Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Alumni (1)
Art, School of (3)
Athletics (2)
Athletics; Office of General Counsel (4)
College of Business (COB); Scholarships (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Economics; Research (1)
Higher Education (1)
Music (1)
Research (1)
Students (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Orange grad to direct Broadway vets in 'The Who's Tommy' for charity 07/25/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...like, ?producing this show in my basement . . .?�? And, though she won?t be taking the stage Monday night, ticket holders will hear from Tony winner and Kent State University alumna Alice Ripley ? a member of the original Broadway cast of ?Tommy? ? via video screens posted around the Tri-C theater....


Art, School of (3)
AKRON STUDENTS IN LOCK 3 SUMMER ARTS PROGRAM ?? MENTORS AID APPRENTICES TO CREATE AND IMPROVE THE DOWNTOWN CITYSCAPE ?? 07/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...www.akronohio.gov/lock3live/sae.htm. ?? For more information, contact program director John M. Moore at moorejm@alumni.hiram.edu or 330-375-2977. ?? THURSDAY ?? Reception - Kent State University School of Art holds a 5-7 p.m. reception for Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent runs through Aug. 24 at its Downtown Gallery,...

Event spotlights downtown Kent art, photography (with gallery) 07/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

..."A Timeless Community: Photographs of Richard Sweet," on display through Aug. 9 at the School of Art Gallery on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University. On Thursday, a joint reception and art walk was held between these events and "Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent," which...

Kent State University Emeritus Art Professor Joseph O'Sickey Dies 07/26/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

He worked at the Ohio State University, Kent State University, the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Akron Institute of Art.\ Renowned northeast Ohio...


Athletics (2)
Kent State represented well in PGA's Canadian Open 07/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By RYAN LEWIS Published: July 24, 2013 Three Kent State golfers will be in the field for the PGA Tour's RBC Canadian Open later this week, held at Glen...

Trio of Kent State golfers finish first day at Canadian Open 07/25/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Three Kent State University golfers are competing at this weekend's Canadian Open PGA Tour event, held in Oakville, Ontario. After one day of competition,...


Athletics; Office of General Counsel (4)
KSU wins second ruling in coach departure 07/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By Carol Biliczky Beacon Journal staff writer Kent: Kent State scored a second victory this week when a Portage County judge ruled that a university...

JUDGE RULES BRADLEY U. VIOLATED KENT STATE'S CONTRACT WITH GENO FORD 07/26/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Dave O'Brien | staff writer Published: July 26, 2013 4:00AM A Portage County judge has ruled that Bradley University, in Peoria, Ill., "intentionally...

Judge sides with Kent over Bradley in coaching contract dispute 07/26/2013 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

A Portage County judge says Bradley University intentionally interfered with Kent State's contract with former basketball coach Geno Ford. According...

Judge rules against Bradley in hiring of Ford as coach 07/26/2013 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

A Portage County judge ruled that Bradley University intentionally interfered with Kent State's contract with former men's basketball coach Geno Ford....


College of Business (COB); Scholarships (1)
Goodyear Endows Business Scholarships at KSU 07/26/2013 Youngstown Business Journal Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. has endowed two scholarships at the Kent State University College of Business Administration, Deborah Spake, dean of the college, has announced. The scholarships were established in...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Glued to Your Cell Phone? You Might Want to Put it Down for This 07/25/2013 AllVoices Text Attachment Email

...you forgot your phone at home and the ensuing panic that followed until you were reunited with it? Well, a recent study, done by a research team at Kent State University, has shown that smartphonesthose amazing devices that we use to text and email, listen to music, watch TV, read, or play video...


Economics; Research (1)
Writing Thank-You Notes Makes You Happier: How Signs Of Gratitude Can Be Self-Serving, Relieving Depression (Toepfer, Walker) 07/25/2013 MedicalDaily.com Text Attachment Email

...of the things that make you happy — which, after writing the thank-you notes, can itself be added to the list. The Study In 2012, researchers at Kent State University conducted tests on 219 individuals, 188 of whom were women, building on prior studies performed in 2009 by doctors Steven Toepfer...


Higher Education (1)
Forbes' college rankings lists Oberlin as best in Ohio; Case Western Reserve No. 3 in state (poll) 07/26/2013 Forbes - Online Text Attachment Email

By Cliff Pinckard, The Plain Dealer Email the author | Follow on Twitter on July 25, 2013 at 10:00 AM, updated July 25, 2013 at 11:42 AM --- (PHOTO)...


Music (1)
MyCommunities.Ohio.com Things to do this weekend -- July 26 07/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...approximately 40 minutes long and start on the hour. Free. For more information, call 330-497-1000 or go to www.gervasivineyard.com. Kent Concert -- The Kent State Piano Institute's concert will be held at 4 p.m. on Sunday, at the First United Methodist Church in Cuyahoga Falls. (http://cuyahogafalls.ohio.com/entertainment/kent-state-university-piano-institute-to-perform-at-first-united-methodist-on-sunday-1.414799)...


