Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Alumni; Architecture and Environmental Design; Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Athletics (1)
College of Business (COB); Institutional Advancement; Scholarships (2)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Economics (1)
Higher Education (2)
Higher Education; Human Resources; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Human Resources; Mathematics; Psychology; Sustainability (1)
Physics (1)
Residence Services (1)
Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Architecture and Environmental Design; Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
BRIEF: ThenDesign Architecture of Willoughby hires project manager 07/23/2013 News-Herald Text Email

...ranges from developing a workable building program and creating an effective design solution through construction and occupancy. He is a graduate of the Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, where he earned a master of architecture degree. Bell also received a bachelor of...


Athletics (1)
MAC football notebook: Mixed emotions come with Kent State's success 07/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

DETROIT: What Kent State football players face in the upcoming season is all a matter of perspective, judging from comments from two of the team's stars....


College of Business (COB); Institutional Advancement; Scholarships (2)
Business briefs -- July 23 07/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

HIGHER EDUCATION Goodyear endows scholarships The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. has created two endowed scholarship funds at Kent State University's College of Business Administration in honor of its former chairman and chief executive officer, Charles J. Pilliod, who retired...

Goodyear endows KSU scholarships (Spake, Lefton 07/24/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Business Administration announced today that two endowed scholarship funds have been established by The Goodyear...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
KSU College of Nursing professor to be inducted into American Academy of Nursing (Doheny) 07/24/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Margaret O'Bryan Doheny, professor emeritus who was on the Kent State University College of Nursing faculty for 35 years, will be inducted into the...


Economics (1)
AUDIO: Unemployment rates are up in all of Ohio's 88 counties (Reynolds) 07/24/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Economics professor says rate changes may be due to more people joining the workforce The unemployment rate went up slightly from May to June in all...


Higher Education (2)
COLLEGES HONORED 07/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Kent State and Walsh universities were the only two institutions in Ohio to be selected as "Great Colleges to Work For" by the industry newspaper,...

Report: Economic concerns drive college choices 07/24/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

WASHINGTON — College costs are driving decisions about which schools to attend, what to study and even where to live, according to a report from loan...


Higher Education; Human Resources; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU named one of the best colleges to work for (Hayes-Nelson, Hauge, Coombs) 07/24/2013 UWire Text Email

Kent State University ; Kent, OH - latest-updates-sp-923 By Katy Coduto Written by Katy CodutoHits: 7 Kent State has been named...


Human Resources; Mathematics; Psychology; Sustainability (1)
New community garden grows on Kent State grounds (Knowles, Widuck, Ruchotzke) 07/24/2013 UWire Text Email

Kent State University ; Kent, OH - latest-updates-sp-923 By Cindy Deng Written by Cindy DengHits: 9 Mathematics specialist Randy Ruchotzke...


Physics (1)
Fermilab Physicist Makes "Frozen Lightning" Art with Accelerators 07/23/2013 Scientific American - Online Text Attachment Email

...plastic, and the resulting electrical breakdown captured the branching pattern of Lichtenberg figures perfectly in three dimensions. Today, the Dynamitron at Kent State's Neo Beam facility does similar work, and one can buy such “frozen lightning” sculptures as artwork. A physicist first and foremost,...


Residence Services (1)
Wright Hall on schedule to finish renovations by August 07/24/2013 UWire Text Email

Renovations to Wright Hall are on target to be completed by Aug. 9, and work on Koonce and Leebrick halls is expected to begin Summer 2014. University...


Students (1)
Kent State student helps prevent threatened violent act at Pa. school (Peach) 07/24/2013 UWire Text Email

Kent State student Zoë Burch was honored by local, state and federal authorities Monday for reporting a potential threat of violence directed at a...


Theatre and Dance (1)
'Fiddler on the Roof' closes Porthouse season (van Baars) 07/23/2013 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Porthouse Theatre, Kent State University's outdoor summer theater on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, will close its 2013 season with "Fiddler on the Roof," running...


News Headline: BRIEF: ThenDesign Architecture of Willoughby hires project manager | Email

News Date: 07/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 23--ThenDesign Architecture of Willoughby announced that Steve Bell has joined the firm as project manager.

