Report Overview:
Total Clips (35)
Alumni (2)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (1)
Board of Trustees; Students (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (9)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Creative Writing (1)
Global Education (1)
KSU at Stark (5)
Music (1)
Office of General Counsel; Research (2)
Psychology (2)
Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Students (2)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
WKSU (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (2)
BLOG: Sound Check: New Devo compilation "Hardcore" illuminates pre-fame music era-1974-1977 07/19/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...[http://www.clubdevo.com/]'s Hardcore documents the group's beginning as pre-punk outcasts in the fertile Akron, Ohio underground rock scene. Spawned at the nearby college of Kent State, site of the infamous May 4 Massacre, DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/] formed as a conceptual art project armed with a radical philosophy...

New Devo compilation "Hardcore" illuminates pre-fame music era-1974-1977 07/19/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...DEVO's Hardcore documents the group's beginning as pre-punk outcasts in the fertile Akron, Ohio underground rock scene. Spawned at the nearby college of Kent State, site of the infamous May 4 Massacre, DEVO formed as a conceptual art project armed with a radical philosophy of de-evolution. Brothers...


Art, School of (1)
Art review: 'Real/Surreal' bends perceptions at Akron Art Museum 07/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...features a dream sequence by surrealist artist Salvador Dalí. Art History 101 — 6:30 p.m. Sept. 19. Free. Register online. Explore surrealism with Kent State University art historian Albert Reischuck.


Athletics (1)
Kent State running backs Archer, Durham named to Doak Walker watch list 07/19/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State running backs Dri Archer and Trayion Durham were named to the Doak Walker Award watch list Thursday. They are among 63 preseason candidates...


Board of Trustees; Students (1)
Kasich appoints student to Kent State University Board of Trustees 07/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Monique Menefee of Cleveland has been appointed by Gov. John Kasich to serve as a student member of the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Her term...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (9)
Is your cellphone making you fat? 07/19/2013 Lansing State Journal -- Online, The Text Attachment Email

...on the couch and watching TV has, but it can be just as bad for you,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an associate professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Ohio. The study found that students spend an average of almost five hours on their cellphones and send hundreds of text...

Study: Your smartphone may be making you fat (Barkley) 07/21/2013 Poughkeepsie Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...on the couch and watching TV has, but it can be just as bad for you,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an associate professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Ohio. The study found that students spend an average of almost five hours on their cellphones and send hundreds of text...

Study: Your smartphone may be making you fat (Barkley) 07/19/2013 WSLS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...on the couch and watching TV has, but it can be just as bad for you," said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an associate professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Ohio. The study found that students spend an average of almost five hours on their cellphones and send hundreds of text...

Could Your Smart Phone Be Making You Fat? 07/19/2013 KSTE-AM - Online Text Attachment Email

A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity. Kent State University researchers say college students who use their phones for the majority of their waking hours have much lower fitness levels...

Cellphone Use Linked To Poor Fitness (Barkley) 07/22/2013 Big News Network Text Attachment Email

eople who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health. A new study by researchers...

Could Your Smart Phone Be Making You Fat? 07/19/2013 KFBK-AM - Online Text Attachment Email

A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity. Kent State University researchers say college students who use their phones for the majority of their waking hours have much lower fitness levels...

Could Your Smart Phone Be Making You Fat? 07/19/2013 KHYL-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity. Kent State University researchers say college students who use their phones for the majority of their waking hours have much lower fitness levels...

High-tech Weight Debate 07/20/2013 WEEK-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...with smartphones... people cannot put their devices down. And now, new research suggests all this phone fanaticism is making us fat! Researchers at Kent State surveyed more than 300 college students...asking about their cell phone use and physical activity. They also had their fitness level and...

Technology Phone junkies lazy too (Barkley) 07/22/2013 Townsville Bulletin (Australia) Text Email

PEOPLE who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy smartphone use and reduced fitness levels among university students Researchers Andrew Lepp and...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
SUSAN STOCKER NAMED INTERIM DEAN OF KENT STATE'S COLLEGE OF NURSING (Diacon, Stocker, Dzurec) 07/19/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, July 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University has named Susan Stocker, Ph.D., interim dean of the College...


Creative Writing (1)
Poetry and Literature Calendar (July 21-27) 07/21/2013 Buffalo News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Series featuring readings by Roger Craik, Geoffrey Gatza and Paul Hogan. Craik, a native of Leicester, England, teaches poetry and creative writing at Kent State University–Ashtabula, and has published four full-length collections of poems, “I Simply Stared” (2002), “Rhinoceros in Clumber Park” (2003),...


Global Education (1)
Kent State University professors to teach in China this summer (Kaykayoglu, Hughes, Egbert) 07/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Eight professors from Kent State University are teaching at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, this summer as part of a partnership between both universities....


KSU at Stark (5)
Balloon flight offers a glimpse of Stark from the skies 07/19/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...launch of the 2013 Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks, which runs through Sunday. The event takes place on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township. More hot-air balloon launches ? weather permitting ? are scheduled for Saturday and early Sunday morning....

VIDEO: Media Balloon Flight Day 07/19/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...press and other invitees took flight in hot-air balloons July 19, 2013, which ushered in the start of the annual Balloon Classic on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township. The Repository's Benjamin Duer and Michael S. Balash were among those media members who hitched a ride....

Balloon flight offers a glimpse of Stark from the skies 07/19/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...launch of the 2013 Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks, which runs through Sunday. The event takes place on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township. More hot-air balloon launches —  weather permitting — are scheduled for Saturday and early Sunday morning....

Liftoff: 2013 Hall of Fame Balloon Classic 07/22/2013 North Canton Patch Text Attachment Email

Check out these photos snapped on the ground and 1,000 feet above North Canton. Forecasters gave the all-clear Friday morning at Kent State University...

Balloon flight offers a glimpse of Stark from the skies 07/19/2013 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...launch of the 2013 Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks, which runs through Sunday. The event takes place on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township. More hot-air balloon launches —  weather permitting — are scheduled for Saturday and early Sunday morning....


Music (1)
ALONG THE WAY:A concert like a Hollywood script 07/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The musicians who perform in the Faculty Recital Series for the annual Kent/Blossom Music Festival held in Ludwig Recital Hall at the Music and Speech...


Office of General Counsel; Research (2)
Kent State probe focuses on the details 07/21/2013 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

You might have missed this last week, but the Ohio inspector general found a "wrongful act or omission" because Kent State University did not have a tag on a piece of lab equipment. Overkill, some might say? "Were it the only issue found, their point would...

Capitol Insider: Kent State probe focuses on the details 07/21/2013 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

You might have missed this last week, but the Ohio inspector general found a “wrongful act or omission” because Kent State University did not have a tag on a piece of lab equipment. Overkill, some might say? “Were it the only issue found, their point would...


Psychology (2)
Why bisexuals stay in the closet 07/20/2013 Los Angeles Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...people who are gay, lesbian or straight: Bisexual women are more likely to binge drink and suffer depression, a George Mason University study found. A Kent State University study of bisexual women found that they were more likely than straight or lesbian women to harm themselves or endure suicidal...

Pew study: Majority of bisexuals still in the closet 07/21/2013 Seattle Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...people who are gay, lesbian or straight: Bisexual women are more likely to binge drink and suffer depression, a George Mason University study found. A Kent State University study of bisexual women found that they were more likely than straight or lesbian women to harm themselves or endure suicidal...


Student Wellness and Recreation Center (1)
Cuyahoga Dangerous for River-Goers 07/22/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Crooked River Adventures said there are still too many factors, including fallen trees, that make the river dangerous for rowers still. Crooked River...


Students (2)
KSU students plead guilty to felony charges for break-in 07/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Five Kent State University students have admitted to breaking into a house following a fight at an East Main Street fast food restaurant in December 2012,...

Shippensburg wins FLW College event on Lake Champlain 07/21/2013 Press-Republican - Online Text Attachment Email

...17-15, $2,000) 2nd: Northwood University – Zach Lowe, Huntington Woods, Mich., and Travis Riedel, Falmouth, Mich. (five bass, 14- 4, $1,000) 3rd: Kent State University – Matthew Fernandez, Dallas, Pa., and Jennifer Newman, South Amherst, Ohio (five bass, 14-3, $500) 4th: Xavier University...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (1)
Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) 07/19/2013 Stockhouse Publishing Ltd. Text Attachment Email

OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise...


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Fiddler on the Roof' closes Porthouse season (van Baars) 07/22/2013 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre, Kent State University's outdoor summer theater on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, will close its 2013 season with "Fiddler on the...


Town-Gown (1)
OUR VIEW: Time to move Kent landmark to its new home 07/22/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Battle over Wells Sherman House ought to come to an end We hope that a Portage County Common Pleas Court ruling on the status of the Kent Wells Sherman...


WKSU (2)
WKSU FM/89.7 expands daytime news offerings, bumps classical music to overnights (Skinner) 07/22/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

WKSU FM/89.7 is restructuring its lineup, expanding daytime news and information content. The Kent-based public radio station still will emphasize classical...

WKSU shakes up schedule with more news (Skinner) 07/22/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Beginning Aug. 5, WKSU (89.7-FM) will make major changes in its schedule, including the move of classical-music programs from daytime into the evening...


News Headline: BLOG: Sound Check: New Devo compilation "Hardcore" illuminates pre-fame music era-1974-1977 | Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 19--Hardcore spuds around the world rejoice! There is new old Devo for you to fetish from the fine folks at Booji Boy Records and SUPERIOR VIADUCT. [http://www.superiorviaduct.com/collections/devo]

For more cool digital versions of the recent Devo releases, including a Live show from the 1981 "New Traditionalist" Tour, go to www.devohardcore.com [http://www.devohardcore.com/]

DEVO -- Hardcore

DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/]'s Hardcore documents the group's beginning as pre-punk outcasts in the fertile Akron, Ohio underground rock scene. Spawned at the nearby college of Kent State, site of the infamous May 4 Massacre, DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/] formed as a conceptual art project armed with a radical philosophy of de-evolution. Brothers Mothersbaugh (Mark, Bob, and Jim) and Brothers Casale (Jerry and Bob) along with drummer Alan Myers soon whipped-up an otherworldly brand of "devolved blues" that could hold its own alongside the beatnik groove of 15-60-75 (aka The Numbers Band) or the primal rock poetry of the Bizarros.

Recorded on various 4-track machines and in tiny studios, basements, and garages between 1974-1977, Hardcore reveals their strikingly clear vision: rock n' roll stripped bare of its collective cool and jerked back into propaganda fit for post-modern man. It's no surprise that these transmissions would soon catch the eye and ear of Brian Eno who later produced their landmark 1978 debut album. Noisy synth, strangled guitar chops, and a primitive rhythmic thud power the early DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/] sound. Threaded beneath it all are lyrical themes of post-McCarthy paranoia, middle-class ephemera, and DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/]'s long-running topic of choice: sex, or lack thereof.