Research (1)
Bright Spots: July 25, 2013 07/25/2013 Youngstown Business Journal Text Attachment Email

Great Lakes NeuroTechnologies makes further advances in brain stimulation, a Kent State professor lands a $330,000 National Science Foundation grant and Findaway World in Solon finds a local library patron for its Playaway...


Students (1)
Fox 8 News at 10PM 07/22/2013 Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

...know I could have saved someone's life is just reallyg i, just really rewarding. >> She received two certificates for her quick thinking one from the kent state police and the other from ohio homeland security.kiol >> Doctors are calling it the newest teen trent and the results could be deadly....


News Headline: Orange grad to direct Broadway vets in 'The Who's Tommy' for charity | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Andrea Simakis, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: How would you imagine the average high school grad uses those precious summer months before college?

Baking by the pool? Check.

Trolling the Chipotle patio for dates? Check.

Directing a 30-person musical starring a handful of Broadway actors to raise money for charity? Ch ? huh? Miles Sternfeld got his diploma from Orange High School in June. The next month, he jetted to New York City to begin rehearsals for ?The Who?s Tommy? with three vets from the Great White Way.

The Who's Tommy

What: A performance of the rock opera benefiting Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS.

When: 7:30 p.m. Monday.

Where: Cuyahoga Community College Eastern Campus Theater, 4250 Richmond Road, Highland Hills.

Tickets: $15-$65, with VIP passes available to pre- and post-show receptions where guests can mingle with the director and cast. Go to tommybenefit.com. And for the last week, he and his hybrid cast, a collection of Cleveland and New York talent, have been honing the show in a studio space in PlayhouseSquare. His vision will culminate Monday in a one-night-only performance at the Cuyahoga Community College Eastern Campus Theater in Highland Hills.

What started as an idea for a senior project has blossomed into a benefit for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, an event that marks, as you might imagine, 18-year-old Sternfeld?s directorial debut. It?s not that he?s had that many opportunities to helm a production. ?When you?re under the age of 18, it?s difficult to ever direct anything,? he says. ?Nobody?s gonna hire you.? So, he hired himself. ?I wanted to do a show that I was really passionate about the way I thought it should be done,? he says. ?If you?re gonna raise money for a cause, you wanna go big or go home. That?s kind of my mantra ? go big or go home.? Given that philosophy, The Who?s broad, brash rock opera, which premiered on Broadway in 1993, is a good choice for his first outing in the director?s chair. Sternfeld, who?ll begin classes as a musical theater major at Point Park University in Pittsburgh this fall, got his first taste of the spotlight in a production of ?Tommy? at Orange?s Stagecrafters Youth Theatre. The 8-year-old actor played the titular character at age 4 ? an easy gig, as he didn?t have memorize any lines.

Like a savvy artist twice his age, Sternfeld exploited his relationships to lasso industry vets, beginning with Jodie Langel, the creator of ?Making It On Broadway,? a weeklong, intensive seminar in New York. That?s where Sternfeld met Langel, who appeared in the likes of ?Les Mis�rables? and ?Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.? He also took master classes from Tony-winning actors and composers. ?I sang for Kristin Chenoweth, who of course we all know,? he says. When Langel heard that her former student wanted to try his hand at directing for a good cause, she signed on as Mrs. Walker, the role made famous by Ann-Margret ? dig those groovy pantsuits! ? as Tommy?s boozy ma. Soon, Michael Berry ? who met Langel in ?Les Miz? and was last seen on Broadway as an original cast member in ?Next to Normal? ? agreed to play Capt. Walker, Tommy?s doomed father. With that sort of clout behind the project, Sternfeld did what any self-respecting teen would do. He reached out to his friends ? on Facebook. That?s how he landed Nick Blaemire (?Godspell? and ?Cry-Baby?) as Tommy and Adrienne Warren (?Bring It On: The Musical?) as the Acid Queen.

Sternfeld says casting by Facebook isn?t as indiscriminate as it sounds. ?By then, we had Michael and Jodie on board, so it seemed legitimate. Obviously, it wasn?t some random message that was like, ?producing this show in my basement . . .?�? And, though she won?t be taking the stage Monday night, ticket holders will hear from Tony winner and Kent State University alumna Alice Ripley ? a member of the original Broadway cast of ?Tommy? ? via video screens posted around the Tri-C theater. If Sternfeld?s name is familiar, you?re likely thinking of his uncle, well-known area director Fred Sternfeld, who heads up the Hathaway Brown Theatre Institute.

Has the wunderkind taken any pointers from his seasoned relative? ?No, not really. I told him to just show up,? the younger Sternfeld says.

Sure, he collaborates with his ?team? ? that?s his choreographer, the Beck Center?s Mart�n C�spedes, and Sean Szaller, a local actor and educator who serves as the production?s musical director ? ?but you gotta do what thrills you,? he says. ?You can?t start asking people, ?Oh, what do you think of this? Does this work for you?? I can?t worry about what everyone else thinks. You?re not gonna be able to please everyone.? Watch your back, James Lapine.

