overturned.

A story from the Kentucky Post the next day read: Dayton and Bellevue were hit hard by the storm, the former town being wrecked from one end to the other.

Reports of capsized boats in the Ohio River led to searches for missing passengers and a train carrying racehorses from Latonia Race track was derailed in Terrace Park, killing three men and 11 horses.

The Lagoon Amusement Park, a premier entertainment complex in Ludlow, suffered more than $50,000 worth of damage, including parts of the dancing pavilion, motor dome, roller coasters and merry-go-round.

The roof to the barracks in Fort Thomas was blown off, along with more than 25 roofs across Bellevue.

In Covington, Coppins Department Store, Bradys Saloon and St. Marys Cathedral suffered damage. The steeple at St. Josephs Church at 12th and Greenup Streets fell and destroyed nearby buildings. Also in Ludlow, St. Boniface Catholic Church sustained more than $30,000 worth of damages as the majority of the building was annihilated.

As bad as the destruction was in Northern Kentucky, Cincinnati suffered significantly more damage and fatalities as entire families were killed in the collapse of five apartment buildings on Sixth Street. Eighteen people died as a result of those buildings crumpling in a domino effect. Seventeen others died throughout southwest Ohio and Kentucky.(Page 2 of 2)Don Hughes, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said it was the deadliest windstorm in Ohio history in which no tornado was involved.

No one saw any evidence of a tornado, Hughes said. But they actually had winds that lasted over a minute that averaged 62 miles an hour, which would be phenomenal.

Thomas Schmidlin, who co-authored Thunder in the Heartland: A Chronicle of Outstanding Weather Events in Ohio (1996; Kent State University Press) with his wife, Jeanne Appelhans Schmidlin, said the storm was likely a derecho, a widespread, long-lived windstorm or straight line wind associated with a band of rapidly moving showers or thunderstorms that produces destruction similar to a tornado.

Even today, people in the local area will talk about a tornado because its kind of outside of our experience when an ordinary straight line wind does that kind of damage, said Schmidlin, also a meteorologist and professor at Kent State University.

Schmidlin believes the storm was a derecho because July is derecho season in Ohio, no funnel cloud was reported and damage was consistent with a straight line wind.

If the same storm hit today, Schmidlin said it would unlikely do as much damage. Better weather technology and warning systems and more stringent building codes would make losses much less than 100 years ago, he said. Most of the structures at the time were made of wood. A coroners inquest into the Sixth Street collapse resulted in the owners not being found negligent because the buildings were more than 50 years old.

That kind of windstorm is always a dangerous thing, but I think the time and the setting of that one led to the catastrophe, Schmidlin said. ?

Return to Top



News Headline: Aultman College of Nursing lone Stark school not raising tuition | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Saimi Bergmann
News OCR Text: College tuition increases seem as inevitable as the start of the new school year. However, for the first time, officials at Aultman College of Nursing have decided to freeze tuition. ?It?s unusual, we recognize that,? said Vi Leggett, a vice president at Aultman.

One of the reasons for the decision was the federal government?s increase of interest rates on student loans. ?We wanted to continue to make sure (college) is affordable for our students,? Leggett said. Aultman is the only Stark County college not raising tuition for the 2013-14 school year, but some schools also froze their rates. Ohio State University will hold steady, as will Wayne College in Orrville, a satellite of the University of Akron.

A 1.5 percent increase at Kent State Stark and Kent State?s main campus is the lowest increase in the last four years. Kent State University Stark and Stark State College remain comparable bargains despite modest increases. Stark State is $150.30 per credit and Kent Stark starts at $235.50 per credit.

Tuition at the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown increased by about 2.5 percent, which spokesperson Heather Bing says is the ?lowest tuition increase we?ve had in the past 25 years.? Nearly half of that increase will be allocated to student scholarships.

The steepest hikes are at private universities. Tuition at both Malone University and Walsh University will increase 4.5 percent. The University of Mount Union will go up by 2.7 percent, but at $27,380 per year, it remains the highest-priced university in Stark County.

Officials at Walsh, Malone and Mount Union all said their ?sticker price? is misleading because 98 percent of their students don?t pay that much due to grants, scholarships and institutional aid. ?The average residential student at Walsh, after scholarships and grants, pays $16,500 on average,? said Teresa Griffin, assistant vice president of university relations. ?The message we want to get out there is when you compare us to public schools, we?re not that far off to what students are paying out of pocket.?

Return to Top



News Headline: Aultman College of Nursing lone Stark school not raising tuition | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College tuition increases seem as inevitable as the start of the new school year. However, for the first time, officials at Aultman College of Nursing have decided to freeze tuition.

“It's unusual, we recognize that,” said Vi Leggett, a vice president at Aultman.

One of the reasons for the decision was the federal government's increase of interest rates on student loans.

“We wanted to continue to make sure (college) is affordable for our students,” Leggett said.

Aultman is the only Stark County college not raising tuition for the 2013-14 school year, but some schools also froze their rates. Ohio State University will hold steady, as will Wayne College in Orrville, a satellite of the University of Akron.

A 1.5 percent increase at Kent State Stark and Kent State's main campus is the lowest increase in the last four years. Kent State University Stark and Stark State College remain comparable bargains despite modest increases.  Stark State is $150.30 per credit and Kent Stark starts at $235.50 per credit.

Tuition at the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown increased by about 2.5 percent, which spokesperson Heather Bing says is the “lowest tuition increase we've had in the past 25 years.” Nearly half of that increase will be allocated to student scholarships.

The steepest hikes are at private universities. Tuition at both Malone University and Walsh University will increase 4.5 percent. The University of Mount Union will go up by 2.7 percent, but at $27,380 per year, it remains the highest-priced university in Stark County.

Officials at Walsh, Malone and Mount Union all said their “sticker price” is misleading because 98 percent of their students don't pay that much due to grants, scholarships and institutional aid.

“The average residential student at Walsh, after scholarships and grants, pays $16,500 on average,” said Teresa Griffin, assistant vice president of university relations. “The message we want to get out there is when you compare us to public schools, we're not that far off to what students are paying out of pocket.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Aultman College of Nursing lone Stark school not raising tuition | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College tuition increases seem as inevitable as the start of the new school year. However, for the first time, officials at Aultman College of Nursing have decided to freeze tuition.

“It's unusual, we recognize that,” said Vi Leggett, a vice president at Aultman.

One of the reasons for the decision was the federal government's increase of interest rates on student loans.

“We wanted to continue to make sure (college) is affordable for our students,” Leggett said.

Aultman is the only Stark County college not raising tuition for the 2013-14 school year, but some schools also froze their rates. Ohio State University will hold steady, as will Wayne College in Orrville, a satellite of the University of Akron.