Few moments in pop music history can match the grinding, pent-up energy of "Mongoloid" and the spastic bounce and sputter of "Jocko Homo" (two anthems presented in their earlier and superior versions here). Cult favorites like "Mechanical Man" and "Auto-Modown" make Volume 1 essential listening.

Volume 2 digs further into the band's cranial bunker with the caveman hit "Be Stiff," the space age surf-blues of "Clockout" and even a demented take on bubblegum pop, "Goo Goo Itch." This 2xLP set includes four previously unreleased tracks: "Man From The Past," "Doghouse Doghouse," "Hubert House," and "Shimmy Shake."

From Henry Rollins' liner notes to the CD version [http://www.superiorviaduct.com/collections/upcoming/products/devo-hardcore-2cd]: "Hardcore DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/] is not some barrel bottom scrape in a desperate attempt to pilfer your billfold! This is pure DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/] -- the sweetest crude, straight from the source!"

Superior Viaduct and Booji Boy Records [http://www.superiorviaduct.com/collections/devo] are proud to present DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/]'s Hardcore to a new generation of spuds, lovingly packaged with Moshe Brakha's stunning cover photography. As David Bowie said in 1977, DEVO [http://www.clubdevo.com/] is indeed "the band of the future."

[http://www.ohio.com/blogs/sound-check/sound-check-online-1.293199/]

Copyright (c) 2013 The Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: New Devo compilation "Hardcore" illuminates pre-fame music era-1974-1977 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Charles Millard
News OCR Text: Hardcore spuds around the world rejoice! There is new old Devo for you to fetish from the fine folks at Booji Boy Records and SUPERIOR VIADUCT.

For more cool digital versions of the recent Devo releases, including a Live show from the 1981 "New Traditionalist" Tour, go to www.devohardcore.com

DEVO - Hardcore

DEVO's Hardcore documents the group's beginning as pre-punk outcasts in the fertile Akron, Ohio underground rock scene. Spawned at the nearby college of Kent State, site of the infamous May 4 Massacre, DEVO formed as a conceptual art project armed with a radical philosophy of de-evolution. Brothers Mothersbaugh (Mark, Bob, and Jim) and Brothers Casale (Jerry and Bob) along with drummer Alan Myers soon whipped-up an otherworldly brand of "devolved blues" that could hold its own alongside the beatnik groove of 15-60-75 (aka The Numbers Band) or the primal rock poetry of the Bizarros.

Recorded on various 4-track machines and in tiny studios, basements, and garages between 1974-1977, Hardcore reveals their strikingly clear vision: rock n' roll stripped bare of its collective cool and jerked back into propaganda fit for post-modern man. It's no surprise that these transmissions would soon catch the eye and ear of Brian Eno who later produced their landmark 1978 debut album. Noisy synth, strangled guitar chops, and a primitive rhythmic thud power the early DEVO sound. Threaded beneath it all are lyrical themes of post-McCarthy paranoia, middle-class ephemera, and DEVO's long-running topic of choice: sex, or lack thereof.

Few moments in pop music history can match the grinding, pent-up energy of "Mongoloid" and the spastic bounce and sputter of "Jocko Homo" (two anthems presented in their earlier and superior versions here). Cult favorites like "Mechanical Man" and "Auto-Modown" make Volume 1 essential listening.

Volume 2 digs further into the band's cranial bunker with the caveman hit "Be Stiff," the space age surf-blues of "Clockout" and even a demented take on bubblegum pop, "Goo Goo Itch." This 2xLP set includes four previously unreleased tracks: "Man From The Past," "Doghouse Doghouse," "Hubert House," and "Shimmy Shake."

From Henry Rollins' liner notes to the CD version: "Hardcore DEVO is not some barrel bottom scrape in a desperate attempt to pilfer your billfold! This is pure DEVO – the sweetest crude, straight from the source!"

Superior Viaduct and Booji Boy Records are proud to present DEVO's Hardcore to a new generation of spuds, lovingly packaged with Moshe Brakha's stunning cover photography. As David Bowie said in 1977, DEVO is indeed "the band of the future."

Return to Top



News Headline: Art review: 'Real/Surreal' bends perceptions at Akron Art Museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Dorothy Shinn
News OCR Text: Kay Sage, No Passing, 1954, oil on canvas, 51 1/4 x 38 in. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 55.10. Photography by Sheldan C. Collins

While the obvious point of the Akron Art Museum's new exhibit, Real/Surreal, is how the realist painting style can often cross the line into surrealism, there's another, subtler, even more rewarding aspect to the exhibit that can only be appreciated in person.

That would be the juxtaposition of exactitude and impossibility, or more explicitly, the strange beauty of precision, no matter what the meaning. That there can be beauty with unexpected meaning, or even more strangely, beauty without meaning, is an unexpected revelation of this show.

There's a phrase, celebrated among surrealists, borrowed from the 19th-century symbolist poet Lautreamont (Isidore Ducasse) that summarizes the desire for an entire aesthetic based on disjunction and displacement: “The chance encounter of a sewing machine and umbrella on an ironing board.”

There's that, plus the exploration of dreams, automatic drawing, psychology, serendipity and the often-boisterous desire to shock the middle class, which seems to define surrealism.

Then there's Rene Magritte's definition, from his explanation of his famous 1935 painting of a huge, open eye, The False Mirror: “The image of the closed eye became a secret sign among Surrealists for the subversion of reality by drawing on interior states. Thus the image of the open eye, ordinarily interpreted as access between the individual and the world, was a false vision or mirror. Reality lay elsewhere.”

This exhibit, then, can be seen as the exploration of false reality and blatant unreality, and how those two views oppose one another to the point of interaction.

You may think I'm messing with you, but wait until you see this show. Organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, it can be seen in Akron through Nov. 3.

Originating in Europe in the 1920s, surrealism tapped the subconscious mind to create fantastic, nonrational worlds, but as this exhibit handily shows, nonrational and rational is often a matter of interpretation.

More than 60 impressive paintings, drawings, prints and photographs taken from the Whitney's collection serve to reveal the ways in which American artists responded to the social and political upheaval of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s by treating reality as a subjective state of mind rather than an inalienable fact.

From the 1920s through the 1950s, many American artists abandoned European modernist styles in favor of creating distinctively American artworks, while re-evaluating older styles and movements. Many American art schools, including the Cleveland Art Institute, recommended that students planning to study abroad go to Munich, where the artists still espoused the classic techniques, rather than Paris, where modernism was all the rage.

So we have artists like Grant Wood and George Tooker studying in Munich, then coming back to this country to create such works as American Gothic and The Subway.

They also interacted with European artists who came to this country in droves after the rise of Nazism.

When we think of realism, however, what we're often thinking of is photographic realism, and artists like Charles Sheeler filled the bill.

Sheeler's River Rouge Plant (1932) was done while he was on an assignment commissioned by Henry Ford to photograph his Detroit automobile works. Sheeler, who got his start in photography using a $5 Brownie, based the painting on those photographs. Here we see not merely the world's largest car factory, but also something infinitely more grand: American industry depicted as monumental as the pyramids on the Nile or the Acropolis in Athens.

This work shows us many of the distinguishing characteristics of realism: believable representation and naturalistic color, lighting and perspective.

By contrast, works such as Yves Tanguy's The Wish (1949) present us with objects that are precisely drawn, shaded and placed in perspective, unidentifiable, in a mystical, otherworldly landscape.

“He would drip paint onto the canvas, then outline and shade each of the drips, as if they were actual objects,” explained Akron Art Museum Chief Curator Janice Driesbach. “He would build up these forms from the drips and add other forms as the ideas presented themselves.”

Andrew Wyeth, represented in the show by the watercolor on paper Juniper and Alder (1941), is said by many to be a master of American realism. However, in his paintings from the late 1930s and 1940s, the compositional structure and perspective often distort the supposed truthfulness.

Combined with Wyeth's exaggerated exactitude in painting details, these distortions lead one to view a number of his works as surrealistic.

This exhibit has been divided into themed sections. The first gallery, to the right of the introductory exhibition space, is a selection from both the real and the surreal camps; following that is “Alone in the City,” “Social Concern,” “Surrealist Photography,” “Empty Landscapes,” “Man and Machine,” “Leisure” and “Interior Portraits.”

These works show how many American artists explored the permeability between the real and the imagined, following with the international literary movement of the same name.

Seminal to surrealist ideas were Sigmund Freud's pioneering theories about the psyche and the unconscious mind. In a 1919 essay Freud proposed that the uncanny occurs when “the distinction between imagination and reality is effaced,” a fitting description for most of the works, both realistic and surrealistic, in this show.

The museum has several special events planned during the course of this exhibit, among them:

ArtTalks@Dusk — 7:30-8 p.m. Thursdays. Free. During Downtown@Dusk band breaks, museum staff and local art professionals speak in the museum's auditorium.

Reading under the Roof Cloud Book Club — 6 p.m. Aug. 22. Free. Discuss Aimee Bender's novel The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, tour the exhibit and have a slice of cake.

Real/Surreal Film Series — Surreal celluloid curated by Akron Film+Pixel, 7 p.m. Fridays. Members $5, nonmembers $7. Register online.

Aug. 16: The Exquisite Corpse Project. Director Ben Popik challenged five comedy writers to each write 15 pages of a movie, having read only the previous five pages. The final film combines the scripts created by the writers with documentary footage of the writing process.

Sept. 20: Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters, documentary about the acclaimed photographer.

Oct. 18: Spellbound. Psychologist Ingrid Bergman tries to solve a murder by unlocking the clues hidden in the mind of amnesiac suspect Gregory Peck. Alfred Hitchcock's thriller features a dream sequence by surrealist artist Salvador Dalí.

Art History 101 — 6:30 p.m. Sept. 19. Free. Register online. Explore surrealism with Kent State University art historian Albert Reischuck.

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News Headline: Kent State running backs Archer, Durham named to Doak Walker watch list | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State running backs Dri Archer and Trayion Durham were named to the Doak Walker Award watch list Thursday.

They are among 63 preseason candidates and are on the list for the second consecutive season.

The Golden Flashes are one of nine teams (Louisville, Georgia, TCU, Arizona State, Arkansas, BYU, Wisconsin and Baylor) with two running backs on the list.

The Doak Walker Award is presented each year to the nation's top running back.

Semifinalists will be named Nov. 14 and the finalists will be named Nov. 25. The award will be presented Dec. 12.

Archer led the nation in yards per carry (9.0) in 2012. He led the Flashes with 1,429 yards on 159 carries and 16 of his 23 touchdowns were rushing.

Durham ran for 1,316 yards on 276 carries and 14 touchdowns.

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News Headline: Kasich appoints student to Kent State University Board of Trustees | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Monique Menefee of Cleveland has been appointed by Gov. John Kasich to serve as a student member of the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Her term began Friday and ends May 16, 2015.

KSU's board consists of 12 members, nine of whom are voting members appointed by the governor of Ohio, with the advice and consent of the state senate.

Menefee joins Alex Evans, a KSU student who is a triple major in biology/pre-med, business management and public health, as the two student trustees -- one graduate and one undergraduate -- appointed to the board for overlapping two-year terms of office.

