Report Overview:
Total Clips (30)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Alumni; University Press (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (1)
Athletics; Office of General Counsel (7)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (5)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Office of General Counsel; Research (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Research; University Administration (3)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (3)
University Press (3)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Hudson BOE fills two personnel spots in ongoing educational carousel 07/17/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Solon and six as a unit principal with Kent City Schools, then Hudson High School, according to Herman. Milcetich has earned degrees from Hiram and Kent State University, where he earned a Ph.D. Milcetich holds several educational licenses and has a wide variety of committee and policy experience,...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
Golfer Ben Curtis looks back at his British Open championship 10 years later (Page) 07/18/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

AKRON, Ohio -- One national golf writer described it as one of the greatest upsets in sport. Not just in golf, but in all of sports. Ben Curtis isn't...


Alumni; University Press (1)
KENT'S RAY'S PLACE WILL OPEN SECOND LOCATION IN FAIRLAWN: 07/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...10,000-square-foot location in Copley Township in April, but announced its plans to move months earlier. Thomas said he's already starting to hear from Kent State University alumni who live and work in the Fairlawn area who are excited about a location opening near them. He also has had new customers...


Art, School of (1)
Kent exhibits show work of photographer Richard Sweet (Turner) 07/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

For nearly 40 years, Richard Sweet traveled across Kent and Portage County, capturing the images of local people and places for the Record-Courier. ...


Athletics (1)
A PROUD FAMILY MAN READY FOR A FOOTBALL CHALLENGE (Haynes, Nielsen) 07/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

First-year Kent State coach Paul Haynes offers insight into what makes him who he is “He's exactly how he presents himself. Very rarely do you have...


Athletics; Office of General Counsel (7)
Kent State awarded $1.2M in Geno Ford suit 07/18/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State won a $1.2 million judgment against former men's basketball coach Geno Ford for leaving in 2011 to become coach at Bradley. The lawsuit claimed...

OUR VIEW: $1.2 million award to KSU sends a signal 07/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Settlement in GENO FORD case may have broader consequences A $1.2 million judgment in favor of Kent State University in a breach of contract action...

Men's College Basketball Nation Blog: 3-point shot: Read your contracts 07/18/2013 ESPN Text Attachment Email

1. The fallout from Kent State winning a $1.2 million settlement from former coach Geno Ford for leaving for Bradley may make coaches re-read their contracts...

Kent State wins $1.2 million lawsuit against former coach Geno Ford 07/18/2013 CBS Television Network Text Attachment Email

Geno Ford will have to pay back $1.2 million to his former employer. The Bradley coach, who was the Kent State coach 2008-11, lost a big lawsuit on Tuesday....

Ohio court case to impact college coaches nationwide 07/18/2013 Dayton Business Journal Text Attachment Email

A $1.2 million judgement for an Ohio college against its former hoops coach is a wake-up call for colleges and universities to enforce their coaching contracts,...

Judge rules Ford owes $1.2 million to Kent State 07/17/2013 WYFF-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Geno Ford will be forced to repay $1.2 million to Kent State after an Ohio judge ruled Tuesday that he ended his contract prematurely with the school to take the head coaching job at Bradley University....

Judge rules Ford owes $1.2 million to Kent State 07/18/2013 KHBS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Geno Ford will be forced to repay $1.2 million to Kent State after an Ohio judge ruled Tuesday that he ended his contract prematurely with the school to take the head coaching job at Bradley University....


College of Education, Health and Human Services (5)
Study links heavy cellphone use with poor fitness levels (Barkley) 07/18/2013 Omaha World-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

People who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health. A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy cellphone use and reduced fitness levels among college students. Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob...

Is Your Smartphone Keeping You From Losing Weight? 07/17/2013 Glamour - Online Text Attachment Email

...without our smartphones—maybe we should try putting them down more often, because they may be contributing to our lack of fitness. New research from Kent State University has found a link between heavy cell phone usage and poor fitness in college students. The researchers studied 300 students in...

Heavy phone use, lack of fitness linked (Barkley) 07/18/2013 Erie Times-News Text Attachment Email

People who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smart phones could ultimately be harming their physical health. A study by researchers at...

Professors connect cell phone use with inactivity (Barkley) 07/17/2013 Brown University News and Events Text Email

Kent State University, Abilene, TX July 17, 2013 (The Daily Kent Stater, provided by UWIRE, a division of Uloop via Comtex) -- Written by India Hines...

Professors connect cell phone use with inactivity (Barkley) 07/17/2013 UWire Text Email

This generation of college couch potatoes don't need televisions or video games. Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, Kent State researchers and faculty from the College of Education, Health and Human Services, have linked cell phone use to bad physical fitness in...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Public Relations Industry Masters Judy Phair And William Oliver To Be Inducted Into National Capital Public Relations Hall Of Fame 07/17/2013 PR Newswire - Online Text Attachment Email

...Beyond the desk work, Bill had incredible impacts in the public relations community. He has been an active member of the Arthur Page Society and with Kent State University About PRSA's National Capital Chapter The National Capital Chapter of PRSA (PRSA-NCC) is a professional public relations...


Office of General Counsel; Research (1)
KENT: Trouble with grant 07/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: The Ohio Inspector General has found fault with the way Kent State handled a federal grant. The state office said KSU did not follow procedures...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Merger for East Side suburbs off the table for now (Hoornbeek) 07/17/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...miles proved a daunting proposition. “It seems strange in this day and age of people being skeptical of government,” said John Hoornbeek, director of Kent State University's Center for Public Policy and Health. “But there are ties that develop between individuals and the jurisdictions in which they...


Research; University Administration (3)
BRIEF: Review finds problem with a federal grant at Kent State 07/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

July 17--KENT -- The Ohio Inspector General has found fault with the way one federal grant was handled at Kent State University. The state office said KSU did not follow procedures when it bought $124,810 in research equipment to study biomolecular...

Review finds problem with a federal grant at Kent State 07/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: The Ohio Inspector General has found fault with the way one federal grant was handled at Kent State University. The state office said KSU did not follow procedures when it bought $124,810 in research equipment to study biomolecular...

Report: KSU did not follow procedure for grant (Mansfield) 07/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Received $124,810 to purchase equipment The Ohio Inspector General's office has found fault with a federal grant awarded to Kent State University...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
GREEN PORTAGE: Leaving the car at home and biking to work in Portage County 07/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

We're outdoor enthusiasts who love to hike, bike, swim and paddle. We met at Kendall Ledges, and our “first date” was a whitewater canoe trip on the...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (3)
Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) 07/18/2013 NBCNews.com (Formerly MSNBC) Text Attachment Email

OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise...

Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) 07/17/2013 Biz Wire Express Text Attachment Email

OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise...

Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) 07/17/2013 Globenewswire Text Email

OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise...


University Press (3)
Iraq veteran Hugh Martin of Macedonia is nationally recognized poet 07/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...therapeutic." Precise writing His first book, a chapbook or pocket-size book, contained 25 poems. Titled So How Was the War? it was published by Kent State University Press in 2010. Poetry, in terms of writing about war, Martin said, "is sort of superior than all forms of written communications....

POEMS CAPTURE WAR EXPERIENCE WITH SENSITIVITY: IRAQ VETERAN NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED 07/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...therapeutic." PRECISE WRITING His first book, a chapbook or pocket-size book, contained 25 poems. Titled So How Was the War? it was published by Kent State University Press in 2010. Poetry, in terms of writing about war, Martin said, "is sort of superior than all forms of written communications....

CHC professor named editor of The Hemingway Review 07/17/2013 Chestnut Hill Local - Online Text Attachment Email

...co-edited two anthologies, “Ernest Hemingway in Context” (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and “Hemingway's The Garden of Eden: 25 Years of Criticism” (Kent State University Press, 2012). She also has assembled special sections for The Hemingway Review on Robert Frost and on Hemingway's “Garden...


News Headline: Hudson BOE fills two personnel spots in ongoing educational carousel | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson -- The Board of Education filled two personnel spots in its ongoing carousel of educational openings at its July 8 meeting by approving a change in assignment of a high school unit principal and hiring a new assistant middle school principal from Chardon High School.

Paul Milcetich, a unit principal at Hudson High School, will take over the helm at East Woods Elementary School beginning Aug. 1. Milcetich was given a three-year contract and will earn $91,375 a year.

Milcetich was ending the second year of a three-year contract and was earning $87,444 annually, according to Assistant Superintendent Phil Herman. The district is in the process of finding Milcetich's replacement.

Milcetich will take over for Jen Filomena, who will become the new principal at Ellsworth Hill, replacing Lisa Hunt. Hunt will take over as human resources director, replacing Herman. Herman will take over as superintendent when Steve Farnsworth retires at the end of July.

"I am equal parts humbled and excited about being the new East Woods principal," Milcetich said. "I am thankful to our Board of Education, district leadership, and the staff members on the interview committee for having the faith in me to place me in this leadership position."

He has 13 years experience, seven as a teacher in Solon and six as a unit principal with Kent City Schools, then Hudson High School, according to Herman.

Milcetich has earned degrees from Hiram and Kent State University, where he earned a Ph.D. Milcetich holds several educational licenses and has a wide variety of committee and policy experience, according to Herman.

Milcetich is looking to "forge strong partnerships with the talented staff at East Woods," he said.

"Also, I plan to build positive relationships with the students and parents to engage them in the educational process and ensure we are meeting all of our students' academic, social, and emotional needs, making the most of the two years they spend at our school," he added.

The Board also hired Michael Sedlak as the new Hudson Middle School assistant principal. Sedlak, former assistant principal at Chardon High School, takes over for Kim Cockley, who was promoted from assistant middle school principal to principal earlier this summer when Chuck DiLauro retired.

Sedlak was given a two-year contract which begins Aug. 5. He will earn $80,968 annually.

Sedlak has seven years experience as a teacher and three as assistant principal, Herman said. Sedlak has degrees from Bowling Green and Grand Canyon universities.

"He brings to us a wealth of administrative experiences in the short time he's been an administrator and has demonstrated a clear understanding of developing a culture for learning and effective instructional practices," Herman said.