A 1.5 percent increase at Kent State Stark and Kent State's main campus is the lowest increase in the last four years. Kent State University Stark and Stark State College remain comparable bargains despite modest increases.  Stark State is $150.30 per credit and Kent Stark starts at $235.50 per credit.

Tuition at the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown increased by about 2.5 percent, which spokesperson Heather Bing says is the “lowest tuition increase we've had in the past 25 years.” Nearly half of that increase will be allocated to student scholarships.

The steepest hikes are at private universities. Tuition at both Malone University and Walsh University will increase 4.5 percent. The University of Mount Union will go up by 2.7 percent, but at $27,380 per year, it remains the highest-priced university in Stark County.

Officials at Walsh, Malone and Mount Union all said their “sticker price” is misleading because 98 percent of their students don't pay that much due to grants, scholarships and institutional aid.

“The average residential student at Walsh, after scholarships and grants, pays $16,500 on average,” said Teresa Griffin, assistant vice president of university relations. “The message we want to get out there is when you compare us to public schools, we're not that far off to what students are paying out of pocket.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Business notebook | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication finished eighth in the overall national championship of the Hearst Journalism Awards Program. The school also earned seventh-place rankings in both the photojournalism and multimedia categories.

Return to Top



News Headline: Results of ELO manganese study released | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Results of a health study regarding the effects of airborne manganese on local residents indicate that those exposed to the mineral are showing some health effects.

The results of the study conducted by the San Francisco State University were shared Thursday with the city's board of health and later that evening with the community at a public session at Kent State University's downtown campus.

The local study compared results of a similar study conducted in 2009 in Marietta, located near a smelter that emits manganese, and Mount Vernon, which has no large airborne source of the mineral.

In East Liverpool, prior investigations had determined that the greatest source of manganese in the city is S.H. Bell, a raw products storage and packaging facility in the East End.

According to George Bollweg of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, manganese levels in the city are the highest in Region 5 and probably in the entire country.

These high levels prompted this study, which involved four different universities in three countries, two federal agencies, the Ohio Department of Health and experts from around the globe.

Participants were adults between the ages of 30 and 75 who had lived within two miles of the S.H. Bell facility for 10 years or more, excluding anyone who ever worked at the company.

In addition to blood tests, participants were subjected to a battery of neurological and neuropsychological tests, as well as having their nails and hair tested to measure a multitude of areas.

Among those were cognitive flexibility, information processing, working memory and attention, visual tracking speed, verbal skills, motor dexterity and strength, postural sway and tremors.

What the study ultimately showed, according to Dr. Rosemarie Bowler of San Francisco State University, is that East Liverpool residents' blood had higher average cadmium levels than Mount Vernon but lower mercury levels than Marietta but were still within normal range of the general population.

As for neurological issues, city residents showed slower movement initiations than Mount Vernon residents but were slightly better than Marietta residents.

More hand tremors were seen in East Liverpool residents than Marietta and they also had more pronounced postural sway (involuntary swaying or inability when standing on both feet) than both Marietta and Mount Vernon.

The scores in all three communities for neuropsychological tests were in normal ranges except for divided memory, visual memory and motor speed, with East Liverpool residents testing lower than those in Marietta for immediate memory, which includes things normally done to care for oneself, such as eating, bathing, dressing, grooming and working.

East Liverpool residents also had lower scores than the other two communities in word reading, motor speed, motor strength and motor tactile.

Bowler reported that living closer to the manganese source resulted in increased tremors and also in lower motor speed and grip strength scores, noting, "We can't say it is caused by manganese but it could be related."

Those with higher manganese levels in their blood did have more symptoms, she added.

"We're learning from your participation," Bowler said, adding that it was determined that blood may not be the ideal biomarker, so evaluations of hair and toenails will be continued in future studies.

And while S.H. Bell has been targeted as the source of the manganese, Bollweg emphasized that the company has drastically reduced its output of the mineral between 2003 and 2012.

Findings against the company and resulting orders were imposed by the USEPA in 2008 and 2010 and Bollweg said decreases were generally seen after that.

"We believe 2013 will be consistent," he said.

According to information provided by Chris Abbruzzese of Ohio EPA, S.H. Bell has paved roads near the facility to reduce dust emissions, implemented dust suppression on unpaved roads; now wets and vacuums paved surfaces; wets affected materials when loading and unloading; implemented a 5-mile-per-hour speed limit near its facilities; is now storing materials that contribute to dust emissions in enclosed buildings; places tarps on trucks leaving the facilities and constructed a truck load-out building with a capture and control system; keeps detailed records of steps taken to reduce dust emissions; and ceased all work resulting in manganese emissions at the Little England facility.

Manganese and chromium are now at acceptable levels and the facility no longer presents an increased risk to residents' health, officials said.

Among the participants in the study was Mayor Jim Swoger, who pointed out he has lived within 500 yards of the S.H. Bell facility for 43 years and his manganese levels are within acceptable parameters.

"Overall, the community should be reassured there are no big time health effects," Bowler concluded.

Return to Top



News Headline: Football Celebration at its Best! | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: State Journal-Register
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Pro Football Hall of Fame is kickin' it at this year's enshrinement festival. 50 year celebration!

Many come from far away and just around the corner for the 19 events that take place over two weeks of the enshrinement festival.

NOTE: For 2013 the PFHOF festival will begin July 19 and runs through Aug. 6 for future years check the website http://www.profootballhoffestival.com/.

Aside from the enshrinement--some of the most popular events run from July 19 - 21. The Balloon classic-Jackson-Belden Food Fest and Fireworks. It is held at the campuses of Kent State University at Stark and Stark State College.

Bring your chairs, blankets and get there early to claim you spot to watch the more than 60 balloons on takeoff. You will find plenty of children's entertainment, food, tours, music, fireworks and more. It is a great family event.

There is more at stake than fun. It is a competition...a sport! More than half of the balloons are competing for money. They are shooting for targets, dropping weighted baggies to the target on the ground. Winning can come down to a millimeter.

With so many activities scheduled there is something for everyone! Visit www.profootballhoffestival.com/schedule for event schedules and http://writetravels.blogspot.com/2012/07/football-fansthis-is-big-event.html and http://writetravels.blogspot.com/2012/07/more-football-festivities.html for more information.

Read more: http://gatehouse.morecontentnow.com/archive/x1293263689/Football-Celebration-at-its-Best#ixzz2Z7n0hPet

Return to Top



News Headline: True Democrats Don't Bankroll Juntas (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: New York Times, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — THE military's coup in Egypt has placed the American political establishment in a bind. Many observers insist that the Obama administration must either formally condone the military takeover or call it a “coup,” which would require a cutoff of American aid, as Senator John McCain has advocated.