Student trustees do not have voting power.

Menefee is pursuing a masters of education in higher education administration and student personnel and received her bachelor of science in Spanish translation with a minor in sociology from KSU earlier this year. She earned a 3.46 GPA and was named to the Dean's List.

As an undergraduate student, Menefee studied abroad in Argentina, and she took her passion to Washington, D.C., as an advocate for TRIO, a set of five federally funded college opportunity programs that motivate and support students in their pursuit of a college degree.

The Board of Trustees is the governing body of KSU.

By Ohio law, the board is responsible for selecting and appointing the president; setting the operating budget; approving personnel appointments; granting all degrees awarded by the university, including honorary degrees; establishing tuition and fee rates; approving contracts; and approving all rules, regulations, curriculum changes, new programs and degrees of the university.

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News Headline: Is your cellphone making you fat? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Lansing State Journal -- Online, The
Contact Name: Barbara Bronson Gray HealthDay
News OCR Text: Smartphone users just might be the new couch potatoes.

Researchers studying college students found that cellphone use — much like watching television — may significantly decrease physical activity and fitness levels.

“Using a cellphone doesn’t have the same kind of negative stigma that sitting on the couch and watching TV has, but it can be just as bad for you,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an associate professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Ohio.

The study found that students spend an average of almost five hours on their cellphones and send hundreds of text messages every day, Barkley said.

Smartphones have become multifunction devices with capabilities similar to an Internet-connected computer. Virtually anywhere and always, users can not only make calls and send texts and emails, but they can interact with Twitter, search the Internet, watch videos and live events, and play video and other games.

All these activities are essentially sedentary, the researchers noted.

Despite the fact that cellphones are mobile devices, they slow people down, Barkley said. Texting on the way to the bus stop, people walk more slowly, trying to do two things at once. Going to the park for a run, they stop to look for messages, check movie times and make a date. Walking past a beautiful scene, they halt and take a photo, and then send it to their friends via Facebook.

“Before you know it you’ve fallen down into this little wormhole sitting on a park bench, playing on your phone,” Barkley said.

Copperman said heavy cellphone use can create mindless eating, much as television does.

And use can also affect sleep, study co-author Barkley noted. He said some students have been known to “sleep text” — sending messages while they’re sleeping and not remembering they did it when they wake up.

Copperman said she worries that while this study focused on college students who were about 20 years of age, many of today’s elementary school students are just as tethered to smartphones. “This is probably affecting physical activity in younger kids now, too,” she said.

For the study, the researchers surveyed more than 300 college students about their cellphone use, leisure activities and physical activity. Then 49 students used a treadmill test to evaluate their heart and lung fitness.

In that group, those who spent a lot of time on their cellphones — up to 14 hours daily — were less fit than participants who only averaged about 1.5 hours of use.

www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity

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News Headline: Study: Your smartphone may be making you fat (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Poughkeepsie Journal - Online
Contact Name: Barbara Bronson Gray HealthDay
News OCR Text: Texting, talking, Internet use are sedentary ways to spend time

Smartphone users just might be the new couch potatoes.

Researchers studying college students found that cellphone use — much like watching television — may significantly decrease physical activity and fitness levels.

“Using a cellphone doesn’t have the same kind of negative stigma that sitting on the couch and watching TV has, but it can be just as bad for you,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an associate professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Ohio.

The study found that students spend an average of almost five hours on their cellphones and send hundreds of text messages every day, Barkley said.

Cellphones — also called smartphones — have become multifunction devices with capabilities similar to an Internet-connected computer. Users can not only make calls and send texts and emails, but they can interact with Twitter, search the Internet, watch videos and live events, and play video and other games.

All these activities are essentially sedentary, the researchers noted.

Despite the fact that cellphones are mobile devices, they slow people down, Barkley said. Texting on the way to the bus stop, people walk more slowly, trying to do two things at once. Going to the park for a run, they stop to look for messages, check movie times and make a date. Walking past a beautiful scene, they halt and take a photo, then send it to their friends via Facebook.

“Before you know it you’ve fallen down into this little wormhole sitting on a park bench, playing on your phone,” Barkley said.

Smartphones have enormous capacity to significantly change people’s lifestyles and health habits, a public health expert agreed.

“We have to look at this similar to what happened in the industrial revolution and how it changed us,” said Nancy Copperman, director of public health initiatives at North Shore-LIJ Health System, in Great Neck. “A study like this raises the importance of how this technology affects how we move, eat and sleep. We have to look at the impact of technology on our health.”

Copperman said heavy cellphone use can create mindless eating, much as television does. If you’re using your cellphone during much of your time awake, you have to sometimes be eating while using the device, she said.

Cellphone use can also affect sleep, study co-author Barkley noted. He said some students have been known to “sleep text” — sending messages while they’re sleeping and not remembering they did it when they wake up.

Copperman said she worries that while this study focused on college students who were about 20 years old, many of today’s elementary school students are just as tethered to smartphones. “This is probably affecting physical activity in younger kids now, too,” she said.

For the study, the researchers surveyed more than 300 college students about their cellphone use, leisure activities and physical activity. Then 49 students used a treadmill test to evaluate their heart and lung fitness.

In that group, those who spent a lot of time on their cellphones — up to 14 hours daily — were less fit than participants who only averaged about 1.5 hours of use.

The findings took into account factors such as gender, percentage of body fat and “self-efficacy” — the participant’s confidence that he or she could be active in a variety of settings, Barkley said.

High-frequency cellphone users tended to report they were involved in more sedentary activities than were low-frequency users. The researchers said that high cellphone users may also be attracted to other forms of digital media such as television, movies, computers and video games.

However, the research can’t conclude that cellphones are causing people to be less fit, Barkley acknowledged. “It’s possible that less fit people use their cellphones more,” he said.

Copperman offered some practical advice. She thinks parents should monitor not just what their children are doing on their smartphones, but how frequently they are using them. Adults should start monitoring themselves, too, she suggested.

The study appeared online recently in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

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News Headline: Study: Your smartphone may be making you fat (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: WSLS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Smartphone users just might be the new couch potatoes.

Researchers studying college students found that cellphone use -- much like watching television -- may significantly decrease physical activity and fitness levels.

"Using a cellphone doesn't have the same kind of negative stigma that sitting on the couch and watching TV has, but it can be just as bad for you," said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an associate professor of exercise science at Kent State University in Ohio.

The study found that students spend an average of almost five hours on their cellphones and send hundreds of text messages every day, Barkley said.

Cellphones -- also called smartphones -- have become multifunction devices with capabilities similar to an Internet-connected computer. Virtually anywhere and always, users can not only make calls and send texts and emails, but they can interact with Twitter, search the Internet, watch videos and live events, and play video and other games.

All these activities are essentially sedentary, the researchers noted.

Despite the fact that cellphones are mobile devices, they slow people down, Barkley said. Texting on the way to the bus stop, people walk more slowly, trying to do two things at once. Going to the park for a run, they stop to look for messages, check movie times and make a date. Walking past a beautiful scene, they halt and take a photo, and then send it to their friends via Facebook.

"Before you know it you've fallen down into this little wormhole sitting on a park bench, playing on your phone," Barkley said.

Smartphones have enormous capacity to significantly change people's lifestyles and health habits, a public health expert agreed.

"We have to look at this similar to what happened in the industrial revolution and how it changed us," said Nancy Copperman, director of public health initiatives at North Shore-LIJ Health System, in Great Neck, N.Y. "A study like this raises the importance of how this technology affects how we move, eat and sleep. We have to look at the impact of technology on our health."

Copperman said heavy cellphone use can create mindless eating, much as television does. If you're using your cellphone during much of your time awake, you have to sometimes be eating while using the device, she said.

Cellphone use can also affect sleep, study co-author Barkley noted. He said some students have been known to "sleep text" -- sending messages while they're sleeping and not remembering they did it when they wake up.

Copperman said she worries that while this study focused on college students who were about 20 years of age, many of today's elementary school students are just as tethered to smartphones. "This is probably affecting physical activity in younger kids now, too," she said.

For the study, the researchers surveyed more than 300 college students about their cellphone use, leisure activities and physical activity. Then 49 students used a treadmill test to evaluate their heart and lung fitness.

In that group, those who spent a lot of time on their cellphones -- up to 14 hours daily --- were less fit than participants who only averaged about 1.5 hours of use.

The findings took into account factors such as gender, percentage of body fat and "self-efficacy" -- the participant's confidence that he or she could be active in a variety of settings, Barkley said.

High-frequency cellphone users tended to report they were involved in more sedentary activities than were low-frequency users. The researchers said that high cellphone users may also be attracted to other forms of digital media such as television, movies, computers and video games.

However, the research can't conclude that cellphones are causing people to be less fit, Barkley acknowledged. "It's possible that less fit people use their cellphones more," he said.

Copperman offered some practical advice. She thinks parents should monitor not just what their children are doing on their smartphones, but how frequently they are using them. Adults should start monitoring themselves, too, she suggested, noting if they're interrupting physical activity by using their phones, or making their cellphone their dinner companion.

"People should take time from their cellular technology for a better quality of life," Copperman said.

The study appeared online recently in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

More information

Learn strategies to increase physical activity from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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News Headline: Could Your Smart Phone Be Making You Fat? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: KSTE-AM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity

A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity.

Kent State University researchers say college students who use their phones for the majority of their waking hours have much lower fitness levels than those who don't.

The study found the health effects on frequent smart phone users are similar to those of people who play video games.

Results were published in the "International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity."

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News Headline: Cellphone Use Linked To Poor Fitness (Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Big News Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: eople who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health.

A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy cellphone use and reduced fitness levels among college students.

Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob E. Barkley, associate professors in Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, found college students who reported the highest cellphone use — averaging 14 hours a day — were less fit than those who used the devices less often.

"There's no ‘phone potato' term, but maybe there should be," Barkley said. "We're just scratching the surface here. I don't think they think about the consequences of sitting and playing with your phone."

Brent Gray Jr. 19, of Cincinnati, admits he would likely be a "phone junkie" if he didn't train as a member of the University of Akron's track team.

The first thing he does when he wakes up is check his phone for texts and updates from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vine and Snapchat, all popular social media apps. He estimates he spends at least 12 hours each day using his iPhone.

"Without my phone, I don't think I'd know what to do with myself," he said. "Without my phone, I'd be disconnected from the world."

Though he stays physically active through track, Gray said he understands how people's lives could become consumed with their smartphones.

"Two hours could go by and you don't even know it," he said.

Lepp and Barkley decided to conduct the study to see whether using cellphones — despite their portability — shared the same ties to inactivity as playing traditional video games and watching TV.

"There's been evidence that those types of behaviors that are defined as sedentary are inversely related to fitness," Barkley said. "The phones now, especially the smartphones, offer access to all those behaviors we have defined as sedentary."

The researchers surveyed more than 300 Kent State students about their cellphone use and broke them into three categories: low users who averaged 101 minutes daily, moderate users averaging 283 minutes and high users averaging 840 minutes.

Activities that counted toward the total include making calls, texting, sending or reading emails, playing games, surfing the Internet, watching videos and using social media. Listening to music wasn't included.

Students were given a test similar to a stress test to measure cardio­respiratory fitness.

"If you were someone who used the phone a lot," Barkley said, "you were less fit."

One explanation: Frequent cellphone users were more likely to report missing out on physical activities such as walking, running, swimming, working out or playing basketball, soccer, football, lacrosse or racquetball to use their devices.

"I think that high cellphone use could be indicative of a broader array of sedentary behaviors," Barkley said.

Results were published recently by the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Brandon Schillig, 22, of North Canton, Ohio, said he tries to find a balance when it comes to his new iPhone. The University of Akron senior estimates he uses the smartphone several hours a day.

"Everything is at the palm of my hand," he said. "It's ridiculous. It's definitely addicting."

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News Headline: Could Your Smart Phone Be Making You Fat? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: KFBK-AM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity

A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity.

Kent State University researchers say college students who use their phones for the majority of their waking hours have much lower fitness levels than those who don't.

The study found the health effects on frequent smart phone users are similar to those of people who play video games.

Results were published in the "International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity."

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News Headline: Could Your Smart Phone Be Making You Fat? | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: KHYL-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study is uncovering a link between smart phones and obesity.

Kent State University researchers say college students who use their phones for the majority of their waking hours have much lower fitness levels than those who don't.

The study found the health effects on frequent smart phone users are similar to those of people who play video games.

Results were published in the "International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity."

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News Headline: High-tech Weight Debate | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEEK-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ..wondering why the guy next to you is trying to text and exercise at the same time?

It's happening more and more with smartphones... people cannot put their devices down. And now, new research suggests all this phone fanaticism is making us fat!

Researchers at Kent State surveyed more than 300 college students...asking about their cell phone use and physical activity. They also had their fitness level and body composition tested.

Not surprisingly, those who confessed to being on the phone all the time were less fit than those who weren't tied to their devices-especially when it came to heart and respiratory fitness. Some students admitting to spending as much as 14 hours a day on the smart phone!

Bottom line, according to the researchers, put the phone down and get moving for better health.

I'm Dr. Cindy Haines of HealthDay TV with news you can use for healthier living.

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News Headline: Technology Phone junkies lazy too (Barkley) | Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Townsville Bulletin (Australia)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PEOPLE who constantly exercise their thumbs by using their smartphones could ultimately be harming their physical health

A new study by researchers at Kent State University found a link between heavy smartphone use and reduced fitness levels among university students

Researchers Andrew Lepp and Jacob E Barkley, associate professors in Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, found college students who reported the highest smartphone use averaging 14 hours a day were less fit than those who used the devices less often

"There's no 'phone potato' term, but maybe there should be," Mr Barkley said

"We're just scratching the surface here. I don't think they think about the consequences of sitting and playing with your phone." Brent Gray Jr, 19, of Cincinnati, admits he would likely be a "phone junkie" if he didn't train as a member of the University of Akron's track team. The first thing he does when he wakes up is check his phone for texts and updates from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Vine and Snapchat all popular social media apps. He estimates he spends at least 12 hours each day using his iPhone

"Without my phone, I don't think I'd know what to do with myself," he said. "Without my phone, I'd be disconnected from the world." Though he stays physically active through track, Gray said he understood how people's lives could become consumed with their smartphones

"Two hours could go by and you don't even know it," he said

The researchers wanted to find out whether using mobile phones despite their portability shared the same ties to inactivity as playing traditional video games and watching TV

Three hundred students were given a test similar to a stress test to measure cardiorespiratory fitness

"If you were someone who used the phone a lot, you were less fit," Barkley said

Results were published by the International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Copyright © 2013 News Limited Australia. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: SUSAN STOCKER NAMED INTERIM DEAN OF KENT STATE'S COLLEGE OF NURSING (Diacon, Stocker, Dzurec) | Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, July 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University has named Susan Stocker, Ph.D., interim dean of the College of Nursing.Stocker currently serves as dean of Kent State University at Ashtabula.The announcement was made today by Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president for academic affairs and Provost.

Stocker will begin serving as interim dean of Kent State's College of Nursing on Aug.1 while a national search is conducted for a permanent dean.Stocker succeeds Laura Dzurec, Ph.D., who is stepping down from the dean position but will continue working for the university teaching and pursuing research work.Stocker will maintain her current position as dean of Kent State Ashtabula in addition to the new interim college dean appointment.

"Dean Laura Dzurec merits our deepest appreciation for producing success after success in the College of Nursing, and now she will apply her considerable talents to her first loves of teaching and research," Diacon said."I could not be more pleased that Dean Stocker, a successful and seasoned nurse and administrator in the Kent system, has agreed to lead the College of Nursing on an interim basis."

Stocker said she feels privileged to serve the university and its College of Nursing in this interim position.

"I am honored that Provost Diacon has asked me to step into this interim role, and I look forward to working with the College of Nursing to keep its programs on a steady course until a new dean is named," Stocker said."Though I will be dividing my time between the College of Nursing and the Ashtabula regional campus, I am confident that the Ashtabula Campus leadership team will help keep things running smoothly and continue to serve the needs of our students.All upcoming campus projects will continue as planned."

Since 2001, Stocker has been serving as dean of Kent State Ashtabula.She also currently holds the rank of associate professor of nursing at Kent State.Since finishing high school, Stocker had attended college either part or full time until 2007 when she completed a doctorate from Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services.

Stocker led the capital campaign that raised $6 million dollars in the Ashtabula area to help finance the Robert S.Morrison Health and Science Building at Kent State Ashtabula.The state-of-the-art learning facility opened its doors to students in August 2009.

During her career as a registered nurse and educator, Stocker has served in a number of leadership capacities and has received numerous honors.She served as the president of the Ohio Nurses Association from 1997-2001 and was appointed to the Ashtabula County Medical Center Board of Trustees.Stocker was inducted into the Madison High School Alumni Hall of Fame in 2007, was honored as the Roger T.Beitler Distinguished Former Student award for the Ashtabula Campus of Kent State, received the President's Award from Growth Partnership for Ashtabula County and was the first faculty member on the Ashtabula Campus to receive the prestigious Kent State University Distinguished Teaching Award.

Stocker resides in Ashtabula, Ohio.

During her tenure as dean of the College of Nursing at Kent State, Dzurec supported the college's faculty and administrators as they refined and enhanced academic and research programming in nursing.College of Nursing graduates across all levels are recognized in practice, teaching and research as the best in Northeast Ohio and nationally, according to Dzurec.She worked with faculty and staff to strengthen the curricula across programs, as faculty built a nationally recognized focus in self-care for students and for faculty.Both Kent State's College of Nursing, as a unit, and individual faculty members have received awards from national organizations for their support of students in the use of self-care.Their research in self-care and related areas continues to grow.

"After nearly 20 years as a nursing education administrator, the attraction of teaching and research - especially as the focus of teaching and research in the college had evolved - proved to be too much for me to ignore," Dzurec said."More and more, I found my energies drawn to the work the faculty were doing.So it seemed like a good idea to get myself to a place that would allow me to actually do the work the faculty was doing."

Dzurec plans to engage even more actively in research in self-care with students and faculty, and to continue the interdisciplinary work she has been doing in workplace dynamics, just culture, communication and bullying.

"While it seems contradictory, bullying emerges readily when people don't engage in self-care," Dzurec said."I look forward to focusing on ways to support students in learning to take care of themselves and in learning to take care of others so that patient care and education benefit.I think I can do that best by engaging actively in teaching and research."

Dzurec lives in Kent, Ohio.

For more information about Kent State's College of Nursing, visit www.kent.edu/nursing.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Poetry and Literature Calendar (July 21-27) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Buffalo News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A list of readings and workshops

Wednesday, 7 p.m.: Reading and book signing with novelist Timothy Shannon, author of “Da's Shillelagh: A Tale of the Irish on the Niagara Frontier” (CreateSpace Publishing). Talking Leaves Books, 3158 Main St.

Thursday, 7 p.m.: Brighton Place Poetry Series featuring readings by Roger Craik, Geoffrey Gatza and Paul Hogan. Craik, a native of Leicester, England, teaches poetry and creative writing at Kent State University–Ashtabula, and has published four full-length collections of poems, “I Simply Stared” (2002), “Rhinoceros in Clumber Park” (2003), “The Darkening Green” (2004) and “Those Years” (2007). Gatza is the editor and publisher of BlazeVOX Books. His books include “Secrets of my Prison House” (2010), “Kenmore: Poem Unlimited” (2009), and “Not So Fast Robespierre” (Menendez Publishing 2008). Hogan is vice president of the John R. Oishei Foundation, and was recently picked to serve on the strategic advisory panel for the Cultural Data Project (CDP), a national initiative designed to strengthen arts and cultural organizations. His books of poetry includes Points of Departures (White Pine Press, 2008) and “Inventories” (BlazeVOX, 2012). Brighton Place, 999 Brighton Road, Tonawanda.

Friday, 7 p.m.: Fourth Friday Poetry Series reading featuring poet and short story writer Patrick Cornelius. Additional reading slots available. Caz Coffee/Dog Ears Bookstore, 688 Abbott Road. $3.

Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Buffalo BookFest, a day-long festival dedicated to printing and the book arts, featuring an artists market and a complete schedule of outdoor adult and kid-friendly hands-on demonstrations of the book arts, including letterpress, bookbinding and screen printing. Western New York Book Arts Center, 468 Washington St. Free and open to the public. Visit wnybookarts.org/buffalo-bookfest-2013/ for information.

Saturday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.: Buffalo Infringement Festival presents a book launch and reading from the most recent issue of Steel Bellow: A Purely Buffalo Literary and Arts Magazine. El Museo, 91 Allen St.

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News Headline: Kent State University professors to teach in China this summer (Kaykayoglu, Hughes, Egbert) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eight professors from Kent State University are teaching at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, this summer as part of a partnership between both universities. The three-week intensive summer session, known as International Course Weeks, runs through Sunday, and was an opportunity for students at Sichuan University to gain international experience from seasoned professors.

"Twenty-five universities around the world were selected to participate in the Sichuan University program," said Ediz Kaykayoglu, assistant director for education abroad in KSU's Office of Global Education. "Professors from each university who are interested apply, and then Sichuan University makes its choices."

The KSU team includes George F Bigham III, lecturer in the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology; Pratim Datta, associate professor, Department of Management and Information Systems; Rozell R. Duncan, assistant professor, and Nichole Egbert, associate professor, both from the School of Communication Studies. Others include Shawn Fitzgerald, director, School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration; David Hughes, professor, College of Architecture and Environmental Design; Julia Levashina, assistant professor, Department of Management and Information Systems; and Phillip Wang, associate professor, College of Education, Health and Human Services.

Applicants were provided a list of courses available for teaching at the university and were asked to rank their top three choices. They also had the option to create a class of their own.

Hughes will teach Comparisons of Chinese and Western Culture -- Architecture, a course he designed, and Appreciation of Western Painting, during a three-week, intense summer intercession. In the Comparisons of Chinese and Western Culture -- Architecture class, Hughes looks at how architecture has had an impact on the world. The western influence used will begin in Egypt.

"My strengths over the years due to my travel, my research and my studies have included Egypt and Africa," Hughes said. "But we'll cover much more in this course."

Hughes, who has been traveling abroad for 46 years, will bring new ideas from his experience to KSU's curriculum and the courses he teaches. He says it is more effective if you have been to the places you are lecturing about.

Egbert is excited to share knowledge and American experiences with students in China. She will teach Introduction to Interpersonal Communication, and Nonverbal Communication Across Cultures.

"I have met a lot of interesting and cool people from China and have always wanted to visit," she said. "I want my students to learn how nonverbal and verbal communication form systems of meaning, and how to be more competent communicators."

Kaykayoglu says that all eight professors will have the opportunity to not only represent KSU in China, but also impact the students there.

"It is important to our international programs, and it also will enhance our education-abroad programs," Kaykayoglu said.

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News Headline: Balloon flight offers a glimpse of Stark from the skies | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Benjamin Duer
News OCR Text: Did you see me?

I may have flown over your house Friday, with pilot Phil Clinger, in a red, white and blue hot-air balloon.

Nine media members, including myself and Repository photographer Michael S. Balash, participated in the first launch of the 2013 Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks, which runs through Sunday.

The event takes place on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township.

More hot-air balloon launches ? weather permitting ? are scheduled for Saturday and early Sunday morning.

For several years, weather conditions have canceled the media flight. So Friday?s experience was quite a treat. Especially, for a guy who can be squeamish with heights. It?s not the actual distance that makes me nervous, it?s the lack of confidence I have to not trip over my feet and plunge to my doom. Don?t even get me started about walking over certain bridges. Or hanging out on balconies.

Clinger, who owns Battle Creek, Mich.-based Altitude Endeavors, quickly settled my nerves with a smooth trip. And with a gorgeous view.

During my flight, I saw a wild turkey and deer run through fields and a cow splash down a stream. There was the outline, possibly chalk, of the United States in a parking lot. For more on my voyage, I recorded the entire flight and produced a short video, and Balash took beautiful photographs.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Media Balloon Flight Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Members of the press and other invitees took flight in hot-air balloons July 19, 2013, which ushered in the start of the annual Balloon Classic on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township. The Repository's Benjamin Duer and Michael S. Balash were among those media members who hitched a ride. This is one of the flights.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://news.vocus.com/ct?haid=8ef9a31a9e3a635f13742572744441896ca3198604d28&co=f000000013080s-1112359307

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News Headline: Balloon flight offers a glimpse of Stark from the skies | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Did you see me?

I may have flown over your house Friday, with pilot Phil Clinger, in a red, white and blue hot-air balloon.

Nine media members, including myself and Repository photographer Michael S. Balash, participated in the first launch of the 2013 Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks, which runs through Sunday.

The event takes place on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township.

More hot-air balloon launches —  weather permitting — are scheduled for Saturday and early Sunday morning.

For several years, weather conditions have canceled the media flight. So Friday's experience was quite a treat. Especially, for a guy who can be squeamish with heights.

It's not the actual distance that makes me nervous, it's the lack of confidence I have to not trip over my feet and plunge to my doom.

Don't even get me started about walking over certain bridges. Or hanging out on balconies.

Clinger, who owns Battle Creek, Mich.-based Altitude Endeavors, quickly settled my nerves with a smooth trip. And with a gorgeous view.

During my flight, I saw a wild turkey and deer run through fields and a cow splash down a stream. There was the outline, possibly chalk, of the United States in a parking lot. For more on my voyage, I recorded the entire flight and produced a short video, and Balash took beautiful photographs.

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News Headline: Liftoff: 2013 Hall of Fame Balloon Classic | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Canton Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Check out these photos snapped on the ground and 1,000 feet above North Canton.

Forecasters gave the all-clear Friday morning at Kent State University at Stark, kicking off the 2013 Hall of Fame Balloon Classic.

Patch Soars Above North Canton's Friendly Skies

Several hot air balloons have already taken off, including ours.

Heading up to 1,000 feet in the air.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW PHOTOS: http://northcanton.patch.com/groups/summer/p/liftoff-2013-hall-of-fame-balloon-classic

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News Headline: Balloon flight offers a glimpse of Stark from the skies | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Did you see me?

I may have flown over your house Friday, with pilot Phil Clinger, in a red, white and blue hot-air balloon.

Nine media members, including myself and Repository photographer Michael S. Balash, participated in the first launch of the 2013 Balloon Classic and Jackson-Belden Food Fest & Fireworks, which runs through Sunday.

The event takes place on the Stark campus of Kent State University in Jackson Township.

More hot-air balloon launches —  weather permitting — are scheduled for Saturday and early Sunday morning.

For several years, weather conditions have canceled the media flight. So Friday's experience was quite a treat. Especially, for a guy who can be squeamish with heights.

It's not the actual distance that makes me nervous, it's the lack of confidence I have to not trip over my feet and plunge to my doom.

Don't even get me started about walking over certain bridges. Or hanging out on balconies.

Clinger, who owns Battle Creek, Mich.-based Altitude Endeavors, quickly settled my nerves with a smooth trip. And with a gorgeous view.

During my flight, I saw a wild turkey and deer run through fields and a cow splash down a stream. There was the outline, possibly chalk, of the United States in a parking lot. For more on my voyage, I recorded the entire flight and produced a short video, and Balash took beautiful photographs.

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY:A concert like a Hollywood script | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The musicians who perform in the Faculty Recital Series for the annual Kent/Blossom Music Festival held in Ludwig Recital Hall at the Music and Speech Building are incredibly talented. After last Wednesday's concert, add to that, "incredibly resourceful."

Joela Jones, pianist with the Cleveland Orchestra, was scheduled to perform Wednesday evening in a special concert, joined by other Orchestra members in a group that included her husband, cellist Richard Weiss, violinists Ying Fu and Jeffrey Zehngut, violist Stanley Konopka, oboist Danna Sundet and bassoonist Barrick Stees.

Unfortunately, Jones became ill and was taken to Emergency Wednesday. At 2:30 in the afternoon, Danna Sundet, co-coordinator of Kent/Blossom, interrupted a practice session to take a telephone call from Jones' husband, Richard Weiss. Neither of them, Sundet was told, could appear that evening.

What to do?

A tornado warning had forced the cancellation of the Faculty Recital Series concert the prior Wednesday so Sundet did not want to cancel again. She telephoned her friend, the amazing Elizabeth DeMio, a collaborative pianist, well known in the Cleveland area, who teaches at the Cleveland Institute of Music.

"So what have we got to work with?," DeMio asked, the clock ticking. Possessed of nerves of steel, she had agreed to fill in for Joela Jones.

The Elgar, "Piano Quintet in A Minor," had to be scrapped because Jones and her husband were key to its performance, but DeMio and Sundet four years ago had performed Poulenc's "Sonata for Oboe and Piano" at Trinity Cathedral in Cleveland. Sundet had her doubts.

"You can do it, Danna," DeMio said reassuringly. They added it to the program.

The DeFalla "Suite Popular Espanola" required a cellist and since Richard Weiss was not available, that work was replaced at the suggestion of Barrick Stees with Saint-Saens' "Sonata for Bassoon and Piano in G Major." Stees would perform that with DeMio.

Sundet and DeMio, to fill out the program, appealed to Cleveland Orchestra violinist Ying Fu, a rising star from China, who had been scheduled to appear with Joela Jones that evening at Kent State. A violinist who can pull a rabbit out of the hat, he volunteered to perform a Beethoven work, "Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 1 in D Major," again with DeMio handling the piano part.

That left Poulenc's "Trio for Oboe, Bassoon and Piano," which Sundet and Stees were scheduled to perform with Joela Jones. DeMio said she could handle that, but wanted to see the music.

The music?

It was with Jones in Cleveland. With two hours left, the Kent/Blossom staff initiated a computer search and couldn't find a copy. Sundet remembered that a student of pianist Donna Lee had a copy and made contact. The student rushed the music to the campus for DeMio, who reassuringly told her fellow musicians, "This is going to be fun."

By 5:30, the Kent/Blossom Marketing Director Ricardo Sepulveda was typing up a new program, Sundet dictating the movements of each work for him.

By 6 p.m. with only 90 minutes left, the musicians were going over their music.

"I only had time to look at the hard parts of the Poulenc Sonata," Sundet said.

Since the Poulenc "Sonata" was first on the program, Sundet asked her Blossom co-coordinator, cellist Keith Robinson, to explain to the audience the changes prompted by Joela Jones' cancellation. Robinson, believing it more appropriate that Denise Seachrist, director of the School of Music, do the explaining asked her assistance. She did a superb job, announcing the changes, intentionally omitting all that had gone into creating the evening's program.

It was a wonderful concert, the musicians carrying it off flawlessly. They received a standing ovation from the audience, most of us unaware that only a few hours earlier, the concert was not yet finalized.

Don't ever get me in a poker game with Elizabeth DeMio, the pianist whose self-confidence kept people like me totally oblivious to what the musicians had actually had to overcome to perform so beautifully.

"Concerts," Sundet said, "are planned months in advance, but as musicians in the trenches we know anything can happen and we learn there is always a solution."

Wednesday evening, she and her collaborators came up with a nearly perfect solution.

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News Headline: Kent State probe focuses on the details | Email

News Date: 07/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Rowland, Darrel
News OCR Text: You might have missed this last week, but the Ohio inspector general found a "wrongful act or omission" because Kent State University did not have a tag on a piece of lab equipment.

Overkill, some might say?

"Were it the only issue found, their point would be well taken, but it wasn't the only issue under review," said IG spokesman Carl Enslen.

"It was noticed in the area where the investigators were working and mentioned to remind the administrators of the university that inventory control of assets is an important obligation.

"There are those who care about government entities being careful about controlling assets so they are not stolen or misplaced."

The probe of four federal stimulus grants questioned whether the northeastern Ohio university had properly acquired surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging equipment, as well as a dynamic light scattering instrument.

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News Headline: Capitol Insider: Kent State probe focuses on the details | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: You might have missed this last week, but the Ohio inspector general found a “wrongful act or omission” because Kent State University did not have a tag on a piece of lab equipment.

Overkill, some might say?

“Were it the only issue found, their point would be well taken, but it wasn't the only issue under review,” said IG spokesman Carl Enslen. “It was noticed in the area where the investigators were working and mentioned to remind the administrators of the university that inventory control of assets is an important obligation. “There are those who care about government entities being careful about controlling assets so they are not stolen or misplaced."

The probe of four federal stimulus grants questioned whether the northeastern Ohio university had properly acquired surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging equipment, as well as a dynamic light scattering instrument.

Former Ohio Republican Chairman Robert T. Bennett apparently played at least a small role in the culmination of a two-year saga with last week's Senate confirmation of former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray as director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

A year and a half ago, Bennett said, Cordray told him he wanted to talk with Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, about the Senate Republican filibuster of Cordray's nomination.

“You know, Rob was more than willing to talk, and I think they forged a little friendship,” Bennett said. “I know Rob was working very hard to try to get whatever modifications (into the bureau) to get him confirmed.

“They're both smart,” Bennett said. “I have always considered Rich Cordray to be the smartest Democrat in Ohio, if you want to know the truth.”

Grove City's John Marshall, personal assistant to former Sen. Max Cleland of Georgia, saw Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, having lunch in the Senate dining room on Wednesday with Karl Rove, the political strategist who advised former Republican President George W. Bush. Marshall and Cleland, now secretary of the American Battle Monuments Commission, stopped by the table, where Rove instantly recognized Marshall from his years as a Democratic campaign operative in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Could this lunch suggest that Portman is considering a run for the presidency?

“When you see Rob Portman's name out there as a potential candidate for president and see him sitting down with Karl Rove, the Republican campaign mastermind, you put 2 and 2 together,” Marshall said.

Those close to Portman would say only that it was a chance for them to catch up. Portman served in the White House under Bush as director of the Office of Management and Budget and U.S. trade representative.

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News Headline: Why bisexuals stay in the closet | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Los Angeles Times - Online
Contact Name: Emily Alpert
News OCR Text: Only 28% of bisexuals have come out because of stereotypes in the straight and gay communities that they're sex-crazed or incapable of monogamy, a new study shows.

Faith Cheltenham's 1-year-old son Storm waves a flag honoring bisexuals before heading to a Fourth of July gathering with her husband, Matt Kanninen. Faith is a bisexual activist and is vocal about the "B" being ignored in the LGBT community. (Barbara Davidson, Los Angeles Times / July 5, 2013)

In the middle of the rainbowy revelers at the pride parade in West Hollywood, Jeremy Stacy was questioned: Are you really bisexual?

"One guy came up to me and said, 'You're really gay,' " said Stacy, who was standing under a sign reading "Ask a Bisexual." "I told him I had a long line of ex-girlfriends who would vehemently disagree. And he said, 'That doesn't matter, because I know you're gay.' "

Stacy had gotten the question before. From a friend who said anyone who had slept with men must be gay — even if he had also slept with women. From women who assumed he would cheat on them. From a boyfriend who insisted Stacy was really "bi now, gay later" — and dumped him when he countered he was "bi now, bi always."

GRAPHIC: Gay marriage across the U.S.

Such attitudes appear to have kept many bisexuals in the closet. At a time when gay rights have made stunning strides, and gays and lesbians have become far more willing to come out, the vast majority of bisexuals remains closeted, a Pew Research Center survey revealed last month.

Only 28% of bisexuals said most or all of the important people in their lives knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 71% of lesbians and 77% of gay men, Pew found. The numbers were especially small among bisexual men: Only 12% said they were out to that degree, compared to one-third of bisexual women who said the same.

Closeted bisexuals told the Los Angeles Times that they had avoided coming out because they didn't want to deal with misconceptions that bisexuals were indecisive or incapable of monogamy — stereotypes that exist among straights, gays and lesbians alike.

Elizabeth, who declined to give her last name, said that when some new friends chatted about women kissing women, she just kept quiet. "I wouldn't come out to them because they would say things" — that she was "sex-crazed" or was making it up.

John, a married man who realized that he was bisexual three years ago and has told his wife, said he worries about bringing her shame if he comes out more publicly. He suspects she would hear, "Surely you must have seen the signs," and, "How do you put up with that?"

His wife has told him he must suppress his feelings. "She believes sexuality is a choice and that I can and should just 'turn it off,' " he said.

FULL COVERAGE: Prop. 8 and DOMA

The stereotypes make some reluctant to use the word, even after they come out. Laura McGinnis, communications director for the Trevor Project, an LGBT youth suicide prevention group, said she was 29 or 30 before she would readily share that she was bisexual or actively correct someone who thought otherwise.

"I hated the label because the assumption is that you're sleeping around," said McGinnis, now raising a child with her wife.

Such assumptions could make being out at work especially difficult: Only 11% of bisexual people polled by Pew said most of their closest coworkers knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 48% of gay men and 50% of lesbians.

Bisexuals were also less likely than gay men and lesbians to say their workplaces were accepting of them, Pew found. In a separate study published in the Journal of Bisexuality, half of bisexual people surveyed said their gay and straight coworkers misunderstood bisexuality.

"Bisexuals are thought to be confused, opportunistic and unable to make commitments — and those aren't the kinds of things you want to see in an employee," said Denise Penn, vice president of the American Institute of Bisexuality, a nonprofit that funds research.

Inside the gay community, bisexual people are often seen as more privileged than gays and lesbians, able to duck discrimination by entering into straight relationships.

Far more bisexuals are in relationships with people of the opposite sex than the same sex, Pew found. They are less likely than gay men and lesbians to have weathered slurs or attacks, been rejected by friends or family or treated unfairly at work, its survey showed.

Yet researchers and activists say bisexuals face another set of frustrations, sometimes shunned by the gay and lesbian community and the straight world alike.

Bisexual women complain they are leered at by straight men and rejected by some lesbians as sexual "tourists" who will abandon them for men. Bisexual men, in turn, struggle to persuade men and women alike that they aren't just gay men with one foot in the closet. Both are stereotyped as oversexed swingers who cannot be trusted.

"Women would say, 'I don't date your kind,' " said Mimi Hoang, who helped form bisexual groups in Los Angeles. Such reactions left her frustrated. "I had nothing against lesbians. I thought I could find camaraderie with people who were also sexual minorities."

In the back of a Himalayan restaurant in Culver City on a recent Sunday, men and women in the bisexual social group amBi traded stories about being dismissed and denied: people folding their arms as they passed during a gay pride parade, would-be girlfriends or boyfriends bolting or assuming they couldn't be faithful to one person.

"This is the first group where I can say, 'I'm bi' — and nobody will judge me," said one woman who wouldn't give her name.

Bisexual activists lament the "B" is overlooked by LGBT organizations that provide little programming specifically for them. Pew found that bisexuals — especially men — were less likely to have belonged to such groups. More than half said they have only a few LGBT friends or none at all.

Researchers believe such isolation may have dire results. Some studies have found that bisexual people are at greater risk of emotional woes than people who are gay, lesbian or straight: Bisexual women are more likely to binge drink and suffer depression, a George Mason University study found.

A Kent State University study of bisexual women found that they were more likely than straight or lesbian women to harm themselves or endure suicidal thoughts. Other studies have also cited higher risks for bisexual men.

"I think these problems are coming from two places," said Northwestern University human sexuality researcher Allen Rosenthal. "The absence of a bisexual community and the psychological stress of being in the closet."

Activists say bisexuals have two closets — a straight and a gay one.

While a gay man might casually mention his husband, or a lesbian might out herself by talking about her girlfriend, bisexuals are often wrongly assumed to be straight or gay depending on who they are with. Spelling out that they are bisexual can be misconstrued as rejecting a current partner or declaring themselves up for anything.

Faith Cheltenham, president of the national bisexual organization BiNet USA, was often presumed to be lesbian when she dated women. When she met the man who would become her husband, she worried people would assume she was straight, invalidating the work she did to come out.

But when she tries to correct that assumption, some mistake it as a sexual invitation. They say, "Why would you tell me you're bi when your husband is right there?" Cheltenham said.

University of Utah research backs up the argument that bisexuality is not just a phase: Though 62% of gay men once identified as bisexual, nearly as many bisexual men — 56% — had once said they were gay, professor Lisa Diamond found. More women switched from calling themselves lesbian to calling themselves bisexual than vice versa.

Though surveys show that bisexuals rival or exceed gays and lesbians in number, experts say there is still little known about bisexuals because studies often group them with gay men and lesbians. While research lags, reality may already be changing: Younger people seem more at ease with bisexuality, adopting alternative labels such as "pansexual" or shrugging off labels completely, McGinnis said.

Northwestern University researcher Brian Mustanski said unlike earlier studies, his research showed bisexual youth were less likely to suffer mental disorders than gay and lesbian youth — a possible sign of growing acceptance of sexual fluidity.

But there's still a long way to go, said Ellyn Ruthstrom, president of the Bisexual Resource Center in Boston. In the middle of a pride parade, "I've had people shout out to me, 'When are you going to come out?' " she said. "Excuse me? We're marching in a pride parade. How out is that?"

Bisexuals less out and less connected

Bisexual men and women rival or exceed gays and lesbians in number, according to studies, but a Pew Research Center survey shows most remain closeted.

Gay men Lesbians Bisexual men Bisexual women

Attended an LGBT pride event

72%

61%

25%

37%

Attended a rally or march in

support of LGBT rights

58%

44%

23%

26%

Been a member of an LGBT organization

48%

49%

12%

34%

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News Headline: Pew study: Majority of bisexuals still in the closet | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Seattle Times - Online
Contact Name: Emily Alpert
News OCR Text: LOS ANGELES — In the middle of the rainbowy revelers at the pride parade in West Hollywood, Jeremy Stacy was questioned: Are you really bisexual?

“One guy came up to me and said, ‘You're really gay,' ” said Stacy, who was standing under a sign reading, “Ask a Bisexual.”

“I told him I had a long line of ex-girlfriends who would vehemently disagree. And he said, ‘That doesn't matter, because I know you're gay.' ”

Stacy had gotten the question before. From a friend who said anyone who had slept with men must be gay — even if he had also slept with women. From women who assumed he would cheat on them. From a boyfriend who insisted Stacy was really “bi now, gay later” — and dumped him when he countered he was “bi now, bi always.”

Such attitudes appear to have kept many bisexuals in the closet. At a time when gay rights have made stunning strides, and gays and lesbians have become far more willing to come out, the vast majority of bisexuals remains closeted, a Pew Research Center survey revealed last month.

Only 28 percent of bisexuals said most or all of the important people in their lives knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 71 percent of lesbians and 77 percent of gay men, Pew found. The numbers were especially small among bisexual men: Only 12 percent said they were out to that degree, compared to one-third of bisexual women who said the same.

Closeted bisexuals told the Los Angeles Times that they had avoided coming out because they didn't want to deal with misconceptions that bisexuals were indecisive or incapable of monogamy — stereotypes that exist among straights, gays and lesbians alike.

The stereotypes make some reluctant to use the word, even after they come out. Laura McGinnis, communications director for the Trevor Project, an LGBT-youth suicide-prevention group, said she was 29 or 30 before she would readily share that she was bisexual or actively correct someone who thought otherwise.

“I hated the label because the assumption is that you're sleeping around,” said McGinnis, now raising a child with her wife.

Such assumptions could make being out at work especially difficult: Only 11 percent of bisexual people polled by Pew said most of their closest co-workers knew about their sexual orientation, compared to 48 percent of gay men and 50 percent of lesbians.

Bisexuals were also less likely than gay men and lesbians to say their workplaces were accepting of them, Pew found. In a separate study published in the Journal of Bisexuality, half of bisexual people surveyed said their gay and straight co-workers misunderstood bisexuality.

“Bisexuals are thought to be confused, opportunistic and unable to make commitments — and those aren't the kinds of things you want to see in an employee,” said Denise Penn, vice president of the American Institute of Bisexuality, a nonprofit that funds research.

LGBT community reacts

Inside the gay community, bisexual people are often seen as more privileged than gays and lesbians, able to duck discrimination by entering into straight relationships.

Far more bisexuals are in relationships with people of the opposite sex than the same sex, Pew found. They are less likely than gay men and lesbians to have weathered slurs or attacks, been rejected by friends or family or treated unfairly at work, its survey showed.

Yet researchers and activists say bisexuals face another set of frustrations, sometimes shunned by the gay and lesbian community and the straight world alike.

Bisexual women complain they are leered at by straight men and rejected by some lesbians as sexual “tourists” who will abandon them for men. Bisexual men, in turn, struggle to persuade men and women alike that they aren't just gay men with one foot in the closet. Both are stereotyped as oversexed swingers who cannot be trusted.

“Women would say, ‘I don't date your kind,' ” said Mimi Hoang, who helped form bisexual groups in Los Angeles. Such reactions left her frustrated. “I had nothing against lesbians. I thought I could find camaraderie with people who were also sexual minorities.”

Bisexual activists lament the “B” is overlooked by LGBT organizations that provide little programming specifically for them. Pew found that bisexuals — especially men — were less likely to have belonged to such groups. More than half said they have only a few LGBT friends or none at all.

Researchers believe such isolation may have dire results. Some studies have found that bisexual people are at greater risk of emotional woes than people who are gay, lesbian or straight: Bisexual women are more likely to binge drink and suffer depression, a George Mason University study found.

A Kent State University study of bisexual women found that they were more likely than straight or lesbian women to harm themselves or endure suicidal thoughts. Other studies have also cited higher risks for bisexual men.

“I think these problems are coming from two places,” said Northwestern University human sexuality researcher Allen Rosenthal. “The absence of a bisexual community and the psychological stress of being in the closet.”

Activists say bisexuals have two closets — a straight and a gay one.

While a gay man might casually mention his husband, or a lesbian might out herself by talking about her girlfriend, bisexuals are often wrongly assumed to be straight or gay depending on whom they are with. Spelling out that they are bisexual can be misconstrued as rejecting a current partner or declaring themselves up for anything.

Not viewed as a phase

University of Utah research backs up the argument that bisexuality is not just a phase: Though 62 percent of gay men once identified as bisexual, nearly as many bisexual men — 56 percent — had once said they were gay, professor Lisa Diamond found. More women switched from calling themselves lesbian to calling themselves bisexual than vice versa.

Though surveys show bisexuals rival or exceed gays and lesbians in number, experts say there is still little known about bisexuals because studies often group them with gay men and lesbians.

While research lags, reality may already be changing: Younger people seem more at ease with bisexuality, adopting alternative labels such as “pansexual” or shrugging off labels completely, McGinnis said.

Northwestern University researcher Brian Mustanski said unlike earlier studies, his research showed bisexual youth were less likely to suffer mental disorders than gay and lesbian youth — a possible sign of growing acceptance of sexual fluidity.

But there's still a long way to go, said Ellyn Ruthstrom, president of the Bisexual Resource Center in Boston.

In the middle of a pride parade, “I've had people shout out to me, ‘When are you going to come out?' ” she said. “Excuse me? We're marching in a pride parade. How out is that?”

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News Headline: Cuyahoga Dangerous for River-Goers | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Crooked River Adventures said there are still too many factors, including fallen trees, that make the river dangerous for rowers still.

Crooked River Adventures announced on Facebook July 18 that it will remain closed through this weekend.

"Although the water level is receding, river conditions are still very dangerous due to obstructions in the water. We'll be working to remove fallen trees and other hazards with a chainsaw in the coming days," the Facebook post read, adding safety is the top priority.

Following last week's severe storm, the Cuyahoga River crested at 14.28 feet, which just happens to be the highest level ever recorded, according to Cuyahoga Falls Service Director Valerie Wax Carr in this Cuyahoga Falls Patch story with video of the river.

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News Headline: KSU students plead guilty to felony charges for break-in | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Five Kent State University students have admitted to breaking into a house following a fight at an East Main Street fast food restaurant in December 2012, and are seeking court-ordered drug treatment to avoid felony convictions.

David D. Coleman and Dontell E. Higgins, both 21, Kwan L. Bailey, 22, SeVaughn L. Knight, 20, and Austin S. Wilson, 19, of South Euclid, all pleaded guilty to one count each of trespass in a habitation, all fourth-degree felonies, according to Portage County Prosecutor Victor Vigluicci. All pleaded guilty to the charge in Portage County Common Pleas Court on June 13 except Wilson, who pleaded guilty May 20.

All five pleas were accepted, and the defendants were ordered to be interviewed for drug treatment intervention in lieu of a felony conviction. If they complete one year of drug treatment and follow Judge Laurie Pittman's orders, the charges will be dismissed and records of their convictions expunged.

The five men were initially charged with second-degree felony burglary after Kent police accused them of breaking into a residence in the 100 block of University Drive on Dec. 1, 2012, following a fight at the Burger King on East Main Street. Police said the men were seen kicking and rocking a vehicle in the parking lot of the restaurant after an argument with the vehicle's occupants.

The men then went to a house at 126 University Drive, forced their way into an apartment there and stole electronics and other items, according to Kent police.

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News Headline: Shippensburg wins FLW College event on Lake Champlain | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Press-Republican - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PLATTSBURGH — The Shippensburg University team of Kevin Hollasch of Shippensburg, Pa., and Hunter Chamberlin of Marriotsville, Md., won the FLW College Fishing Northern Conference event on Lake Champlain Saturday with five bass weighing 17 pounds, 15 ounces. The victory earned the club $2,000 and advanced the team to the FLW College Fishing Northern Conference Invitational tournament.

After winning the FLW College Fishing Northern Conference event on the Potomac River, Hollasch and Chamberlin felt no pressure on Lake Champlain. “We took a gamble and went up north,” said Hollasch. “With the rough waters I don't think a lot of other teams did that. We basically just went all-in on our spots up there and it paid off.”

Hollasch and Chamberlin weighed three largemouth and two smallmouth, fishing rocks and weeds in 8 to 15 feet of water. “We started off the day and we were going to target smallmouth, but once we got up there and saw the conditions we figured we'd just go and work shallow.” The spur-of-the-moment change worked to the tune of a 5-3 largemouth and a win by more than three pounds.

The pair said they exclusively fished a Senko on a drop-shot rig with Trokar hooks and Elite Tungsten weights and didn't lose a fish all day.

Three regular-season qualifying events are held in each conference – Central, Northern, Southeastern, Texas and Western. The top 15 teams from each qualifying tournament will advance to one of five two-day FLW College Fishing Conference Invitational tournaments, where the first-place team wins $4,000 for their club. The top 10 teams from each Conference Invitational advance to the 2014 FLW College Fishing National Championship.

College Fishing is free to enter. All participants must be registered, full-time undergraduate students at a four-year college or university and members of a fishing club recognized by their college or university.

The next FLW College Northern Conference tournament is scheduled for September 14-15 at the Chesapeake Bay in North East, Md., and is hosted by Cecil County Tourism.

For regular updates, photos, tournament news and more, follow College Fishing on Facebook at Facebook.com/FLWFishing and on Twitter at Twitter.com/FLWFishing. Visit CollegeFishing.com to sign up or to start a club at your school.

The top 15 teams that advanced to the Northern Conference Invitational tournament are:

1st: Shippensburg University – Kevin Hollasch, Marriottsville, Md., and Hunter Chamberlin, Shippensburg, Pa. (five bass, 17-15, $2,000)

2nd: Northwood University – Zach Lowe, Huntington Woods, Mich., and Travis Riedel, Falmouth, Mich. (five bass, 14- 4, $1,000)

3rd: Kent State University – Matthew Fernandez, Dallas, Pa., and Jennifer Newman, South Amherst, Ohio (five bass, 14-3, $500)

4th: Xavier University – Ty Styons, Fairfield, Ohio, and Andrew Decilles, Batesville, Ind. (five bass, 14-2, $500)

5th: Grand Valley State – Scott Taege, Algonquin, Ill., and Matt Smartt, St. Clair Shores, Mich. (five bass, 14-00, $500)

6th: Glenville State College – Brandon Abbott, Glandeeville, W.V., and Nick Lambert, Oceana, W.V. (five bass, 13-9)

7th: SUNY-Plattsburgh – Matt Ziomek, Amherst, Mass., and Myles Tallada, West Chazy, N.Y. (five bass, 13-3)

8th: SUNY-Plattsburgh – Brendan Bolis, Canton, N.Y., and Richard Lee, Port Kent, N.Y. (five bass, 12-8)

9th: Castleton State College – Dan Infurna, Fair Haven, Vt., and Jordan Aquistapace, Rutland, Vt. (five bass, 12-5)

10th: SUNY-Plattsburgh– Frank Benedetto, Islip Terrace, N.Y., and Ted Appleton, Penfield, N.Y. (five bass, 12-4)

11th: Mansfield University – Matt Novitski, Mansfield, Pa., and Colton Otto, Carlisle, Pa. (five bass, 12-3)

12th: Fairmont State University – Ryan Houser, Morgantown, W.V., and Andrew Walker, Fairmont, W.V. (five bass, 11-12)

13th: University of Akron – Christian Combs, Clinton, Ohio, and Brenton Casto, Massillon, Ohio (five bass, 11-11)

14th: Virginia Commonwealth – Alex Miller, Moseley, Va., and Donnie Miller, Midlothian, Va. (five bass, 11-7)

15th: Longwood University – Christopher Hubert, Virginia Beach, Va., and Greg Ewing, Bristow, Va. (five bass, 11-5)

Complete results can be found at CollegeFishing.com.

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News Headline: Dr. Timothy Rasinski Partners With Scientific Learning to Share Expertise on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stockhouse Publishing Ltd.
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OAKLAND, Calif., July 17, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic, has partnered with Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) to share his expertise on the topics of reading fluency and comprehension. Scientific Learning is the maker of the Reading Assistant™ and Fast ForWord® online learning programs.

Through this partnership, Rasinski will participate as a member of the advisory board for the Reading Assistant program, and provide input into its ongoing development and enhancement. Reading Assistant is the only online reading tool that "listens" to students as they read out loud, intervenes when they struggle, and automatically scores students' oral reading. It provides individualized online reading coaching for every student, helping them to strengthen vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

In addition, Rasinski will write blog posts and papers, and lead webinars on issues related to fluency and its importance in reading. His most recent webinar, "Keys to Increasing Reading Comprehension in the Age of Common Core," is available on-demand. Rasinski will also provide guidance in the development of evaluation studies for Reading Assistant.

"Our own research indicates that fluency has not been priority in many schools. However, when fluency instruction is offered to students the potential for gains is tremendous. Through my work with Scientific Learning, my goal is to share my expertise to help educators understand just how important reading fluency is and the role it plays in reading comprehension," said Rasinski. "I'm also looking forward to offering my expertise to the Reading Assistant program as it evolves. I've seen the program at work for the last several years and have been very impressed by it. It's a valuable tool for helping students develop fluency."

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is author of the best selling books on reading fluency The Fluent Reader and The Fluent Reader in Action, now in its second edition. His scholarly interests include reading fluency and word study, reading in the elementary and middle grades, and readers who struggle. His research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, Reading Psychology, and the Journal of Educational Research.

"We're excited to work with such a distinguished expert in reading education and fluency," said Robert C. Bowen, CEO for Scientific Learning. "We look forward to learning from Dr. Rasinski's knowledge and expertise, and incorporating his insights into our efforts to help students strengthen their reading fluency with the Reading Assistant program. By combining his research and experience with our online reading program, we can help students of diverse ages and ability levels rapidly strengthen their fluency and comprehension, and maximize their ability to read to learn."

About Scientific Learning Corp.

We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270 research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end.

Today, more than 2.2 million learners have used Scientific Learning software products. We provide our offerings directly to parents, K–12 schools and learning centers, and in more than 45 countries around the world. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call toll-free 888-810-0250.

CONTACT: Media Contact:
Hallie Smith
Director of Marketing
Scientific Learning Corporation
(619) 795-6509
HSmith@scilearn.com

Investor Contact:
Jane Freeman
Chief Financial Officer
Scientific Learning Corporation
(510) 625-6710
JFreeman@scilearn.com

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News Headline: 'Fiddler on the Roof' closes Porthouse season (van Baars) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre, Kent State University's outdoor summer theater on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, will close its 2013 season with "Fiddler on the Roof," running July 25 through Aug. 11.

Eric van Baars, assistant artistic director for Porthouse Theatre, will direct this production, and John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State University, will provide the choreography. The show also features design work by two Kent State alumni -- costume design by Sarah Russell, and set design by Nolan O'Dell. Musical direction is by Jennifer Korecki.

"This life-affirming musical will illuminate the powers of tradition, both in the theatrical sense of the rituals which draw us to musical theatre and the powers of communal values to support our tough decisions in life," van Baars said.

Van Baars explained this production of "Fiddler on the Roof" will respect the tradition of the show while also including some new creative interpretations.

"There is such value placed on the traditions of mounting a production of 'Fiddler on the Roof,' from the use of the iconic Jerome Robbins choreography to the religious observations of the Hebrew faith. Just as Tevye is tested to accept change, our production will play with some of the traditional elements, promising to be not-your-Bubbe's 'Fiddler,'" van Baars said.

George Roth will play patriarch Tevye, and Tracee Patterson will star opposite as Golde. As the three eldest daughters in the family, Danielle Dorfman will play Tzeitel, Maddi Drees will play Chava and Jessica Benson will play Hodel. Lissy Gulick will play Yente, and Greg Violand will play the Constable. Frank Jackman will play Lazar, and Larry Nehring will play Avrham.

The show's score by Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick features songs loved the world over: "Sunrise, Sunset," "If I Were A Rich Man" and "Matchmaker," among many others.

"Fiddler on the Roof" will run July 25, 26, 27, 30, 31 at 8 p.m., Aug. 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, at 8 p.m. and July 28 and Aug. 4, 10, 11 at 2 p.m. Porthouse Theatre is on the grounds of Blossom Music Center at 1145 W. Steels Corners Road.

In Porthouse tradition, the Green Show will be performed on the lawn before each production of "Fiddler." The Green show cast is made up of student members of the Porthouse Theatre Academy, made up of soon-to-be college students entering the Kent State musical theatre program.

Single tickets are $32 through $38 for adults, $26 through $35 for seniors and $17 through $21 for students. For details, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds to enjoy the beautiful surroundings of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which is next to the theatre grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There also is a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Picnic tables also are available.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Time to move Kent landmark to its new home | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Battle over Wells Sherman House ought to come to an end

We hope that a Portage County Common Pleas Court ruling on the status of the Kent Wells Sherman House can enable the landmark structure to be relocated to the North Water Street site preservationists have chosen for it.

The structure, which dates to the 1850s, originally was the home of Frances Kent Wells, a daughter of town father Zenas Kent and a sister of Marvin Kent, for whom the community is named. It is one of a handful of structures in Kent with direct ties to the family.

The Greek Revival structure was located on Erie Street, where it was moved in the 1920s, which put it in the path of The Esplanade, the pedestrian walkway linking Kent State University and the downtown area. After its historic nature was publicized in 2011, Kent State spared it from being demolished and paid for it to be temporarily relocated to a site on East College Avenue, where it has been parked for more than a year.

The site on North Water Street chosen for its permanent home has been used as a park and performing arts area in recent years. Opponents of relocating the structure there went to court, citing concerns about the use of the proposed site and questioning the procedures used by city bodies to approve its relocation.

Magistrate Kent Graham dismissed those claims, noting expressly that those contesting the move "have no ownership, no legitimate claim and no express permission to exclude the Wells-Sherman from improving its lot." He also said they had no right to use the lot without permission of its owners, Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. Graham's ruling was afºfirmed by Common Pleas Judge John Enlow.

Saving this landmark from demolition was a victory for historic preservation in Kent. Those who rallied to preserve it did so against the odds and the ensuing court challenge may have seemed like an uphill battle at times. We commend them for persevering in their effort to save history.

We also commend Kent State University for its willingness not only to spare the structure but to pay for its relocation and to provide a temporary site for it. That location is within sight of the new KSU Hotel and Conference Center, and the house, in its present state, does little to enhance the view. It's time to move it to its new -- and hopefully, final -- home on North Water Street, where restoration can begin.

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News Headline: WKSU FM/89.7 expands daytime news offerings, bumps classical music to overnights (Skinner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WKSU FM/89.7 is restructuring its lineup, expanding daytime news and information content.

The Kent-based public radio station still will emphasize classical music, but that emphasis will shift totally to 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. From 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, the station will focus on news. The new schedule goes into effect Monday, Aug. 5.

Station executives say the changes will allow for “more stimulating and diverse national programs to complete listening blocks that will make it easier for listeners to find news and music at predictable times during the day.” “We believe this combination of news and music is the sound of Northeast Ohio's future,” the station's executive director, Dan Skinner, said in a statement released Monday.

“WKSU is dedicated to telling the story of Akron, Canton, Cleveland and beyond through local and regional news, and the added national programs will allow us to tie the world together. The station continues to offer quality, unique music presentations that stand out nationally and honor WKSU's objective of promoting arts and culture.”

The station will air the WKSU-produced “Folk Alley Radio Show” 6-8 p.m. Sundays. Shows making their Northeast Ohio debut include:
• “The Takeaway with John Hockenberry” (9-10 a.m. Monday-Friday);
• The national call-in show “On Point with Tom Ashford” (10 a.m.-noon Monday-Friday);
• “Snap Judgment,” a contemporary blend of story and urban music (4-5 p.m. Sunday).

Weekend lineups also will see a shake-up with new and returning shows. The new 5 a.m.-to-8 p.m. Monday-Friday schedule will be:
• 5-8 a.m., “Morning Edition;”
• 9-10 a.m., “The Takeaway;”
• 10-noon, “On Point;”
• noon-2 p.m., “Here and Now;”
• 2-3 p.m., “Fresh Air with Terry Gross;”
• 3-4 p.m., “The World;”
• 4-6 p.m., “All Things Considered;”
• 6-6:30 p.m., “Marketplace;”
• 6:30-7 p.m., “All Things Considered;”
• 7-8 p.m., “Q with Jian Ghomesh.”

Changes to Saturday's lineup:
• 10-11 a.m. “Wait, Wait ... Don't Tell Me!”
• 11-noon, “Car Talk;”
• noon-1 p.m., “Whad'Ya Know;”
• 1-2 p.m., “This American Life;”
• 2-3 p.m., “Fresh Air Weekend;”
• 3-4 p.m., “On the Media;”
• 4-5 p.m., “The Regina Brett Show;”
• 5-6 p.m., “All Things Considered;”
• 6-8 p.m., “A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.

Changes to the Sunday lineup start:
• noon-1 p.m., “Car Talk”
• 1-2 p.m., “Wait, Wait ... Don't Tell Me!”
• 2-3 p.m., “The Splendid Table;”
• 3-4 p.m., “TED Radio Hour;”
• 4-5 p.m., “Snap Judgment;”
• 5-6 p.m., “All Things Considered;”
• 6-8 p.m., “Folk Alley Radio Show.”

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News Headline: WKSU shakes up schedule with more news (Skinner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Beginning Aug. 5, WKSU (89.7-FM) will make major changes in its schedule, including the move of classical-music programs from daytime into the evening and abbreviated broadcasts of folk music.

In a statement, WKSU executive director Dan Skinner said, “This combination of news and music is the sound of Northeast Ohio's future.”

The new lineup reflects efforts by National Public Radio to reinvigorate its news programming — notably by the cancellation of Talk of the Nation and the expansion of Here and Now. It also give WKSU a weekday schedule closer in style to that of Cleveland-based public-radio station WCPN (90.3-FM).

After Morning Edition from 5 to 9 a.m., the new weekday lineup will include The Takeaway, hosted by John Hockenberry, at 9 a.m., followed by call-in show On Point with Tom Ashbrook at 10 a.m., both making their Northeast Ohio debuts. The expanded Here and Now will air at noon, then Fresh Air With Terry Gross in a new time period, 2 p.m. The World takes over the 3 p.m. hour, followed by All Things Considered from 4 to 6 p.m., Marketplace at 6, more All Things Considered at 6:30 and Q With Jian Ghomeshi at 7 p.m.

Mark Pennell's classical music program, currently in daytime, will move to 8 weeknights, followed at 11:30 p.m. by Nightaire, David Roden's overnight show. Sylvia Docking's classical program shifts from its two-hour weekday slot to Saturday and Sunday evenings and overnight.

Other weekend changes include time-slot juggling on Saturdays, more talk on Sundays and the reduction in folk programming from about eight weekend hours to two, a Folk Alley Radio Show at 6 p.m. Sunday.

After the still-in-place Inside Europe, Living on Earth and Weekend Edition, the Saturday order from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. will now be Wait Wait … Don't Tell Me, Car Talk reruns, Whad'Ya Know Radio Hour, This American Life, Fresh Air Weekend (a new show), On the Media, The Regina Brett Show and All Things Considered. A Prairie Home Companion remains at 6 p.m., followed by Docking's classical-music shows.

The Splendid Table moves from Saturday to Sunday, as part of a new block from noon to 6 p.m. of Car Talk repeats, Wait Wait, The Splendid Table, TED Radio Hour, Snap Judgment and All Things Considered. Those shows replace two classical music programs, while In Performance moves to 8 p.m. Sundays, following the Folk Alley show. Travel With Rick Steves and The Thistle & Shamrock are no longer scheduled.

The station will continue to offer an all-classical and an all-folk lineup via separate channels for online and HD Radio listeners, as well as a separate all-news channel.

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