Sedlak also demonstrated a "positive approach to his work and life," Herman added.

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News Headline: Golfer Ben Curtis looks back at his British Open championship 10 years later (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON, Ohio -- One national golf writer described it as one of the greatest upsets in sport. Not just in golf, but in all of sports.

Ben Curtis isn't sure that is entirely accurate, but he doesn't sweat the small stuff. Never has.

Has it really been 10 years? Was it that long ago that Curtis, making his first start in a major event, overtook some of the best in the game in the final round and won the 2003 British Open -- the Open Championship for all you highbrows -- at Royal St. George's?

It catapulted Curtis from an unknown to PGA Tour star status, a meteor that blasted through the sky and lit up golf's horizon. By becoming the first player since Francis Ouimet's stunning win in the 1913 U.S. Open to win a major in his first attempt, Curtis joined the world of instant celebrity.

Curtis, then just 26, earned the valued exempt status on the Tour, which gave him unencumbered entrance into any of its events for 10 years. He moved into the instant comfort zone of not having to worry about where he would collect his next paycheck.

Curtis, who recently built a new home in Kent, returned to the United States and hit chip shots from one New York rooftop to another while David Letterman chuckled. He met President George W. Bush. He returned to town to a rousing welcome at Hopkins International Airport. He threw out the first pitch at an Indians game. He married his college sweetheart. The Claret Jug trophy he received rarely left his house, a daily reminder to what he had accomplished.

View full sizeThe July 21, 2003 cover of The Plain Dealer's Golf Monday section featuring Kent State graduate Ben Curtis after his win at the British Open.
Plain Dealer archiveHow unknown was Curtis when he shot rounds of 72-72-70-69 for a 1-under 283, which included a clutch 8-foot par putt on the 72nd hole? One year earlier, two years out of Kent State, he finished second in the Ohio Open at Tam O'Shanter in Canton. One year to the day later he won the British Open.

He was the only player in the field to finish under par. Vijay Singh and third-round leader Thomas Bjorn, who took three swings to escape a bunker on the 16th hole in the final round, tied for second at even-par and Tiger Woods and Davis Love III tied for fourth at 1-over. Nick Faldo shot 287. Sergio Garcia shot 288. Defending champion Ernie Els shot 290.

"It's hard to imagine that it's been that long," said Curtis, while hitting putts on a practice green at Firestone Country Club last week. "For me, it's hard to imagine I've been on the Tour for 12 years. It has gone by so fast. Of course, having kids tends to put things in perspective."

He said he frequently thinks about that magical week in England, especially as the Open draws nearer. He thinks about that week when he "made everything I looked at" and how on the night before the final round he uncharacteristically told his fiancee, Candace Beatty -- who would become his wife a few weeks later -- that he was going to win. Curtis has never done that. Not before and not since. Predictions as bold as that -- especially when he was two strokes behind playing on a course he had not seen before -- simply aren't his style.

"I have no idea why I said that," he said. "We were just sitting around and she asked me how I thought I would do on Sunday. I said I was going to win. I just felt really good all week, comfortable. For the three weeks before that I had played well but didn't have much to show for it. Then, that week I started to see some results. I got more comfortable."

He said he remembers very little from Saturday's round but recalls most of Sunday when he played in the fourth-to-last group with an equally unknown partner in Welshman Phillip Price. He also remembers the first shot he hit in the championship.

"Here I am, playing in my first major and I duck-hook my tee shot with my first swing," he said unabashedly. "I hit it into the hay on the left. I hack it out of there and it goes through the fairway into the hay on the right. I hack it out of there to about 30 feet and made the putt. Maybe it was a good sign."

Back at Firestone last week, heads turned and fingers pointed as Curtis drove his cart toward the West Course. Kent State coach Herb Page rode in the passenger seat. They are oblivious as several members of a large outing on the South Course recognize Curtis as he drives by.

That's OK with Curtis, who has never been one to seek the spotlight and spends more time being a father and family man than he does being a celebrity.

On this day Firestone's most famous member was preparing to play in his 11th British Open, which begins early Thursday morning at Muirfield in Gullane, Scotland. Curtis tees off at 2:49 a.m. EST.

Curtis wore the ever-present Titleist hat, wrap-around sunglasses, Bermuda shorts, tennis shoes and a golf shirt with a Kent State baseball logo. He changes from the sneakers into a pair of white Footjoys while sitting in his cart.

The only thing revealing his identity is his pro bag, where his name is stitched prominently on a lower pocket along with his initials -- the B and the C intertwined -- which serve as the logo for the Ben Curtis Family Foundation which Curtis and his wife began several months ago.

"We're gonna shoot over to 10 on the West and then sneak in somewhere," Curtis explains. "I like it that way. Not many people over there today."

Curtis and Page, perhaps as close as any former player and coach can be, talk about playing their usual game. Curtis will play Page's drive, struck from the white tees, while Page plays the drive hit by Curtis, struck from the tips. Buck a hole. No presses. Good-natured trash talk is frequent but takes a back seat to a swapping of compliments. They decide to play their own ball.

"How good is that?" Page says to no one in particular when Curtis hits a pitch shot from a difficult angle that snuggles close to the hole. "He just kind of cozied that one up there, didn't he?"

Curtis has won four times and has earned more than $13 million since joining the Tour in 2003. He owns a major and compiled a 2-1 record as a member of the winning Ryder Cup team in 2008, beating Lee Westwood in an early singles match.

Not too bad.

"I wish the career would have been more consistent," he said, acknowledging his 10-year exemption to the British ends this year without another title. "I wish I would have had more wins. As a player you're always looking for more consistency."

This year has been one of ups and downs. He has played in 16 events but has missed eight cuts. Still, he has banked nearly $340,000.

At Muirfield, Curtis is reunited with caddie Andy Sutton, the Englishman who was on the bag at Royal St. George's in 2003. "It'll be nice having Andy around," Curtis said. "He's not afraid to tell you what he thinks and I like that. It's comforting to have someone on the bag who you know you can trust."

During their Ohio practice round, Page and Curtis reach the 13th hole when a marshal approaches.

"Can I get your names?" he asks, checking a clipboard.

"That's Ben Curtis," the observer says, pointing to Curtis and Page on the far side of the fairway.

"Oh, OK, play on," the marshal says.

Being Ben Curtis has its advantages.

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News Headline: KENT'S RAY'S PLACE WILL OPEN SECOND LOCATION IN FAIRLAWN: | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abraham, Lisa
News OCR Text: FORMER WINKING LIZARD SITE OF BURGERS AND BEER HANGOUT COMING IN FALL

Ray's Place, downtown Kent's most beloved hangout, plans to open a second location in Fairlawn this fall.

Ray's owner Charlie Thomas said if all goes as planned, he will open by October at the former Winking Lizard Tavern location, in the plaza at 25 Ghent Road.

Thomas, who has owned the 76-year-old Ray's for nearly 35 years, said he has been thinking about a second location for some time, but was a little surprised when he found the spot in Fairlawn.

"This became available last fall and when I went to look at the property, I said, 'I think this is us,' " Thomas said. "The price was right I think we can do really well here."

The Winking Lizard moved to a new 10,000-square-foot location in Copley Township in April, but announced its plans to move months earlier.

Thomas said he's already starting to hear from Kent State University alumni who live and work in the Fairlawn area who are excited about a location opening near them. He also has had new customers coming to Kent to check out the place to see what's coming to their neighborhood.

Ray's Place features a menu of burgers, sandwiches and entrees along with a large selection of beers.

Thomas said the menu in Fairlawn will be pretty much the same as the Kent location, including the famous MoFo Burger: two beef patties stuffed with bacon, mushrooms and American cheese, finished with relish, onions, pickles, lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, mustard and ketchup - every topping in the house.

The Fairlawn location is 6,500 square feet and will feature 60 beers on draft, including a large selection of craft beers, Thomas said.

Last week, the Fairlawn Planning Commission approved plans for $70,000 in renovations to the plaza.

According to the application filed with the commission by Jennifer Smith of David Pelligra & Architects Inc., "the remodel is creating a more consistent facade for the entire building and encourage a new restaurant to fill the void in the vacated spot." The building is owned by Sandra Noll, SJL Stonegate LLC.

Bill Arnold, assistant commissioner of the Fairlawn zoning, housing, and residential building department said Thomas would have to apply for building permits for any renovation work he wants to perform inside, but there was nothing that would stop the restaurant from opening as planned this fall.

Ray's Place has been a fixture in downtown Kent since 1937.

In 2009, chef Michael Symon of Cleveland mentioned Ray's Place in an article in Food Network Magazine. When asked about his favorite burger, Symon said it was Ray's MoFo. In 2011, the Food Network show Best Thing I Ever Ate featured famous chefs talking about the best burgers they had ever eaten, and Symon again named the MoFo.

Last year, KSU associate professor Patrick O'Connor began working on a book to commemorate Ray's 75th anniversary, and sought stories from the public about the landmark. The book is to feature fond, funny, sentimental or weird memories shared by employees and customers.

Thomas said the book, which is being published by Black Squirrel Books, an imprint of the Kent State University Press, is expected to be released in late August.

Book signing events will be planned at Ray's when the book is released and during Kent State's Homecoming on Oct. 5, he said.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Kent exhibits show work of photographer Richard Sweet (Turner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For nearly 40 years, Richard Sweet traveled across Kent and Portage County, capturing the images of local people and places for the Record-Courier.

Next week, his work will be traveling Kent, with three separate events showcasing the various sides of Sweet's work.

"A Timeless Community: Photographs of Richard Sweet" opened in June and will be on display until Aug. 9 at the School of Art Gallery, located on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University.

The event coincides with two others in downtown Kent.

"Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent," will take place at the Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., from July 24 through Aug. 24.

The Kent Historical Society also will display more of Sweet's work at its museum at about the same time as the downtown gallery's show. "Richard Sweet: Art, Innovation and Community" will be the title of the event.

There will be a joint reception and art walk between the three events from 5 to 7 p.m. on July 25. At all three events, prints will be available for sale to raise money in a scholarship of art established at KSU in Sweet's name.