Related in News
Hardening Split in Egypt as Islamists Stage Huge Demonstrations (July 13, 2013)
Related in Opinion
Room for Debate: Is Egypt Evolving, or Collapsing? (July 7, 2013)
Connect With Us on Twitter
For Op-Ed, follow @nytopinion and to hear from the editorial page editor, Andrew Rosenthal, follow @andyrNYT.
.But this semantic debate misses the larger point. While a minority of Congressional representatives bicker with the White House, State Department and Pentagon over the definition of a “coup” and what the Obama administration must do to comply with federal law, the Egyptian military has already cleverly satisfied many of the conditions to keep the aid flowing — namely, it has installed a civilian-led government and set a timetable for elections.

This window dressing shouldn't hide the fact that a coup took place, nor should it stop the United States government from reacting to it as the law prescribes.

If Mr. Obama wants American rhetoric about democracy to be taken seriously in the wake of a military intervention, aid to Egypt's army has to be on the chopping block, as our laws state. Egyptians are already suspicious of American intentions — and they will be even more skeptical of America's goals if we fail to respect our own legislative checks on foreign assistance as they try to build their own democracy.

Continuing aid as if nothing happened would reinforce the perception among Egyptians that all America cares about is maintaining good ties with unaccountable generals and that President Obama's policy has little to do with building democratic institutions and empowering the “masses” as his administration so often claims.

Indeed, the generals' latest intervention is more insidious and duplicitous than their role after they nudged Hosni Mubarak from the presidency in 2011. The heads of the armed forces are selling nationalism to the population while remaining above the law.

Egypt's generals do not wish to govern. Their calculation is that so long as they are not visibly running the country, they are safe. And they have learned that it is better to play the role of fire department while letting civilians of different political stripes assume the role of permanent arsonists.

The army has shown that it is happy to wield influence while veiling its power. The generals watched their existing and new privileges formalized in the flawed Constitution that Mr. Morsi pushed through without public debate. All the while, the military's budget remained an institutional secret away from the glare of public scrutiny. A future Parliament was forbidden to legislate against it. As the problems multiplied and the country teetered, the defense minister feigned political neutrality and ambiguously implied that intervention was an ever-present option.

Having pitted the secular revolutionaries against the Muslim Brotherhood, the generals have successfully divided the coalition that overthrew Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and they now stand atop the only organization in post-Mubarak Egypt that is able to create political realities on the ground.

The generals may miscalculate or overreach one day. They may even come up against an uprising that overruns them, given their continuing disregard for providing bread, freedom or social justice. But until that time, they will remain focused on sapping the authority of the state's civilians so that the military remains structurally advantaged against either elected politicians or the rest of society, who will continue to labor under stagnating political and economic conditions.

And all the while, despite this decidedly undemocratic structure, American aid is likely to keep flowing, along with generous donations from authoritarian anti-Muslim Brotherhood governments in the oil-rich Persian Gulf region.

In spite of its own low bar, the United States government also made clear that cutting aid to Egypt would hurt American interests. This is unsurprising, given the United States' longstanding relationship with Egypt's army consummated by the 1979 Camp David Accords, America's need to use the Suez Canal, Cairo's assent to the United States' airspace requests, as well as intelligence and military cooperation.

Some centrist policy analysts have had moral qualms about this situation and are now calling for American aid to be suspended temporarily because of Egypt's “soft coup.” It's very convenient to make such moralistic calls when American aid to Egypt has already been disbursed for the current fiscal year and the next payment won't be due until next year. Furthermore, American allies like Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait have already issued pledges of $12 billion to shore up the new Egyptian government.

But the most disingenuous part of the entire aid-suspension debate revolves around the “masses” that the Obama administration speaks of in such glowing terms. Nearly all American aid remains attached to the most unaccountable force in the political life of Egyptians at a time when there are growing calls in Cairo by the protest movement to cut all American aid to Egypt.

By financing the armed forces to the tune of $1.3 billion per year, the United States government sends a bipartisan message that its support lies where it invests its money — much of which actually never reaches Cairo but is channeled back to the American arms industry in states like Ohio, where components for M1A1 Abrams tanks and other military hardware are produced. Thus, cutting American aid would effectively trim the subsidy Washington provides to these domestic industries. Those lawmakers defending aid to Egypt aren't being realists; they're protecting their districts, constituents, and the corporations that donate to re-election campaigns.

While the voices of Egyptians and the mobilized masses seem to matter so much when popularly impeaching an elected president or a longtime dictator, the voice of those same masses when it comes to calls for cutting off American aid seem to resonate much less in Washington — affirming many Egyptians' belief that America has double standards and damaging the United States' image at a crucial moment in Egypt's history.

Joshua Stacher, an assistant professor of political science at Kent State University, is the author of “Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Why bisexuals stay in the closet | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times - Online
Contact Name: Emily Alpert
News OCR Text: In the middle of the rainbowy revelers at the pride parade in West Hollywood, Jeremy Stacy was questioned: Are you really bisexual?

"One guy came up to me and said, 'You're really gay,' " said Stacy, who was standing under a sign reading "Ask a Bisexual." "I told him I had a long line of ex-girlfriends who would vehemently disagree. And he said, 'That doesn't matter, because I know you're gay.' "

Stacy had gotten the question before. From a friend who said anyone who had slept with men must be gay even if he had also slept with women. From women who assumed he would cheat on them. From a boyfriend who insisted Stacy was really "bi now, gay later" and dumped him when he countered he was "bi now, bi always." Such attitudes appear to have kept many bisexuals in the closet. At a time when gay rights have made stunning strides, and gays and lesbians have become far more willing to come out, the vast majority of bisexuals remains closeted, a Pew Research Center survey revealed last month.

Only 28% of bisexuals said most or all of the important people in their lives knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 71% of lesbians and 77% of gay men, Pew found. The numbers were especially small among bisexual men: Only 12% said they were out to that degree, compared to one-third of bisexual women who said the same.

Closeted bisexuals told the that they had avoided coming out because they didn't want to deal with misconceptions that bisexuals were indecisive or incapable of monogamy stereotypes that exist among straights, gays and lesbians alike.

Elizabeth, who declined to give her last name, said that when some new friends chatted about women kissing women, she just kept quiet. "I wouldn't come out to them because they would say things" that she was "sex-crazed" or was making it up.

John, a married man who realized that he was bisexual three years ago and has told his wife, said he worries about bringing her shame if he comes out more publicly. He suspects she would hear, "Surely you must have seen the signs," and, "How do you put up with that?"