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News Headline: AKRON STUDENTS IN LOCK 3 SUMMER ARTS PROGRAM ?? MENTORS AID APPRENTICES TO CREATE AND IMPROVE THE DOWNTOWN CITYSCAPE ?? | Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Shinn, Dorothy
News OCR Text: Fifty-eight Akron high school students are spending a good part of their summer in downtown Akron as part of the city's Lock 3 Summer Arts Experience, which for the 11th year is providing work for professional artists, education for students and public artwork to inspire residents. ?? The program was founded by Mayor Don Plusquellic in 2003 and allows "arts apprentices" to be mentored by professionals, earn a paycheck and create art that improves the cityscape in and around downtown. ?? The program solicits applications from Akron middle and high school students each spring. A panel of artists interviewed the applicants to determine readiness and arts aptitude. This year, 58 of the 190 students interviewed were selected and matched with one of the six lead artists for the 100-hour program and 18 were chosen for two 30-hour programs. ?? In 2008, Akron expanded the program to include a Neighborhood Canvas component, consisting of 30 hours of work to extend Summer Art's reach to students who show artistic interest and talent but cannot commit to the full 100-hour program. ?? This year, one of the neighborhood components created and installed a concrete sculpture and bench along the towpath at Lock 3 Park while the other designed and created leather and metal jewelry to be marketed and displayed this weekend at Akron's Hardesty Park Arts Expo. ?? This year's program is funded in part by the Akron-Summit County Public Library and the city. The University of Akron's School of Art and School of Dance partners with the program by contributing studio space and the Summit County Department of Jobs & Family Services is allowing for the installation of a mural on its property. ?? Since the beginning of the program, nearly 800 young people have taken part. Applications for the summer program are delivered to the schools and posted to the city's Summer Arts Experience website annually in March. To see updates on the project, go to www.akronohio.gov/lock3live/sae.htm. ?? For more information, contact program director John M. Moore at moorejm@alumni.hiram.edu or 330-375-2977.
?? THURSDAY ?? Reception - Kent State University School of Art holds a 5-7 p.m. reception for Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent runs through Aug. 24 at its Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent. For more information, contact director of galleries Anderson Turner at haturner@kent.edu or go to http://galleries.kent.edu.
?? FRIDAY ?? Mural Unveiled - Sankofa Fine Art Plus and Cleveland's historic Karamu House will hold an unveiling of Artovation, a 40-by-36-foot mural portrait of stage and screen actress Ruby Dee by Los Angeles-based mural artist Kent Twitchell from 4-7 p.m. at the Karamu House theater, 2355 E. 89 St., Cleveland, with the help of local artist-apprentices. For more information, email jinida.doba@gmail.com.
?? SATURDAY ?? Exhibit Opens - With a Trace, Photographs of Absence opens at the Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St. It remains on view through Jan. 26, 2014. For more information, call 330-376-9185 or go to http://akronartmuseum.org/exhibitions/details.php?unid=3825.
?? TUESDAY ?? Mudcakes - The Quirk Cultural Center, 1201 Grant Ave., Cuyahoga Falls, holds a 4-4:45 p.m. Mudcakes clay class for 6- to 8-year-olds. It will continue on Aug. 6 and 13. Children will learn to explore working with clay and creating their own masterpiece. Fee is $24, $20 residents, including all supplies. To register, call the Parks and Recreation Department at 330-971-8225 or the Quirk Cultural Center at 330-971-8425.
?? WORTH NOTING ?? Ai Weiwei Exhibit - The Cleveland Museum of Art, 11150 East Blvd., University Circle, has opened an installation of the famous artist/social activist Ai Weiwei in its new atrium. The installation, Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads, remains on view through Jan. 26. Information, 216-421-7340 or www.clevelandart.org/events/exhibitions/ai-weiwei-circle-animalszodiac-heads. ?? Valley Art Center Search - The center is seeking candidates for its executive director position. The full-time position oversees the administration of the center and its staff that is well established in the community, offers more than 400 classes in several media to students of all ages and presents five gallery exhibitions each year. Ann Chaney, executive director for a combined 12 years, is retiring in September. Applications should include a cover letter, resume, salary requirements and names and contact information for three professional references. Forward application to: Search Committee, 34194 Aurora Road, Box 147 Cleveland, OH 44139 or email davis4davis@aol.com. Application deadline is 4:30 p.m., Aug 1.
?? DEADLINES ?? July 30 - Is the last day to submit entry fees for Peninsula Art Academy's Fiber Art Show, to go on view Aug. 3-30. It's open to all area fiber artists. Both functional and non-functional works will be accepted. Prizes will be awarded. Entry fee is $30, $25 for members for up to three works per artist. Entry fees need to be sent to Peninsula Art Academy; P.O. Box 171, Peninsula, OH 44264. For information and an entry form call 330-657-2681. An open house reception will be held 2-4 p.m. Aug. 3. ??