Before joining TDA, Bell was a project manager with another local firm. His breadth of experience ranges from developing a workable building program and creating an effective design solution through construction and occupancy.

He is a graduate of the Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, where he earned a master of architecture degree.

Bell also received a bachelor of science in architecture from Kent State.

ThenDesign Architecture also has offices in Pittsburgh and Chicago.

___

(c)2013 The News-Herald (Willoughby, Ohio)

Visit The News-Herald (Willoughby, Ohio) at www.news-herald.com

Distributed by MCT Information Services

Copyright (c) 2013 The News-Herald, Willoughby, Ohio

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News Headline: MAC football notebook: Mixed emotions come with Kent State's success | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DETROIT: What Kent State football players face in the upcoming season is all a matter of perspective, judging from comments from two of the team's stars.

Kent State completed a remarkable 11-3 season and went undefeated in the Mid-American Conference regular season, falling to Northern Illinois in a nail-biter of a championship game. With success comes notoriety, all-purpose offensive weapon Dri Archer said.

“There's definitely a target on our back as a team,” he said. “Usually, we're the team that's always trying to get up there, but now we're the team that's on top of the hill and we've got that target on our back and everyone's going to try to knock us off.”

But reality can sting like a bucket of cold water to the face. This year's: Kent State is picked to finish no better than third place in the conference's East Division.

“I wouldn't call it a target. I just think a lot of people don't respect us yet,” defensive lineman Roosevelt Nix said. “They just think it was one of those good years. We'll definitely have to bring it again to solidify our name in the conference. Just doing it again would definitely let people know we were here to stay.”

Kent State is in a year of transition after coach Paul Haynes arrived to fill the shoes of Darrell Hazell, who left for the top job at Purdue. Haynes is attempting to continue Kent's ascension to the top of the MAC. After landing at the top last year, the Flashes don't want to go back down.

“We don't want to maintain, we want to get better,” Archer said. “Guys have worked harder than ever since I've been here and we're going to be ready.”

And they don't plan to allow a coaching change to disrupt that.

“This is my third head coach so I was just going into it with an open mind. Coach Haynes is a great guy, and the staff he brought in, they're all good coaches,” Nix said. “You just open yourself up to trust the fact that there is a new coach and you've got a new scheme and there is going to be new things. You just have to adapt to it.”

Watching out

Nix and Archer are without a doubt focused on the upcoming season, but as a byproduct of their success last year, they've garnered some national attention.

Nix has been added to four awards watch lists (Bednarik Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Outland Trophy, Rotary Lombardi Trophy).

“It's definitely an honor,” he said. “To hear the stories of the men who played and why the awards were named after them. It's definitely an honor to be on those watch lists and just to play under that title is just a great feeling.”

Archer matched his teammate with four of his own — Walter Camp Award, Paul Hornung Award, Maxwell Award and the Doak Walker Award.

“There was a lot of buzz going around, but it was definitely a great feeling to be recognized for my level of play. Not too many guys can say that ever,” Archer said.

Commissioner speaks

MAC Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher addressed the reporters at MAC Media Day before the start of player interviews, hitting on a number of issues.

He revealed that the issue of miscellaneous expense money — a plan where college athletes would get a stipend — isn't necessarily dead.

When asked about the current structure of 13 teams in two divisions, Steinbrecher said that he has little problem with the unbalanced nature of the current situation, adding that any team added to the conference would have to be the right fit.

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News Headline: Business briefs -- July 23 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HIGHER EDUCATION

Goodyear endows scholarships

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. has created two endowed scholarship funds at Kent State University's College of Business Administration in honor of its former chairman and chief executive officer, Charles J. Pilliod, who retired in 1983.

The Charles J. Pilliod Endowed Scholarships will be awarded each fall to two full-time students enrolled in the business college.

Pilliod was a strong supporter of Kent State and its College of Business Administration during his 42-year career at Goodyear. He helped create the Goodyear Executive Professorship, which began in 1973 and has funded 20 professorships.

A native of Cuyahoga Falls, Pilliod joined Goodyear in 1941 as a production trainee.