His wife has told him he must suppress his feelings. "She believes sexuality is a choice and that I can and should just 'turn it off,' " he said. The stereotypes make some reluctant to use the word, even after they come out. Laura McGinnis, communications director for the Trevor Project, an LGBT youth suicide prevention group, said she was 29 or 30 before she would readily share that she was bisexual or actively correct someone who thought otherwise.

"I hated the label because the assumption is that you're sleeping around," said McGinnis, now raising a child with her wife.

Such assumptions could make being out at work especially difficult: Only 11% of bisexual people polled by Pew said most of their closest coworkers knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 48% of gay men and 50% of lesbians.

Bisexuals were also less likely than gay men and lesbians to say their workplaces were accepting of them, Pew found. In a separate study published in the Journal of Bisexuality, half of bisexual people surveyed said their gay and straight coworkers misunderstood bisexuality.

"Bisexuals are thought to be confused, opportunistic and unable to make commitments and those aren't the kinds of things you want to see in an employee," said Denise Penn, vice president of the American Institute of Bisexuality, a nonprofit that funds research.

Inside the gay community, bisexual people are often seen as more privileged than gays and lesbians, able to duck discrimination by entering into straight relationships.

Far more bisexuals are in relationships with people of the opposite sex than the same sex, Pew found. They are less likely than gay men and lesbians to have weathered slurs or attacks, been rejected by friends or family or treated unfairly at work, its survey showed.

Yet researchers and activists say bisexuals face another set of frustrations, sometimes shunned by the gay and lesbian community and the straight world alike.

Bisexual women complain they are leered at by straight men and rejected by some lesbians as sexual "tourists" who will abandon them for men. Bisexual men, in turn, struggle to persuade men and women alike that they aren't just gay men with one foot in the closet. Both are stereotyped as oversexed swingers who cannot be trusted.

"Women would say, 'I don't date your kind,' " said Mimi Hoang, who helped form bisexual groups in Los Angeles. Such reactions left her frustrated. "I had nothing against lesbians. I thought I could find camaraderie with people who were also sexual minorities."

In the back of a Himalayan restaurant in Culver City on a recent Sunday, men and women in the bisexual social group amBi traded stories about being dismissed and denied: people folding their arms as they passed during a gay pride parade, would-be girlfriends or boyfriends bolting or assuming they couldn't be faithful to one person.

"This is the first group where I can say, 'I'm bi' and nobody will judge me," said one woman who wouldn't give her name.

Bisexual activists lament the "B" is overlooked by LGBT organizations that provide little programming specifically for them. Pew found that bisexuals especially men were less likely to have belonged to such groups. More than half said they have only a few LGBT friends or none at all.

Researchers believe such isolation may have dire results. Some studies have found that bisexual people are at greater risk of emotional woes than people who are gay, lesbian or straight: Bisexual women are more likely to binge drink and suffer depression, a George Mason University study found.

A Kent State University study of bisexual women found that they were more likely than straight or lesbian women to harm themselves or endure suicidal thoughts. Other studies have also cited higher risks for bisexual men.

"I think these problems are coming from two places," said Northwestern University human sexuality researcher Allen Rosenthal. "The absence of a bisexual community and the psychological stress of being in the closet."

Activists say bisexuals have two closets a straight and a gay one.

While a gay man might casually mention his husband, or a lesbian might out herself by talking about her girlfriend, bisexuals are often wrongly assumed to be straight or gay depending on who they are with. Spelling out that they are bisexual can be misconstrued as rejecting a current partner or declaring themselves up for anything.

Faith Cheltenham, president of the national bisexual organization BiNet USA, was often presumed to be lesbian when she dated women. When she met the man who would become her husband, she worried people would assume she was straight, invalidating the work she did to come out.

But when she tries to correct that assumption, some mistake it as a sexual invitation. They say, "Why would you tell me you're bi when your husband is right there?" Cheltenham said.

University of Utah research backs up the argument that bisexuality is not just a phase: Though 62% of gay men once identified as bisexual, nearly as many bisexual men 56% had once said they were gay, professor Lisa Diamond found. More women switched from calling themselves lesbian to calling themselves bisexual than vice versa.

Though surveys show that bisexuals rival or exceed gays and lesbians in number, experts say there is still little known about bisexuals because studies often group them with gay men and lesbians. While research lags, reality may already be changing: Younger people seem more at ease with bisexuality, adopting alternative labels such as "pansexual" or shrugging off labels completely, McGinnis said.

Northwestern University researcher Brian Mustanski said unlike earlier studies, his research showed bisexual youth were less likely to suffer mental disorders than gay and lesbian youth a possible sign of growing acceptance of sexual fluidity.

But there's still a long way to go, said Ellyn Ruthstrom, president of the Bisexual Resource Center in Boston. In the middle of a pride parade, "I've had people shout out to me, 'When are you going to come out?' " she said. "Excuse me? We're marching in a pride parade. How out is that?"

Return to Top



News Headline: Cabaret to benefit Salem theater | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM

Over the 37-year history of Salem Community Theatre, there has been a plethora of talented actors, actresses, singers and dancers who began their career development on its stage. And now some of those performers are ready to display their talent, and at the same time support and benefit the “theatrical home” they grew that talent in.

This weekend, 10 young entertainers will present “Look What SCT Has Done for Me,” a musical cabaret by SCT alumni. Proceeds will benefit the theater.

Director is Salem native Connor Bezeredi, a junior in Youngstown State University's musical-theater department. “We all see this as a way to give back to SCT and help ensure that the institution continues its reputation and history of providing a great venue for future talented entertainers,” he said.

In addition to Bezeredi, the cabaret cast includes:

Cassie Utt, a Bowling Green University graduate with a dual degree in vocal performance and computer science who works at Eaton Corp., Pittsburgh, and Mainstreet Musicals in New York City; Carly Magnuson of Canfield, a junior in YSU's musical-theater department; Tyler Stouffer of Salem, who just completed his freshman year at Bowling Green's musical-theater department; Lauren Teminsky of Canfield, a junior at Chicago College of Performing Arts; Kathie Steeb of Columbiana, a junior in YSU's musical-theatre department; Niki Slaven of Leetonia, a commercial voice major at Belmont University in Nashville; Nathan Pecchia of Canfield, a freshman theater major at Wright State University; Alli Dolphin of Salem, a junior theatre studies major at YSU; and Natalie Sprouse of Columbiana, who is pursuing a degree in recording technology in Cleveland.

Pianist Alex Marr of Poland, a Kent State University student, is accompanist.