Betty Hejma-Sweet, the photographer's widow, wrote an invitation to the event, discussing her husband's love of Portage County and his pride in his education from Kent State University.

"Richard loved his work," she wrote. "It was his life. He also loved sharing his talent with the community."

She said that the event has drawn so much attention from her husband's friends that "Richard is among us again."

The scholarship fund is set up for students from Theodore Roosevelt High School in Kent or possibly students from Portage County who want to study fine art or photography at KSU, said Shawn Gordon, director of advancement at the College of the Arts, who worked with Hejma-Sweet to set up the scholarship.

Hejma-Sweet said she endowed the scholarship to leave a legacy in her husband's memory.

"He had opportunities to do other things and always said no," she said. "This was home."

Each of the exhibits will focus on differing aspects of Sweet's work. The exhibit in the School of Art features more of his work with an artistic focus, said Anderson Turner, director of galleries for the School of Art, and the exhibit at the Downtown Gallery will feature more of Sweet's community-oriented work. Brenton Pahl, graduate assistant at the School of Art, was curator for both exhibits.

"To me, the key is that this is what the downtown gallery has always been about, and what the Record-Courier is about, and what Richard was when he was here," Turner said. "It's a tribute to who Richard was as a person."

The Kent Historical Society's images will focus on historic images, and mosaics Sweet put together featuring images such as the downtown mill and the Kent dam. It also will feature a slide show with more than 100 images and some of the antique cameras Sweet collected over the years.

A booklet will be available featuring articles by Ernie Mastroianni, an R-C photography colleague, who wrote about the technical aspects of Sweet's work, and Roger Di Paolo, Record-Courier editor, who wrote about the role of a photojournalist in the community.

"We have so many images we want to display," said Tom Hatch, director of the historical society. Some of the more prominent ones include images of the downtown Kent fire in 1972 and protests related to May 4, 1970.

The staff of the historical society began to look through Sweet's work, and Hatch said they were overwhelmed with the sheer volume of it. Pahl and other students at the School of Art took over, organizing the slides and negatives.

Hejma-Sweet said many of the images on display came from her home.

"This is Portage County history," she said. "For me to sit on it would be a crime ... It's time."

Sweet, who came to KSU to study architecture, ended up getting a degree in fine arts. He started working for the R-C in 1966, when he was still a student at KSU. He became full-time photographer in 1971. He retired in 2004 and died the following year.

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News Headline: A PROUD FAMILY MAN READY FOR A FOOTBALL CHALLENGE (Haynes, Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: First-year Kent State coach Paul Haynes offers insight into what makes him who he is

“He's exactly how he presents himself. Very
rarely do you have to guess what he's
feeling or what he's thinking. Those
kinds of peopleare fun to work with.”
kent state director of athletics joel nielsen

I wish every Kent State football fan could
have sat right beside me Tuesday morning
as I spent 40 minutes “getting to know” Paul
Haynes.
I walked into the office of the Golden Flashes'
rookie head coach with 20 questions in
hand geared toward providing the KSU football
faithful insight into the man that's about
to lead their program into the most hotly anticipated
season in four decades.
I left with all of that and much, much more.
In those 40 short minutes Haynes covered
the highlights of an illustrious career in football
dating back to his playing days at Columbus
St. Francis DeSales and Kent State,
followed by stops as an assistant coach at
national powerhouses Ohio State, Michigan
State and Arkansas, among others. A career
that includes a winless
season with the Flashes,
two national championship
appearances
with the Buckeyes and
virtually everything in
between.
He also opened up
on a personal level, revealing profound stories
and deep thoughts from a proud family
man who understands football's place in his
life. A man who has not let success or failure
change who he is and what he stands for. A
man with character, who is not a character.
“I have a title, but I'm just a normal dude,”
Haynes smiled. “It's just me. I can only be me.”
As a reporter, I walked out of Haynes' office
thinking to myself, “Wow, that's incredible
story material.”
As a fan of college football, and sports in
general, I left thinking, “This guy really gets it.”
Football has given him an avenue to help
shape impressionable young men into productive
adults, and he's utilizing it to the fullest
— for all of the right reasons.
Rather than pollute a good story by splicing
in clever words and transitional phrases
of my own, I've decided to simply let Haynes'
answers to the various topics we discussed at
Tuesday's meeting rip one by one.
So let's get to know Kent State football
coach Paul Haynes.
n On his first six months as head coach of
the Golden Flashes:
“With everything I do, my main focus is always
on the players. You're dealing with 18 to
22 year olds, and we've had a minimal amount
of problems. Plus we had our highest-ever
(team) GPA last semester (2.84).”
“To me, those are two
things that you can sit there
and see the transition for
them, from (previous head
coach Darrell) Hazell to me,
has been a smooth one.”
n Highlight of those first
six months:
“The GPA. That doesn't
happen a lot of times with
transition. I think our support
staff has done a great
job, plus our assistant coaches
picked up the pieces as far
as challenging our guys to
get the 3.0.”
n On the reception he's received
from the campus and
community:
“I think it's been great. The
community, to get them involved,
we have to be visible
and be seen. In the spring,
we went to local elementary
schools and had the (players)
reading to kids. We will
continue to do that in the
fall. We're gonna go to all of
the elementary schools in
Kent, Ravenna, Stow and
Hudson, we're gonna branch
out. And we're gonna go see
cancer patients at the hospital
every Friday during the
season. That's our job, to
get out there. I just want to
make (the community) feel
like a part of the team, and
when we win, we all win.”
n On returning to lead his
alma mater:
“It's a little different when
you're in this role, but it's
been fun seeing a lot of people
you haven't seen in a long
time. It's been fun to see all
of the changes around here.
Now comes the new phase of
going into the Xs and Os and
getting into the season, but
so far it's been great.”
n On his family (wife Danita;
19-year-old daughter Jordyn,
a sophomore at Kent
State; 15-year-old son Tarron,
a sophomore at Kent
Roosevelt; and 9-year-old
daughter Kennedy Rose,
Franklin Elementary):
“My family is super important.
That's the one thing I
think that I learned at Arkansas.
(Ohio State head
coach Jim Tressel) was a
family guy, and our families
were down on the field before
and after games, but our kids
were never at practice. At Arkansas
our kids were sitting
at practice. We had a family
night every Monday at Ohio
State, and we had it every
night at Arkansas, and that's
what I'm gonna do here. Our
families will be here with us
at training table. If your kids
are old enough, they can be
out there at practice, and the
kids can be down on the field
during games, too. I believe
that is so important, cause
we're away from our families
for so many hours. I think it's
so important that our families
are around during the
season, cause you lose so
much of that family time and
you never get it back. Plus,
when we talk to our players
about our core values, there's
no better teacher than to see
us with our families.
“My wife is the rock. She
takes care of the house so I
can sit here and do this job
the best that I can do it. My
daughter (Jordyn) transferred
here from Arkansas.
She wants to be part of our
football family wherever we
are, instead of being somewhere
else. She just wouldn't
feel comfortable not being involved
with this. My son is super
excited, then my youngest
... it's amazing, down at
the parade during the (Go-
Daddy.com Bowl) game (in
Mobile, Ala.) how fast she
changed to cheering for Kent
State. It's amazing in this profession
how fast you have to
change your loyalties and
ties and everything else, and
they've been full-steam ahead
with every move we've made.
I have an awesome family that
makes it easy on me to do this
job the best that I can do it.
I probably don't thank them
enough for all of the things
that they do and the support
that they give.
“I was thinking of picking
days out of the week to
go to lunch with each of my
kids, and you've gotta have
a date night with your wife.
You have to (schedule) it
cause otherwise you won't,
you'll consume yourself in
this (job). Regardless of what
your record is, it's over when
it's over and you've lost that
time. You spend so much
time taking care of other
peoples' kids that your own
kids are neglected.”
n What makes you laugh:
“My kids, for one, make me
laugh. We have our two nieces
at our house right now, they
are hysterical. I like comedy
movies. Kevin Hart is hilarious
to me. I'm an easy-going
guy. Life's too short to be so
serious. Even in your worst
of times, you've gotta find
some type of humor in it just
to keep you going.”
n What makes you cry:
“Seeing disappointment in
my family for sure and seeing
disappointment in these
players. Those definitely are
the two biggest things. Football
is an emotional game. I
think the thing from a coaches'
standpoint is that you
have to be even-keeled. Even
when you're at the highest
highs, you'd better be humble,
and when you're at the
lowest low, you still need to
be humble. But I think consistency
is the key. I've been
around coaches where it's
up here when you're winning
and they're down here when
you're losing, and I think
that's tough on the kids and
the staff. Two of the greatest
coaches I've been around,
(former Kent State head
coach/current Baltimore Ravens
defensive coordinator)
Dean Pees and coach Tressel,
win or lose, those guys
were always even-keeled —
just let's go to work. If you're
winning stay humble, and if
you're losing, what are we doing
wrong? It doesn't take
yelling and screaming to get
that done.”
n What makes Paul
Haynes Paul Haynes:
“It starts with how I was
raised. My parents were
high school graduates that
worked their way up from
the bottom of their companies
to the top of their companies
with a lot of sacrifice,
sending three of us through
private schools not on a private
school salary at the beginning.
There was a lot of
sacrifice and commitment
and dedication by them, and
you saw that. So as you get
older, you look back on that
and you appreciate it, not at
the time (it's happening) of
course. By no means were we
rich, but we didn't do without.
I think that's the foundation
that starts it all. They
were at every game, home
or away. My (two) sisters
were the same. Once you
saw one Haynes, you saw
them all and that was awesome.
Though the years with
the people that I've had as
mentors — my high school
coach Tony Pusateri, coach
Tressel, Dean Pees, guys like
that have influenced my philosophy
on coaching, how to
coach and what it takes to
be a successful coach far beyond
the wins and losses.”

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News Headline: Kent State awarded $1.2M in Geno Ford suit | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State won a $1.2 million judgment against former men's basketball coach Geno Ford for leaving in 2011 to become coach at Bradley.

The lawsuit claimed Ford had no permission to terminate his Kent State contract, which was scheduled to expire in 2015. Ford's teams went 68-37 in three seasons at Kent State.

Bradley issued a statement Tuesday saying its actions and Ford's actions “have been entirely ethical, legal, and transparent. The lawsuit is ongoing and will continue to be addressed through the court system.”

Fritz Byers, an attorney representing Ford, declined comment. Messages seeking comment were left for the coach.

While Kent State agreed to let Ford talk to Bradley, “Consent to interview was not a consent to breach the employment contract,” Portage County Common Pleas Judge John Enlow said in a 14-page ruling Friday. “KSU did not acquiesce to Coach Ford's abandonment of their mutual contract.”

Ford was Kent State's head coach from April 2008 through March 27, 2011, when Bradley announced him as its new coach.

Ford led Kent State to its second consecutive Mid-American Conference regular-season title in 2010-11. The Flashes finished 25-12 and lost in the NIT quarterfinals.

Ford also has coached at NAIA Shawnee State and Division III Muskingum.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine said the ruling reflects a state obligation to ensure contract enforcement.

“When coaches and high-profile employees leave public universities in breach of their contracts, the state of Ohio has an obligation to seek the compensation to which it is entitled,” DeWine said in a statement Tuesday.

Kent State's claims against Bradley for alleged contract interference are scheduled for trial Oct. 7, DeWine said.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: $1.2 million award to KSU sends a signal | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Settlement in GENO FORD case
may have broader consequences

A $1.2 million judgment in
favor of Kent State University in a
breach of contract action against
former head basketball coach Geno Ford
could set a precedent and, at the very
least, ought to send a signal to coaches,
administators and others who choose to
disregard the terms of their employment
agreements.
Geno Ford was a
popular and extremely
capable basketball
coach who took a
coaching position with
Bradley University in
Illinois in March 2011 shortly after the
KSU Golden Flashes appeared in the
semi-finals of the Mid-American Conference
men's basketball tournament. His
departure was relatively abrupt, but not
without precedent; other winning Kent
State coaches have made quick exits for
greener pastures at the end of a stellar
season.
Ford had signed a multi-year contract
with KSU in 2008 that was extended in
2010 and bound him to remain in Kent
through the 2014-15 season. The terms
of the contract prohibited him from taking
other coaching jobs within the MAC
while he was at Kent State — a standard
non-compete clause — and required him
to seek permission from the university's
athletic director before responding to other
job offers.
He received permission to interview
with Bradley and subsequently took the
coaching job there just two days after the
end of KSU's 2010-11 season. KSU notified
Bradley that Ford's contract had a
damages clause that would be activated;
the university filed a lawsuit against
the former coach and his new employer.
The case against Bradley is set to go to
trial in October.
In ordering the $1.2 million award to
Kent State, Portage County Common
Pleas Judge John Enlow cited the provision
in Ford's contract stating that he
would owe KSU damages totaling the balance
of his salary for the remainder of the
contract. Ford was earning $300,000 per
year when he left Kent.
Employment contracts are legally binding
agreements. While it is not unusual for
coaches and others to go on to other positions
in mid-contract, the obligation to
the employer remains unless the employer
chooses to waive it, as is sometimes the
case. In this instance, Kent State had negotiated
a contract with a winning coach
with the intention of keeping him in Kent.
Kent State's decision to go to court
in the wake of Ford's departure demonstrated
the university's intent to enforce
contractual obligations and to send a
message that breaching a contract has
consequences. In Ford's case, the consequences
have proven to be quite costly.
Our guess is that others considering similar
moves may pay closer attention to the
contracts they have signed.

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News Headline: Men's College Basketball Nation Blog: 3-point shot: Read your contracts | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: ESPN
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 1. The fallout from Kent State winning a $1.2 million settlement from former coach Geno Ford for leaving for Bradley may make coaches re-read their contracts very carefully. According to one prominent coaching agent, "coaches will be forced to structure their contracts a certain way. Buyout language is absolutely huge. A lot of times coaches don't realize it until they are put in a position of getting terminated or leaving for another job. Most times contracts are finalized so quickly these days. These coaches must pay attention to details." We've seen this before in coaches leaving from West Virginia to Michigan in men's basketball and football and a number of others. But many times these are negotiated settlements, rarely a court case awarding the school. The Kent State case should cause coaches to pause and ensure their contracts are favorable in case they bolt early.

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News Headline: Kent State wins $1.2 million lawsuit against former coach Geno Ford | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: CBS Television Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Geno Ford will have to pay back $1.2 million to his former employer. The Bradley coach, who was the Kent State coach 2008-11, lost a big lawsuit on Tuesday.

The judge, John A. Enlow, determined Ford prematurely ended his Kent State contract (which was through 2015). The $1.2 million figure comes from a buyout on Ford's restructured contract in 2010, which amounted to liquidated damages. Kent State long held the position that Ford was out of bounds in believing the buyout terms of the contract ($300,000 per year remaining) could be obfuscated by him and/or his new school.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says Friday's court ruling by a judge in Portage County, home of Kent State, reflects a state obligation to insure contract enforcement. There was no immediate comment in response to messages left Tuesday for Ford and the Bradley University legal office handling media inquiries. At the time of the lawsuit filing, Bradley said it had recruited Ford “in a straightforward and professional manner” with the consent of Kent State.
Bradley hired Ford away from Kent State in March 2011.

The saga is not yet over, either. Kent State is reported to be going after Bradley for "torturous interference with Kent State's contractual relationship" with Ford. The inter-university lawsuit battle there is scheduled to go to trial in October.

According to Sporting News, Bradley put out a brief statement that included the university stating its actions "have been entirely ethical, legal, and transparent. The lawsuit is ongoing and will continue to be addressed through the court system."

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News Headline: Ohio court case to impact college coaches nationwide | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Business Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A $1.2 million judgement for an Ohio college against its former hoops coach is a wake-up call for colleges and universities to enforce their coaching contracts, a local expert says.

The award came late last week from a Portage County judge in the case of Kent State University and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine against Gene Ford, who was accused of breaching his contract when he left Kent State to go coach at Bradley University in Illinois.

Peter Titlebaum — a professor and coordinator of the sport management program at the University of Dayton — told me Wednesday that the ruling means coaches may not be so quick to leave if they know they are going to have to honor their contracts or buyout clauses within those deals.

At the same time it may cause schools on the hunt for new coaches to pause before hiring someone in the midst of a contract.

“It makes it a little clear that somebody is going to be responsible if you break your contract; the question is, who is going to pay for it,” Titlebaum said. “This is a risk that these schools are taking by poaching other coaches.”

In April 2010, the school and Ford, who goes by Geno Ford, agreed to a new contract extending his employment through the end of the 2014-2015 season that boosted his annual salary to $300,000, making Ford the highest-paid basketball coach in the Mid-American Conference. In March 2011, Ford agreed to become the head basketball coach for Bradley University.

A clause in Ford's contract said the school would be entitled to damages totaling the balance of Ford's annual salary due for the remaining amount of his contract term if he left early. With four years left and a $300,000 annual salary that added up to $1.2 million.

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News Headline: Judge rules Ford owes $1.2 million to Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: WYFF-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Geno Ford will be forced to repay $1.2 million to Kent State after an Ohio judge ruled Tuesday that he ended his contract prematurely with the school to take the head coaching job at Bradley University.

Ford's contract as Kent State coach ran through 2015. He left in 2011 for Bradley after three seasons with the Golden Flashes.

The $1.2 million was the buyout amount of Ford's contract, which was restructured in 2010. Kent State argued that Ford and his new employer wrongly believed the buyout terms of $300,000 for each remaining year on the contract could be obfuscated.

Kent State also has sued Bradley for "torturous interference with Kent State's contractual relationship" with Ford. The case is scheduled to go to trial in October.

Ford and Bradley officials offered no response other than a statement reported by The Sporting News from university officials that read, in part, that its actions "have been entirely ethical, legal, and transparent. The lawsuit is ongoing and will continue to be addressed through the court system."

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News Headline: Judge rules Ford owes $1.2 million to Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: KHBS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Geno Ford will be forced to repay $1.2 million to Kent State after an Ohio judge ruled Tuesday that he ended his contract prematurely with the school to take the head coaching job at Bradley University.

Ford's contract as Kent State coach ran through 2015. He left in 2011 for Bradley after three seasons with the Golden Flashes.

The $1.2 million was the buyout amount of Ford's contract, which was restructured in 2010. Kent State argued that Ford and his new employer wrongly believed the buyout terms of $300,000 for each remaining year on the contract could be obfuscated.

Kent State also has sued Bradley for "torturous interference with Kent State's contractual relationship" with Ford. The case is scheduled to go to trial in October.

Ford and Bradley officials offered no response other than a statement reported by The Sporting News from university officials that read, in part, that its actions "have been entirely ethical, legal, and transparent. The lawsuit is ongoing and will continue to be addressed through the court system."

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News Headline: Study links heavy cellphone use with poor fitness levels (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Omaha World-Herald - Online
Contact Name: Cheryl Powell
News OCR Text: People who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health.

A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy cellphone use and reduced fitness levels among college students.

Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob E. Barkley, associate professors in Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, found college students who reported the highest cellphone use — averaging 14 hours a day — were less fit than those who used the devices less often.

“There's no 'phone potato' term, but maybe there should be,” Barkley said. “I don't think they think about the consequences of sitting and playing with your phone.”

Brent Gray Jr., 19, of Cincinnati, admits he would likely be a “phone junkie” if he didn't train as a member of the University of Akron's track team.

The first thing he does when he wakes up is check his phone for texts and updates from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vine and Snapchat. He estimates he spends at least 12 hours each day using his iPhone.

“Without my phone, I don't think I'd know what to do with myself,” he said. “Without my phone, I'd be disconnected from the world.”

Activities that counted toward the total include making calls, texting, sending or reading emails, playing games, surfing the Internet, watching videos and using social media. Listening to music wasn't included.

Students were given a test similar to a stress test to measure cardio­respiratory fitness.

“If you were someone who used the phone a lot,” Barkley said, “you were less fit.”

Brandon Schillig, 22, of North Canton, Ohio, said he tries to find a balance when it comes to his new iPhone.

“Everything is at the palm of my hand,” he said. “It's ridiculous. It's definitely addicting.”

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News Headline: Is Your Smartphone Keeping You From Losing Weight? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Glamour - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Health writer. Loves '80s music, spin class, and velvet-nosed kittens. Wishes nachos were a food group.

Sometimes, it's hard to imagine life without a smartphone—how on earth did we check email, send messages (without actually, you know, talking to each other), and play way-too-addicting games such as Candy Crush Saga? (I can't believe I just admitted that.)

Now, one study is showing that we should do more than just imagine life without our smartphones—maybe we should try putting them down more often, because they may be contributing to our lack of fitness.

New research from Kent State University has found a link between heavy cell phone usage and poor fitness in college students. The researchers studied 300 students in the Midwest to find out how much time they spent on their cells every day, and tested the fitness levels and body composition of a portion of them. The results: the people who spent lots of time on their phones—as much as 14 hours a day (!)—weren't as physically fit as those who averaged about 90 minutes of phone use each day.

The researchers found that the students who were spending lots of time on their phones were supplementing with time on other media—video games, movies—which shows they may not have been all that interested in exercise in the first place. But others reported that if they were bored, they'd download apps instead of being more active; or that if they were being active, hearing the phone buzz or beep would make them stop and check email or Facebook instead.

Write the authors: "The possibility that cell phone use may encourage physical activity among some low-frequency users while disrupting physical activity and encouraging sedentary activity among high-frequency users helps explain the significant negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness identified in this study."

Hmmm...on the other hand, there are tons of smartphone apps that encourage physical activity, and you can certainly use it as a tool in your workouts (listening to music, tracking exercise, and so on). So if there is a link, perhaps it has more to do with how physically active you are (or want to be) in the first place. Maybe?

What do you think of the study? How often do you use your phone—and does it ever deter you from (or help you with) your workouts?

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News Headline: Heavy phone use, lack of fitness linked (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Erie Times-News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: People who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smart phones could ultimately be harming their physical health.

A study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy cell phone use and reduced fitness levels among college students.

Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob E. Barkley, associate professors in Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, found college students who reported the highest cell phone use -- averaging 14 hours a day -- were less fit than those who used the devices less often.

"There's no 'phone potato' term, but maybe there should be," Barkley said. "We're just scratching the surface here. I don't think they think about the consequences of sitting and playing with your phone."

Brent Gray Jr. 19, of Cincinnati, admits he would likely be a "phone junkie" if he didn't train as a member of the University of Akron's track team.

The first thing he does when he wakes up is check his phone for texts and updates from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vine and Snapchat, all popular social media apps. He estimates he spends at least 12 hours each day using his iPhone.

"Without my phone, I don't think I'd know what to do with myself," he said. "Without my phone, I'd be disconnected from the world."

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News Headline: Professors connect cell phone use with inactivity (Barkley) | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Brown University News and Events
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University, Abilene, TX July 17, 2013 (The Daily Kent Stater, provided by UWIRE, a division of Uloop via Comtex) -- Written by India Hines Hits: 99

This generation of college couch potatoes don't need televisions or video games. Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, Kent State researchers and faculty from the College of Education, Health and Human Services, have linked cell phone use to bad physical fitness in college students.

"We found that there is a negative association between fitness and cell phone use," Barkley said. "The more you use it the lower their cardiovascular fitness."

"We were well aware of previous research that indicated a link between watching television and playing video games and the negative outcomes it has on health," said Barkley. "Modern cell phones can do the same thing as a computer or television, but it does not have to be sedentary activity so we wanted to explore the relationship it could have on fitness."

Barkley and Lepp surveyed 300 students throughout the Midwest. Forty-nine of those students had their fitness level and composition tested. It showed students who spent as much as 14 hours on their phone were less fit than those who only spent 90 minutes on it.

Benjamin Cope, recreation program coordinator at Student Recreation and Wellness Center, said students on their cell phone would be more distracted.

"The people who were on their phone excessively would be more distracted and have less time to be engaged in exercise related activates throughout the day," said Cope.

Ryan Nolen, graduate higher education major, knew he had to change his inactivity with exercise.

"My trigger moment was when my pants started not to fit," he said. He now does a daily exercise routine to stop from falling into sedentary activities.

Barkley recommends students not using their phone when walking because it can slow you down, and do not use a cell phone when you're on the treadmill to help increase physical fitness.

Cope also recommends using time wisely and trying new activities.

"Take a bike ride or try a new activity that you have never tried before such as rock climbing or kayaking. If you need visual stimulation while working out try some Wii exercise related games," Cope said.

"Figure out a set time to devote yourself to exercising because it becomes easier to keep up with it," suggested Nolen. "It should get to a point where you feel guilty if you are not doing your workout."

Contact India Hines at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

http://kentwired.com/kent-state-researchers-connect-cell-phone-use-with-inactivity

Copyright (c) 2013 http://www.uwire.com/ UWIRE, a division of http://www.uloop.com/ Uloop

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News Headline: Professors connect cell phone use with inactivity (Barkley) | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This generation of college couch potatoes don't need televisions or video games. Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, Kent State researchers and faculty from the College of Education, Health and Human Services, have linked cell phone use to bad physical fitness in college students.

"We found that there is a negative association between fitness and cell phone use," Barkley said. "The more you use it the lower their cardiovascular fitness."

"We were well aware of previous research that indicated a link between watching television and playing video games and the negative outcomes it has on health," said Barkley. "Modern cell phones can do the same thing as a computer or television, but it does not have to be sedentary activity so we wanted to explore the relationship it could have on fitness."

Barkley and Lepp surveyed 300 students throughout the Midwest. Forty-nine of those students had their fitness level and composition tested. It showed students who spent as much as 14 hours on their phone were less fit than those who only spent 90 minutes on it.

Benjamin Cope, recreation program coordinator at Student Recreation and Wellness Center, said students on their cell phone would be more distracted.

"The people who were on their phone excessively would be more distracted and have less time to be engaged in exercise related activates throughout the day," said Cope.

Ryan Nolen, graduate higher education major, knew he had to change his inactivity with exercise.

"My trigger moment was when my pants started not to fit," he said. He now does a daily exercise routine to stop from falling into sedentary activities.

Barkley recommends students not using their phone when walking because it can slow you down, and do not use a cell phone when you're on the treadmill to help increase physical fitness.

Cope also recommends using time wisely and trying new activities.

"Take a bike ride or try a new activity that you have never tried before such as rock climbing or kayaking. If you need visual stimulation while working out try some Wii exercise related games," Cope said.

"Figure out a set time to devote yourself to exercising because it becomes easier to keep up with it," suggested Nolen. "It should get to a point where you feel guilty if you are not doing your workout."

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: Public Relations Industry Masters Judy Phair And William Oliver To Be Inducted Into National Capital Public Relations Hall Of Fame | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Lifetime Achievement Award to be Bestowed at Annual Thoth Gala

WASHINGTON

The chapter started the Public Relations Hall of Fame in 1999 by inducting 50 leaders with significant accomplishments in the public relations field as part of the chapter's 50th Anniversary celebration. The Hall of Fame members hold more than a thousand awards, distinctions, honorary degrees, advisory positions, charity board seats, and Who's Who citations among them. . Criteria for induction in the NCC Public Relations Hall of Fame includes 30 or more years of distinguished accomplishments, visionary leadership, mentoring, commitment to the profession, positive and significant impacts on the industry, and contributions to the community. Inductees must have worked in the Washington, DC

Judy Phair

Judy's contributions to public relations and the society are numerous. She served as National PRSA president in 2005, overseeing the membership organization for 22,000 public relations professionals. In October 2010

According to Schario, "Judy began her career as a reporter and brings that sense of curiosity and concern for the facts to her paid and volunteer work. She has a reputation for fairness and tenacity."

Judy's commitment to the PR profession is exemplified in her continued involvement with PRSA. She is past chair of PRSA's prestigious College of Fellows, co-chair of its Educational Affairs Committee and The MBA/Business School Initiative, PRSA Foundation Board Member, and PRSA representative on the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC). She also writes and speaks about public relations.

Judy opened PhairAdvantage Communications, LLC, in 2002, and resumed a full-time focus on the agency in 2010 after serving as vice president, communications, for the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), an association of 211 top graduate business schools worldwide and the owner of the Graduate Management Admission Test, from 2006-10. Previously, Judy was vice president for public affairs at the Council on Competitiveness, a nonpartisan, nonprofit Washington, D.C.

William (Bill) Oliver

Goodyear said, "as [AT&T's] Senior VP for Public Affairs, [Bill] helped provide both the vision and strategy for many of AT&T's public fights for almost two decades."

Oliver was featured as one the Holmes Report's "100 Most Important In House Communicators in the World" for his service at the helm of AT&T's public affairs. Oliver began his career in Washington, DC

Beyond the desk work, Bill had incredible impacts in the public relations community. He has been an active member of the Arthur Page Society and with Kent State University

About PRSA's National Capital Chapter

The National Capital Chapter of PRSA (PRSA-NCC) is a professional public relations association of more than 1,500 members in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan region. PRSA-NCC provides professional development programs, accreditation instruction, and networking. PRSA-NCC also promotes public relations education through five area Public Relations Society of America student chapters. For more information, please visit www.prsa-ncc.org or call 703-691-9212. Connect with us on Facebook at PRSANCC or follow us on Twitter @PRSANCC with #thoth2013.

SOURCE The Public Relations Society of America's National Capital Chapter (PRSA-NCC)

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News Headline: KENT: Trouble with grant | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The Ohio Inspector General has found fault with the way Kent State handled a federal grant.
The state office said KSU did not follow procedures when it bought $124,810 in research equipment through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in 2009 to study biomolecular interactions.
This was one of four random grants the state office reviewed at Kent State in February 2012. The review found no problems with the three other projects.
According to the state report, two KSU professors purchased two pieces of equipment with funds from the National Science Foundation. However, the researchers did not attach a fixed asset tag for inventory control to one piece of equipment, did not establish that one piece of equipment was purchased through a sole-source provider and did not competitively bid the second item.

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News Headline: Merger for East Side suburbs off the table for now (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Johnston, Laura
News OCR Text: Cuyahoga County Executive Ed Fitzgerald, center, announced that four east side suburbs were exploring the possibility of a merger, on June 22, 2011. Standing from left to right in the background are former Mayor Bruce Akers of Pepper Pike, and mayors Kathy Mulcahy of Orange Village, Charles Smith of Woodmere, and Susan Renda of Moreland Hills. Marvin Fong, The Plain Dealer

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The much-hurrahed push for a possible merger of four East Side suburbs has quietly settled into a study to share services.

Researchers are still compiling a report of possible options for Moreland Hills, Orange, Pepper Pike and Woodmere. But government leaders have shelved the idea of a full-blown merger, at least for now.

“It is off the table right now,” said Moreland Hills Mayor Susan Renda. “I think that in our initial round of meetings with the residents that there wasn't a whole lot of support for it. There were probably more negative comments than positives.”

Said Pepper Pike Mayor Richard Bain: “It seemed a premature conclusion to come to, a merger, before you've studied it and described what are even the benefits of sharing services.”

When mayors of the four communities announced in June 2011 they were studying a merger, it was the most significant step toward regionalism Cuyahoga County – and its increasingly cash-strapped 59 municipalities -- had ever seen.

In a news conference, county Executive Ed FitzGerald called the possibility “a bold collaboration by four leaders who are willing to do the smart and right thing for their communities.”

Officials had planned to ask voters in November 2012 to approve a commission to formerly study the merger, then put a merger proposal on the ballot this year.

The possibility seemed to make inherent sense, since the suburbs all were once part of Orange Township. They share schools and recreation programs. The villages of Moreland Hills, Orange and Woodmere already collaborate for dispatch services, and all four communities contract for income tax collection.

But integrating the four into one city of 13,500 residents and 18 square miles proved a daunting proposition.

“It seems strange in this day and age of people being skeptical of government,” said John Hoornbeek, director of Kent State University's Center for Public Policy and Health. “But there are ties that develop between individuals and the jurisdictions in which they live. Those ties are not easily broken.”

There are also logistics to reconcile: property and income tax rates, for example, and budgets. Together, the cities spend about $27 million annually.

“The will of the people, they don't see a significant of enough benefit worth giving up the independence they have,” said Phil Bessler, an Orange resident and Baldwin Wallace University business professor.

In 2010, as part of a BW study (pdf), Bessler found that Hunting Valley, Moreland Hills, Orange and Pepper Pike could save millions of dollars a year, he said.

Now, the county is spearheading a more in-depth business plan considering ways to share trash pick-up, fire protection and law enforcement. Grants from the state and the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency are footing the $110,000 bill for the work by Rochester, NY-based CGR Inc.

The first part of the study (pdf), a detailed report of existing services, was released in June. The next portion, with options for savings, will be finished this fall.

The research is delving much deeper than officials originally expected, said Orange Mayor Kathy Mulcahy. And it could still point toward a merger.

Mulcahy at least wants a vote on the issue.

“There are savings to be had through a merger,” she said. “I don't know how much that is. And I don't know if there's enough to warrant it.”

Sharing services is easier, though. Government leaders can quietly collaborate through contracts, without asking voters for approval.

Ed Jerse, who is overseeing the study as the county's director of regional collaboration, said there's no reason to rush to a merger.

Former Pepper Pike Mayor Bruce Akers, who had stood with the mayors to announce a possible merger, though, said he's disappointed. Only in a merger, he said, can cities eliminate most overhead administration costs.

“It made such good sense then and it makes good sense today,” Akers said. “In a day and age when revenues are shorter and shorter and residents still demand good services… this is a great way to economize.”

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News Headline: BRIEF: Review finds problem with a federal grant at Kent State | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 17--KENT -- The Ohio Inspector General has found fault with the way one federal grant was handled at Kent State University.

The state office said KSU did not follow procedures when it bought $124,810 in research equipment to study biomolecular interactions through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in 2009.

This was one of four random grants that the state office reviewed at Kent State in February 2012. The review found no problems with the three other projects.

According to the state report, two KSU professors purchased two pieces of equipment with funds from the National Science Foundation. However the researchers did not attach a fixed asset tag for inventory control to one piece of equipment, did not establish that one piece of equipment was purchased through a sole-source provider and did not competitively bid the second item..

___

(c)2013 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

Visit the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio) at www.ohio.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright (c) 2013 The Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Review finds problem with a federal grant at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The Ohio Inspector General has found fault with the way one federal grant was handled at Kent State University.

The state office said KSU did not follow procedures when it bought $124,810 in research equipment to study biomolecular interactions through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in 2009.

This was one of four random grants that the state office reviewed at Kent State in February 2012. The review found no problems with the three other projects.

According to the state report, two KSU professors purchased two pieces of equipment with funds from the National Science Foundation. However the researchers did not attach a fixed asset tag for inventory control to one piece of equipment, did not establish that one piece of equipment was purchased through a sole-source provider and did not competitively bid the second item..

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News Headline: Report: KSU did not follow procedure for grant (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Received $124,810 to
purchase equipment

The Ohio Inspector General's
office has found fault
with a federal grant awarded
to Kent State University
through the American Recovery
and Reinvestment
Act.
The inspector general's report
found that KSU failed
to follow the competitive
bid process when it used
$124,810 in National Science
Foundation funds to purchase
research equipment
to study biomolecular interactions.
The university is not being
asked to return the grant
money.
“The report does not require
the university to return
grant dollars but instead recommends
only policy and
procedural changes,” KSU
spokesman Eric Mansfield
said in a statement.
KSU's policies for purchasing,
selling, disposing and inventorying
property state
that “... the purchase or lease
of any equipment, material,
and supplies when the cost is
twenty-five thousand dollars
or greater ... shall be awarded
to the lowest and/or most
responsive bidder pursuant
to competitive bidding procedures.”
According to the report,
KSU purchased a suite of
surface plasmon resonance
instruments from Reichert,
Inc., and a dynamic light scattering
instrument from Malvern
Instruments through
the National Science Foundation
grant money.
Although KSU told the
Office of the Ohio Inspector
General during the investigation
that Reichert,
Inc, was “sole-source provider,”
which would allow
the bidding process to be
skipped, an email from KSU
to the foundation “indicat-
ed research had been performed
on other pieces of
equipment manufactured
by different vendors,” according
to the report.
No quotes from vendors
other than Malvern were
obtained when KSU purchased
the dynamic light
scattering instrument, according
to the report. It
goes on to state that although
an internal university
memo claimed
that because the unit
was demonstrational and
purchased at a discounted
rates bidding requirements
could be waved,
“the university's purchasing
policy does not exclude
discounted goods from
competitive bidding procedures.”
The report also found
that the university failed
to properly inventory the
research equipment.
The investigation was
initiated in order to comply
with a 2009 Ohio General
Assembly act requiring
the inspector general
to monitor the spending of
funds received by the state
through the American Recovery
and Reinvestment
Act of 2009.
According to the report,
four KSU grants were
picked at random for the
investigation. No other
problems were found.
Mansfield said the university
is addressing the
issues spelled out in the
report to ensure proper
oversight.
“University leaders have
received the Inspector General's
report and are working
with the state to ensure
all standards for oversight
are met. A review of university
purchasing policies was
already underway even before
the IG report was received,”
Mansfield said.

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News Headline: GREEN PORTAGE: Leaving the car at home and biking to work in Portage County | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: We're outdoor enthusiasts who love to hike,
bike, swim and paddle. We met at Kendall Ledges,
and our “first date” was a whitewater canoe trip
on the Class-III Youghiogheny River. Among Portage
County's attractions even in the early 1970s
were parks like Towner's Woods and Fred Fuller
… and, of course, the mighty Cuyahoga.
In 1979, we moved from Kent to Brady Lake and
have lived there ever since. The area had much to
offer 30-odd years ago, and succeeding decades
have witnessed almost-miraculous improvements.
Noteworthy developments include breaching
the Kent dam and creating Riveredge Park.
Equally impressive are new hike/bike paths. We
often use the section west of Lake Rockwell Road
to ride to work in Kent.
Cycling to Nancy's office takes 20 minutes,
not much longer than it does to drive and park.
Her morning-slow body warms on her two-mile
approach to the paved bike path. After passing
Towner's Woods and Beckwith's Farm, she turns
west onto the trail.
She rolls along the former railroad right of way,
with iron tracks to her left and Beckwith's woods
on the right. As she approaches walkers or joggers,
she calls, “Passing Left!” And “Thank you!”
She's happy to share the road, and they're pleased
that she didn't run them down. She traverses two
bridges, then catches a glimpse of Kent's Lake
Street industrial buildings and the entrance to the
River Bend neighborhood. She hears the song of
a train whistle and the rhythm of the train.
She sails on, with woods on both sides. The
Cuyahoga River and Standing Rock are close on
the right, followed by houses and more industrial
buildings. Near the former Crain Street Bridge
she dismounts, walks across the tracks to Water
Street, then cycles two more blocks to her office
— her mind alive and ready for the day ahead.
Rick sometimes takes a longer route, south to
Meloy Road, then north to Kent State University.
Together, we enjoy road biking throughout Portage
County and environs. We often ride to Hudson-
Judson and pick up the Hike-Bike Trail that
follows former railway paths through Portage,
Summit, and Cuyahoga Counties.
***
Biking to work involves a few challenges. It requires
some riding on roads, and while we don't
mind a little four-wheeled company, many people
do. The City of Kent, AMATS, and KSU are making
roads more bicycle friendly, with bike lanes
and improved signage. For those with hybrid or
mountain bikes, a pea-gravel trail offers a safe
commute between Kent and Ravenna.
Snow and ice present a serious impediment.
The bike path isn't plowed, and traffic lanes on
roads are narrowed by the snow that piles up on
the shoulder. Most of our riding, therefore, is between
March and November.
Even in warm weather, complications arise. If
it's raining, we arrive wet. If we carry books or
computers, we need to keep them dry. When it's
hot, we arrive sweaty. Some places of employment
offer showers and changing rooms. Lacking that
luxury, we wear something presentable, yet durable
and not too heavy, and we force ourselves
to ride slowly to keep perspiration to a minimum.
In return for a few inconveniences, we get exercise,
fresh air, a great start to our work day, and
the satisfaction of knowing that we have not contributed
to air pollution and climate change.
In addition to two long-established bike shops
in Stow, two stores have recently opened in the
Kent-Ravenna area — Kent Cycle and Portage
Cyclery. For more information on local cycling,
contact Kent State's Outdoor Adventure Center
or the Akron Bicycle Club.
See you on the trail….

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News Headline: Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: NBCNews.com (Formerly MSNBC)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise on the topics of reading fluency and comprehension. Scientific Learning is the maker of the Reading Assistant™ and Fast ForWord® online learning programs.

Through this partnership, Rasinski will participate as a member of the advisory board for the Reading Assistant program, and provide input into its ongoing development and enhancement. Reading Assistant is the only online reading tool that "listens" to students as they read out loud, intervenes when they struggle, and automatically scores students' oral reading. It provides individualized online reading coaching for every student, helping them to strengthen vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

In addition, Rasinski will write blog posts and papers, and lead webinars on issues related to fluency and its importance in reading. His most recent webinar, "Keys to Increasing Reading Comprehension in the Age of Common Core," is available on-demand. Rasinski will also provide guidance in the development of evaluation studies for Reading Assistant.

"Our own research indicates that fluency has not been priority in many schools. However, when fluency instruction is offered to students the potential for gains is tremendous. Through my work with Scientific Learning, my goal is to share my expertise to help educators understand just how important reading fluency is and the role it plays in reading comprehension," said Rasinski. "I'm also looking forward to offering my expertise to the Reading Assistant program as it evolves. I've seen the program at work for the last several years and have been very impressed by it. It's a valuable tool for helping students develop fluency."

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is author of the best selling books on reading fluency The Fluent Reader and The Fluent Reader in Action, now in its second edition. His scholarly interests include reading fluency and word study, reading in the elementary and middle grades, and readers who struggle. His research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, Reading Psychology, and the Journal ofEducational Research.

"We're excited to work with such a distinguished expert in reading education and fluency," said Robert C. Bowen, CEO for Scientific Learning. "We look forward to learning from Dr. Rasinski's knowledge and expertise, and incorporating his insights into our efforts to help students strengthen their reading fluency with the Reading Assistant program. By combining his research and experience with our online reading program, we can help students of diverse ages and ability levels rapidly strengthen their fluency and comprehension, and maximize their ability to read to learn."

About Scientific Learning Corp.

We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270 research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end.

Today, more than 2.2 million learners have used Scientific Learning software products. We provide our offerings directly to parents, K–12 schools and learning centers, and in more than 45 countries around the world. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call toll-free 888-810-0250.

CONTACT: Media Contact:
Hallie Smith
Director of Marketing
Scientific Learning Corporation
(619) 795-6509
HSmith@scilearn.com

Investor Contact:
Jane Freeman
Chief Financial Officer
Scientific Learning Corporation
(510) 625-6710
JFreeman@scilearn.com

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News Headline: Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Biz Wire Express
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski,
Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and
director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with
Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise on the
topics of reading fluency and comprehension. Scientific Learning is the
maker of the Reading Assistant(TM) and Fast ForWord(R) online learning
programs.

Through this partnership, Rasinski will participate as a member of the
advisory board for the Reading Assistant program, and provide input
into its ongoing development and enhancement. Reading Assistant is the
only online reading tool that "listens" to students as they read out
loud, intervenes when they struggle, and automatically scores students'
oral reading. It provides individualized online reading coaching for
every student, helping them to strengthen vocabulary, fluency, and
comprehension.

In addition, Rasinski will write blog posts and papers, and lead
webinars on issues related to fluency and its importance in reading.
His most recent webinar, "Keys to Increasing Reading Comprehension in
the Age of Common Core," is available on-demand. Rasinski will also
provide guidance in the development of evaluation studies for Reading
Assistant.

"Our own research indicates that fluency has not been priority in many
schools. However, when fluency instruction is offered to students the
potential for gains is tremendous. Through my work with Scientific
Learning, my goal is to share my expertise to help educators understand
just how important reading fluency is and the role it plays in reading
comprehension," said Rasinski. "I'm also looking forward to offering my
expertise to the Reading Assistant program as it evolves. I've seen the
program at work for the last several years and have been very impressed
by it. It's a valuable tool for helping students develop fluency."

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or
edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is
author of the best selling books on reading fluency The Fluent Reader
and The Fluent Reader in Action, now in its second edition. His
scholarly interests include reading fluency and word study, reading in
the elementary and middle grades, and readers who struggle. His
research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and
has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The
Reading Teacher, Reading Psychology, and the Journal of Educational
Research.

"We're excited to work with such a distinguished expert in reading
education and fluency," said Robert C. Bowen, CEO for Scientific
Learning. "We look forward to learning from Dr. Rasinski's knowledge
and expertise, and incorporating his insights into our efforts to help
students strengthen their reading fluency with the Reading Assistant
program. By combining his research and experience with our online
reading program, we can help students of diverse ages and ability
levels rapidly strengthen their fluency and comprehension, and maximize
their ability to read to learn."

About Scientific Learning Corp.

We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain
learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270
research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize
achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and
maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end.

Today, more than 2.2 million learners have used Scientific Learning
software products. We provide our offerings directly to parents, K--12
schools and learning centers, and in more than 45 countries around the
world. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call
toll-free 888-810-0250.


CONTACT: Media Contact:
Hallie Smith
Director of Marketing
Scientific Learning Corporation
(619) 795-6509
HSmith@scilearn.com

Investor Contact:
Jane Freeman
Chief Financial Officer
Scientific Learning Corporation
(510) 625-6710
JFreeman@scilearn.com

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News Headline: Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Globenewswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise on the topics of reading fluency and comprehension. Scientific Learning is the maker of the Reading Assistant ™ and Fast ForWord ® online learning programs.

Through this partnership, Rasinski will participate as a member of the advisory board for the Reading Assistant program, and provide input into its ongoing development and enhancement. Reading Assistant is the only online reading tool that "listens" to students as they read out loud, intervenes when they struggle, and automatically scores students' oral reading. It provides individualized online reading coaching for every student, helping them to strengthen vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

In addition, Rasinski will write blog posts and papers, and lead webinars on issues related to fluency and its importance in reading. His most recent webinar, " Keys to Increasing Reading Comprehension in the Age of Common Core," is available on-demand. Rasinski will also provide guidance in the development of evaluation studies for Reading Assistant.

"Our own research indicates that fluency has not been priority in many schools. However, when fluency instruction is offered to students the potential for gains is tremendous. Through my work with Scientific Learning, my goal is to share my expertise to help educators understand just how important reading fluency is and the role it plays in reading comprehension," said Rasinski. "I'm also looking forward to offering my expertise to the Reading Assistant program as it evolves. I've seen the program at work for the last several years and have been very impressed by it. It's a valuable tool for helping students develop fluency."

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is author of the best selling books on reading fluency The Fluent Reader and The Fluent Reader in Action, now in its second edition. His scholarly interests include reading fluency and word study, reading in the elementary and middle grades, and readers who struggle. His research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, Reading Psychology, and the Journal of Educational Research.

"We're excited to work with such a distinguished expert in reading education and fluency," said Robert C. Bowen, CEO for Scientific Learning. "We look forward to learning from Dr. Rasinski's knowledge and expertise, and incorporating his insights into our efforts to help students strengthen their reading fluency with the Reading Assistant program. By combining his research and experience with our online reading program, we can help students of diverse ages and ability levels rapidly strengthen their fluency and comprehension, and maximize their ability to read to learn."

About Scientific Learning Corp.

We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270 research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end.

Today, more than 2.2 million learners have used Scientific Learning software products. We provide our offerings directly to parents, K-12 schools and learning centers, and in more than 45 countries around the world. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call toll-free 888-810-0250.

CONTACT: Media Contact: Hallie Smith Director of Marketing Scientific Learning Corporation (619) 795-6509 HSmith@scilearn.com Investor Contact: Jane Freeman Chief Financial Officer Scientific Learning Corporation (510) 625-6710 JFreeman@scilearn.com


Copyright © 2013 GlobeNewswire, Inc.

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News Headline: Iraq veteran Hugh Martin of Macedonia is nationally recognized poet | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 17--MACEDONIA -- Hugh Martin never expected to be where he is today.

A so-so student in high school who joined the Ohio Army National Guard in hopes of making his life better, Martin had never written a poem when he was deployed to Iraq nearly a decade ago.

Years later, while a student at Muskingum University he took a poetry class.

Something clicked.

"It was an interesting situation. I immediately recognized him as a poet, even though I'm fairly sure he had never written a poem before then," said Jane Varley, an associate professor at Muskingum and chair of the English department. She taught the poetry class Martin was taking.

"He had a poet's sensibility, and it was simple to get him started," Varley said. "All I had to do was give him the names of some books and poets. From there, he discovered the world of poetry.

"From the start, his poems were good because they didn't mess around with unnecessary language, and he has gotten better and better at balancing clarity with an incredible depth of feeling," she said.

Martin, 29, a Nordonia High School graduate and native of Macedonia, is midway through a two-year Stegner Fellowship in Poetry at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. Novelist Wallace Stegner established the fellowship in 1946.

Martin hopes to land a position teaching poetry and writing at a college or university after his fellowship ends next summer, but also plans to continue writing and is interested in filmmaking as well.

He was one of about 2,000 who applied for 10 of the fellowships at Stanford, including only five in poetry.

His book of poems about his experiences in Iraq, The Stick Soldiers, was published in March. It was named winner of the A. Poulin Jr. Poetry Prize.

Also in March, the New York Times published an essay Martin wrote to mark the 10th anniversary of the Iraq war.

Martin, son of Ken and Katherine Martin, joined the Ohio Army National Guard's 1-107th Armored Battalion out of Stow while still in high school, a few months before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He went to basic training the next summer. He had been enrolled at Muskingum for one semester before being called to active duty and was deployed to Iraq in 2004.

While he was trained as a tanker, he served in Iraq as an infantryman. He wrote a journal daily but no poems.

It wasn't until Varley's poetry class that he began to write free-verse poems about his experiences in the Middle East.

"I got very comfortable with working with one page and focusing on a very particular, specific moment and writing different drafts and working on one poem at a time," Martin said during a recent interview at his parents' home in Macedonia.

"My teacher was very encouraging and she gave me a lot of authors to read. And that is when I started seriously writing about Iraq."

Soldier's viewpoint

Ken Martin, 60, an attorney and Macedonia councilman, said he appreciates his son's sensitivity.

"He wrote from the standpoint of the ordinary grunt out there slogging through it," he said. "I admire what he has been able to do with storytelling."

Katherine Martin, 61, also an attorney and a media relations official at NASA, said her son's poems make her realize the importance of poetry in painting a mental picture.

"It is amazing to me that he has turned what he experienced in Iraq into poetry," she said.

Martin said he really doesn't consider himself a poet but more of a writer.

He has hundreds of drafts of poems, is working on a second book related to Iraq that includes poems and essays and also has put together 150 pages of a memoir.

"It is very relaxing," he said of the act of writing. "It helped me adjust a lot because I have learned how to get [his war experiences] out there in a way. It feels good."

After receiving his bachelor's degree in English from Muskingum, he spent three years at Arizona State University, where he received a master's degree in fine arts in creative writing.

Writing poems about Iraq, he said, "was a way to write about these experiences that were very strange to me, and it was hard to communicate them to anybody or to civilians. ... It was therapeutic."

Precise writing

His first book, a chapbook or pocket-size book, contained 25 poems. Titled So How Was the War? it was published by Kent State University Press in 2010.

Poetry, in terms of writing about war, Martin said, "is sort of superior than all forms of written communications. To write a good poem, it has to be very precise. You have to use an economy of language. ... You have to look at the humanity of everyone -- American, Iraqi, civilians."

Eavan Boland, director of the Creative Writing Program at Stanford, said Martin's work "came off the page so strong, so authentic, so deeply involved in an important public event."

She said what makes Martin's work so strong is "not so much that it's war poetry ... as that it leads out into the really universal theme of the struggle between humane individual feeling and the intense collective obligation any soldier puts on with a uniform. That is a tension that could swamp any poem. But it doesn't in Hugh's work. It enriches and confirms it."

Muskingum's Varley said the reason Martin has had success as a poet "is because he is working with the compelling and complicated landscape of war, but beyond that, his poetry speaks to all kinds of people in all kinds of situations. If I had to pinpoint one quality that characterizes him as a poet, I'd say it's compassion."

There is something about the experience of war, Varley said, that draws people to art.

"Art is an endeavor to try to make sense of chaos," she said, "and in the case of Hugh Martin, to make poetry is not a reaction to war but a present-tense, proactive, ongoing effort to find what is beneath the surface of our lives."

In the forward of The Stick Soldiers, Cornelius Eady wrote: "Here's eleven months worth of sawdust, sweat, dear reader. Somehow, Hugh Martin has wrung poetry from a scab, and now, the full shock and beauty and mystery of the things of war that won't let go will stick to you."

Martin's books can be purchased through Amazon.com.

Copyright (c) 2013 The Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: POEMS CAPTURE WAR EXPERIENCE WITH SENSITIVITY: IRAQ VETERAN NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED | Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Carney, Jim
News OCR Text: Hugh Martin never expected to be where he is today.

A so-so student in high school who joined the Ohio Army National Guard in hopes of making his life better, Martin had never written a poem when he was deployed to Iraq nearly a decade ago.

Years later, while a student at Muskingum University he took a poetry class.

Something clicked.

"It was an interesting situation. I immediately recognized him as a poet, even though I'm fairly sure he had never written a poem before then," said Jane Varley, an associate professor at Muskingum and chair of the English department. She taught the poetry class Martin was taking.

"He had a poet's sensibility, and it was simple to get him started," Varley said. "All I had to do was give him the names of some books and poets. From there, he discovered the world of poetry.

"From the start, his poems were good because they didn't mess around with unnecessary language, and he has gotten better and better at balancing clarity with an incredible depth of feeling," she said.

Martin, 29, a Nordonia High School graduate and native of Macedonia, is midway through a two-year Stegner Fellowship in Poetry at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. Novelist Wallace Stegner established the fellowship in 1946.

Martin hopes to land a position teaching poetry and writing at a college or university after his fellowship ends next summer, but also plans to continue writing and is interested in filmmaking as well.

He was one of about 2,000 who applied for 10 of the fellowships at Stanford, including only five in poetry.

His book of poems about his experiences in Iraq, The Stick Soldiers, was published in March. It was named winner of the A. Poulin Jr. Poetry Prize.

Also in March, the New York Times published an essay Martin wrote to mark the 10th anniversary of the Iraq war.

Martin, son of Ken and Katherine Martin, joined the Ohio Army National Guard's 1-107th Armored Battalion out of Stow while still in high school, a few months before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He went to basic training the next summer. He had been enrolled at Muskingum for one semester before being called to active duty and was deployed to Iraq in 2004.

While he was trained as a tanker, he served in Iraq as an infantryman. He wrote a journal daily but no poems.

It wasn't until Varley's poetry class that he began to write free-verse poems about his experiences in the Middle East.

"I got very comfortable with working with one page and focusing on a very particular, specific moment and writing different drafts and working on one poem at a time," Martin said during a recent interview at his parents' home in Macedonia.

"My teacher was very encouraging and she gave me a lot of authors to read. And that is when I started seriously writing about Iraq."
SOLDIER'S VIEWPOINT

Ken Martin, 60, an attorney and Macedonia councilman, said he appreciates his son's sensitivity.

"He wrote from the standpoint of the ordinary grunt out there slogging through it," he said. "I admire what he has been able to do with storytelling."

Katherine Martin, 61, also an attorney and a media relations official at NASA, said her son's poems make her realize the importance of poetry in painting a mental picture.

"It is amazing to me that he has turned what he experienced in Iraq into poetry," she said.

Martin said he really doesn't consider himself a poet but more of a writer.

He has hundreds of drafts of poems, is working on a second book related to Iraq that includes poems and essays and also has put together 150 pages of a memoir.

"It is very relaxing," he said of the act of writing. "It helped me adjust a lot because I have learned how to get [his war experiences] out there in a way. It feels good."

After receiving his bachelor's degree in English from Muskingum, he spent three years at Arizona State University, where he received a master's degree in fine arts in creative writing.

Writing poems about Iraq, he said, "was a way to write about these experiences that were very strange to me, and it was hard to communicate them to anybody or to civilians. ... It was therapeutic."
PRECISE WRITING

His first book, a chapbook or pocket-size book, contained 25 poems. Titled So How Was the War? it was published by Kent State University Press in 2010.

Poetry, in terms of writing about war, Martin said, "is sort of superior than all forms of written communications. To write a good poem, it has to be very precise. You have to use an economy of language. ... You have to look at the humanity of everyone - American, Iraqi, civilians."

Eavan Boland, director of the Creative Writing Program at Stanford, said Martin's work "came off the page so strong, so authentic, so deeply involved in an important public event."

She said what makes Martin's work so strong is "not so much that it's war poetry ... as that it leads out into the really universal theme of the struggle between humane individual feeling and the intense collective obligation any soldier puts on with a uniform. That is a tension that could swamp any poem. But it doesn't in Hugh's work. It enriches and confirms it."

Muskingum's Varley said the reason Martin has had success as a poet "is because he is working with the compelling and complicated landscape of war, but beyond that, his poetry speaks to all kinds of people in all kinds of situations. If I had to pinpoint one quality that characterizes him as a poet, I'd say it's compassion."

There is something about the experience of war, Varley said, that draws people to art.

"Art is an endeavor to try to make sense of chaos," she said, "and in the case of Hugh Martin, to make poetry is not a reaction to war but a present-tense, proactive, ongoing effort to find what is beneath the surface of our lives."

In the forward of The Stick Soldiers, Cornelius Eady wrote: "Here's eleven months worth of sawdust, sweat, dear reader. Somehow, Hugh Martin has wrung poetry from a scab, and now, the full shock and beauty and mystery of the things of war that won't let go will stick to you."

Martin's books can be purchased through Amazon.com.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: CHC professor named editor of The Hemingway Review | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chestnut Hill Local - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Suzanne del Gizzo, associate professor of English and director of departmental honors at Chestnut Hill College, has been named editor-elect of The Hemingway Review, the journal of the Hemingway Society. Del Gizzo was named editor at the society's annual board meeting at the American Literature Association conference in May.

Del Gizzo is a well-regarded Hemingway scholar, having published 20 articles on Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and on 20th century literature in a number of distinguished journals, including The Hemingway Review. She has co-edited two anthologies, “Ernest Hemingway in Context” (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and “Hemingway's The Garden of Eden: 25 Years of Criticism” (Kent State University Press, 2012).

She also has assembled special sections for The Hemingway Review on Robert Frost and on Hemingway's “Garden of Eden.” Other work for the journal includes evaluating submissions and reviewing books, while also reviewing publications for the American Literary Scholarship journal.

Del Gizzo is well-known and well-respected by the Hemingway community, serving the society in a variety of roles over the years. She is currently serving her third term on the board of the society, has organized programs for the American Literature Association and Modern Language Association from 2007-2011, and has co-directed the society's international conference in Lausanne, Switzerland.

“I am honored and excited to serve the society in this way,” del Gizzo said. “My principal goal will be to maintain the extremely high standards that Editor Susan Beegel has established for the Review so that it continues to be the premier journal for Hemingway scholarship.”

The Ernest Hemingway Foundation was established in 1965 by his widow, Mary Hemingway, “for the purposes of awakening, sustaining an interest in, promoting, fostering, stimulating, supporting, improving and developing literature and all forms of literary composition and expression.” Within that context, the Foundation's activities have emphasized “the promotion, assistance and coordination of scholarship and studies relating to the works and life of the late Ernest Hemingway.”

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