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News Headline: Goodyear endows KSU scholarships (Spake, Lefton | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's
College of Business Administration
announced
today that two endowed
scholarship funds have
been established by The
Goodyear Tire & Rubber
Company in honor of its retired
Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer Charles
J. Pilliod.
The Charles J. Pilliod
Endowed Scholarships
will be awarded each fall
to two full-time students
enrolled in the College of
Business Administration
at Kent State.
“Goodyear has been a
long-standing partner with
the College of Business Administration,”
said Deborah
Spake, dean of the
college. “I am pleased that
the scholarship will honor
Mr. Pilliod who has been so
supportive of our students.”
To be considered for the
scholarship, students must
have above average grades,
play a leadership role in a
student organization, demonstrate
interest in international
business, have work
experience and be a sophomore
or above in standing.
Students may use the
scholarship funds for tuition,
room and board, university
fees, books and supplies
or study abroad travel
expenses.
“We are thrilled to see
our partnership continue,”
said President Lester
A. Lefton.

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News Headline: KSU College of Nursing professor to be inducted into American Academy of Nursing (Doheny) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Margaret O'Bryan Doheny,
professor emeritus who was
on the Kent State University
College of Nursing faculty
for 35 years, will be inducted
into the American Academy
of Nursing on Oct. 19, in
Washington, D.C.
There are more than 2,000
nurse leaders in education,
management, practice, policy
and research who are
members of the American
Academy of Nursing.
“It's very exciting to be
chosen to be inducted into
the American Academy of
Nursing,” said Doheny, who
lives in Strongsville. “It has
been a goal I've had, so it's
nice to be recognized by my
peers.”
Doheny said the application
process to become
a member is very intense.
First, the applicant must
be sponsored by two current
academy fellows in good
standing to validate the applicants'
contributions. Once
the application is completed,
a Fellow Selection Committee
is charged with the
responsibility to review the
application for admission to
the Academy.
“The academy itself is dedicated
to serving the community
and getting nursing
knowledge out to the public,”
Doheny said.
In order to apply to be a
fellow of the academy, one
has to be a member of the
American Nursing Association.
Doheny is a member of the
Ohio Nursing Association.
She also has been recognized
for her research and leadership
by the Delta Xi chapter
of Sigma Theta Tau, an international
nursing organization,
Daughters of American
Revolution and the National
Association of Orthopedic
Nurses.
In her application, Doheny
included contributions that
she made to the nursing
and healthcare community,
which included osteoporosis
prevention.
Doheny's area of research
is osteoporosis. Doheny has
received numerous grants
and has completed numerous
publications and presentations
based on her osteoporosis
research.
Doheny is one of the first
nationally recognized nursing
researchers to do research
on bone health in
men. She has been doing
research for 20 years, and is
most appreciative of the support
from Kent State's College
of Nursing, she said.
As a member of the American
Academy of Nursing,
Doheny is expected to be an
active member and contribute
her time and energy as
a leader in the nursing community.
Doheny said she hopes to
shape health policy related
to osteoporosis and provide
evidence to people to recognize
that osteoporosis is a
problem not only in the aging
population, but is considered
a pediatric disease that
can be prevented.

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News Headline: AUDIO: Unemployment rates are up in all of Ohio's 88 counties (Reynolds) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Economics professor says rate changes may be due to more people joining the workforce

The unemployment rate went up slightly from May to June in all 88 Ohio counties, but employment in some key Ohio industries is holding.

Lockwood Reynolds, an economics professor at Kent State University, says the 0.2 percent increase in Ohio's June unemployment is negligible.

Reynolds also says employment in service sectors such as health care is doing well in Ohio and manufacturing is holding steady.

According to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, nearly 20,000 more people in the Cleveland metropolitan area were looking for or getting jobs in June compared to May. Reynolds says that affects the numbers.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/36289

“They're looking, that's a good thing, but they haven't found anything yet, that's a bad thing," Reynolds says. "So any time the participation rate goes up, that's a good thing overall, but it's going to tend to make the unemployment rate number look worse.”

Reynolds says new college grads entering the job market after graduation could also be raising the unemployment rate.

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News Headline: COLLEGES HONORED | Email

News Date: 07/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State and Walsh universities were the only two institutions in Ohio to be selected as "Great Colleges to Work For" by the industry newspaper, the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The Chronicle surveyed more than 44,000 employees at 300 colleges and universities to select 97 institutions as the best for which to work.

Survey results are based on institutional audits of demographics and workplace policies and surveys administered to faculty, administrators and professional support staff. Kent State performed well in compensation and benefits, one of 12 categories evaluated.

This is the third time in four years that KSU has been recognized in the survey.

The private, Catholic Walsh University in North Canton performed well in one category, tenure clarity and purpose.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Report: Economic concerns drive college choices | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WASHINGTON — College costs are
driving decisions about which schools
to attend, what to study and even
where to live, according to a report
from loan giant Sallie Mae.
Parents no longer foot the largest
portion of the bill, according to the
lender's annual survey. That role goes
to grants and scholarships, with student
loans coming in third.
While the recession has largely
passed, economic worries have not
and many families are making college
choices driven by fears of tuition
hikes and job losses, according
to the survey.
“Parents are willing to stretch themselves,”
said Sarah Ducich, Sallie Mae's
senior vice president for public policy.
“It's not that they're not willing to
pay. It's that their income is not keeping
up.”
College spending per student was
about $21,000 during 2012, down from
a peak of $24,000 in 2010, according
to the Sallie Mae-Ipsos Public Affairs
report.
The annual survey of student financial
aid found students earned about
$6,300 in grants and scholarships to
pay for college costs, taking the top
spots from parents.
Parents chipped in $5,727 on average,
a decrease of 35 percent since
2010.
Student loans were the third most
common source to pick up the bill for
courses, housing and books. The average
student borrowed $8,815 in federal
loans.
The rate for those loans was the subject
of debate in the Senate last week,
as lawmakers considered a compromise
that would offer some students
lower rates for the next few years but
would prescribe higher rates for future
classes. The Senate is expected to vote
on that White House-backed compromise
this week.

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News Headline: KSU named one of the best colleges to work for (Hayes-Nelson, Hauge, Coombs) | Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University ; Kent, OH - latest-updates-sp-923

By Katy Coduto

Written by Katy CodutoHits: 7

Kent State has been named one of the top universities to work for by The Chronicle of Higher Education in its sixth annual ranking of "Great Colleges to Work For." It is the only public university in Ohio to be placed on this list.

Kent State excelled in the Compensation and Benefits category, meaning that university employees polled cited this category as a strength for Kent State. The Chronicle also noted employees' ability to take classes for free as an "outstanding feature."

Geraldine Hayes-Nelson, Ph.D., the executive director for human resources outreach, said that Kent State's benefits and compensation go beyond what most people expect from a university.

"We have various resources that support employees, but also their family, their spouses, their children, as well as opportunities for personal development and training in their personal area and realm of responsibility," Hayes-Nelson said.

Kent State is one of 97 universities being recognized. According to its website, the Chronicle of Higher Education surveys almost 45,000 university employees from 300 institutions. In the survey, employees answer 60 questions on a five-point scale from agree to disagree. A university needs to excel in at least one of 12 categories to be recognized.

Beyond benefits like vacation time and merit pay in the last year, Kim Hauge, communications and project manager for human resources, said that a major strength that Kent State offers to employees is a family-friendly work environment.

"There are many family-friendly policies we have," Hauge said. "They provide some flexibility to allow a work and family life balance as well."

Danielle Coombs, assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and its newly appointed undergraduate coordinator, said that she has had a continuously positive experience while working for Kent State.

"I've had a really great experience working here at Kent State," Coombs said. "In the time I've been here, I've seen a lot of growth in a very positive direction."

This includes the university's strength through the recession, which Coombs noted was greater than many other similar universities.

"I think, honestly, that during the recession a lot of university faculty were furloughed or had to take pay cuts," Coombs said. "Here at Kent, we were still able to get incremental raises and get merit pay last year coming back in."

Hayes-Nelson also cited the ongoing growth of the university and the city of Kent as another benefit to working for Kent State.

"We also have opportunities to grow with the community, which you can see with everything happening around us," she said.

Hauge also noted that Kent State is the only public university in Ohio to be included in the list.

"We're the only public university in the state of Ohio to win this honor," she said. "Certainly we'll use this in our marketing efforts to retain employees."

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: New community garden grows on Kent State grounds (Knowles, Widuck, Ruchotzke) | Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University ; Kent, OH - latest-updates-sp-923

By Cindy Deng

Written by Cindy DengHits: 9

Mathematics specialist Randy Ruchotzke chuckles in excitement as he sees a leafy green stem peak out of his tomato plot in Kent State's new community garden. The garden, which opened up to students, faculty, staff and community members last month, is located where Allerton Apartments once stood.

In June, Kent State's Sustainability Task Force sent a request to the Portage Local Food's Facebook page and Kent State's Human Resource Department about getting involved with the new community garden. According to the July 2013 Wellness newsletter, a publication of Human Resources, those interested got to choose between three different plot sizes entirely free of charge. Melanie Knowles, sustainability manager of Facilities, Planning and Design, said she received an overwhelming response and was able to get all 40 plots occupied.

"There have been a lot of people around campus who have expressed interest in a community garden over the years," Knowles said. "We just thought it was time and see what kind of participation we'll get."

Since the garden is sitting on the footprint of the Allerton Apartments, Knowles said it's "not really the healthiest soil" to work with. She said her and other gardeners have been bringing in soil, humus and other necessary nutrients to keep the garden healthy.

"A big part of our work this year is to enrich the soil," Knowles said. "Some are struggling and some are doing well, but hopefully by next year we'll have much richer soil."

Ruchotzke said he only has one 5-by-20-feet plot for just tomatoes, which have been growing well. He said he hopes to bring home tomatoes from his garden to make fresh salsa for his children.

"I love the taste of fresh food and I love having a variety of tastes," Ruchotzke said. "My KSU community garden has 27 varieties of heirloom tomatoes. Sure, I can purchase heirloom tomatoes at a local farmers' market, but I love to grow varieties beyond what is available commercially."

Cindy Widuck, project director for the Department of Psychology and community member, said she has two 5-by-20-feet plots planted with a variety of vegetables. She said she is planning on donating one of the plots' crops to the Campus Kitchen Project.

"I'm always looking for ways to help out in the community," Widuck said. "The garden hasn't produced much yet. Hopefully in the next week I should start having tomatoes and zucchini to donate."

Knowles said this summer's gardening is acting as a "trial year" to see what they can do to improve the garden next year. She said the current gardeners are looking to expand their plot size next year. Depending on the number of applicants reserved for next year, Knowles said she will look into expanding the garden to accommodate more members.

"The Wellness did an article about it and I've already had three people since then contacted me saying 'Is there any room left? What about next year?'" Knowles said. "If people want to garden and it's a good community, which so far has been really great, then I don't see why we wouldn't expand to accommodate if you want to join."

(Distributed for UWire via M2 Communications (www.m2.com))

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: Fermilab Physicist Makes "Frozen Lightning" Art with Accelerators | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Scientific American - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Physicist Todd Johnson has been working at Fermilab for 30 years, but he also dabbles in art. In the 1990s, he focused on holographic photography. These days — inspired by a pal who builds Tesla coils in his spare time — he's all about capturing lightning-like fractal patterns in plastic cubes with the help of a linear accelerator. He doesn't do this at Fermilab, but at a commercial polymer cross-linking facility in Ohio some 400 miles away. Per Symmetry Breaking:

Johnson arrives at the facility with stencils laser-cut from steel or handmade from sheet lead; clear acrylic hunks of varying sizes; and a lot of ideas. He sends his pieces of acrylic through the accelerator's electron beam, which is designed to break chemical bonds in plastics. Because acrylic is an insulating material, the beam scatters through the material, losing momentum as it goes. Only areas of the acrylic not covered by a stencil are exposed to the beam, allowing Johnson to create shapes.

Eventually the beam coalesces into a pool of electrons that desperately want to escape but can't—an invisible puddle of potential energy. Releasing that energy is a simple but arresting process. To do it, Johnson uses a hand-made tool reminiscent of a crude, oversized syringe. It works like a click pen—press on one end and the tip comes out the other with enough force to puncture the acrylic. The instant the tool punctures the surface, there's a burst of white light as the pool of excited electrons escapes from the material, leaving trails of vaporized acrylic in its place.

On their way out of the acrylic, the electrons follow the same natural laws that govern all systems that flow—electricity snaking its way from a storm cloud to Earth, rivers branching into ever smaller creeks and streams, or the spidery web of veins that distributes blood throughout your body.

Photo: Todd Johnson

Johnson even created a piece where the pattern looked like a capillary system as a gift for the wife of a pulmonologist. That's appropriate, since these fernlike patterns often form on the skin of people struck by lighting, caused by the capillaries under the skin rupturing from the shock wave generated by the electrical discharge. When lightning strikes sand, it can create fulgurites, as the sand is fused into glass by the intense heat.

The colloquial name for these sorts of branching patterns is “lightning flowers,” but they are also called “Lichtenberg figures” in honor of 18th century physicist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.

Born in 1742 to a pastor in Darmstadt, Germany, Lichtenberg showed a natural curiosity and penchant for math and science at an early age. Eventually he became a professor of physics there, a job he held for the rest of his life. A spinal deformation left him hunchbacked, a causing difficulties with his breathing in his later years. But he enjoyed an excellent reputation as a satirist as well as a scientist, and was  wildly popular with women, enjoying several romantic dalliances before marrying one Margarethe Kellner, who bore him six children.

This was an era when scientists were fascinated by electricity (“electric fluid”), conducting experiments on charged objects and how sparks jumped between them, using Leyden jars and electricity tubes, among other equipment. Benjamin Franklin famously conducted his experiment with an elevated “lightning rod” or wire to “draw down the electric fire” from a storm cloud, while standing in the protection of an enclosure similar to a soldier's sentry box.

Lichtenberg was among the first to bring Franklin's lightning rods to Germany, installing several around his home in Göttingen. He also built a large (six feet in diameter) electrostatic generator, or electrophorus, to study the electric fire–including figuring out how to record the branching patterns left in the wake of electrical discharges.

Original Lichtenberg figure, 1777. Public Domain. Via http://www.develotech.net/Archive/Circuits/Docs/Lichtenberg%20Figure/Lichtenberg.htm

First he used the electrophorus to blast  an insulating material, such as resin, glass or hard rubber, with a very high voltage. Then he sprinkled the surface with a mix of powdered sulfur, red lead and lead tetroxide and watched the pretty branching patterns form, before pressing a piece of paper onto the surface to transfer those images to the paper.

The sulfur, you see, becomes negatively charged during handling, while the red lead becomes positively charged. So the sulfur sticks to those areas of the plate that are positively charged — opposites attract! — and the lead sticks to the negatively charged areas. (This is also the proof of principle for modern xerography.)

Lichtenberg noted two types of patterns: one for a positive charge, which had longer, more elaborate branching, and the other for a negative charge, which more closely resembled a shell. (Occasionally there would be a mixed figure, with the negatively charged area producing a red nucleus, surrounded by yellow rays resulting from the positively charged areas.) His conclusions were published in his 1777 memoir, Super Nova Methodo Naturam ac Motum Fluidi Electrici Investigandi.

Those experiments set the stage for modern plasma physics research. In the 1920s, Arthur von Hippel and others recorded light from high voltage electrical discharges onto photographic film. Von Hippel discovered he could change the length of the branching pattern simply by increasing the applied voltage or reducing the surrounding air pressure.

Photo: Todd Johnson

In the 1940s, Arno Brasch and Fritz Lange were working with one of the first particle accelerators (they called it a “Capacitron”) at AEG in Germany, capable of producing high-voltage electron beams that left bluish flame-like tails of ionized air in their wake.

Brasch and Lang were the first to inject free electrons into cubes of plastic, and the resulting electrical breakdown captured the branching pattern of Lichtenberg figures perfectly in three dimensions. Today, the Dynamitron at Kent State's Neo Beam facility does similar work, and one can buy such “frozen lightning” sculptures as artwork.

A physicist first and foremost, Johnson doesn't seem to be all that interested in selling the fruits of his labors. He only spends a couple of days twice a year working on his Lichtenberg figures, although he spends months planning the next project and putting together the materials, like his laser-cut stencils.  And it doesn't always work out the way he planned. “It's frustrating, but it's part of the excitement,” he told Symmetry Breaking. “The minute you shut the machine off at the end of the day, you think of things you want to do next time.”

References:

Cox, J.H. and Legg, J.W. “The Klydonograph and Its Application to Surge Investigation,” Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, January 1925.

Gross, Bernhard. (1958) “Irradiation effects in Plexiglas,” Journal of Polymer Science 27(115): ,135-143.

Hashishes, Yuzo. (1979) “Two Hundred Years of Lichtenberg Figures,” Journal of Electrostatics, 6(1), 1-13.

Lichtenberg, Georg Christoph. De Nova Methodo Naturam Ac Motum Fluidi Electrici Investigandi (Concerning the New Method Of Investigating the Nature and Movement of Electric Fluid). Göttinger Novi Commentarii, Göttingen, 1777.

Merrill, F.H. and von Hippel, A. (1939) “The Atomphysical Interpretation of Lichtenberg Figures and Their Application to the Study of Gas Discharge Phenomena,”  Journal of Applied Physics 10(12): 873-887.

Reiss, Peter T. (1846) “Ueber elektrische Figuren und Bilde,” Annalen der Physik und Chemie 145(9): 1-44.

About the Author: Jennifer Ouellette is a science writer who loves to indulge her inner geek by finding quirky connections between physics, popular culture, and the world at large. Follow on Twitter @JenLucPiquant.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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News Headline: Wright Hall on schedule to finish renovations by August | Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
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News OCR Text: Renovations to Wright Hall are on target to be completed by Aug. 9, and work on Koonce and Leebrick halls is expected to begin Summer 2014.

University officials in the Department of Residence Services noticed that Wright and Koonce halls did not have enough common space for students to gather. Jill Church, director of Residence Services, said students living in Wright Hall during the 2013-14 school year will have a new sky lounge on the tenth floor, which replaces 13 dorm rooms.

"It's exciting to be able to invest in the housing we have currently," Church said. "A lot of places will just build something new and for us, we're able to take an existing building that students love and identify with."

Joseph Graham, associate director in the Office of University Architect, said the sky lounge will have panoramic views of campus and plenty of space for students to socialize and build a community with fellow residents. He said it will include bathrooms, new furniture, a kitchen and TV.

"The goal was to lower the density of the buildings a little bit, making it more community oriented," Graham said.

Church said the removal of 13 dorm rooms wasn't a significant number in terms of student housing numbers. She said the sky lounge is going to create a space for students to feel more comfortable and happy with where they're living.

"With a housing system of 6,228 beds, the loss of 13 rooms to create an attractive gathering space is something we're willing to do," Church said. "It was a great trade off for us."

Several mechanical upgrades and cosmetic changes were also made throughout Wright Hall. Updates include a new heating and cooling system, elevators, flooring, furniture, paint and windows. In addition, all dorm rooms are now structured for easy customization with free-standing furniture, Graham said.

"They used to be able to loft your desk on the dresser and on the desk, but now you can do it on the wardrobe," Graham said. "There's a little bar on the back that allows you clip your bed on the wardrobe. The neat thing I really like about that is that the wardrobe sticks above the upper bunk. It gives you almost like a night table, so you have a place for your alarm clock and things like that."

The estimated cost of the Tri-Towers renovations is about $38 million and will save the university about $40,000 annually per building, said Scott Centea, associate mechanical engineer in the Office of the University Architect. Church said the project is covered by a $30 million bond and funding from other sources. With new furnishings, she said student cost for housing in Wright Hall is about $50 more, which makes it $2,990 per semester.

"The reason is because of the carpet and the furniture," Church said. "We're not saying it's because it's brand new and we're giving you a sky lounge, so we're charging more. It's stating because we have these additional amenities, so we're going to price it a little bit higher."

Church said Wright Hall needed the most attention, so the same renovations to Koonce and Leebrick Hall are saved for Summer 2014. Leebrick Hall will not have a sky lounge. Graham, who was involved in the improvement of bathrooms in Tri-Towers in early 2000, said doing the renovations has been rewarding.

"We're trying to make these buildings look, operate and function for the next 20 years," Graham said. "It's been a few years since we've been back in these buildings and it's nice to see the finale of it."

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: Kent State student helps prevent threatened violent act at Pa. school (Peach) | Email

News Date: 07/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
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News OCR Text: Kent State student Zoë Burch was honored by local, state and federal authorities Monday for reporting a potential threat of violence directed at a high school in Pennsylvania. The threat was confirmed by authorities and the suspect was arrested.

Burch, who is going into her second year as an exploratory major, said she was in an online chat room when she saw a violent threat directed at the school. She reported the threat to Kent State Police, which led to involvement of Pennsylvania authorities and the FBI in Northeast Ohio and Pittsburgh.

Representatives from Kent State's administration and police department, Pennsylvania State Police, Ohio Homeland Security and the FBI gathered in the Student Center to recognize and thank the Pittsburgh native for acting quickly when she saw suspicious activity on the Internet.

"It was a great thing to do," said John Peach, Kent State Chief of Police. "We aren't asking great things of people -- just do the little things that result in great things."

When Burch first saw the threat, she said she called her mother, who told Burch to call the police if she felt it was serious.

"It's not one of those things that you take a lot of time to do," Burch said of reporting the threat. "I think it's our duty."

Burch smiled as she accepted framed certificates from Kent State and Ohio Homeland Security. Pennsylvania State Police and FBI officers thanked her for the lives she may have saved by not being afraid to report what she saw.

Burch said she didn't know about Ohio Homeland Security's "If You See Something, Say Something" campaign.

"I just read the comment and decided to report it because it was frightening," she said.

"The strong message we would like to get out is if anybody sees something they think is potentially dangerous [...] notify the police department immediately," Peach said. "We would rather deal with a report that has no merit [...] than deal with a tragedy."

Students can call the Kent State Police Department at 330-672-3070 or use the anonymous university tip line, ThreatLine, here.

"If you see something, say something," Burch said. "It's worth it."

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: 'Fiddler on the Roof' closes Porthouse season (van Baars) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
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News OCR Text: Porthouse Theatre, Kent State University's outdoor summer theater on the grounds of Blossom Music Center, will close its 2013 season with "Fiddler on the Roof," running July 25 through Aug. 11.

Eric van Baars, assistant artistic director for Porthouse Theatre, will direct this production, and John Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts at Kent State University, will provide the choreography. The show also features design work by two Kent State alumni -- costume design by Sarah Russell, and set design by Nolan O'Dell. Musical direction is by Jennifer Korecki.

"This life-affirming musical will illuminate the powers of tradition, both in the theatrical sense of the rituals which draw us to musical theatre and the powers of communal values to support our tough decisions in life," van Baars said.

Van Baars explained this production of "Fiddler on the Roof" will respect the tradition of the show while also including some new creative interpretations.

"There is such value placed on the traditions of mounting a production of 'Fiddler on the Roof,' from the use of the iconic Jerome Robbins choreography to the religious observations of the Hebrew faith. Just as Tevye is tested to accept change, our production will play with some of the traditional elements, promising to be not-your-Bubbe's 'Fiddler,'" van Baars said.

George Roth will play patriarch Tevye, and Tracee Patterson will star opposite as Golde. As the three eldest daughters in the family, Danielle Dorfman will play Tzeitel, Maddi Drees will play Chava and Jessica Benson will play Hodel. Lissy Gulick will play Yente, and Greg Violand will play the Constable. Frank Jackman will play Lazar, and Larry Nehring will play Avrham.

The show's score by Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick features songs loved the world over: "Sunrise, Sunset," "If I Were A Rich Man" and "Matchmaker," among many others.

In Porthouse tradition, the Green Show will be performed on the lawn before each production of "Fiddler." The Green show cast is made up of student members of the Porthouse Theatre Academy, made up of soon-to-be college students entering the Kent State musical theatre program.

Single tickets are $32 through $38 for adults, $26 through $35 for seniors and $17 through $21 for students. For details, call 330-672-3884 or visit www.porthousetheatre.com.

Porthouse Theatre features free parking and allows patrons to bring in picnics (including alcohol) to its grounds to enjoy the beautiful surroundings of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which is next to the theatre grounds. A covered picnic pavilion is available for reservation at $2 per person or free for subscribers and is based on availability. There also is a concession stand of light snacks and beverages. Picnic tables also are available.

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