SCT managing director is Gary Kekel.

There also will be a raffle of gift baskets to support Salem Community Theatre's continuing operation.

“Look What SCT Has Done for Me” will be staged at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Salem Community Theatre, 490 E. State St. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. For tickets and information, call the SCT box office at 330-332-9688, visit salemcommunity-theatre.org or find them on Facebook.

Other stories of interestnewsmakersKris Jenner lives dream on new talk showImprov comedy ensures laughsThe top-five concert tours, ranked by average box-office gross per city. Includes the average ticket

Return to Top



News Headline: College campuses among BDS battleground | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Ohio Treasurer Mandel target of pro-Palestinian groups for state's $80 million investment in Israel

Oberlin College plans to host a Divestment 101 class because of the recent divestment campaign endorsed by the Oberlin Student Senate.

Divestment from Israel has become more mainstream and acceptable with various anti-Israel groups growing on college campuses.

The aryanist blog, Unityofnobility.com published an altered picture of Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel with its article, "Ohio just got Jewed, Jewish Treasurer buys $60 million in Israel bonds."

Seventeen pro-Palestinian organizations from around Ohio signed an open letter demanding that the state of Ohio pull its $80 million investment in Israel bonds.

Palestine solidarity organizations, the International Socialist Organization chapters in Cincinnati, Columbus and Toledo and pro-Palestinian groups at Kent State University, The Ohio State University, University of Toledo and Oberlin College endorsed the letter.

The letter stated that the investment, "undertaken without consent" of Ohio citizens, "shames the state of Ohio and poorly reflects upon the character" of the state's citizens.

Josh Mandel, treasurer of the state of Ohio, said Israel Bonds generate three to four more times the yield of U.S. Bonds, which he said the state of Ohio and the U.S. government also invest in. He said Israel bonds are a "safe, secure and responsible" investment for Ohio tax dollars.

"In the Ohio Treasurer's office, we make decisions on what's best for our taxpayers," Mandel said, "not based on what radical Islamic groups want us to do."

While it would not comment directly, Kent State Students for Justice in Palestine issued an email about signing the open letter.

"We are a group that calls for equality for Palestinians and all oppressed people around the world. Hence, it is our conviction that, by virtue of this purchase, the state of Ohio is being complicit with Israeli policies that discriminate against Palestinians. While the Israeli government claims to want peace, it continues to build illegal settlements while refusing to allow the return of Palestinian refugees because of their ethnicity and religion. This is apartheid, and it must end if we are to see a just resolution. Therefore, we support a boycott of these bonds, which could easily have been purchased without involvement in Israel's discriminating policies. When Ohio chooses to invest in apartheid instead of domestic projects, it sends a message to all Ohioans and to Palestinians that they support Israeli apartheid over US projects and a just resolution of the Palestine-Israel conflict. Put simply: Ohio should invest in Ohio, not apartheid."

Omar Kurdi, president of Students for Justice in Palestine and Israel, said the organization signed the letter because it was the best divestment option at the time to get its message across.

"We find that the (investment) money is going to promote injustice in that region and promote apartheid and discrimination in Israel and the Palestinian region," said Kurdi, a junior at Ohio University in Athens. "We want to apply pressure to to those in charge to further escalate the peace process."

Unity of Nobility, a blog that provides "news and documents on the destruction of the white race," published an article, "Ohio just got Jewed, Jewish treasurer buys $60 million in Israel bonds," in March. The site published a picture of Mandel wearing a yellow star of David and the word "Jude," a badge Jews were forced to wear during the Holocaust.

Mandel said he is the grandson of a Holocaust survivor, and he found the digitally altered picture very offensive.

Mandel said as a U.S. Marine and as a state representative, these groups opposed his mission, but "we never backed down to them." He called their allegations of Israel being an apartheid state a "false, ridiculous and shameful claim."

"I have no plans in backing down to radical Islamic groups that are opposing my purchase of Israel bonds," he said.

Boycott, divestment and sanctions campaigns have been part of a global movement since 2005, when Palestinian civil society initiated the movement against Israel until it complied with "international law and Palestinian rights," according to the Palestinian BDS National Campaign's website.

The movement and supporting groups like Students for Justice in Palestine have taken to college campuses to protest Israeli occupation in Palestine and get college students across the U.S. to think about divestment from Israel.

Student-run legislatures at University of California campuses in Berkeley, Irvine and San Diego have passed resolutions urging divestment from Israel, according to an article from jns.org. Other resolutions were defeated at UC-Riverside, UC-Santa Cruz and UC-Santa Barbara, as well as Stanford University.

The Student Senate at Oberlin College endorsed a resolution in May that called for divestment from six companies – Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard, Group 4 Securicor, SodaStream, Elbit Systems and Veolia – that do business in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza.

Noa Flesichacker, co-chair of JStreet U, the pro-Israel group at Oberlin College, said the resolution polarized campus conversation.

"It brought to surface a lot of the conversation about Israel," she said. "It was uncomfortable for a lot of people because they had to decide whether they were pro-Israel or anti-Israel."

Gary Coleman, executive director at Cleveland Hillel, said the university's board of trustees will likely defeat the resolution, but talk of divestment still hinders the peace process.

"Campuses should be a marketplace of ideas, and the freedom of speech allows people to talk about issues you might not agree with," Coleman said. "But there's a difference between not agreeing and hating. One of the words that is a dirty word to the Jewish people is divestment from the state of Israel. The way we read it is saying that the state of Israel is not legitimate as a Jewish state."

Adina Holzman, assistant director of the research center for the Anti-Defamation League, said at least 35 colleges throughout the U.S. participated in Israel Apartheid Week in March. She said campus chapters for Students for Justice in Palestine have grown to 92 across the United States.

"Certain anti-Israel themes and language, like BDS and apartheid, have seeped into mainstream language more than in the past," she said. "The quantity of events hasn't been different, but it has been holding its own in the last three or four years. We express concern that these expressions have become more acceptable."

The Ohio State University Committee for Justice in Palestine hosted a rally outside the Ohio Union in Columbus last Nov. 16, when its president, Jana Al-Akhras, spoke about Israeli military actions in the Gaza region.

"This is a massacre. The Gazans are being ethnically cleansed," said Al-Akhras in a YouTube video, "Die-In Solidarity Protest: Committee for Justice in Palestine @ OSU," from the rally. "The weapons used to massacre these Gazan civilians are paid for by our tax dollars. They are paid for by United States tax dollars. It is important to boycott, divest and sanction these things."