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Event spotlights downtown Kent art, photography (with gallery) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Lisa Scalfaro/Recor-Courier
News OCR Text: The Kent Historical Society is displaying some of the photography of former Record-Courier photographer Richard Sweet. The display coincides with an exhibit, "A Timeless Community: Photographs of Richard Sweet," on display through Aug. 9 at the School of Art Gallery on the second floor of the Art Building at Kent State University. On Thursday, a joint reception and art walk was held between these events and "Time & Town: A Sweet History of Kent," which is on display at the Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., through Aug. 24.

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News Headline: Kent State University Emeritus Art Professor Joseph O'Sickey Dies | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: He worked at the Ohio State University, Kent State University, the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Akron Institute of Art.\

Renowned northeast Ohio artist Joseph O'Sickey passed away at 94 on Monday, just one day after his latest exhibition at the Canton Museum of Art concluded.

The emeritus art professor at Kent State University's last exhibit was called "Joseph O'Sickey: Unifying Art, Life and Love," which featured 160 works during the seven decades of his life dedicated to art.

A documentary about O'Sickey, who will received the 2013 Ohio Governor's Award for the Arts, premiered on PBS on May 3.

O'Sickey died Monday after a two year battle with lymphoma, reports The Plain Dealer. He was in hospice's care at Robertson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna, Cleveland Heights architect Robert Blatchford told Cleveland.com.

Several of the artist's oil and watercolor pieces featured the water and gardens of his Twin Lakes home and some were of his life, Algesa, who died in 2006 at 89 years old.

A private memorial service was on Tuesday at the Wood-Kortright-Borkoski Funeral Home in Ravenna. A public celebration of Joseph and Algesa will be scheduled at a later time.

O'Sickey taught at Kent State University for about 30 years.

"One of the things Joe always talked to people about was perspective really in terms of many things: living your life, being creative, thinking about art, drawing and painting," Shawn Gordon, director of advancement for the College of the Arts told the Record-Courier. "He was constantly challenging you to sort of think outside of what you think you see."

O'Sickey's work has been collected by world-renowned institutions across the country, including the Cleveland Museum of Art.

In an interview with The Plain Dealer in December, O'Sickey said:

"I've had a wonderful life ... and I had Algesa. No matter how successful another artist might be, he didn't have Algesa.”

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News Headline: Kent State represented well in PGA's Canadian Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By RYAN LEWIS Published: July 24, 2013
Three Kent State golfers will be in the field for the PGA Tour's RBC Canadian Open later this week, held at Glen Abbey Golf Club.
Senior Corey Connors is the lone active Golden Flash and one of only four amateurs in the field. He's currently Canada's top-ranked golfer (No. 41 in the world World Amateur Golf Rankings). Connors will tee off at 2:15 p.m. on Thursday and at 9 a.m. on Friday.
He'll be joined by KSU 2012 grad Mackenzie Hughes and '05 grad Peter Laws. Hughes made his PGA Tour debut in this tournament a year ago. He has an 8:50 a.m. tee time on Thursday.
Laws was recently named an assistant coach at Iowa State. He's set to tee off at 1:45 p.m. on Thursday and at 8:30 a.m. on Friday.

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News Headline: Trio of Kent State golfers finish first day at Canadian Open | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Three Kent State University golfers are competing at this weekend's Canadian Open PGA Tour event, held in Oakville, Ontario.

After one day of competition, Corey Connors is in a tie for 41st place after shooting s 1-under 71, while Mackenzie Hughes and Peter Laws are both in a tie for 117th place following a 2-over 74 in the first round of competition.

The Canadian Open continues play this afternoon with Brendan Steele atop the leaderboard after shooting a 7-under 65.

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News Headline: KSU wins second ruling in coach departure | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer

Kent: Kent State scored a second victory this week when a Portage County judge ruled that a university in Illinois interfered with its contract with basketball coach Geno Ford.
Judge John Enlow on Wednesday upheld KSU's motion for summary judgment against the private, independent Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., which hired Ford away from KSU.
“When a university disregards those contracts and knowingly poaches another school's coach, that university must be held accountable,” Attorney General Mike DeWine said in a media release.
The state represented KSU because it is a tax-supported university.
On July 16, Enlow ruled that Ford, now 38, owes Kent State $1.2 million because he broke his contract.
He joined KSU in April 2008 and in April 2010 signed an extended contract with a base salary of $300,000 that made him the highest-paid basketball coach in the Mid-American Conference.
His contract included a clause that if he or KSU canceled the five-year employment agreement before March 31, 2015, the other party would get the balance of the base salary remaining in Ford's contract.
Since four years were remaining on Ford's contract when he left in March 2011 to go to Bradley, KSU should get $1.2 million, Enlow ruled.
KSU also is seeking $1.6 million in damages from Bradley University. A Portage County jury will determine how much Bradley must pay KSU.
KSU spokesman Eric Mansfield said the university had no comment because of the ongoing litigation.
Attorney William Kohlase of Peoria, who represented Bradley, did not return a call seeking comment.
The attorney general's office appointed the Akron law firm of Roderick Linton Belfance as special counsel to represent Kent State in the cases against Ford and Bradley University.
Carol Biliczk can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: JUDGE RULES BRADLEY U. VIOLATED KENT STATE'S CONTRACT WITH GENO FORD | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Dave O'Brien | staff writer Published: July 26, 2013 4:00AM

A Portage County judge has ruled that Bradley University, in Peoria, Ill., "intentionally interfered" with Kent State University's contract with former men's basketball coach Geno Ford, and is liable for damages.