Al-Akhras participated in the "Viva Palestina" convoy in 2009 in which she and others in the humanitarian aid convoy met with Hamas leaders who have been designated as global terrorists by the U.S. government, according to an article in The Jawa Report. Al-Akhras did not respond to emails asking for her comments.

Students for Justice in Palestine at the University of Toledo created a mock Israeli checkpoint last year and constructed a drywall barrier to represent the wall that separates Israel from the West Bank, according to the school's newspaper, The Independent Collegian.

The chapter's president, Butheina Hamdah, wrote in a column in The Independent Collegian in March 2010 about Israel's decision to construct 1,600 additional housing units in East Jerusalem.

"It is becoming clearer that the implementation of a 'two-state solution' is no longer a viable means by which to secure peace, due to Israel's continued occupation and oppression of the Palestinians in their own territory," Hamdah wrote. "If Israel is unwavering on the settlements and occupation, we cannot expect them to be willing to completely dissolve the state of Israel to form a single state with the Palestinians."

Hamdah did not respond to emails requesting comment.

Kent State University's SJP chapter posed a demonstration similar to Toledo's SJP by setting up an "apartheid wall" outside the university's student center for Israel Apartheid Week this March 4-8, according to an article on the school newspaper's website, KentWired.com. Kent State SJP declined to comment on matters other than the state of Ohio's purchase of Israel Bonds.

Holzman, the ADL spokesperson, said pro-Israel groups on college campuses need to counter anti-Israel speech with programs that showcase Israel in a positive way. She said students should get involved in student government or leadership positions to affect policy on campus.

What is the BDS movement?

The boycott, divestment and sanctions movement started in 2005, when a "clear majority of Palestinian civil society called upon their counterparts and people of conscience all over the world to launch boycotts, implement divestment initiatives, and demand sanctions against Israel." The Palestinian BDS National Committee coordinates BDS campaigns.

The movement was inspired by the boycott, divestment and sanctions movements against South Africa's apartheid that began in 1948. The BDS movement urges "various forms of boycott against Israel until it meets its obligations under international law by:

1. Ending its occupation and colonization of all Arab lands occupied in June 1967 and dismantling the Wall;

2. Recognizing the fundamental rights of the Arab-Palestinian citizens of Israel to full equality; and

3. Respecting, protecting and promoting the rights of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes and properties as stipulated in UN Resolution 194," according to the Palestinian BDS National Committee's website.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pro-Palestinian groups press Ohio to pull Israel Bonds investment | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: JNS.org
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (Cleveland Jewish News/JNS.org) Seventeen pro-Palestinian organizations from around Ohio signed an open letter demanding that the state of Ohio pull its $80 million investment in Israel bonds.

Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.
Palestine solidarity organizations, the International Socialist Organization chapters in Cincinnati, Columbus and Toledo and pro-Palestinian groups at Kent State University, The Ohio State University, University of Toledo and Oberlin College endorsed the letter.

The letter stated that the investment, “undertaken without consent” of Ohio citizens, “shames the state of Ohio and poorly reflects upon the character” of the state's citizens.

But Josh Mandel, treasurer of the state of Ohio, said Israel Bonds generate three to four more times the yield of U.S. Bonds, in which he said both the state of Ohio and the U.S. government also invest. He said Israel bonds are a “safe, secure and responsible” investment for Ohio tax dollars.

“In the Ohio Treasurer's office, we make decisions on what's best for our taxpayers,” Mandel said, “not based on what radical Islamic groups want us to do.”

Kent State Students for Justice in Palestine issued an email about signing the open letter.

“We are a group that calls for equality for Palestinians and all oppressed people around the world. Hence, it is our conviction that, by virtue of this purchase, the state of Ohio is being complicit with Israeli policies that discriminate against Palestinians,” the email said.

Return to Top



News Headline: Now Playing Onstage in Cleveland - Week of 7/14/2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: BroadwayWorld.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SOUTH PACIFIC

Porthouse Theatre-Kent State University
6/13-8/10/2013

South PacificSet in an island paradise during World War II, two parallel love stories are threatened by the dangers of prejudice and war. Nellie, a spunky nurse from Arkansas, falls in love with a mature French planter, Emile. Nellie learns that the mother of his children was an island native and, unable to turn her back on the prejudices with which she was raised, refuses Emile's proposal of marriage. Meanwhile, the strapping Lt. Joe Cable denies himself the fulfillment of a future with an innocen

Return to Top



News Headline: Theater review: 'Working' at Porthouse | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Enjoy Ohio.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The musical Working, playing at Porthouse Theatre, explores the concept of work and what a variety of jobs mean to human beings, whether they're a source of fulfillment or dissatisfaction, a means to an end or even an act of desperation.

The play, which premiered in Chicago in 1978 and has been updated multiple times since, is based on the 1974 book Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do by Studs Terkel and adapted by Stephen Schwartz and Nina Faso. Its score contains songs by multiple composers, ranging from Schwartz to James Taylor.

Director Jim Weaver's strong young cast of 12 singers, all of whom are in college or have recently graduated, are often successful in bringing out the humanity of 25 varied characters who share their feelings about how work does or does not define them. These real middle-class workers' words, which seek meaning in their work and their personal lives, were originally transcribed by Terkel.

The opening song, All the Livelong Day, is a confusing cacophony of multiple voices but the musical quickly establishes itself as one with heart, pathos, longing and pride in one's work.

Some of the show's most memorable moments include the great pride of a waitress who loves her job, sung powerfully by Tee Boyich in It's an Art, and Shamara Costa's depiction of how backbreaking factory work is in Millwork. Boyich is also equally strong in her Just a Housewife song, which bemoans stereotypes about stay-at-home moms.

Sprinkled throughout the script is a monologue bringing the nobility of a fireman (Jake Wood) alive, as well as the desperation that drove a young girl to prostitution (Danielle Dorfman).

Tim Welsh provides excellent characterizations ranging from comical to bittersweet, as the proud mason who says “stone's my business; stone's my life” to the retired fireman who tries to find ways to fill his days and still goes out to witness fires.

This musical is the 2010 version, which updates most of the professions. The score also includes two newer songs by In the Heights creator Lin-Manuel Miranda: the salsa-flavored Delivery, about a fast-food worker, and the emotional duet A Very Good Day, about caregivers.

One creepy character who does not fit into the musical is an ex-newsroom assistant who has fantasies of mass murder. This very strange bit, played by Mark Warren Goins, depicts warped, violent-minded young man Charlie Blossom, who says he's a pacifist. The monologue comes from way out in left field and appears to have no redeeming value.

At the other end of the spectrum, in A Very Good Day, Michael Glavan and Dorfman as elder care worker Utkarsh Trajillo and nanny Theresa Liu, sing “Now I do what no one wants to do.” They are referring to the low-paying jobs of immigrants, but that nuance is lost due to director Jim Weaver's nontraditional casting, which doesn't match the actors' races to their various roles. Regardless, in this scene both characters, who sing briefly in their native tongues, reveal that they value their work and are fond of the people they care for.

Choreography by Weaver is quite basic and at times static. But overall, the show is uplifting, continually reminding the audience that workers from all walks of life can take pride in their jobs.

Another common thread is parents' desires for their children to not have to toil as hard as they have, including the dream of a cleaning lady (powerhouse Emily Hubbard in Cleanin' Woman) that her daughter will break the third-generation chain of cleaning ladies in her family.

In the end, most parents are bound to feel a tug at the heartstrings when Wood portrays a construction worker in hard hat who reveals he wants so much more for his son in these Fathers and Sons lyrics: “This is why I work … I want my kid to tell me he won't be like me. … ‘Dad, you're a nice guy but you're a dummy.' ”

Return to Top



News Headline: Outfest: 'Big Joy' Directors Stephen Silha and Eric Slade Talk About Capturing the Spirit of Poet and Filmmaker James Broughton | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: indieWIRE
Contact Name: Steve Greene
News OCR Text: "Big Joy" directors Eric Slade and Stephen Silha

James Broughton turns 100 years old in November.

Although the poet, filmmaker and writer passed away in 1999, it almost feels inaccurate to talk of him in the past tense. One of the biggest themes that runs through "Big Joy: The Adventures of James Broughton," the new documentary by Stephen Silha and Eric Slade is that there was (and is) a timeless element to his work. Whether it's his deceptively simple poetry or the emotional exuberance of some of his experimental short films, Broughton's work seems as much of the present as it does of the past. "In a way, his work is more relevant to the 21st century than it was to the 20th," Silha told Indiewire.

"Big Joy" chronicles Broughton's personal journey as a member of the San Francisco Renaissance artistic movement and his individual achievements in the poetry and filmmaking fields. It also doesn't hesitate to show the various periods of both turmoil and satisfaction in Broughton's personal life, from his early relationship with film critic Pauline Kael, his marriage to collaborator Susanna Hart and his final decades alongside Joel Singer, a student with whom Broughton lived and worked until his death.

The film has had a busy year so far, playing at SXSW, Tribeca and Frameline in addition to SIFF. Monday night, it screens for LA audiences at Outfest. We had a chance to sit down with the Silha and Slade last month at the Seattle International Film Festival to discuss the directors' personal relationships with Broughton himself, important interview lessons and the moments that painfully couldn't quite make the final cut.

How long has this been something that you've been passionate about?

Stephen Silha: I had known James Broughton for the last ten years of his life. In the back of my head, I really wanted to do something to bring his work back into the world. I started doing research for a book, but then I realized that nobody would read the book because so few people have heard of him. His 23 experimental films were so groundbreaking and interestingly visual, so I realized it had to be a film. It wasn't until 2008 that I finally said, “If I don't do it now, I'm never going to do it.” So I went out to Port Townsend, did a ritual at his grave and through that process met one of our producers and cinematographers Ian Hinkle. Before that, I had talked to Eric because I realized if I was going to make a film I needed to work with people who knew what they were doing. I had seen Eric's film about Harry Hay, “Hope Along the Wind,” which I just thought was great.

Eric Slade: I had met James at a Radical Faerie gathering at Wolf Creek in Southern Oregon in the late ‘80s. I had seen his groundbreaking film “The Bed” and that had stuck with me forever. So when Stephen and I started talking about it, I knew a little about James.

SS: I first encountered his work at the Museum of Modern Art when I was just wandering through one day. His films were playing in one of the small auditoriums and I just sat there, amazed at these visual, poetic images. Homoerotic, interestingly subtle and at the same time, out there. Ten years later, I was assigned to the same cabin with him and Joel [Singer] at the Radical Faerie Gatherings in Breitenbush Hot Springs. We became friends and James became a wonderful mentor for me.

How do you think your relationship with his work would have been different if you knew him first as a poet rather than a filmmaker?

SS: His poetry took me longer to get into. It seemed simplistic when I first encountered it. When we were making the film, we read his poetry all the time to try to infuse the creative process with his spirit. The more we delved into it, I really have come to appreciate his mastery of the English language and the way he worked and reworked those poems.

ES: When we first started working on the film, I think one of the challenges was going to be “How do we not make it look like he was just a filmmaker?” But after reading lots and lots of his poetry, I think we really distilled down to some of his best little nuggets in the film. Filmmaking can be this quasi-military endeavor sometimes. It's expensive, you want to get the most out of your crew for the day. You go into a shoot and say, “Let's go!” But when we'd sit down for an interview, Stephen would say, “Let's light a candle....Now let's read a poem before we start.” Every time we'd meet to discuss the next step as a group, we'd pass a book of poetry around and read it.

It helps that you not only have other people reading his work, but you have footage of him reading it too.

SS: There wasn't as much usable footage of him reading his own poetry as we would have liked.

William Desloge jumps over “The Bed” while James Broughton watches Bill Desloge/Frisky Divinity Productions

ES: There's a lot of audio recording of him reading. So we just had to find different visual devices to do that. And how do you turn his journal entries, which are just words on a page, into a major element of the film? Stephen had met this incredibly talented animator, Michael Mann, at a conference in Vancouver. When he came onto the project, things changed a lot. Between his animation and Davey Havok reading his poetry, they both did a beautiful job.

SS: The fact that he journaled from age 13 until he died was a great gift to the film. A lot of documentaries don't have the inner life of the poet the way this one does.

ES: His journals and his home movies were things that he never created with the idea of a wide audience and never intended to be read or be seen by the public. So you get that inner journey that you would have missed otherwise.

SS: There are even some times where what he said in his journal was different from what he said in his memoir.

I imagine that a lot of people who see this don't know much about James Broughton, but also don't know much about the culture he came out of. How did you decide how much to emphasize the background of the movement and the area versus just James himself?

SS: We discovered, in doing our research, that he was such a seminal figure in that San Francisco Renaissance period, but no one's ever done a documentary about it. And you could argue that it's more important than the Beat movement. It's just that Allen Ginsberg was such a great publicist. They came and did the Beat thing in the soil that had been created over ten years in San Francisco by Broughton, [Jack] Spicer, [Robert] Duncan, [Kenneth] Rexroth, Madeline Gleason, Anna Halprin and all of their friends. We definitely needed to tell that side of the story too. We were doing an interview with Keith Hennessy, the performance artist. “The Crazy Professor,” I call him. He said, “Whenever I go on stage I feel like I'm standing on Broughton's shoulders. I'm very influenced by his work.” We did the interview right before a performance of a piece called “Crotch” that he was doing in San Francisco. As part of the performance, he did a seven-minute history of queer performance art on a sheet of plastic. I asked him if he could do one for James Broughton.