The ruling by Portage County Common Pleas Judge John Enlow was announced Thursday by Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who appointed an Akron law firm to represent the university in the matter, and KSU.

A jury will be convened to decide what damages Bradley will pay KSU, according to DeWine. In court filings, KSU had asked Enlow to award $1.6 million in damages, but he ruled that such damages "must be proven at trial."

[READ RELATED STORY: Kent State awarded $1.2 million
in breach of contract suit against Geno Ford]

Enlow found in favor of a motion for summary judgment by KSU, ruling that Bradley U. "intentionally interfered" with the contract between Ford and KSU, according to DeWine's office. A summary judgment is a ruling made by the court for one party against another in a case based on its merits, without a jury hearing arguments.

In his ruling, Enlow wrote that Bradley U. "largely bases its case on KSU allowing Coach Ford to have discussions with other basketball programs."

According to the lawsuit, any non-Mid-American Conference school seeking to hire Ford had to seek permission from KSU Athletics Director Joel Nielsen before doing so. Bradley U. sought and received permission to talk to Ford following the 2010-11 basketball season, and he agreed to become their head coach in March 2011.

Despite that, Enlow ruled, "consent to interview is not consent to hire," as Ford's contract stated that "'Ford recognizes ... his promise to work for the university for the entire term of this five (5) year contract,'" as quoted in court documents.

"But that provision did not void or take priority over the five year term of the contract and specified damages for a breach," Enlow wrote.

A Bradley U. spokeswoman, Kath Conver, referred all questions to the university's counsel, Bill Kohlhase. A message seeking comment was left for Kohlhase.

Ford was hired by KSU in April 2008 at an annual salary of $200,000. The contract was later extended by one year, and Ford's salary increased to $300,000 annually in April 2010. That made him the highest-paid basketball coach in the MAC.

KSU filed suit against Ford and Bradley U. for breach of contract in April 2011. Enlow previously found Ford liable for $1.2 million in damages for breaching his contract, which extended through the 2014-15 basketball season.

The Akron law firm Roderick Linton Belfance was appointed by DeWine to represent KSU in the lawsuit against Ford and Bradley U.

"We have a duty to protect our public colleges and universities from third-parties that try to undermine or interfere with their contracts," DeWine said, announcing the ruling. "When a university disregards those contracts and knowingly poaches another school's coach, that university must be held accountable."

The Golden Flashes went 68-37 over three seasons with Ford as their head coach.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1128 or @recordpub.com

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News Headline: Judge sides with Kent over Bradley in coaching contract dispute | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Portage County judge says Bradley University intentionally interfered with Kent State's contract with former basketball coach Geno Ford.

According to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine – who is representing Kent -- it will be up to a jury to decide how much that should cost Bradley.

Three weeks ago, the judge ordered Ford himself to pay the university $1.2 million for breach of contract. Ford had three years remaining on his contract – with a salary of $300,000 a year -- when he quit Kent in 2011 to become Bradley's head coach.

Kent immediately sued him and Bradley.

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News Headline: Judge rules against Bradley in hiring of Ford as coach | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Portage County judge ruled that Bradley University intentionally interfered with Kent State's contract with former men's basketball coach Geno Ford.

The court upheld Kent State's motion for summary judgment against Bradley, ruling that the Peoria Ill., university brought about the breach of contract without justification.

A Portage County jury will determine the amount of damages Bradley caused to Kent State.

Ford, a native of Cambridge who starred at Ohio University, was hired by Kent State in 2008 and received a contract extension in 2010. One year later he accepted the position at Bradley, in breach of the terms of his employment contract with Kent State.

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News Headline: Goodyear Endows Business Scholarships at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Youngstown Business Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. has endowed two scholarships at the Kent State University College of Business Administration, Deborah Spake, dean of the college, has announced. The scholarships were established in honor of Charles J. Pilliod, retired chairman and CEO of Goodyear.

The scholarships will be awarded each fall to two full-time students enrolled in the KSU business college.

During Pilliod's 42-year career at Goodyear, he was a staunch supporter of Kent State and its college of business administration, Spake noted.

read more

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News Headline: Glued to Your Cell Phone? You Might Want to Put it Down for This | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: AllVoices
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Smartphones, for most of us, are always within reach, and in most cases they have become an extra appendage. Remember the last time you forgot your phone at home and the ensuing panic that followed until you were reunited with it?

Well, a recent study, done by a research team at Kent State University, has shown that smartphonesthose amazing devices that we use to text and email, listen to music, watch TV, read, or play video gamesmay replace the TV as technologys new health killer device.

In one respect this is rather shocking, as unlike the TV, smartphones are small and portable, making it easy to use while doing mild to moderate physical activity like running on a treadmill or going for a walk.

Read More: http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/general-health-2/glued-to-your-cell-phone-you-might-want-to-put-it-down-for-this

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News Headline: Writing Thank-You Notes Makes You Happier: How Signs Of Gratitude Can Be Self-Serving, Relieving Depression (Toepfer, Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: MedicalDaily.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The act of writing a thank-you note can produce feelings of happiness and satisfaction with life, not to mention reducing depressive symptoms in the process.

The act of writing a thank-you note after receiving a gift can be a knee-jerk response for some, groomed from childhood to always say "Thank you" even when the person isn't present. Others find themselves procrastinating the gesture, relegating it for tomorrow, then the next week, until the moment passes and eventually all that surfaces is a consolatory remembrance many months down the line.

But writing thank-you notes carries a more selfish incentive, studies find. When people list the things they're grateful for, their overall mood improves and their depressive symptoms subside. You feel more at ease, less stressed, and more mindful of the things that make you happy — which, after writing the thank-you notes, can itself be added to the list.

The Study

In 2012, researchers at Kent State University conducted tests on 219 individuals, 188 of whom were women, building on prior studies performed in 2009 by doctors Steven Toepfer and Kathleen Walker, both associate professors in Human Development and Family Studies. The new team, still led by Toepfer, divided their participants into two groups, writers and non-writers.

The pair had the subjects complete questionnaires once a week for four weeks. During weeks two, three, and four the subjects wrote a letter of gratitude. The letters ranged from half a page to a full page in length, and participants both hand wrote and typed the letters. Toepfer and his team did not believe the method of letter-writing affected the outcome.

During the measurement periods, the team looked at four distinct levels: gratitude, life satisfaction, happiness, and depressive symptoms.

According to the definitions in their 2009 study, the first three measurements contained the following criteria:

Gratitude: typically comprised of appreciation, thankfulness, and a sense of wonder... It indicates that people can extract the most satisfaction and enjoyment from life events and facilitates positive experiences.

Life Satisfaction: commonly referred to as the cognitive and personal assessment of general quality of life and is based on unique or personalized criteria that varies among individuals.

Happiness: a feeling of gladness and satisfaction or contentment, suggesting increased insight, and therefore subjective selection and consideration about the important things in one's life.

The newest trait, depressive symptoms, was included only as part of the 2012 study, where it was defined as such:

Depressive Symptoms: assessments of a negative affect and its contribution to well-being. Depression can be defined not only by high levels of negative affect but also relative levels compared to positive affect.

The Results

The results of the studies bolstered Toepfer's and Walker's earlier findings in 2009, the team said. Not only did the larger sample size agree with the increases in happiness, life satisfaction, and gratitude, but the new component of depressive symptoms decreased substantially.

"The implications are that this type of expressive writing can benefit those who suffer from depressive symptoms," concluded the researchers. "Further research is necessary, but gratitude letters may be a simple intervention for those who struggle with such symptomatology."

While the researchers acknowledge that attaching a definition to subjective, nebulous concepts like happiness can compromise the study, their methodology has salience.

Founder of behavioral economics and Nobel Prize-winning economist, Daniel Kahneman claims happiness is two-faced. It's split, in other words, between an experiencing self and a remembering self. The experiencing self lives in the moment, while the remembering self stores that moment to look back on while experiencing later moments.

Writing thank-you notes seems to serve both selves, perhaps explaining why they reinforce such positive emotions in the writer. His or her experiencing self finds immense gratitude in the writing process itself, of transferring heartwarming ideas to the page.

All the while, it's drawing upon the remembering self in order to formulate those ideas. They're where the ideas come from. You're happy presently showing gratitude, and you're happy reliving the moments you're writing about.

"We know that happiness is mainly being satisfied with people that we like, spending time with people that we like," said Kahnmen. "There are other pleasures, but this is dominant."

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News Headline: Forbes' college rankings lists Oberlin as best in Ohio; Case Western Reserve No. 3 in state (poll) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Forbes - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Cliff Pinckard, The Plain Dealer
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on July 25, 2013 at 10:00 AM, updated July 25, 2013 at 11:42 AM
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(PHOTO) Forbes ranks Oberlin College as the best in Ohio and No. 50 in the nation, praising the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, above. (Courtesy of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music)
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CLEVELAND, Ohio — Let's hear it for the ol' mikado yellow and cardinal red.

Those are the school colors for Oberlin College, which at No. 50 is the highest-ranking Ohio school on Forbes' list of top colleges in America. At No. 3 in the state is Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, ranked No. 89 overall. Forbes' list includes 650 schools.

Oberlin is a private liberal-arts school that has 2,959 undergraduate students with a total annual cost of $59,683, including tuition and housing. Forbes gives the school a grade of A-plus, citing its Conservatory of Music, which is the oldest in continuous operation in the country. It also notes the school has a 64-bit supercomputer, the first at any four-year liberal-arts school in the country.

Oberlin is also lauded for purchasing about 40 percent of its total food budget locally.

Case scores an A from Forbes. It has 4,016 undergraduate students and 9,636 students overall, and the total annual cost is $59,026. From the Forbes summary:

The school is part of the Global E3, which allows engineering students at member universities to attend overseas schools at home institution tuition. A campus wind turbine powers nearly 5 percent of the energy used in the student athletic center. In addition, student workers at the university's farm produce over 3 tons of vegetables annually which are served in campus dining halls. The annual Hudson Relay, the oldest tradition at CWRU, is a 26-mile relay race that occurs around campus to commemorate when the university moved 26 miles from Hudson, Ohio to its current location in 1882.
Rounding out the top five Ohio schools are Kenyon College in Gambier at No. 69; Case Western Reserve at No. 89; Denison University in Granville at No. 130; and Ohio State University in Columbus at No. 138.

John Carroll University in University Heights is ranked No. 9 in Ohio and No. 219 overall. Other Northeast Ohio schools of note: Hiram College (No. 18 in the state, No. 379 overall); Baldwin-Wallace in Berea (21, 457); University of Akron (24, 585); Kent State (26, 605); Cleveland State (27, 612); and Youngstown State (30, 638).

Forbes does not list a grade for Cleveland State, which has 11,522 undergraduate students and 17,229 students overall. Its total annual cost is $28,058. Here's what Forbes has to say about CSU:

CSU is one of the only university's in the nation with a public K-12 school on campus, where education students can gain teaching experience. President Obama has visited the university four times. Angelin Chang, a Grammy Award-winning pianist, is a member of the music faculty. At CSU, there are more than 250 partnerships and collaborations such as the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland Metropolitan School District, City of Cleveland, and the NASA Glenn Research Center, to name a few.

Stanford University in California is ranked No. 1 overall on the Forbes list. The private school has nearly 20,000 students and a total annual cost of $58,846. On Stanford, Forbes notes:

Located in Palo Alto, Stanford is largely responsible for developing the region that would become known as Silicon Valley, the home to the world's highest tech companies and greatest innovators. Beyond that, Stanford houses the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, a major public policy think tank that attracts scholars from around the world. The university is home to the world's largest stem cell research facility, and an entirely new campus for the business school, thanks to the $6.2 billion fundraising campaign that has gone down in the books as the most successful university fundraising campaign in history.
After Stanford, the top 10 schools are Pomona College in Claremont, Calif.; Princeton University in New Jersey; Yale University in New Haven, Conn.; Columbia University in New York; Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pa.; West Point in West Point, N.Y.; Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.; Williams College in Williamstown, Mass.; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass.

Forbes partnered with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity in forming its list. Go here for a more extensive explanation of its methodology.

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News Headline: MyCommunities.Ohio.com Things to do this weekend -- July 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: July 24,2013 06:28 PM GMT

Once again, the Ohio.com staff has complied a list of local upcoming events for this weekend and beyond. So check out a few things going on in your community or nearby neigborhoods.

For more things to do, visit Enjoy.Ohio.com.

Barberton

Concert -- The Legacy Five will be playing at 6 p.m. this Friday at the Hartville Kitchen. The cost of entry is $36. (http://events.ohio.com/hartville_oh/events/show/329925703-legacy-five)

Group meeting -- A New Beginning Social Group for Widows and Widowers will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday at Thano's Restaurant. (330-745-6239)

Bath

Cookout -- Fun in the “SON” Kingdom cookout will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday. The event will be held at the Bath Community Activity Center. (http://events.ohio.com/akron_oh/events/show/337540823-fun-in-the-son-kingdom-cookout)

Hale Farm & Village — 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath Township. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays-Sundays, through August. Museum admission is $10, $5/child age 3-12. Western Reserve Historical Society members and children 2 and under are free. 330-666-3711, www.halefarm.org

Play-- Western Reserve Playhouse's Applause opens at 8 p.m. on Friday and continues through Aug. 17.m. The cost is $14, $12 seniors and students. (330-620-7314)

Copley-Fairlawn

Yoga -- Outdoor yoga classes will be held at 9 a.m. this Saturday at Crown Point Ecology Center. The cost of the class is $8. (http://events.ohio.com/akron_oh/events/show/337052483-outdoor-yoga-classes-at-crown-point-ecology-center)

Dancing -- Ballroom Dancing will take place at 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Sherwood Dance Club, 960 Jacoby Road, Copley Township. The cost is $7. (330-864-4484)

Cuyahoga Falls

Concert -- The Cleveland Orchestra will be playing works of Debussy and Beethoven at 7 p.m. on Saturday, at Blossom Music Center. (http://events.ohio.com/cuyahoga_falls_oh/events/show/340643663-the-cleveland-orchestra-debussy-beethoven)

Sale -- The Food Truck Roundup & Huge Tent Sale will take place at 9 a.m. on Saturday, at Rubber City Harley-Davidson. (http://events.ohio.com/cuyahoga_falls_oh/events/show/334540643-food-truck-roundup-huge-tent-sale)

Green

Dance With Kent Le Mar -- Lessons will take place at 9 a.m. Saturdays, Theatre Dance Centre, 4800 Massillon Road, Green. For ages 30 or older. $10 per class. (330-899-9655)

Lacrosse Tournament -- The Summer Chill Lacrosse Tournament will be held at 9 a.m. on Saturday, at the Diamond Community Park. (http://events.ohio.com/canton_oh/events/show/309665907-summer-chill-lacrosse-tournament)

Hudson

Farmers Market -- The Hudson Farmers Market will take place at 9 a.m. on Saturday, at Clocktower Green. (http://www.hudson.oh.us/Calendar.aspx?EID=725)

Summer Music Nights - Sight N Sound will be held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, at First and Main Green. (http://www.hudson.oh.us/Calendar.aspx?EID=694)

Jackson

Networking -- The Jackson-Belden Chamber of Commerce will host a networking event from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday at Muggswigz Coffee & Tea Company.

Winery Tours — Noon to 2 p.m. Saturdays through Sept. 28 at Gervasi Vineyard, 1700 55th St. NE, Canton. Tours are approximately 40 minutes long and start on the hour. Free. For more information, call 330-497-1000 or go to www.gervasivineyard.com.

Kent

Concert -- The Kent State Piano Institute's concert will be held at 4 p.m. on Sunday, at the First United Methodist Church in Cuyahoga Falls. (http://cuyahogafalls.ohio.com/entertainment/kent-state-university-piano-institute-to-perform-at-first-united-methodist-on-sunday-1.414799)

Farmers Market -- The Haymaker Farmers' Market will be held at 9 a.m. on Saturday, at the Haymakers Farmers' Market. There is no cost for entry. (http://events.ohio.com/kent_oh/events/show/324757263-haymaker-farmers-market)

Stow

Musical -- Fiddler on the Roof will start at 7 p.m. on Saturday, at Kent State University's main campus. (http://events.ohio.com/kent_oh/events/show/333759203-fiddler-on-the-roof)

National Night Out-- The Stow Police Department and local Target store will host Stow's National Night Out event from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m on Aug. 6 . on the grassy area between SKIP Playground and Fire Station No. 1.

Wadsworth

Wadsworth Community Band — Seeking new members on all instruments. No audition required. Rehearsals are 7-9:15 p.m. Thursdays in the Wadsworth Middle School band room. http://wadsworthcommunityband.com or 330-336-1290.

BBQ Showdown -- Barbeque competition held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 2 at the Wadsworth Soprema Senior Center and Cafe, 617 School Drive. http://wadsworth.ohio.com/wadsworth-soprema-senior-center-and-cafe-s-bbq-showdown-to-feature-cooking-competition-1.414797

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News Headline: Bright Spots: July 25, 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Youngstown Business Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Great Lakes NeuroTechnologies makes further advances in brain stimulation, a Kent State professor lands a $330,000 National Science Foundation grant and Findaway World in Solon finds a local library patron for its Playaway Bookpack kits.

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News Headline: Fox 8 News at 10PM | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 News at 10 PM - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (VIDEO)

some severe weather in places. 66 degrees tonight could partly cloudy some dense fog. C we have 3 miles at youngstown right now.at almost a mile and lorain. Resort to we start to see some dense fog. Chance of chance chance of afternoon thunder shout at eventually will see a line development most of the line will go south, but will be on the northern edge of that.ut 77 on thursday with great sleepy weather with the 57. You can see the northwest wind taking over. Here comes another clean sweep that we have in-line. No lie need no '90s anytime this week going into next week. ' all of the heat will once again migrate to the rockies and to the west.lloc while we maintain a temperate temperature patternn and from time to time cool and comfortable.ti wednesday and thursday being the next batch and then tour early next week. >> They can state university sophomore was honored today for spotting a potentially violent threat online and that a learning authorities.re 19 zoe burch was recognized by can stay in ohio homeland security for her fast response when she discovered a threat in an online chat room.ohre so a posted they were going into their pennsylvania high school with a gun to commit a shooting. Zoe burch called police and call police and the suspect was later arrested. >> He is actually so rewarding. I mean when I read it I was thinkingre what would happen if I did not say anything and just to know that you know I could have saved someone's life is just reallyg i, just really rewarding. >> She received two certificates for her quick thinking one from the kent state police and the other from ohio homeland security.kiol >> Doctors are calling it the newest teen trent and the results could be deadly. >> Still to come, find out what an ohio boy accidentally and heldfi and why it could easily happen again you a lot o thinng on a ke. Out your life. Fa your dres. Onof my drms cameto me on bike. To opeup my own shop. So what haens whenyou colete aam? We, you ju start thinkingf the ne.

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