ES: There's so much to say. That clearly could be its own documentary. Keith's able to cram in a whole bunch of stuff in an entertaining way. One of the comments from the rough-cut screeners was, “That's the element that lets me know that I'm not watching an American Masters PBS documentary.”

You could also probably fill up an entire documentary with just Broughton's personal life. Again, was there a specific line you drew when giving background on his family relationships?

ES: The thing was always: come back to the story. What moves the story ahead and in the best way? By following the story, one thing leads to another. Him making “Erogeny” led him to open back up to the idea of love with men, which led him to his relationship with Joel. Immersing ourselves long enough in the story, we just saw the thread, how it carried from one to the other. Pauline Kael was out of the film many times because there aren't any photos of Pauline and James together.

SS: He said that it's more important to live poetically than to be a good poet. So what does it mean to live poetically? What is the personal life? How does that play into his work?

James Broughton, 1940s Bob Lopez/Kent State University Broughton Archives

Obviously you have to tread delicately when you're talking with the family members, but there's one moment when you're talking to his ex-wife, Susanna Hart and you let that moment breathe as we see the changes in her face. That has to be tough because you also don't want to make her the object of pity.

SS: That interview itself was powerful partly because Eric had coached me. He said, “Be careful not to emote verbally because after the pause, sometimes you get the best things.” It was our first interview we did together and I was really biting my tongue. Susanna was pre-Alzheimer's at that time and it wasn't until we showed her the wedding program that she had calligraphed that her memory started coming back. The first few questions were “I don't remember...I don't remember.” But then we she saw that and we had her read the poem he wrote about her, then it started to come back. It was a very interesting interview and I think Dawn [Logsdon] did a great job in the editing, deciding exactly how to make that work.

ES: I like that Susanna comes back at the very end reading “This is It.” You get the sense that it might have been traumatic, but yet she's still on board for the whole James Broughton project. We didn't want her to look like the victim, because she's clearly not the victim. She went willingly into this marriage knowing she was marrying a gay man or someone that had at least had gay relationships. I think it was one of the best parts of her life and she was sad when it ended. There's damage that comes along the way when you live your true path and we wanted to show that.

Was having everyone read “This is It” an idea that you had at the beginning or was that something that popped up organically?

ES: I just said, “Let's have everyone read that poem.” I didn't know what we were going to do with it. I had abandoned the idea towards the end, in the edit. But then our assistant editor, Kyung Lee (who is really great) came in one day and she said, “I just did this. What do you think?” We said, “Oh my God, that's great!”

SS: The rhythm in that is so perfect. We agonized a lot about how to end the film. How to begin it and how to end it were the hardest.

ES: I've done a lot of film projects where you make sure everyone does the same thing and then you edit it all together. It's kind of a trope, but Kyung found a way to cut it that made it so fresh. We also have all these people reading poems that you've never met before. You get the sense that his spirit is going out into the universe.

If James was working today, is there a particular format or style that he would seized upon?

SS: I think he would be into transmedia, experimenting with how you can use a film to get people to perform. He was, in a way, doing transmedia when he got dancers and people to improvise while shooting the film, then would show the film and sometimes do poetry readings in concert with those.

ES: One of the cool things about James is that each film was not only a new topic, but a new way of making films. You see new, wildly different styles that go through his work. He would have kept evolving, for sure. He was an expert craftsman. I think his work would have gotten sharper and sharper and clearer and clearer.

SS: If YouTube was around when he was doing it, he'd be well-known. But because all his films were different, because all his 23 books of poetry were slightly different, there wasn't a niche that anybody could put him in. It's one of the reasons we made the film.

Was there a particular work of his that you came to appreciate more over the course of making “Big Joy?”

SS: I think “Erogeny” is one of his best films. It's this very short film that goes with the poem of the same name. It was really important to me to put those oases like that in “Big Joy” where you really dive into the work.

ES: To have some places where there's just music and pictures for a while is nice. The one that I really came to appreciate actually isn't in the film. It's called “Dreamwood.” It's his longest film. It's a very Jungian, deep archetypal imagery film. When I first started working on “Big Joy,” I skimmed through everything just to see what the imagery looked like. But when you actually watch “Dreamwood,” it's deep and very moving.

SS: Well, it culminates with the hero fucking the Earth. [laughs]

James Broughton and soulmate Joel Singer; Film still from “Devotions” (1983) James Broughton Estate

ES: Yep. It does. And it's beautiful! It really is. That's one that I really came to appreciate.

SS: Also “Devotions,” the film about all the different ways that men love each other. Very refreshing, fascinating and funny film.

ES: But “The Bed” is still my favorite. I never grow tired of watching it. The imagery is so vivid and so exciting.

For those unfamiliar with Broughton's work, would you prefer they come to your film with a surface-level knowledge of his films? Or would you have them start with “Big Joy” first and then know the journey that went into his work?

SS: I think it makes more sense to see “Big Joy” first and then to see his films. Seeing them without context, you don't quite get how amazing they are.

ES: I agree. Some people who see his films fall totally in love. But most people, like with much of experimental film, see it and think, “....Huh.” You have to really sit with it, and some of them you have to see a couple of times before you get all these deep layers. If you see “Big Joy” first, you'll understand what went into them. I hope everyone who comes out of the film thinks, “I want to see ‘The Bed!'”

I'm guessing there's a bunch of material you weren't able to use. Any plans for those?

ES: One of his books, “Making Light of It,” has all these great aphorisms in it. One of them is “Simplify, clarify, vivify.”

SS: “And when in doubt, cut.”

ES: So our editor put those on the wall when she was cutting the film.

SS: I would love to make some of the interviews available online. We're hoping to do an educational curriculum that would help people understand the San Francisco Renaissance and Broughton's role in gay culture and hippie culture. That's why I'm taking a couple of years before diving into another project. I'm trying to get this out into the world and amplify its potential.

ES: It's really cool to see people writing about the film now, particularly about Broughton as though they'd known about him or as if they almost knew about him but just missed him. He didn't get the media attention that he deserved, but now he is. It's great to see that happening. That was always our goal, to make something that's an experiential prayer that you live through that is the spirit of James Broughton. We get that reaction from people, that they come of the theater saying, “We want to go live a bigger life” or that they want to embrace their own spirit in a bigger way. That's the most satisfying thing, that it can have that impact on people.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus