Report Overview:
Total Clips (43)
Alumni (3)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (2)
Athletics; Students (1)
Biological Sciences (1)
Board of Trustees; Office of the President (4)
Board of Trustees; Office of the President; Students (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Fashion Design; KSU Museum (2)
Geology (1)
Higher Education (2)
Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (3)
KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
KSU at Salem (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Political Science (5)
Psychology (2)
Residence Services (3)
Students (2)
Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown (1)
University Administration (1)
University Press (1)
Other (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
Artist/educator is YSU commencement speaker 08/12/2013 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

Youngstown Alfred L. Bright, an internationally renowned artist and trail-blazing African-American educator, will be the featured speaker at Youngstown...

Sagamore Hills resident becomes 'face of' planned Akron Children's Museum 08/11/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...Stephanie Rericha don't have children, he plans to give the museum membership to his sister and brother-in-law and their two young daughters. The 2009 Kent State University graduate works full time for American Greetings in Cleveland. "I've worked at American Greetings World Headquarters in Cleveland...

Sagamore Hills resident becomes 'face of' planned Akron Children's Museum 08/10/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Stephanie Rericha don't have children, he plans to give the museum membership to his sister and brother-in-law and their two young daughters. The 2009 Kent State University graduate works full time for American Greetings in Cleveland. "I've worked at American Greetings World Headquarters in Cleveland...


Art, School of (1)
Juvenile court to feature art exhibit, family activity at Summit for Kids 08/10/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...will display a variety of art pieces created by youth in its Detention Center during the past year. During that time, the court has partnered with the Kent State University National Art Education Association (NAEA) student group. These student volunteers conducted one-hour long art lessons that first...


Athletics (2)
Kent State baseball coach Jeff Duncan to speak at KACC luncheon Thursday 08/12/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

First-year Kent State baseball head coach Jeff Duncan will be the featured guest speaker at the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce's luncheon on Aug. 15...

Kent State OL Pat McShane carted off field with injury 08/10/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Haynes. "This is the week you look around the nation and see a lot of guys getting hurt and banged up. It's just the nature of the beast." Ironically, Kent State started the same five offensive linemen in every game last season. Junior tight end Kyle Payton is also out of action because of a...


Athletics; Students (1)
DAY IN THE LIFE 08/12/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Dri Archer is recognized by many as Kent State's superstar speedster, who now has a Heisman campaign. He is that player, but in reality, he is simply...


Biological Sciences (1)
Recent Reports from Kent State University Highlight Findings in Alzheimer Disease 08/10/2013 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...mechanisms can mediate alterations in transcription due to environmental influences." Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In order to identify genes susceptible to regulation in the adult cortex by one type of epigenetic mechanism, histone, and...


Board of Trustees; Office of the President (4)
Times are changing for local university presidents 08/11/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Luis Proenza's bombshell announcement last week that he would step down from the helm of the University of Akron next summer after 15 years on the job was the latest in a series of presidential shakeups that have the potential to dramatically...

PUSHED BY PROENZA: AN AGING INDUSTRIAL REGION HAS BENEFITED FROM HIS MESSAGE ABOUT HOW TO GET AHEAD IN THE NEW ECONOMY 08/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Almost any assessment of the 14 years Luis Proenza has led the University of Akron must begin with the physical transformation of the campus. Appearances matter, and the $620 million investment has brought a sense...

OUR VIEW: Seeking Kent State's next chief executive 08/10/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Some attributes to consider in choosing a successor to lefton Kent State University's search for a successor to President Lester Lefton has begun in earnest with the appointment of a search committee that will...

Kent State Presidential Search Committee Includes City Manager, Bank Executive 08/12/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Outgoing president set to retire in July 2014 The 15-person committee charged with finding the successor to Kent State University's President Lester...


Board of Trustees; Office of the President; Students (1)
Local news briefs -- Aug. 10 08/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT Search committee KENT: Kent State University has formed a search committee to recruit a successor to President Lester A. Lefton, who previously announced retirement will...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Smartphone Use Linked to Poor Physical Fitness (Lepp) 08/12/2013 Daily Glow Text Attachment Email

If you are like most people, you spend more time exercising your fingers on your iPhone than your glutes and hamstrings on a Stairmaster. Unfortunately,...


Fashion Design; KSU Museum (2)
Friends of Fashion Gala highlights talents of Bob Mackie 08/11/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Friends of Fashion of the Kent State University Museum and Fashion School is hosting "Bob Mackie: A Razzle Dazzle Collection," on Sept. 28, in the atrium of Rockwell Hall at...

Friends of Fashion Gala highlights talents of Bob Mackie 08/10/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Friends of Fashion of the Kent State University Museum and Fashion School is hosting "Bob Mackie: A Razzle Dazzle Collection," on Sept. 28, in the atrium of Rockwell Hall at...


Geology (1)
Let's not go BANANAs over shale gas drilling 08/09/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...occurring radioactive materials (NORM), that we have been producing and handling for the past 75 years. Indeed, according to a study last year out of Kent State, fracked wells actually produce less contaminated water than conventional wells on a per million cubic foot basis of production. Earthquakes,...


Higher Education (2)
Bob Dyer: UA graduation rate is awful 08/10/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...If you are among the multitude who missed it, feast on these stats: • Of all the first-time, full-time students who enroll at the main campus at the University of Akron, only 14 percent graduate in four years. • Only 38 percent graduate in six years. That is absolutely, positively unacceptable....

YSU plans to involve other colleges and career technical centers 08/11/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Youngstown State University received a $874,000 grant to fund student manufacturing internships in Mahoning, Trumbull, Columbiana, Mercer and Lawrence...


Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (3)
Kent Central Gateway opening celebrated 08/10/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent economic development including the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, Acorn Alley II and the Fairmount Properties block with corporate offices, residential apartments,...

Kent Central Gateway opening celebrated 08/12/2013 Hudson Hub-Times Text Attachment Email

Local, state and national dignitaries gathered on East Erie Street in Kent Aug. 4 to celebrate the completion of the Portage Area Regional Transportation...

New Kent Central Gateway Transit Center set to open Aug. 12 08/09/2013 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...transportation options in Northeastern Ohio and is key to local efforts to revitalize downtown Kent and connect the city's central business district with Kent State University. FTA Regional Administrator Marisol Simon joined Congressman Tim Ryan and other local officials at the event. The Department...


KSU at E. Liverpool (2)
Edupalooza activities make learning fun for kids 08/10/2013 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...of spurring economic development. "Education is the largest employer in East Liverpool," Shepherd pointed out, saying, "We are lucky" to have the Kent State University campus, Buckeye Online School for Success, Ohio Valley College of Technology in Calcutta and other educational entities in the...

City holds fun, entertaining day 08/10/2013 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...of spurring economic development. "Education is the largest employer in East Liverpool," Shepherd pointed out, saying, "We are lucky" to have the Kent State University campus, Buckeye Online School for Success, Ohio Valley College of Technology in Calcutta and other educational entities in the...


KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Salem's Discovery Garden benefits pantry 08/11/2013 Salem News - Online Text Attachment Email

SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is sharing the bounty from its Discovery Garden with deliveries of fresh produce to the Salem Community Pantry in recent...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Kent company revs up with motorcycle visor 08/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...which gets a large portion of its revenues through research grants and contracts. The company has its research, development and production facilities at Kent State University's Centennial Research Park, off state Route 59. AlphaMicron's other consumer product is a ski goggle that tints with the...


Political Science (5)
Dear square is safer handful (Stacher) 08/09/2013 Capital Public Radio Text Attachment Email

...for cc and by extension the military could end up costing Egyptian and Democratic gains made since two thousand Joshua stacker is in Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rival force either inside the state or outside the state that can really challenge its hegemony or seek...

Egypt from the Muslim brotherhood (Stacher) 08/09/2013 WBFO-FM (WBFO 88.7) Text Attachment Email

...unbridled enthusiasm for easy expansion in military could end up costing Egyptian democratic gains they've made it out Joshua stacker is in Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rhyme will force either inside the state or out of state that can really challenge its hegemony or seek...

Neighboring countries struggling with con (Stacher) 08/09/2013 WBEZ-FM (Chicago Public Radio) Text Attachment Email

...seeking an extension the military could end up costing Egyptians the Democratic gains made since two thousand and Joshua stacker isn't legit expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rival force either inside the state or outside the state that can really challenge its hegemony or seek...

Killing US ambassador in Egypt (Stacher) 08/09/2013 KOPB-AM Text Attachment Email

...and by extension the military could end up costing Egyptians the Democratic gains they've made since two thousand Joshua stacker is in Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rival force either inside the state or out of state that can really challenge the hegemony or seek to moderate...

Top Egyptian General Reaches Rock Star Status (Stacher) 08/09/2013 Morning Edition - NPR Text Email

...Sissi, and by extension, the military, could end up costing Egyptians the democratic gains they've made since 2011. Joshua Stacher is an Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio. JOSHUA STACHER: There is no rival force, either inside the state or outside the state, that can really challenge...


Psychology (2)
How to Avoid the Self-Esteem Trap 08/09/2013 Yahoo! News Text Attachment Email

...issue of Mind includes a Special Report that highlights learning techniques. In the lead article of this section, John Dunlosky, a psychologist at Kent State University, and his colleagues explain how they sifted through hundreds of scientific papers to determine what study methods work best...

How to Avoid the Self-Esteem Trap 08/09/2013 Scientific American - Online Text Attachment Email

...this issue of Mind includes a Special Report that highlights learning techniques. In the lead article of this section, John Dunlosky, a psychologist at Kent State University, and his colleagues explain how they sifted through hundreds of scientific papers to determine what study methods work best...


Residence Services (3)
Even a pro needs advice for college prep 08/11/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Saundra Wright is a professional organizer, but found herself floundering this summer when faced with the all the organization decisions needed to get...

Even a pro needs advice for college prep 08/11/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Saundra Wright is a professional organizer, but found herself floundering this summer when faced with the all the organization decisions needed to get...

Even a pro needs advice for college prep 08/11/2013 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Saundra Wright is a professional organizer, but found herself floundering this summer when faced with the all the organization decisions needed to get...


Students (2)
Kent State Veterans Club hosting 3rd annual Adam Hamilton Scholarship Fund Memorial Cornhole Tourney 08/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: The Kent State Veterans Club is hosting the 3rd annual Adam Hamilton Scholarship Fund Memorial Cornhole Tournament this Saturday. With all proceeds...

Prison for former Kent man in sex assault of teenage girl 08/12/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A former Kent man h a s be e n sentenced to nine months in pr i s o n and been labeled a sex offender after pleading guilty to soliciting a 14-yearold...


Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
PERSON OF INTEREST: TYLER HANES 08/11/2013 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Text Email

Tyler Hanes is drawn to musical theater for the stories. Now, the 20-year-old is writing his story. The rising junior at Kent State University had met Broadway star Idina Menzel nine other times, but he added a chapter when she invited him on stage for a duet during...


Town-Gown (1)
Building Better Neighborhoods Special 08/10/2013 Building Better Neighborhoods Special - WEWS-CLE (ABC) Text Attachment Email

...you. First, let's take a look at kent. This is known as the tree city. It's the largest city. If you haven't been to kent late or perhaps you went to kent state and haven't been back in a long time, you won't believe the transformation taking place in the downtown area. [ music ] >> They're singing...


University Administration (1)
EDITORIAL: A good time to catch a college movie 08/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Dear Would-Be College Presidents, I know many of you are looking closely at all the changes in Northeast Ohio, including at Kent State and the University of Akron, and seeing opportunities. As someone who has been both a student and teacher at UA, I very much believe...


University Press (1)
Cleveland author James Jessen Badal featured on episode of 'Haunted History' 08/12/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Cleveland writer and teacher James Jessen Badal, author of "In the Wake of the Butcher: Cleveland's Torso Murders," will be featured...


Other (1)
EDITORIAL: You're the U in OSU and KSU 08/12/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

The bumper sticker reads: "My Kid and My Money go to Ohio State." For most parents who mount the tuition treadmill, it's not funny. It's the truth. ...


News Headline: Artist/educator is YSU commencement speaker | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Youngstown

Alfred L. Bright, an internationally renowned artist and trail-blazing African-American educator, will be the featured speaker at Youngstown State University's summer commencement at 10 a.m. Saturday in Beeghly Center.

Angela Cameron of Mineral Ridge, who will receive a master's degree in education in counseling, is the featured student speaker.

The ceremony also marks the first commencement under the leadership of Randy J. Dunn, who became YSU's eighth president July 15.

Bright earned a bachelor's degree in art education from Youngstown University in 1964 and a master's degree in painting from Kent State University in 1965. He was the first African-American full-service faculty member at Youngstown University in 1965. Bright also was the founding director of the Black Studies (Africana Studies) Program at YSU, a post he had from 1970 to 1987. In that role, Bright developed an inter- disciplinary program of study and coursework that brought curricular diversity to the university and the greater Youngstown area.

Bright has had more than 50 solo art exhibits, including shows at the Butler Institute of American Art, Stanford University, Kent State University and the Canton Art Institute. His work also appears in permanent collections, including those at the Butler, Kent State University Gallery, Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts, Northeastern University, the Harmon and Harriet Kelly Collection of African- American Art and the Canton Museum of Art.

A 2012 performance on Super Bowl Sunday at the Akron Art Museum, in which Bright painted “Portals In Time” to live music by the Jesse Dandy Jazz Trio, drew the largest crowd the museum has ever seen in its 90-year history.

Among Bright's awards, honors and listings are: Who's Who in American Art, Who's Who in Black America, three YSU Distinguished Professorship Awards, Phi Kappa Phi National Artist Award Nominee and the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. Bright served a five-year term on the Ohio Arts Council and is on the Junior Achievement Foundation Board of Directors.

Cameron earned a bachelor's degree in sociology from Ohio University before enrolling in the YSU Beeghly College of Education's Department of Counseling, Special Education and School Psychology graduate program for counseling.

During her graduate work, Cameron presented research at the All-Ohio Counselors Conference in 2011 and 2012, the School Psychology Summer Institute in 2012, the Educational Research Exchange in 2013 and the American Counseling Association's National Conference in 2013. She was inducted into the Golden Key International Honor Society, Omicron Delta Kappa honor society, Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society and Chi Sigma Iota inter- national honor society.

Cameron also was very involved in Chi Sigma Iota and served as president of the Eta Chapter. She was nominated by faculty and peers for Chi Sigma Iota's Outstanding Entry-Level Student Award. She is a member of the American School Counselor Association, American Counseling Association, Ohio Counselors Association, Ohio School Counselors Association, Ohio Afterschool Association and National Afterschool Association.

Cameron has worked as the children-services coordinator at the Jewish Community Center, director of the Youngstown Afterschool Alliance and a research associate/evaluator at YSU. Most recently, she completed her school-counseling internship at Lordstown and Warren City schools, and she completed her clinical mental-health counseling internship at Meridian Community Care in Youngstown.

During her career, she has been awarded more than $6.5 million in grant funding for various programs.

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News Headline: Sagamore Hills resident becomes 'face of' planned Akron Children's Museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Sagamore Hills resident's logo design for a proposed children's museum in Akron bested more than 30 other submissions.

Alex Rodgers' design -- which spells "Akron" in different colors using a wind-up wheel for the letter A, a spaceman (or alien) for the letter R and a blimp for the O -- was one of the three finalists selected last month. The other finalists were Norman Mallard from Akron and Josh Smith from Cuyahoga Falls. The three designs were then shown to the public for an online vote. More than 2,000 votes were cast.

"I'm definitely a big kid at heart," Rodgers said. "So designing for kids is what I love to do most. Most people around me know this, so I had lots of friends and family telling me I should submit a design, and I'm glad they did! I always design and illustrate with a sense of wit or whimsy when I'm working for myself. It's harder for me to find the bigger picture if I'm not having a little fun doing it. For this logo in particular, I wanted to make sure I focused on the perception of kids. For children, life is all about discovery, imagination, and adventure. I knew that I could create a logo that nuanced all of that, while paying homage to Akron, with its letterforms. It took a few pages of sketching, but once I got it down it didn't take too long for everything to come together digitally."

Katie Smith, marketing and communications with the proposed museum, said that the facility will hopefully open in about three years in the O'Neil Building, adjacent to Lock 3, on South Main St. in downtown Akron. The museum's attractions will be aimed at children 12 and younger.

Rodgers said he was "thrilled it will be the 'face' of the museum."As the winning designer, Rodgers received a one-year family membership to the museum, when it opens, and gift cards to Akron-area businesses totaling $200. Rodgers said that since he and fiancé Stephanie Rericha don't have children, he plans to give the museum membership to his sister and brother-in-law and their two young daughters.

The 2009 Kent State University graduate works full time for American Greetings in Cleveland.

"I've worked at American Greetings World Headquarters in Cleveland since right out of college," he said. "I design and plan greeting cards for retailers all over the U.S., including Target and Walmart. It's a really awesome company to work for. The people there are great, and there are renowned artists that work in the same building."

In addition, Rodgers said he is the president of his own company, Lil' Burritos.

"I started it in October of 2010 with my fiance, who majored in early-childhood education at Kent State," he said. "At the time, I was at AG and was unsure if my part-time job there would turn full time. While my back was to the wall, I decided to take the plunge and start my own passion project. It started as a way to combine both of our interests and create gifts for our nieces, but has grown into something we never really anticipated. Now I have both a full-time spot with AG, and Lil' Burritos as my hobby. So I'm usually quite busy."

Rodgers said as a child, his parents took him up to the Cleveland Children's Museum.

"We always wondered when Akron would build one of its own so that we'd have one nearby," he said. "When I heard about the contest, I knew I wanted to take a chance at being a part of it."

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News Headline: Sagamore Hills resident becomes 'face of' planned Akron Children's Museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Sagamore Hills resident's logo design for a proposed children's museum in Akron bested more than 30 other submissions.

Alex Rodgers' design -- which spells "Akron" in different colors using a wind-up wheel for the letter A, a spaceman (or alien) for the letter R and a blimp for the O -- was one of the three finalists selected last month. The other finalists were Norman Mallard from Akron and Josh Smith from Cuyahoga Falls. The three designs were then shown to the public for an online vote. More than 2,000 votes were cast.

"I'm definitely a big kid at heart," Rodgers said. "So designing for kids is what I love to do most. Most people around me know this, so I had lots of friends and family telling me I should submit a design, and I'm glad they did! I always design and illustrate with a sense of wit or whimsy when I'm working for myself. It's harder for me to find the bigger picture if I'm not having a little fun doing it. For this logo in particular, I wanted to make sure I focused on the perception of kids. For children, life is all about discovery, imagination, and adventure. I knew that I could create a logo that nuanced all of that, while paying homage to Akron, with its letterforms. It took a few pages of sketching, but once I got it down it didn't take too long for everything to come together digitally."

Katie Smith, marketing and communications with the proposed museum, said that the facility will hopefully open in about three years in the O'Neil Building, adjacent to Lock 3, on South Main St. in downtown Akron. The museum's attractions will be aimed at children 12 and younger.

Rodgers said he was "thrilled it will be the 'face' of the museum."As the winning designer, Rodgers received a one-year family membership to the museum, when it opens, and gift cards to Akron-area businesses totaling $200. Rodgers said that since he and fiancé Stephanie Rericha don't have children, he plans to give the museum membership to his sister and brother-in-law and their two young daughters.

The 2009 Kent State University graduate works full time for American Greetings in Cleveland.

"I've worked at American Greetings World Headquarters in Cleveland since right out of college," he said. "I design and plan greeting cards for retailers all over the U.S., including Target and Walmart. It's a really awesome company to work for. The people there are great, and there are renowned artists that work in the same building."

In addition, Rodgers said he is the president of his own company, Lil' Burritos.

"I started it in October of 2010 with my fiance, who majored in early-childhood education at Kent State," he said. "At the time, I was at AG and was unsure if my part-time job there would turn full time. While my back was to the wall, I decided to take the plunge and start my own passion project. It started as a way to combine both of our interests and create gifts for our nieces, but has grown into something we never really anticipated. Now I have both a full-time spot with AG, and Lil' Burritos as my hobby. So I'm usually quite busy."

Rodgers said as a child, his parents took him up to the Cleveland Children's Museum.

"We always wondered when Akron would build one of its own so that we'd have one nearby," he said. "When I heard about the contest, I knew I wanted to take a chance at being a part of it."

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News Headline: Juvenile court to feature art exhibit, family activity at Summit for Kids | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Creativity will be the theme for the Summit County Juvenile Court's activities during Summit for Kids, which will take place Aug. 17 at the John S. Knight Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The court will be offering an eco-friendly, family fun art activity in Hay Room A of the John S. Knight Center. Families are encouraged to create designs from items that can be found at home and will be able to take home ideas on how they can be more environmentally conscious.

"Summit for Kids is an event designed for families, and this activity provides something the entire family can enjoy" said Judge Linda Tucci Teodosio.

Additionally, Judge Teodosio said the court will display a variety of art pieces created by youth in its Detention Center during the past year. During that time, the court has partnered with the Kent State University National Art Education Association (NAEA) student group. These student volunteers conducted one-hour long art lessons that first examined contemporary art pieces as a group and then applied the lessons learned to a studio portion of the class.  Classes are led by NAEA president Daniel Humphrey and the youth were encouraged to do self-portraits and depict positive people or events in their lives and create art from those memories. Examples of this artwork can also be found in Hay Room A.

"I hope the people who see these creations are as impressed as I was when I saw them," stated the judge. "They are deeply personal and thoughtful portraits infused with imagination. You can tell the youth took their lessons and their project seriously."

Summit for Kids is free and open to the public. The Juvenile Court informational booth, which will be located in the second floor main exhibit hall, will have free school supply giveaway items as youth prepare to return to school.

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News Headline: Kent State baseball coach Jeff Duncan to speak at KACC luncheon Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: First-year Kent State baseball
head coach Jeff Duncan will be
the featured guest speaker at the
Kent Area Chamber of Commerce's
luncheon on Aug. 15 at the Water
Street Tavern.
The cost of the luncheon is $15
for KACC members or $20 for potential
members.
Networking for the event begins
at 11:30 a.m., with lunch sponsored
by McKay Bricker Framing
and Gallery to follow. Duncan's talk
will follow after lunch. The KACC
asks for all RSVPs to be in no later
than Tuesday. Email RSVPs to
kcalvin@kentbiz.com or by calling
330-673-9855.

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News Headline: Kent State OL Pat McShane carted off field with injury | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Allen Moff
News OCR Text: Senior left guard Pat McShane, one of only two returning starters on the offensive line from a year ago, was carted off the field after suffering a knee injury during Thursday's practice.

"It was a pass play. I think somebody rolled on him from behind," said Haynes. "We'll wait for the swelling to go down and see what happens. He goes to the doctor next week."

Redshirt freshman Alex Nielsen and junior college transfer Jim Katusha will fill in while McShane is sidelined.

"We've just gotta be careful for the rest of camp to make sure that we're smart," said Haynes. "This is the week you look around the nation and see a lot of guys getting hurt and banged up. It's just the nature of the beast."

Ironically, Kent State started the same five offensive linemen in every game last season.

Junior tight end Kyle Payton is also out of action because of a heart ailment.

"He had this in high school. It's something that we knew about. It just happened over the summer again, he had some issues with breathing," said Haynes. "I think he has to go back and have a procedure. He'll be available down the road.

"Other than that it's just typical camp nicks and bruises. We'll fight through it."

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News Headline: DAY IN THE LIFE | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dri Archer is recognized by
many as Kent State's superstar
speedster, who now has a Heisman
campaign. He is that player, but
in reality, he is simply a teammate
that likes to blend in and have fun.
So what's it like to be senior speed demon Dri Archer, Kent State's
do-it-all Heisman Trophy candidate? Right now, it's probably not
as glamorous as you may expect.
Archer, like college football players across the country, is in the
midst of the preseason camp grind as the Golden Flashes prepare
for their 2013 season opener on Aug. 29 against Liberty. The hard
work he'll put in over this three-week stretch will hopefully lead to glory for both
Archer and his team once the season begins, but before the glory comes the grind.
With the help of Kent State head coach Paul Haynes, who provided full access to
the team, Record-Courier sports writer Allen Moff spent
last Wednesday following Archer through a 16-hour day,
featuring a pair of practices and several team meetings.
Here's what happened, a day in the life of Dri:
MORNING PRACTICE
It's Wednesday, Aug. 7, the first day of dreaded two-a-day practices at Dix Stadium.
Archer wakes up early to get prepared for a long, strenuous day on and
off the field.
“It was an early day, our first two-a-day, so I got up early this morning at 5:45. I
wanted to wake up early and make sure I'm awake for practice. The bus (transporting
players from their dorms to the stadium) left at like 6:15, so I made sure
I had all of my stuff ready. When I get here (Dix Stadium), I go straight to the
training room, get taped, put my pads in my pants, put my pants on. Then I have
breakfast. I usually eat cereal every morning, just keep it the same, either Apple
Jacks or Fruit Loops. After I eat cereal, I go back into the locker room and just
hang out for a little while, just sit at my locker until we have meetings.”
On this day, team meetings start at 7:40 a.m., followed by a morning practice at
8:30. As practice begins, I warn Archer's running backs coach, Ted Bahhur, that
I'll be following him around throughout the day.
“That's great,” said Bahhur. “He'll be all over the place.”
n Practice begins under cloudy skies, with a cool breeze blowing through the stadium and temperatures
comfortably in the mid-70s. Players are in full-pads, and action begins with a walk-through
on the offensive side as plays continue to be installed early in camp. Archer is lined up at wide receiver
as the quarterbacks practice check-downs.
9 a.m.
Archer and several teammates practice catching punts produced by both the
team's punters and a machine that for whatever reason spits out an ugly, sidewinding
kick that not even Archer can run up fast enough to field.

But Archer proceeds to
catch the next several punts
cleanly and looks very comfortable
doing so.
Since kickoff returns are
being fazed out at the pro
level, Archer needs to add
the ability to return punts
to his arsenal to impress
NFL scouts. Aside from his
size (5-foot-8, 175 pounds),
the only knock on Archer
last year was his hands — he
was inconsistent as a passcatcher,
and previous head
coach Darrell Hazell hesitated
to install him as a punt
returner because he wasn't
completely confident in his
ability to consistently catch
punts.
Returning punts is also
another way to get the ball
in Archer's hands this season,
since teams will almost
assuredly avoid booting the
ball his way on kickoffs.
“It's just added another
role. I feel very comfortable
(catching punts). It's something
I work on to try and
get better at every day. That
was something I worked on
mostly in the off-season. I
came here every chance I
got, had a punter come out
here and just caught punts.
I'm pretty comfortable.”
After catching punts, a
trainer gives Archer an extra
five-minute stretch before
kickoff return drills begin.
Archer led the nation a
year ago by averaging 36.9
yards per kickoff return with
three touchdowns.
9:30 a.m.
walk-throughs continue,
as Archer and Bahhur
spend some time working
with junior running back
Anthony Meray on routerunning
techniques. He also
spends some time pointing
things out to freshman running
back Roman Clay.
“I try to coach some of the
young guys playing behind
me in the same role, to get
these young guys up to par.
Having an upperclassman
to watch and learn from,
having them talk to you, it
helps them a lot.”
As practice continues to
unfold, Archer breaks into
short conversations with
several different players
from both sides of the ball.
Archer doesn't seem to be
involved in a certain “click,”
which can be typical of star
players. He just mixes in and
mingles with just about everyone,
even breaking out
into dance along with various
other teammates as
rap songs play periodically
throughout practice.
“I'm cool with everybody. I
talk to everybody. Even the
defensive side, I mess with
everybody. I just try to have
fun while I'm practicing. It's
all fun out here. We go at it
on offense-defense, but it's
just all fun for real.”
9:45 a.m.
The team splits up for individual
position drills, and
the running backs don't
seem overly enthused about
it.
“I know you guys are tired,
but we gotta get going,”
Bahhur prods.
It's been nonstop football
since the players reported
for camp last Thursday,
and it's obviously starting
to take its toll on them both
mentally and physically.
“The toughest part of
camp is getting rest and
coming to practice every
day and wanting to work, especially
for the young guys.
They say every day they just
want it over, say they don't
want to do it, but it's our job
now. That's probably the
hardest part for everybody,
just coming together every
morning and wanting to go
to practice. It's tough both
(mentally and physically),
but it's more mental. You've
gotta have the mentality of
wanting to do something to
be able to do it, you don't
want to take plays off, take
days off. It's all up in your
head. I just use it as another
chance to get better each
and every day.”
9:55 a.m.
Seven-on-7 drills begin.
Archer tries to down-block
220-pound freshman defensive
back Elcee Refuge and
it doesn't go real well, as
Refuge powers through the
block and helps break up
the play. Archer isn't afraid
to get his nose dirty blocking,
but it's not something
he'll be asked to do all that
much this season for obvious
reasons.
About 15 minutes later,
during more 7-on-7 drills,
offensive coordinator Brian
Rock voices his displeasure
with the offense's tempo.
The effort level rises, but
so do the turnover numbers
as several poor snaps from
the backup center wind up
on the turf.
10:25 a.m.
The team goes live, offense
vs. defense, although
tackling to the ground is
not permitted. While the offense
has had the better of
the defense early in camp,
that doesn't happen on this
morning as several blitzers
go unblocked and several
more snaps are not properly
executed. Four passes
are tossed Archer's way, but
none are completed. On one
attempted screen to Archer
four defenders are waiting,
forcing quarterback David
Fisher to just throw the ball
into the ground.
Moments later practice
ends, and Haynes isn't overly
impressed with the showing.
He calls the offensive
execution “very sloppy,” and
criticizes the defense for not
running to the football.
“We know the price. We've
gotta be willing to pay the
price,” Haynes tells the players
in the post-practice huddle.
“(Haynes) hasn't been
very happy,” said Archer.
“You're gonna have your
good days and you're gonna
have your bad days, that's
all part of football, all part of
camp. It's just a long grind,
you know. We've just gotta
have a better practice this
afternoon.”
Archer is then first to the
cold tub, which is just as it
sounds — a huge tub filled
with ice that each player
must soak in after practice.
Physically, he's feeling great
so far, and he wants to keep
it that way.
“It's definitely a grind, but
I'm healthy as I've been in
awhile. We've practiced six
days, and I'm doing good so
far. I'm happy, feeling pretty
good coming into the season.”
n After practice, I look back at
what I've just witnessed and realize
that if I didn't know Dri Archer was
Dri Archer, I probably wouldn't have
noticed him all that much.
As a player, his incredible speed
and burst aren't being utilized or
emphasized during the early stages
of preseason practice.
“Now we're just trying to
install all the plays in our
playbook. It's not like get
Dri the ball this play and
that play. We try to spread
the ball out. It's just practice.
I know when the game
comes, it's gonna be a little
different. I understand what
we're working toward, we're
working towards the season.
We've just gotta take steps
each and every day.”
As a teammate, Archer
basically just blends right
in with the rest of the squad.
“I'm just a laid-back guy.
I'm not really one of those
guys that's gonna say this,
say that. I'm pretty chill,
outside of football especially.
Just like a normal kid. I
try to blend in, try not to be
noticed too much.”
Of course, it's hard to
“blend in” entirely when
you're a star player from
Kent State that's being
touted for the Heisman Trophy.
Archer considered leaving
school early and entering
the NFL Draft following
his record-shattering junior
season, but after he decided
to stay, he was promised
that the school would promote
him for the Heisman.
Kent State has delivered
with a campaign that includes
an official Dri4Heisman.
com website, an @Dri-
4Heisman Twitter page,
Facebook page and a digital
comic strip, “The Archer,”
illustrated by Kent
State graduate Chuck Ayers
of Crankshaft and Funky
Winkerbean fame.
Obviously, being a Heisman
candidate from Kent
State is “neat,” but is it a
distraction?
“It's a little bit (time consuming),
but not really. It's
very unique, it's great getting
recognition from being
in the MAC. It's a good feeling.
But I'm just trying to be
humble about it. I still gotta
go out and just play football.
It's something that's just
not even on my mind. I'm
just worried about the guys
on this team and winning
the MAC championship. I
just focus on the playbook,
focus on our next opponent,
which is Liberty.”
3:30 p.m.
Lunch (grilled chicken,
rice, pasta) at Dix Stadium
follows the morning practice,
then the players have a
few hours to recover before
reporting for practice No. 2
of the day at 3:30.
“After lunch, we had some
down time to relax before
our next obligation, so I
took a little nap, just tried
to rest and get off my feet. I
had a banana, drank some
Gatorade to put some fluids
in my system so I don't
cramp up at practice. Then
it started all over again. I got
taped back up, we had specialty
meetings then individual
meetings, then practice.”
Archer alternates between
position meetings
between the running backs
and wide receivers, since he
plays both spots.
“I switch week by week.
This week I've been going
with the running backs,
next week I'll probably go
with the receivers. I talk
with the coaches and we
make that decision, so we're
all on the same page.”
n After Archer emerges from a
quick trip to the training room, he
and yours truly sprint (guess who
won?) through a downpour from the
locker room to the running backs
meeting room next to the ticket
booth at the front entrance of Dix
Stadium.
Eight running backs,
coach Bahhur and I are all
crammed into a small room
that fits a table, a desk holding
a computer and a video
screen — barely.
Bahhur talks first about
ways the offense was tipping
off plays to the defense during
the morning practice, including
the screen pass to
Archer that was completely
blown up.
“I see what you're saying
(about the tip-off), but they
still all knew that (play) was
coming,” said Archer, as
Bahhur agreed.
Bahhur then goes over
other things the coaches
noticed from the running
backs after watching film
of the morning practice,
and relays plans and plays
they will run during the afternoon
practice session.
He then tests some of the
younger players' knowledge
of the playbook by asking
them what they're supposed
to do on certain plays, as Archer
and fellow 1,000-yard
rusher from 2012 Trayion
Durham help their teammates
through the process.
Before dismissing the
backs so they can suit up
for practice, Bahhur tells
his troops that they're “gonna
be tired for the rest of
camp. You've gotta fight
through it.”
While the meetings were
taking place, the storm ended,
but not before dropping
enough rain to effectively
flood the west side of the
field. Still, since the rain has
ceased, Haynes decides to
practice outside rather then
move it indoors to the fieldhouse.
While some players quietly
question that decision as
they emerge from the locker
room and notice huge puddles
on the field, Archer quietly
trots onto the turf at
4:10 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
Archer and the wide receivers
take turns catching
short passes, then at 4:40,
Archer receives the ball on
an inside handoff on the first
play of a walk-through.
Although players are only
wearing shorts and shells
(helmets and shoulder
pads) during the afternoon
session, most of it is spent
conducting live drills. The
defense once again gets the
best of the offense repeatedly.
A pass is picked off, a
pitch is fumbled and Archer
actually shows some frustration
when he breaks open a
couple times on pass routes
but fails to get the ball.
“That's just how I play, I
can't help it. I'm a player
that likes the ball, and when
I don't get the ball — especially
when I'm wide open —
it gets under my skin. But I
just gotta keep my composure.
I know the ball will find
its way to my hands.”
After the practice ends, a
disappointed Haynes delivers
a stern message to the
players, questioning their effort,
attitude and how much
they want it — a form of the
same speech just about every
other coach in the country
will use at one point or
another as a wake-up call
during the two-a-day grind.
Later, I overhear the offensive
assistant coaches talking
about how the unit was
sharp in previous practices,
but just had ‘one of those
days' on this day.
“You could definitely tell
today was the first two-aday,”
said Archer. “It was
slow, guys were tired. It was
a bad day overall, I'm not
gonna lie about it. There's
room for improvement, and
we've gotta get better starting
early tomorrow morning.”
EVENING ACTIVITIES
Archer is once again first
in the cold tub, then the
players quickly shower before
busing to the student
center for dinner.
“(Haynes) mixes up the
scenery so we don't have to
be at the stadium all day.
That's why we have dinner
on campus and have meetings
in this room, so we're
not stuck at the stadium all
day. We get different looks.”
n In the chow line, Archer
spends several minutes picking
a plateful of individual pineapple
chunks out of a huge fruit salad.
Some players don't really like it and
whisper about it, others joke directly
with Archer about it, but they all
decide they're not challenging their
beloved Heisman candidate over
pineapple chunks.
After dinner, the entire
team heads to the M.A.C.
Center Annex for one final
meeting. Haynes conducts
these team meetings every
night of camp, and they
all feature guest speakers
and lectures/speeches from
coaches and players.
The guest speaker on
this night is Logan Vance,
a member of the 2nd Ranger
Battalion — a special operations
light infantry unit
of the United States Army
— who is now a student at
Kent State. Haynes names
all of his special teams units
after military units and loves
to have guest speakers from
the military address his
players.
Vance, who fought in Afghanistan
and Iraq, talks
to the team about being
a professional at all times
and striving to be the best
at what you choose to do.
“(Previous head coach
Darrell) Hazell had speakers
too. That definitely helps,
getting words from a lot of
different people. It hits everyone
deep. I think it's very
useful.”
Assistant coaches then
lecture on two-minute offense/
defense, then the
meeting ends with touching
senior speeches by quarterback
David Fisher, defensive
back Fabrice Pratt and
center Phil Huff. Archer will
give his senior speech next
week.
I catch up with Archer one
last time before he trudges
off to his room to rest up
for yet another grueling day
that will start in less than
eight hours.
“It's always good to end
the day, knowing you have
another (long) day tomorrow.
But I feel good. I'll get
some rest and hit the field
running full speed tomorrow
morning.”

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News Headline: Recent Reports from Kent State University Highlight Findings in Alzheimer Disease | Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 AUG 10 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week -- Current study results on Neurodegenerative Diseases have been published. According to news reporting out of Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The mechanisms by which environmental influences lead to the development of complex neurodegenerative diseases are largely unknown. It is known, however, that epigenetic mechanisms can mediate alterations in transcription due to environmental influences."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In order to identify genes susceptible to regulation in the adult cortex by one type of epigenetic mechanism, histone, and protein acetylation, we treated mice with the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA). After 1 week of treatment with TSA, RNA was extracted from the brain cortices of mice and gene expression differences were analyzed by microarray profiling. The altered genes were then compared with genes differentially expressed in microarray studies of disease by database and literature searches. Genes regulated by TSA were found to significantly overlap with differentially expressed genes in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Several TSA-regulated genes involved in chromatin remodeling and epigenetic reprogramming including histone cluster 1, H4 h (Hist1H4 h), methionine adenosyltransferase II, alpha (Mat2a), and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate homocysteine reductase (Mtrr) overlapped with genes altered in early-stage AD in gray matter. We also show that the expression of hemoglobin, which has been shown to be altered in neurons in the AD brain, is regulated by TSA treatment."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This analysis suggests involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in neurons in early stages of AD."

For more information on this research see: Transcriptional signatures mediated by acetylation overlap with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. Experimental Brain Research Experimentelle Hirnforschung Experimentation Cerebrale, 2012;221(3):287-97.

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Vadnal, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, Dementia, Genetics, Histones, Treatment, Tauopathies, United States, Brain Diseases, Nucleoproteins, Alzheimer Disease, North and Central America, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Central Nervous System Diseases.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Times are changing for local university presidents | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Luis Proenza's bombshell announcement last week that he would step down from the helm of the University of Akron next summer after 15 years on the job was the latest in a series of presidential shakeups that have the potential to dramatically alter higher education in the state of Ohio, particularly in the northeastern part of the state.

Last spring, for instance, Kent State's Lester Lefton announced he would step down next summer after seven years on the job. Youngstown State's Cynthia Anderson this summer vacated the top post at the financially hard-pressed university after three years at the helm.

Moreover, longtime Cuyahoga Community College president Jerry Sue Thornton, a fixture in the Ohio higher education landscape for the last two decades, stepped down this summer. On the private school front, Hiram College president Thomas Chema said he would step down after the conclusion of the coming academic year after more than a decade leading the small liberal arts college.

And beyond Northeast Ohio, with perhaps the biggest blockbuster of all, Ohio State's E. Gordon Gee — the quirky, bowtie-clad character many saw as the face of higher education in Ohio — swiftly retired this summer after a series of recorded verbal gaffes surfaced in which he mocked Catholics and other rival schools.

Of course, each presidency carries its own set of circumstances, and not all came to a halt amid scandal like Dr. Gee's.

As Cleveland State president Ron Berkman, who has served in his role since 2009, characterized it, “I don't think there's anything in the water.”

However, some higher education leaders and observers suggest the sweeping leadership changes could be emblematic of the evolving nature of the college presidency, a job that has shifted dramatically from that of a top academic into a role more suited for a corporate, CEO-like individual.

“If you look nationally over the last several years, there has been more change,” said Bruce Johnson, president of the Inter-University Council of Ohio, an advocacy group representing the state's 14 public universities. “The tenure of university presidents has been shorter. It's a high-stress environment.”

Under pressure

The multifaceted, high-pressure job into which the college presidency has evolved is one of the reasons observers say the average length of a college presidency has inched downward in recent years. In 2006, the average tenure of a college president hovered at about 8.5 years, but that figure has since fallen to about seven, according to a 2012 report from the American Council on Education.

“The demands are much higher. It's a harder job,” said Miami University president David Hodge, who has served in his role since 2006. “We live in a much more contentious world and in a proverbial fish bowl. Everything is more visible. It's incredibly more challenging to work in such an overtly public arena.”

Still, Ohio, and particularly Northeast Ohio, has been graced with a handful of long-serving individuals such as Drs. Proenza and Thornton, though that might not be the case going forward should the trend of a shrinking presidency continue. But with a bevy of leadership changes on the horizon, the state's collective higher education community is poised to lose some of its most vocal and experienced advocates.

“I think it'll bring new voices, new perspectives,” Dr. Proenza said. “With all of that, it takes a little bit of time for those voices to get their grounding and to begin to understand the context of how their voices need to be expressed. But I think it'll be positive.”

In recent years, the state's public colleges and universities have started to work more collaboratively than in the past — a shift that was fueled during former Gov. Ted Strickland's administration when he and the former chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, Eric Fingerhut, implored the state's public institutions to work cohesively as a system, rather than a tribe of competitors scattered across the state.

Gov. John Kasich, meanwhile, continued that thread of collaboration when he asked the state's higher education leaders to work together to submit a single wish list for campus construction dollars as well as collaborating to hash out a new funding formula.

“I don't expect that (dynamic) to change wildly,” Dr. Hodge said. “Of course, Gordon Gee was of particular importance because of his special relationship with the governor and Ohio State, but I don't expect that overall dynamic to change. I hope the new people coming on quickly grasp that.”

Seeking "a different approach'

Trustees at the state's universities moving forward with presidential searches are cognizant of the importance of selecting versatile individuals who can take charge of their respective institutions at a pivotal time in higher education.

The state's public institutions, for one, are grappling with a new funding formula that ties half of universities' state dollars to graduation rates — a dramatic shift from the previous formula whereby colleges and universities were paid, for the most part, based on how many students they enrolled.

At the same time, universities locally and across the country are grappling with the infusion of online learning and questioning how it might disrupt how they've educated students for the last century. Colleges and universities are, more than ever, under pressure to rein in spending as the student debt crisis continues to grip the country.

These challenges wouldn't even cross the desk of a college president 15 or 20 years ago.

“You have to be on top of the fact that the industry is changing so dramatically from something traditional to something that is so tech savvy,” Mr. Johnson said. “That requires a different approach.”

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News Headline: PUSHED BY PROENZA: AN AGING INDUSTRIAL REGION HAS BENEFITED FROM HIS MESSAGE ABOUT HOW TO GET AHEAD IN THE NEW ECONOMY | Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Almost any assessment of the 14 years Luis Proenza has led the University of Akron must begin with the physical transformation of the campus. Appearances matter, and the $620 million investment has brought a sense of place, in the new dormitories, buildings, classrooms, recreational facilities and green spaces. The makeover is a necessary part of attracting talent to the city and the region, of the university serving in multiple ways as a catalyst for improving the quality of life.

Yet the new look may not rank as the leading accomplishment of the Proenza years. Arguably, more important has been his contribution to changing the outlook of the area, no less than how we think about ourselves, his consistent and accurate message about what is required for an aging industrial town to succeed in the new economy.

Proenza has seized on the strengths of the university, such as polymers, engineering, chemistry and intellectual property law, to shape an identity and set a platform for broader innovation. Consider just a few of the endeavors he has launched, the University of Akron Research Foundation, the research relationship with Timken, the undergraduate program in corrosion engineering.

Part of what distinguishes these efforts are the links to the surrounding community, collaborations, public and private, seeking to get the most out of our talent and resources. This is what Proenza means, in part, by the Akron Model. The concept isn't easily reduced to a few words. Yet others in this country and abroad have wanted to know more, recognizing the vision at work.

"Vision" long has been overused. Yet it applies well in this instance, Proenza pointing a way forward and having the gumption to keep doing so.

That isn't to say all has been smooth going. Proenza will remain as university president until next summer, and the year ahead will be full of challenges. Enrollment has sagged. Graduation rates are too low. The university relies heavily on adjunct faculty members who are inadequately compensated. The pay package for Proenza as he moves from president to holding the new Trustees Chair in Higher Education and the Economy reflects the pattern elsewhere. Yet just as in those other instances, it invites contrasts with students struggling to cover the high cost of college.

With Proenza stepping down, that means Ohio has lost another important voice for higher education, Gordon Gee recently and abruptly leaving Ohio State, Lester Lefton preparing to exit at Kent State. Fortunately, Proenza will have a perch designed to keep him engaged in the conversation he often has led and elevated. The university trustees would do well to keep these skills in mind in selecting his successor. Obviously, a new president will want to do things differently and may have needed strengths that Proenza does not possess. At the same time, this community and region have benefited from the prodding of someone with strong ideas about how to perform better.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Seeking Kent State's next chief executive | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some attributes to consider in choosing a successor to lefton

Kent State University's search for a successor to President Lester Lefton has begun in earnest with the appointment of a search committee that will recruit candidates and serve in an advisory capacity to the university Board of Trustees, who will make the final decision on Kent's 12th chief executive.

The 15-member Presidential Search Committee, chaired by KSU Trustee Richard Marsh, includes representatives of the academic world, faculty and student governance and the Kent community. It is a diverse group, representative of many of the constituencies with whom Kent State's next president will interact.

President Lefton's successor will inherit a campus that has been strengthened by the retiring president's tenure. Enrollment is strong, there is a strengthened commitment to academic excellence and the campus itself is the focus of continued efforts at renewal. Kent State's relationship with its host community has attained a welcome interdependency unrivaled in the 103-year history of the institution.

We hope that the search committee, in recruiting and assessing candidates to succeed President Lefton in 2014, will seek applicants whose attributes include:

n Strong academic credentials, combining experience in the classroom with scholarship and research.

n A sense of foresight, the ability to look beyond immediate challenges and focus on ensuring that Kent State remains competitive in the future.

n An innovative attitude, a willingness to consider new opportunities for academic growth to enhance Kent's marketability for future students.

n An appreciation of the greater Kent community and the mutual benefits that result from strong ties between the campus and its host city.

n A sense of regionalism, nurturing cooperation with other learning institutions while positioning Kent State for academic leadership in Northeastern Ohio.

n Confidence, a trait that is vital for any chief executive but even more so for a university president who must be able to make bold decisions without falling prey to second-guessing.

Kent State has launched a website, www.kent.edu/presidentialsearch, to update the community on the search process and to seek feedback. Two community forums also will be held on Aug. 20, one at 1 p.m. with the regional campuses via videoconferencing, and the second at 3 p.m. in the Kiva at the Kent Student Center. More forums will follow.

Feedback during the search process is important. So is the opportunity for Kent State's next chief executive to interact with university constituencies. A commitment to bringing the finalists for president to the campus prior to the board's decision on its choice would be beneficial to the university as well as Kent State's next leader.

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News Headline: Kent State Presidential Search Committee Includes City Manager, Bank Executive | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Outgoing president set to retire in July 2014

The 15-person committee charged with finding the successor to Kent State University's President Lester Lefton includes two Kent community leaders.

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller and Richard Coe, CEO of Portage Community Bank, will serve on the committee to find Kent State's 12th president. Ruller also served on the search committee that recommended Lefton's hiring to the university trustees.

Lefton is set to retire July 1, 2014.

The university named the search committee members this week. In May, the university trustees named Richard Marsh, a 1973 Kent State graduate and member of the board of trustees, as the committee chair.

Excluding Dr. Jerry Sue Thornton, president emeritus of Cuyahoga Community College, the remaining 12 members of the search committee are all part of the Kent State community. They are:

•Michael Allen, executive chair, Graduate Student Senate; Ph.D. candidate, geography

•Dennis Eckart, vice chair, Presidential Search Committee; vice chair, Board of Trustees; principal, North Shore Associates

•Dr. Paul Farrell, chair, Faculty Senate; professor of computer science

•Dr. Ronald Fowler, special assistant to the president, community engagement; chair, Diversity Advisory Board

•Dr. Lee Fox-Cardamone, associate professor, psychology, Stark Campus; executive committee, Faculty Senate

•Dr. Thomas Janson, professor and coordinator of graduate studies, music; past chair and member, Faculty Senate

•Joel Nielsen, director of intercollegiate athletics

•Amish Patel, executive director, Undergraduate Student Government; communications studies major

•Dr. Susan Roxburgh, associate professor, sociology; member, Faculty Senate

•Maria Schneider, president, Alumni Association National Board of Directors; alumni board representative, Foundation Board of Directors; managing consultant-premier segment, institutional relationships, TIAA-CREF

•Dr. Deborah Spake, dean, College of Business Administration

•Dr. Susan Stocker, dean, Kent State University at Ashtabula; interim dean, College of Nursing

In establishing the committee, we as a board sought to achieve a diversity of backgrounds and perspectives and a deep understanding of the requirements for the next president,” Marsh said.

The university also is asking for public input on the search, and members of the community can provide feedback via a page on the university's website.

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- Aug. 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Search committee

KENT: Kent State University has formed a search committee to recruit a successor to President Lester A. Lefton, who previously announced retirement will be effective July 1.

He has served in the role since July 1, 2006.

Kent State finds itself at a unique point, one filled with achievement and remarkable opportunities for continued growth,” said Richard Marsh, chair of the Presidential Search Committee and a member of the Kent State Board of Trustees. “Record enrollments, a commitment to academic excellence and the revitalization of our campuses and communities indicate that the university is strong and ready to welcome our 12th president.”

The committee is advisory to the Board of Trustees and consists of faculty, trustees, students and staff.

For more information about the process, go to www.kent.edu/presidentialsearch.

- - - - - - - -

Sex offenses

KENT: A Kent State University student was sentenced this week to almost two years in prison and will be required to register as a Tier I sex offender following incidents involving two 14-year-old girls at a slumber party he chaperoned in February in Kent.

Benjamin Schwartz, 20, pleaded guilty in June to felony importuning and misdemeanor counts of gross sexual imposition and unlawful sexual conduct with a minor.

Judge John Enlow sentenced Schwartz, who is listed as biotechnology major at Kent State's main campus, on Monday. Along with the jail time, Schwartz is required to register as a Tier I sex offender and faces five years of mandatory probation following his release.

Under Ohio law, Tier I sex offenders are subject to registration and verification requirements once every 12 months for 15 years.

Prosecutors say Schwartz attacked the first 14-year-old victim during the afternoon of Feb. 16 and attacked the second victim in the early morning of Feb. 17. He was able to separate the victims from the other juveniles in attendance at a home on Kimberly Drive by using threats.

Schwartz did not have a prior criminal history, prosecutors said.

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News Headline: Smartphone Use Linked to Poor Physical Fitness (Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily Glow
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If you are like most people, you spend more time exercising your fingers on your iPhone than your glutes and hamstrings on a Stairmaster. Unfortunately, that constant smartphone use may be detrimental to your health.

Researchers at Kent State University in Ohio have found that people who spent a lot of time, up to 14 hours per day, on their smartphones were less physically fit than those who spent much less time, only about 90 minutes per day, on their mobiles, according to a press release from the school. The researchers published their study in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

"I wasn't surprised because I have been observing the way that smartphone use is changing our behavior for a long time," Andrew Lepp, a co-author on the study, told Daily Glow. He said he sees it on the Kent State campus and near his home. "Inject a smartphone into a group of people, and they become less physically active; that little screen has become irresistible for some people."

Lepp, an associate professor at Kent State, also said what he found particularly interesting is that, although people have long recognized the relationship between reduced fitness and more traditional sedentary behaviors such as TV watching, they have not yet made the connection between smartphone use and fitness.

Yet a smartphone is much like a device such as a TV that encourages sedentary behavior. It is always on hand, constantly inviting the user to sit and watch, said Lepp. It is very difficult for some people to resist this temptation.

Work Out, Look Good

Unfortunately, forgoing exercise in favor of updating your Facebook status may not only affect your physical fitness level, but your appearance as well. Exercise has very real beauty benefits. By increasing blood flow, it can help fight acne, keep your hair strong and healthy, and give your skin a rosy glow. Exercise also helps increase the production of collagen, so it helps fight wrinkles.

"Our study suggests that increased cellphone use is associated with decreased physical activity, increased sitting, and decreased physical fitness," said Lepp. He went on to say that he thinks everyone should seriously examine their smartphone use. For example, you might ask yourself, "Is my smartphone always on hand?" "Do I constantly touch the screen to light it up?" "Do I take it into the gym when exercising?" "Is it in my hand when taking a walk, rather than out of a sight in a pocket or purse?"

If you answer yes to any of the above, the device may be getting in the way of healthier behaviors, such as physical activity. "Certainly the smartphone is a useful technology and adds convenience to our lives, but it can also be addictive and consuming," Lepp said. "The healthiest people in our study limited their smartphone use to around 90 minutes per day; these tended to be active, healthy people."

Tell us: Do you spend more time working your smartphone than you do working out?

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News Headline: Friends of Fashion Gala highlights talents of Bob Mackie | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Friends of Fashion of the Kent State University Museum and Fashion School is hosting "Bob Mackie: A Razzle Dazzle Collection," on Sept. 28, in the atrium of Rockwell Hall at 6 p.m.

Television favorites Mitzi Gaynor, Carol Burnett and Sonny & Cher from the Golden Age of TV Variety Shows of the 60's and 70's will grace the stage again through video clips of some of their most notable performances, as they showcase costume designer Bob Mackie. Dressing the stars for success, Mackie used his talents to adapt to singing, dancing, and comedy: whatever they could conceive he would dress them for the part, He created all costumes in each skit, sometimes hundreds of costumes per show. Thirty-five of his celebrity-worn costumes will be on display along with other Mackie designs.

The gala will begin with a social hour featuring the live music of Jack Hurd and Combo, and "The Collection Viewing" of original Mackie costumes worn by the stars. Dinner will be served in the atrium, followed by the show in the Fashion School auditorium.

The event, open to the public, is black tie optional. Cost is $125 per person. Reservation deadline is Sept. 13; call 330-688-8899 for details and reservations.

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News Headline: Friends of Fashion Gala highlights talents of Bob Mackie | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Friends of Fashion of the Kent State University Museum and Fashion School is hosting "Bob Mackie: A Razzle Dazzle Collection," on Sept. 28, in the atrium of Rockwell Hall at 6 p.m.

Television favorites Mitzi Gaynor, Carol Burnett and Sonny & Cher from the Golden Age of TV Variety Shows of the 60's and 70's will grace the stage again through video clips of some of their most notable performances, as they showcase costume designer Bob Mackie. Dressing the stars for success, Mackie used his talents to adapt to singing, dancing, and comedy: whatever they could conceive he would dress them for the part, He created all costumes in each skit, sometimes hundreds of costumes per show. Thirty-five of his celebrity-worn costumes will be on display along with other Mackie designs.

The gala will begin with a social hour featuring the live music of Jack Hurd and Combo, and "The Collection Viewing" of original Mackie costumes worn by the stars. Dinner will be served in the atrium, followed by the show in the Fashion School auditorium.

The event, open to the public, is black tie optional. Cost is $125 per person. Reservation deadline is Sept. 13; call 330-688-8899 for details and reservations.

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News Headline: Let's not go BANANAs over shale gas drilling | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: I recently watched “Gasland II” on HBO. The producer has taken his fight against the drilling industry outside of Pennsylvania to the American oil and gas industry at large. This time, he explores problems such as the 2010 Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

This is as it should be. Oil and gas development has never been environmentally benign. The sudden awakening of environmental activism wrought by the advent of shale development is, unfortunately, less about the environment than it is about NIMBY (“not in my back yard”) activism.

Notwithstanding all the uproar, very little about hydraulic fracturing is new to the oil and gas business.

To be sure, we are creating larger volumes of contaminated water to complete wells than we do for conventional oil and gas drilling. But these volumes are small compared to the volumes of contaminated water, laced with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), that we have been producing and handling for the past 75 years. Indeed, according to a study last year out of Kent State, fracked wells actually produce less contaminated water than conventional wells on a per million cubic foot basis of production.

Earthquakes, too, are old news. It has been known for several decades that saltwater disposal wells could trigger small earthquakes.

Spills are certainly not new. Despite thoughtful regulations, oil spills have happened and will continue to happen, as will spills of contaminated water. Human error cannot be regulated out of existence. Those of us in Ohio like to think that the Cuyahoga River catching fire triggered the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act, but in fact it was the Santa Barbara oil spill in 1969 — the first of too many such major catastrophes the industry has endured over the years.

Unfortunately, these problems will not end as a result of studying “lessons learned from BP.” We do what we can to eliminate human error, and we put up with errors when they happen because, well, the fallout pales in comparison with, say, Chernobyl.

So if none of these problems are new, why all the uproar now? The reason: For the first time, we are seeing oil and gas developed in densely populated areas of Pennsylvania and Ohio — areas that have not in modern times had to endure the inconvenience of oil and gas development.

It turns out that oil and gas development is unsightly and inconvenient. Who knew?

No one from Ohio or Pennsylvania seemed to know. This part of the country was unconcerned about the problem of oil and gas development so long as it was constrained to the Gulf Coast. But environmental problems did exist.

In the 1990s, U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., began lobbying the United States to return to Louisiana a portion of the billions of dollars the U.S. receives for royalties for offshore Louisiana oil and gas production. The reason: The industry servicing offshore rigs had, through building canals, caused a major loss of wetlands through coastal erosion from salt water intrusion. And the wetlands are the first line of defense against hurricanes in south Louisiana.

So what was the response from Pennsylvania, Ohio and the rest of the country? A collective yawn. It took the 2005 demolition of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina to finally get the U.S. Minerals Management Service to allocate $930 million in 2010 to Cameron Parish to begin to rebuild the ecosystem in Southwest Louisiana.

Of course, this historical lack of awareness is hardly a reason to continue to ignore problems — to the extent they really exist. For this, we can all be thankful for the robust new activism, even if misguided by NIMBYism.

The oil and gas industry knows it is not business as usual in Ohio and Pennsylvania. They have to perform better than they have, notwithstanding statistics that demonstrate real environmental problems are uncommon. The oil and gas industry has spent, and will continue to spend, money on public relations. But in the end, it will be its environmental performance that matters most. The best companies know this.

The problem is that while the NIMBY culture has worked to keep the oil and gas industry on its toes, it has not worked well in educating the public. There is still public confusion over environmental issues. Unfortunately, documentaries like “Gasland II,” which continues to suggest, for instance, that there is connection between fracking and natural gas migration into the water table, do not help.

But even more problematic is that the NIMBY culture inevitably develops into another infamous California acronym: BANANAs — build absolutely nothing anywhere near anything.

This happens when we become so entrenched in our activism that we lose perspective. We no longer undertake the balancing of environmental impact versus economic value, and we flatly reject all development whatsoever. This is what led to the electricity crisis in California in 2000.

Let me explain how this happens. I always ask this question to shale activists: If not hydraulic fracturing of shale, where should we get our oil and gas? And until you give up your automobile and your gas-warmed homes, don't tell me we just replace it with renewable energy. Should we strip mine tar sands, like they do in Alberta? Should we continue shipping our wealth to oil and gas producing nations overseas, many of which are hostile to us?

Both of these options are less environmentally benign than is hydraulic fracturing. According to the World Bank, Nigeria flares or vents around 15 billion cubic meters of gas a year, a byproduct of oil production. In the United States, largely as the result of the shale boom, we have reduced our greenhouse gas footprint to levels we dared not hope for just five years ago.

The better American oil and gas companies will admit the new awareness of environmental problems will be good for the industry in the long run. But let's try to keep some perspective.

Activists cannot continue to pretend that the environmental problems from shale development are somehow different from those generated by conventional oil and gas development. Oil and gas companies, on the other hand, cannot pretend that conventional oil and gas development has been environmentally benign for the past 75 years.

But most importantly, let's not go BANANAs about shale development in Ohio.

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News Headline: Bob Dyer: UA graduation rate is awful | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Dyer, Bob
News OCR Text: The silence is deafening.

This community should be up in arms over a set of recently released federal statistics involving college graduation rates.

Maybe everyone was off on summer vacation July 25, when the Beacon Journal printed a guest column by a national higher-education research analyst. If you are among the multitude who missed it, feast on these stats:

• Of all the first-time, full-time students who enroll at the main campus at the University of Akron, only 14 percent graduate in four years.

• Only 38 percent graduate in six years.

That is absolutely, positively unacceptable.

The same university that is throwing up buildings faster than a drunken Donald Trump can't graduate more than 14 out of 100 students in four years?

Close to two-thirds of the students who enter with high hopes can't succeed in six years?

Pathetic. Almost criminal.

In a guest commentary in the Beacon on Aug. 2, UA Provost Mike Sherman tried to downplay the report by saying those numbers — “a misleading federally mandated measurement,” as he put it — cover only first-time, full-time students who graduate from the same institution they enrolled in originally.

He cited a case in which a student transferred to UA from another college and earned his degree while gaining co-op work experience that led to a great job with General Motors. Sherman pointed out that the statistics in question don't cover those situations.

Well, guess what? Every other university in the country has similar tales of students transferring in and doing well. But not every university has a graduation rate that is 20 percent below the national average and near the bottom of the pack in Ohio.

Nobody set out to trash UA. The local university was judged using exactly the same criteria as Miami (70 percent graduate in four years, 82 percent in six years), Ohio State (51 and 80), Ohio U (44 and 65), Bowling Green (35 and 58), Kent State (26 and 50), Toledo (24 and 46) and so on down the line.

UA trails Wright State (18 and 40) and, in terms of four-year success, is a single percentage point better than Shawnee State (13 and 22).

Shawnee State — where 46 percent of the freshmen leave before their second year. I can tell you without even checking that Shawnee State did not embark on a $620 million building binge during the past 13 years.

And we haven't even mentioned the many private colleges around Ohio, places like Wooster (68/75) and Wittenberg (66/71) and Walsh (49/60) — oh my. With grants and aid, private schools can cost the same as public schools.

The author of the original column, Joseph Yeado, works for The Education Trust, a Washington-based advocacy group for low-income and minority students. Among the group's board members:

• A law professor from Yale.

• The deputy director of education for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

• A chancellor emeritus of the University System of Maryland.

• A dean in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard.

Not exactly a bunch of rummies spewing “misleading” statistics.

Yeado took a particular interest in the graduation rates of African-American students at UA. He should have, because those are beyond awful.

When it comes to black students enrolled full time at UA, the federal stats show that slightly less than 10 percent graduate in six years and a miniscule 3 percent are able to take home a diploma within the traditional four years.

In his rebuttal, the UA provost boasted that statistics not yet processed at the federal level will show that the six-year black graduation rate for the class of 2012 soared to 17 percent. What he didn't mention was that the black graduation rate was 24 percent in 2002 — and it hasn't hit 18 percent since 2003.

For comparison, the six-year black graduation rate is 73 percent at Ohio State, 64 percent at Miami, 57 percent at Wooster, 55 percent at Ohio U and Wittenberg, 50 percent at Bowling Green, 40 percent at Kent State and 20 percent at Toledo.

Add all these numbers together and we are left to conclude that either:

A.) UA is not giving the students the support they need, or

B.) UA is admitting people who simply are not equipped to do the work.

There's no law saying Akron has to enroll everyone with a pulse. Of course, if a school is more selective, it has a harder time raising the money to rebuild its entire campus and fill room upon room of new student housing.

This school has been building, building, building. But what is it building?

Isn't it time for UA to devote a big pile of money to, say, converting its faculty from predominantly part time — 59 percent! — to full time, rather than sprucing up the campus?

Area taxpayers should be demanding to know why a university that has been constructing things faster than a post-World War II Levittown is foundering in one of the most important categories in higher education.

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News Headline: YSU plans to involve other colleges and career technical centers | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Youngstown State University received a $874,000 grant to fund student manufacturing internships in Mahoning, Trumbull, Columbiana, Mercer and Lawrence counties.

The federal grant is through the West Central Job Partnership, a nonprofit job training and workforce development program in New Castle, Pa.

“We want to create a coordinated approach to internships in manufacturing throughout eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania,” said Stephen Rodabaugh, associate dean of the YSU College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

In 2007, the five counties were designated the country's first workforce investment area by former Govs. Ted Strickland of Ohio and Ed Rendell of Pennsylvania.

“Northeastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania share a border, common labor force, worker dislocations, current and emerging industries, and a common vision to enhance economic and workforce development,” the request for proposals for the grant says.

Rodabaugh said YSU plans to work with other higher-education institutions including Eastern Gateway Community College, Butler County Community College and Kent State University-Trumbull as well as career technical centers in the five counties.

Objectives are to expand the number of manufacturing work/study and internship opportunities in the five counties, enhance students' educational experiences through quality professional work placements, and assist manufacturers in their recruitment efforts through access to interested and qualified students.

Last year, YSU received a $575,000 grant from the Ohio Board of Regents to fund a new internship and co-op program in the STEM fields and business fields such as accounting, finance, management and marketing.

But that grant is just for establishing internships and co-ops at businesses in Ohio.

“It does not go across the border,” Rodabaugh said. “This federal grant goes across the border with a regional approach.”

Part of the project involves creation of an online internship matching system for students, manufacturers and educational institutions.

One long-term goal of the program is to forge relationships between universities and employers, allowing opportunities for mutual research between companies and faculty members, Rodabaugh said.

The short-term beneficiaries of that are students who gain experience and manufacturing companies that build their workforce, he said.

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News Headline: Kent Central Gateway opening celebrated | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent economic development including the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, Acorn Alley II and the Fairmount Properties block with corporate offices, residential apartments, retail and restaurants.

"TIGER stands for transportation investment generating economic recovery and the Kent Central Gateway transit center is a project that has done just that," said Marisol Simon, a regional representative of the Federal Transit Administration. "This project is a prime example of how transit investments, when they're done right, can be the center of a community's economic redevelopment."

Throughout the planning and construction of PARTA's facility and Kent redevelopment, collaboration between government and private entities has been repeatedly credited for Kent's revival, which Rep. Tim Ryan reiterated at the event.

"We have a mindset in the country right now that we can't do big things and I think, more than anything else for me, this is an example of what American people can do if you come together, work together, work through your problems, you have a spirit of cooperation and you keep the goal in mid throughout all of the ups and downs," Ryan said. "This is an amazing project and an amazing monument to that spirit."

PARTA General Manager John Drew said a small, dedicated staff at PARTA, along with guidance of its board and partners in the other downtown development projects, managed to pull off an enormous accomplishment in the face of doubt.

"Several people said to me as we were going on with this project that we will never get the money. Well, once we did they said we couldn't build it. Well, once we did they said we couldn't run it," Drew said. "Wrong on all accounts."

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller said what has happened in Kent will help to strengthen the county.

"A strong Kent makes for a strong Portage County and I don't think that message should be lost at any stretch of the way," Ruller said. "We really think that we can not only be an economic engine to ourselves here in the city, but to the county."

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News Headline: Kent Central Gateway opening celebrated | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Local, state and national dignitaries gathered on East Erie Street in Kent Aug. 4 to celebrate the completion of the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway.

The $26 million parking, transit hub and retail facility, mostly funded through a $20 million federal TIGER grant, helped to leverage more than $110 million in downtown Kent economic development including the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, Acorn Alley II and the Fairmount Properties block with corporate offices, residential apartments, retail and restaurants.

"TIGER stands for transportation investment generating economic recovery and the Kent Central Gateway transit center is a project that has done just that," said Marisol Simon, a regional representative of the Federal Transit Administration. "This project is a prime example of how transit investments, when they're done right, can be the center of a community's economic redevelopment."

Throughout the planning and construction of PARTA's facility and Kent redevelopment, collaboration between government and private entities has been repeatedly credited for Kent's revival, which Rep. Tim Ryan reiterated at the event.

"We have a mindset in the country right now that we can't do big things and I think, more than anything else for me, this is an example of what American people can do if you come together, work together, work through your problems, you have a spirit of cooperation and you keep the goal in mid throughout all of the ups and downs," Ryan said. "This is an amazing project and an amazing monument to that spirit."

PARTA General Manager John Drew said a small, dedicated staff at PARTA, along with guidance of its board and partners in the other downtown development projects, managed to pull off an enormous accomplishment in the face of doubt.

"Several people said to me as we were going on with this project that we will never get the money. Well, once we did they said we couldn't build it. Well, once we did they said we couldn't run it," Drew said. "Wrong on all accounts."

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller said what has happened in Kent will help to strengthen the county.

"A strong Kent makes for a strong Portage County and I don't think that message should be lost at any stretch of the way," Ruller said. "We really think that we can not only be an economic engine to ourselves here in the city, but to the county."

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News Headline: New Kent Central Gateway Transit Center set to open Aug. 12 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OH (WOIO) -

The Kent Central Gateway multi-modal transit center is a state-of-the-art facility that improves access to transportation options in Northeastern Ohio and is key to local efforts to revitalize downtown Kent and connect the city's central business district with Kent State University. FTA Regional Administrator Marisol Simon joined Congressman Tim Ryan and other local officials at the event.

The Department provided $20 million for the $25 million project through the TIGER (Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery) grant program. The remaining cost was covered by local funding sources.

The new transit center is at the heart of local efforts to dramatically transform the City of Kent's downtown core into a thriving employment, business and cultural center. The facility is central to a larger effort by the city, university and private developers to invest roughly $125 million to develop over 500,000 square feet of office and retail space, a new hotel and conference center, which opened in June, and a new county courthouse all within walking distance of the Gateway facility.

According to the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority, more than 250 jobs were created during construction of the project, and hundreds of additional new jobs in the city are also expected due to related development.

PARTA will begin operating service out of the new transit center on Aug. 12. The facility will provide improved access between downtown Kent and the university, and serve as a key transfer location for PARTA and regional bus routes, connecting riders to Akron, Cleveland and other locations in Portage County. The facility also includes parking, pedestrian and bicycle connections to provide additional options for residents and visitors to get around.

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News Headline: Edupalooza activities make learning fun for kids | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL - Just because an activity is educational doesn't mean it can't be fun.

That was the lesson learned Saturday at Edupalooza - Back to School Bash, the first of what promoters hope becomes an annual event to bring education to the forefront in the city.

Sponsored by Edutech Corridor, the Edupalooza held downtown offered children from kindergarten to college a variety of activities throughout the day incorporating fun, science, technology and safety lessons.

Makenna Wheatley, 7, and her brother, Landon, 4, honed their artistic skills in chalk during the Edupalooza Back to School Bash held Saturday in East Liverpool.

From the OH Wow! Children's Center for Science and Technology demonstrations on making solar s'mores and a dino-dig to balloon animals fashioned by Elise Smith for the East Liverpool High School Band, children and adults had ample opportunity for hands-on educational experiences.

In between were performances by Gary Barker as Brett Michaels, a martial arts demonstration by ATA Martial Arts of Calcutta, a demonstration by St. Clair Township Police Department K-9 team of Chris Davis and Axel, and displays of the city fire department's aerial truck, cruisers from the city police department and Ohio State Highway Patrol, Tri-County ambulances and tours of the Air Evac medical helicopter based at the county airport.

"Everything is supposed to be fun but educational," according to Pennie Zehnder, one of the founders of Edutech Corridor. "We want them to see that learning can be fun."

Booths from schools and agencies, vendors and others rounded out the day's activities with information, gifts, registration for services and more.

In addition, 112 book bags filled with school supplies were distributed to children who had previously been pre-selected through the Way Station but who had to present vouchers at the event to receive their bag and supplies.

With a $2,000 community grant from Walmart, Edutech was able to purchase the book bags and some supplies, with each of the Edutech members also contributing supplies to fill the bags, according to Zehnder.

The grant also provided funding to pay for OH Wow! to participate.

Every child who came to the event was also given a free raffle ticket toward school supplies.

Mayor Jim Swoger offered the welcome to open the event.

Edutech Corridor was the brainchild of local architect Scott Shepherd and Zehnder, the director of his firm, A&I Studios, and was founded in 2010 under the auspices of the East Liverpool Area Chamber of Commerce.

Shepherd said the idea was to open lines of communication between the educational entities that exist in the area in the hopes of spurring economic development.

"Education is the largest employer in East Liverpool," Shepherd pointed out, saying, "We are lucky" to have the Kent State University campus, Buckeye Online School for Success, Ohio Valley College of Technology in Calcutta and other educational entities in the area.

According to Shepherd, cities that have recovered from tough economic times did so because of strong educational bases such as exists in East Liverpool.

Zehnder noted, "Education is an industry and needs to be treated as such. East Liverpool is a central hub of education."

Since the inception of Edutech Corridor, members now work together to share educational opportunities, Zehnder said.

She said that, while this year's Edupalooza focused primarily on local educational entities, plans call for trying to include surrounding public school districts next year.

But with downtown streets teeming with young people eager to learn by doing on Saturday, Shepherd deemed Edutech Corridor's first Edupalooza a success.

"For the first year, I think we did really well. We wanted to do something for kids that was positive for the community," he said.

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News Headline: City holds fun, entertaining day | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name: JO ANN BOBBY-GILBERT - East Liverpool Reporter
News OCR Text: By JO ANN BOBBY-GILBERT - East Liverpool Reporter (jgilbert@reviewonline.com) , The Review

Save | Post a comment |

EAST LIVERPOOL - Just because an activity is educational doesn't mean it can't be fun.

That was the lesson learned Saturday at Edupalooza - Back to School Bash, the first of what promoters hope becomes an annual event to bring education to the forefront in the city.

Sponsored by Edutech Corridor, the Edupalooza held downtown offered children from kindergarten to college a variety of activities throughout the day incorporating fun, science, technology and safety lessons.

Article Photos

Handing out coloring books and other information at the Edupalooza Back to School Bash in East Liverpool were (left) Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper Kevin Thompson and city Patrolman Shawn Long. Here, Danielle Jones, 10, accepts a book. (Photo by Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert)

From the OH Wow! Children's Center for Science and Technology demonstrations on making solar s'mores and a dino-dig to balloon animals fashioned by Elise Smith for the East Liverpool High School Band, children and adults had ample opportunity for hands-on educational experiences.

In between were performances by Gary Barker as Brett Michaels, a martial arts demonstration by ATA Martial Arts of Calcutta, a demonstration by St. Clair Township Police Department K-9 team of Chris Davis and Axel, and displays of the city fire department's aerial truck, cruisers from the city police department and Ohio State Highway Patrol, Tri-County ambulances and tours of the Air Evac medical helicopter based at the county airport.

"Everything is supposed to be fun but educational," according to Pennie Zehnder, one of the founders of Edutech Corridor. "We want them to see that learning can be fun."

Booths from schools and agencies, vendors and others rounded out the day's activities with information, gifts, registration for services and more.

In addition, 112 bookbags filled with school supplies were distributed to children who had previously been pre-selected through the Way Station but who had to present vouchers at the event to receive their bag and supplies.

With a $2,000 community grant from Walmart, Edutech was able to purchase the bookbags and some supplies, with each of the Edutech members also contributing supplies to fill the bags, according to Zehnder.

The grant also provided funding to pay for OH Wow! to participate.

Every child who came to the event was also given a free raffle ticket toward school supplies.

Mayor Jim Swoger offered the welcome to open the event.

Edutech Corridor was the brainchild of local architect Scott Shepherd and Zehnder, the director of his firm, A&I Studios, and was founded in 2010 under the auspices of the East Liverpool Area Chamber of Commerce.

Shepherd said the idea was to open lines of communication between the educational entities that exist in the area in the hopes of spurring economic development.

"Education is the largest employer in East Liverpool," Shepherd pointed out, saying, "We are lucky" to have the Kent State University campus, Buckeye Online School for Success, Ohio Valley College of Technology in Calcutta and other educational entities in the area.

According to Shepherd, cities that have recovered from tough economic times did so because of strong educational bases such as exists in East Liverpool.

Zehnder noted, "Education is an industry and needs to be treated as such. East Liverpool is a central hub of education."

Since the inception of Edutech Corridor, members now work together to share educational opportunities, Zehnder said.

She said that, while this year's Edupalooza focused primarily on local educational entities, plans call for trying to include surrounding public school districts next year.

But with downtown streets teeming with young people eager to learn by doing on Saturday, Shepherd deemed Edutech Corridor's first Edupalooza a success.

"For the first year, I think we did really well. We wanted to do something for kids that was positive for the community," he said.

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News Headline: KSU Salem's Discovery Garden benefits pantry | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Salem News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SALEM - Kent State University at Salem is sharing the bounty from its Discovery Garden with deliveries of fresh produce to the Salem Community Pantry in recent weeks.

John Majernik, faculty member of the horticulture program, is helping to oversee the development of the garden, along with fellow instructor Maurice Peoples. They worked with students to plant items such as potatoes, broccoli, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, Swiss chard, onions, sweet peppers, carrots, beets, dill, parsley, squash, green beans and a "hodge podge of vegetables."

This past spring, Majernik and Peoples spent time planning, designing and prepping the garden plot, which is essentially an outdoor classroom where individuals can "learn, grow, live and laugh."

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News Headline: Kent company revs up with motorcycle visor | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Byard, Katie
News OCR Text: Kent's AlphaMicron Inc. has sold a few thousand of its original motor­cycle visor inserts that instantly grow lighter or darker, changing tint to block out the sun.

That might not seem like much, but it was done with no advertising — apart from the company's website and appearances at trade shows.

Now, AlphaMicron — which uses liquid crystal technology to create flexible materials that change color or tint — is promoting its new and improved version of the insert that it hopes will rev up sales. Liquid crystals are used in a variety of products, including cellphones, laptops and flat-screen TVs.

“We did quite a lot of revamping,” AlphaMicron's CEO Bahman Taheri said, improving on the initial version of the insert in big and small ways. “I think this insert will do really well.”

Taheri said that for a motor­cyclist, having the ability to instantly change a visor's tint is no small matter.

“You ride into and out of tunnels, [you] are in different lighting conditions,” he said. “You have that freeway sun and the freeway kind of curves and the sun is now behind you.”

One of the big changes in the new and improved visor insert: It now can be easily transferred from one face shield to another and is more aerodynamic.

Also, the insert now tints 10 percent darker.

“We had a pretty large customer request for that,” said Ysabel Price, a member of the sales team for AlphaMicron, noting the company solicited customer feedback on earlier versions.

Another big change: the battery life is longer. (The battery is enclosed in the button used to change the tint function from manual to automatic.)

Ross Armbruster, a sales and project manager for AlphaMicron, said the earlier versions weren't heavily promoted because they were essentially “beta versions to gather feedback for product improvement.”

AlphaMicron will show off the new visor insert at the inaugural American International Motorcycle Expo Oct. 16-20 in Orlando, Fla. The show — for motorcyclists as well as those in the motorcycle industry — is modeled after a successful trade show in Italy, known for its love of motorcycles.

The visor will be available this month through the website of Alpha­Micron's affiliate, AMI Powersports (amipowersports.com). It sells for $149.99.

The motorcycle expo will include manufacturers of motorcycles and equipment, including helmets.

Taheri said the company already has signed up with helmet makers Akuma and AGV to market inserts.

Technology advocate NorTech also is promoting the product as part of the region's emerging flexible electronics industry. NorTech has dubbed the industry cluster FlexMatters; the “flex” refers to the flexible plastic on which the electronics are printed.

The visor insert is only the second consumer product developed and manufactured by the 35 to 40 employees at AlphaMicron, which gets a large portion of its revenues through research grants and contracts. The company has its research, development and production facilities at Kent State University's Centennial Research Park, off state Route 59.

AlphaMicron's other consumer product is a ski goggle that tints with the push of a button.

About 10 employees are involved in manufacturing the products. Taheri said there are no plans to move production outside of Kent, or the United States.

The products are complex, he said, and “not something you can farm out to someone else” easily.

He added, “We want the products to be made in the USA,” creating local jobs and attracting buyers who want U.S. products.

AlphaMicron's desire to keep manufacturing its products in Northeast Ohio has been supported by the state, which has contributed millions in Third Frontier funding to company projects.

Taheri and two other former Kent State University faculty members, involved with Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, founded AlphaMicron in 1997 to carry out research involving visors worn by U.S. Air Force pilots. Through that grant, Alpha­Micron developed a patented, flexible, liquid-crystal film that can be applied to curved surfaces — such as motorcycle visors.

Katie Byard can be reached at 330-996-3781 or kbyard@thebeaconjournal.com .

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News Headline: Dear square is safer handful (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Capital Public Radio
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: dear square is safer handful of street vendors with whom brisk trade in posters and fifteen -year-old general under five child cc vendor and he said he found the day despite the blazing summer he attempted people indoors in a thoughtful and test customers clamor in posters and matches featuring general belief in Egypt from the Muslim brotherhood , vendors it would like to see cc run for president if he had that depicting a general statement , arrogant in his underwear except that Egyptian flag as a female customer asked him how much the poster at Egypt's new hero in trademark sunglasses , as suggested by another one in which he is even wearing them and him and him and him and generally dark glasses and the best thing about this poster many Egyptian share her groupie like enthusiasm for cc and compare him to come out on illness or the populist leader who spearheaded Egypt's first military coup in nineteen fifty two and Quentin was the seeking and electrified many Egyptian revolutionaries including some who protested against the military strong-arm tactics when it ran the country filing Hosni Mubarak ouster -- Abdallah is an associate professor of journalism at the American University in Cairo and charismatic is that you can send me comes out with his black sunglasses that he who is in that you have to give that and she said he plans to help achieve a stable and prosperous Egypt appeals to the public Egyptians are looking for anything because we've been through all kinds of things through the past two and half years and when I used to that similar Egyptians you know one this is a thing that they keep looking for senior managers interviewed advantages repeated criticism of the Obama administration resonates with Egyptian many of whom accused the United States of trying to control their country to benefit Israeli interests but some analysts warned that unbridled enthusiasm for cc and by extension the military could end up costing Egyptian and Democratic gains made since two thousand Joshua stacker is in Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rival force either inside the state or outside the state that can really challenge its hegemony or seek to moderate its positions it through the military that can set the agenda and King God Egypt in a direction that suits its economic and political interests by retired Major General Mohammed Hadi signee and I found Center for political and strategic studies since easy faces obstacles that previous generals here did not have Egyptians are quick to take to the streets these days if they don't like what their leaders are doing it retired General Hansen as a result there is no guarantee that cc popularity will last until elections are held next year , but it is Wisniewski and therefore a man like that cc is coming in atmosphere which is understandable I think the rise would be parties that she is no residence on his Vietnam so far cc has not said whether he'll run for president he says his current involvement in politics is only preserving democracy in Egypt Soraya Stephanie Nelson NPR news Cairo and just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya that country's longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question is increased lawlessness in that country the militias that ousted Mona Gadhafi are fighting with each other a thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police this We learned that the United States charged a militia leader in big gauzy for the murder of Amb. Christopher Stevens on September 11 of last year to learn more about all of this research near Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick has worked extensively in Libyan joins us this morning from Cairo to good morning good morning to let me start with these charges against this militia leader in the attack on the consulate in Benghazi USA interviewed the man accused of leaving that attacked a year ago tells me it's cute but I will tell you what we interviewed were all reactor Victoria better because witnesses in the area had been him directing at least a part of it that it will have about five that can him to be up to you at large and ungodly living at home and cry out how little we are the US government or living room in Tripoli had into their own street especially by David he broke up you wonder to

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News Headline: Egypt from the Muslim brotherhood (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WBFO-FM (WBFO 88.7)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Egypt from the Muslim brotherhood many , vendors and would like to cc you run for president if the ad is good for picking generals immense talent better than any of his underwear except for the Egyptian flag as a final thought a female customer asks him how much the poster is Egypt's new hero in trademark black sunglasses cost as suggested by another one ... even wearing them a woman as him and he and I and she said the general is beautiful and dark glasses the best out of your many Egyptians share her groupie like enthusiasm for easy in comparison to Gamal Abdel Nasser the populist leader who spearheaded Egypt's first military coup in nineteen fifty two that is only was the easy question to electrify many Egyptian revolutionaries including some who protested against the military strong-arm tactics when it ran the country filing Hosni Mubarak's ouster -- Abdallah is an associate professor of journalism at the American University in Cairo and charismatic anxiety and seventy comes out with his black sunglasses and collision that have to admit that together and she has FCC's plans to help achieve a stable and prosperous Egypt appeals to the public Egyptians are looking for anything because we've been through all kinds of things to the pastor and half years and when I used to that so most Egyptians you know one this is a thing that we keep looking for senior mothers interviewed at his repeated criticism of the Obama administration resonates with Egyptians many of whom accused the United States of trying to control their country to benefit Israeli interests some analysts warned that unbridled enthusiasm for easy expansion in military could end up costing Egyptian democratic gains they've made it out Joshua stacker is in Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rhyme will force either inside the state or out of state that can really challenge its hegemony or seek to have moderate its positions it through the military that can set the agenda and King God Egypt in a direction that suits its economic and political interests by retired Major General Mohammed Hadi say our current Center for political and strategic tiny faces obstacles that previous channels here did not have Egyptians are quick to take to the streets these days if they don't like what their leaders are doing a retired general asset as a result there is no guarantee that cc popularity will last until elections are held next year formal but it is within easy but therefore a man light and cc is coming in atmosphere which is understandable I think the price would be how you speciality out democracy also on the Vietnam so far CC has not said whether he'll run for president he says his current involvement in politics is only preserving democracy Arius are hiding out that NPR news Cairo and just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya that country's longtime dictator more market off he was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question there's been increased lawlessness in that country the militias that ousted more about your fighting with each other a thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police this week we learned that the United States charged a militia leader in Benghazi for the murder of Ambassador Christopher Stevens on September eleventh of last year now to learn more about all of this Virginia Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick is working pensively in Libby and he joins us this morning from Cairo David good morning good morning let me start with these charges against this militia leader in the attack on the Consulate and Ben got USC interview the man accused of leading that attack Jericho tells me it's you are right out hell are you someone who we interviewed last fall shortly after the Victoria restaurant because the witnesses in the area had seen him correcting Police Department attract an official that at that time they consider him to be a suspect you at large in Benghazi living at home and that's a sign of how Little League either the US government or the living room intricately had into their own street specially when God be a immutable country yet yes I wonder if it's what extent is this really tests for the Libyan authorities whether they can touch the sky and then touch the malicious yesterday and got one of the really there who believe there were two people in Libya of the event at the American compliment God we are almost a distraction from the larger issue of how to pull together a

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News Headline: Neighboring countries struggling with con (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WBEZ-FM (Chicago Public Radio)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: neighboring countries struggling with con founding realities of the Arab spring in Libya elected government remains in place but it may be too weak to bring in the militia leader accused of killing US ambassador in Egypt the general who led a coup against the country's first democratically elected president is now celebrated like a movie star and that's what will begin this morning general Delphi style cc has achieved a kind of cult status that no Egyptian leader has enjoyed in decades as NDI Soraya Seiden Nelson reports that hero worship could backfire him as an attachment have to swear these days safer handful of street vendors with whom risk trade imposters a fifteen -year-old general under futile cc per minute and fifty thousand printed date despite the blazing summer he attends to keep people indoors is to send customers clamor for the forty cent posters imagine entering general I believe he saved Egypt from the Muslim brotherhood , vendors it would like to see CC run for president if he adds that the depicting a general statement tell better than any of his underwear except for the Egyptian flag as well over a female customer asks him how much the poster is Egypt's new hero in trademark black sunglasses , as suggested by another one ... he is wearing them a woman is to you as soon as the general is beautiful and dark glasses is the best thing about this poster many Egyptian share her groupie like enthusiasm for cc and compare him to Gamal Abdel Nasser the populist leader who spearheaded Egypt's first military coup in nineteen fifty two that were in the newsroom : so you see she seemed electrified many Egyptian revolutionaries including some protests against the military from arm tactics when it ran the country filing ? ouster -- Abdallah is an associate professor of journalism at the American University in Cairo if my arithmetic is at hand seventy comes out with his black sunglasses in a collision that have admit that after giveth and she then cc plans to help achieve a stable and prosperous Egypt appeals to the public Egyptians are looking for anything because we've been through all kinds of things that asked a half years and when I used to that similar Egyptians you know one this is anything that we keep looking for senior managers interviewed at FCC's repeated criticism of the Obama administration resonates with Egyptian many of whom accused the United States of trying to control their country to benefit Israeli interests but some analysts warned that unbridled enthusiasm for seeking an extension the military could end up costing Egyptians the Democratic gains made since two thousand and Joshua stacker isn't legit expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rival force either inside the state or outside the state that can really challenge its hegemony or seek to moderate its positions it through the military that can set the agenda and King God Egypt in a direction that suits its economic and political interests by retired Major General Mohammed Condi saying our town center for political and strategic style SEC faces obstacles that previous channels here did not have Egyptians are quick to take to the streets these days they don't like what their leaders are doing it retired General Hassan as a result there is no guarantee that seeking popularity will last until elections are held next year from what I think is with you but therefore a man like an cc is coming in atmosphere which is understandable I think the rice would be parties to shipping out more guns on his Vietnam so far CC has not said whether he'll run for president he says his current involvement in politics is aimed only at preserving democracy in Egypt Soraya survey Nelson NPR news Cairo and just preserving some semblance of order is the challenge in neighboring Libya that country's longtime dictator more market off he was toppled from power two years ago and never future of Libya as even a functioning state is a question there's been increased lawlessness in that country the militias that ousted more about your fighting with each other a thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police this week we learned the United States charged a militia leader in Benghazi for the murder of Ambassador Christopher Stevens on September eleventh of last year never learn more about all of this is rich in your Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick Hughes worked extensively in Libya joins us this morning from Cairo David good morning morning semi- start with use charges against Ms. Melissa Leo during the attack on the consulate Benghazi you actually

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News Headline: Killing US ambassador in Egypt (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: KOPB-AM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: killing US ambassador in Egypt the general who led coup against the country's first democratically elected president is now celebrated with a movie star and that I will begin this morning general on Delta LCC has achieved a kind of cult status that no Egyptian leader has enjoyed in decades as NDI Soraya Seiden Nelson reports that hero worship could backfire him you might actually have to swear these days safer handful of street vendors with whom risk trade imposters of behavioral general under five child PC vendor in any case he found hundreds a day despite the blazing summer he attends to keep people indoors is a problem as customers clamor for the recent posters and matters entering the general we received Egypt from the Muslim brotherhood , vendors it would like to see CC run for president if he adds that depicting a general schematic , better than any of his other where's accepted Egyptian flag as well for a female customer asks him how much the poster is Egypt's new hero in trademark black sunglasses cost the suggestion by another one in which he is even wearing them another woman is him and him and I is that the general is beautiful and dark glasses the best thing about this poster many Egyptian share her groupie like enthusiasm for cc and compare him to Gamal Abdel Nasser the populist leader who spearheaded Egypt's first military coup in nineteen fifty two in the newsroom and was leading seeking E2 electrified negligence revolutionaries including some who protested against the military strong-arm tactics when it ran the country filing Hosni Mubarak 's ouster -- vandalize an associate professor of journalism at the American University in Cairo and charismatic anxiety has he comes out with his black sunglasses a heated pool agenda that you have to give that she cc plans to help achieve a stable and prosperous Egypt appeals to the public Egyptians are looking pretty good because we've been through all kinds of things to the past and half years and when I used to that so most Egyptians you know one this that is the thing that we keep looking for she and others interviewed at FCC's repeated criticism of the Obama administration resonates with Egyptians many of whom accused the United States of trying to control their country to benefit Israeli interests some analysts warned that unbridled enthusiasm for cc and by extension the military could end up costing Egyptians the Democratic gains they've made since two thousand Joshua stacker is in Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio there is no rival force either inside the state or out of state that can really challenge the hegemony or seek to moderate its positions it through the military that can set the agenda and King God Egypt in a direction that suits its economic and political interests by retired Major General Mohammed Conti PsyD at the Allentown Center for political and strategic studies SEC faces obstacles that previous generals here did not since Egyptians are quick to take to the streets these days if they don't like what their leaders are doing it retired General Hassan as a result there is no guarantee that he his popularity will last until elections are held next year for more butter because Wisniewski and therefore a man like an cc is coming in atmospheric which is understandable I think the price would be how you sufficiently narrow democracy also on his Vietnam so far CC has not said whether he'll run for president he says his current involvement in politics as in only preserving democracy in Egypt psoriasis are hiding out and NPR news Cairo and just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya that country's longtime dictator more market off he was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question there's been increased lawlessness in that country the militias that ousted market offer you're fighting with each other a thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police this week we learned that the United States charged a militia leader in Benghazi for the murder of Ambassador Christopher Stevens on September eleventh of last year not learn more about all of this leverage your times correspondent David Kirkpatrick he's worked extensively in Libya joins us this morning from Cairo David good morning morning let me start with these charges against this militia leader in the attack on the Consulate and Ben God to you actually interviewed the man accused of leaving that attack Jericho tells me it's you are right up your ally in the more we interviewed were all career . Victoria restaurant

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News Headline: Top Egyptian General Reaches Rock Star Status (Stacher) | Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Morning Edition - NPR
Contact Name: Nelson, Soraya Sarhaddi
News OCR Text: Morning Edition

10:00-11:00 AM

DAVID GREENE: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

LINDA WERTHEIMER: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. We begin this hour with neighboring countries struggling with the confounding realities of the Arab Spring.

DAVID GREENE: In Libya an elected government remains in place, but it may be too weak to bring in the militia leader accused of killing a U.S. ambassador. In Egypt, the general who led a coup against the country's first democratically elected president is now celebrated like a movie star.

LINDA WERTHEIMER: And that's where we'll begin this morning. General Abdel-Fattah el Sissi has achieved a kind of cult status that no Egyptian leader has enjoyed in decades. But, as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports, the hero worship could backfire.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: There's not much action in Tahrir Square these days, save for a handful of street vendors who do a brisk trade in posters of 58-year-old General Abdel Fattah el Sissi. Vendor, Amr Behkit, says he sells hundreds a day despite the blazing summer heat that tends to keep people indoors.

AMR BEKHIT: (Foreign language spoken)

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: He says customers clamor for the 40-cent posters and masks featuring the general, because they believe he saved Egypt from the Muslim Brotherhood. Many tell the vendor they would like to see Sissi run for president. Bekhit adds that goods depicting the general's image sell better than any of his other wares, except for the Egyptian flag.

AMR BEKHIT: (Foreign language spoken)

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: A female customer asks him how much the poster of Egypt's new hero in trademark black sunglasses costs. He suggests she buy another one in which Sissi isn't wearing them, but the woman refuses.

AMR BEKHIT: (Foreign language spoken)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Foreign language spoken)

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: She says: The general is beautiful in those dark glasses, it's the best thing about this poster. Many Egyptians share her groupie-like enthusiasm for Sissi. They compare him to Gamal Abdel Nasser, the populist leader who spearheaded Egypt's first military coup in 1952.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: Sissi's speeches electrify many Egyptian revolutionaries, including some who protested against the military's strong-arm tactics when it ran the country following Hosni Mubarak's ouster. Rasha Abdalla is an associate professor of journalism at the American University in Cairo

RASHA ABDALLA: He's quite charismatic, he's relatively handsome, he comes out with his black sunglasses. He's a cool general, you have to admit that, you have to give that to him.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: She adds that Sissi's pledge to help achieve a stable and prosperous Egypt appeals to the public.

RASHA ABDALLA: The Egyptians are looking for a leader because we've been through all kinds of things through the past two and a half years and we are not used to that. So most Egyptians, you know, want this stability thing that they keep looking for.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: She and others interviewed add that Sissi's repeated criticism of the Obama administration resonates with Egyptians, many of whom accuse the United States of trying to control their country to benefit Israeli interests. But some analysts warn that unbridled enthusiasm for Sissi, and by extension, the military, could end up costing Egyptians the democratic gains they've made since 2011. Joshua Stacher is an Egypt expert at Kent State University in Ohio.

JOSHUA STACHER: There is no rival force, either inside the state or outside the state, that can really challenge its hegemony or seek to kind of moderate its positions. It's really the military that can set the agenda and can guide Egypt in a direction that suits its economic and political interests.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: But retired major general Mohamed Kadry Said, of the Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies, says Sissi faces obstacles that previous generals here did not. He says Egyptians are quick to take to the streets these days if they don't like what their leaders are doing. The retired general adds that as a result, there is no guarantee that Sissi's popularity will last until elections are held next year.

MOHAMED KADRY SAID: For Mubarak it was easy, but for a man like Sissi, he's coming in an atmosphere which is unstable. I think the price will be high, especially now with democracy and so on, it is real now.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON: So far, Sissi has not said whether he'll run for president. He says his current involvement in politics is aimed only at preserving democracy in Egypt. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, NPR News, Cairo.

Copyright © 2013 NPR

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News Headline: How to Avoid the Self-Esteem Trap | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: I have always assumed that having a strong sense of self-worth was important. I figured it made a person happier, healthier, more successful, and easier to be around. Turns out that these benefits of self-esteem are rather hard to prove. Having high self-esteem has some modest pluses, studies suggest. It makes you more persistent, for example, and boosts performance at school and work ever-so-slightly, writes Jennifer Crocker and Jessica J. Carnevale in the cover story in the current Scientific American Mind (see "Self-Esteem Can Be an Ego Trap"). But those with big heads also seem plagued by a problem: they can't see where they fall short, which makes self-improvement difficult. Worse, Crocker and Carnevale write, a focus on self-esteem lays out a humungous, hard-to-see trap.

Like paparazzi stalking a celebrity, many of us try to chase self-esteem. The hunt often consists of striving for achievements that prove us worthy. But everyone fails sometimes, even at what they do best, so to base your self-esteem on getting an A or winning an award makes you psychologically vulnerable to other, perhaps more likely, outcomes. This attitude also can diminish your chances of success. If you spend your time trying to prove your worth, rather than working to improve your abilities, you are likely to put in less effort toward meeting your goals (because people with this bent often feel that having to work hard is a sign that they are less capable). You may even handicap yourself--staying up late the night before a test, say--so that you will have a ready excuse if you fail. What is more, your desire to demonstrate your excellence makes you a lousy companion, as you are more likely to direct the conversation around this topic.

The point here is not that you shouldn't be ambitious or work toward meaningful ends. It is that you need a less egocentric reason for doing so. Instead of worrying about how you measure up, set your sights on helping your family, friends, or team or working toward the greater good. Try to lose yourself in a project or endeavor or focus on what you might learn from it rather than concentrating on what its outcome means about you. When you fail or fall short, it is natural to feel lousy, but it will feel less lousy if you divorce this result from what it says about you. Add a dollop of compassion for yourself and you will feel even better. What is more, if you can separate mistakes from personal failure, you will be better able to learn from your blunders and find greater success in the future.

How We Learn

Speaking of learning, this issue of

Mind includes a Special Report that highlights learning techniques. In the lead article of this section, John Dunlosky, a psychologist at Kent State University, and his colleagues explain how they sifted through hundreds of scientific papers to determine what study methods work best (see "Psychologists Identify the Best Ways to Study"). These techniques cement knowledge in the long run, no matter what the material to be learned or the test used to measure comprehension. Here's the lowdown.

The winners!

Test Yourself. Making flash cards, answering questions at the end of a chapter, or devising your own tests of the material are excellent ways to cement your knowledge.

Spread out Study Sessions. To remember something for a week, rehearse the material in sessions separated by 12 to 24 hours. To retain the information for five years, wait six to 12 months before going back to it.

The losers...

Highlighting. Brandishing those bright pens or underscoring noteworthy phrases doesn't inscribe the information in your brain. Marking up text is only useful if it is combined with a more helpful learning technique.

Rereading. Don't waste time running your eyes over the text again. Instead, engage in more active strategies such as testing yourself or asking yourself why the material makes sense.

The in-between

Asking Why. Asking yourself to explain or elaborate on the material you are learning can help you retain it.

Mixing up Lessons. Instead of finishing one type of problem or body of information before moving on to the next, switch off between different subjects or topics more often.

ScientificAmerican.com. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: How to Avoid the Self-Esteem Trap | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Scientific American - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: I have always assumed that having a strong sense of self-worth was important. I figured it made a person happier, healthier, more successful, and easier to be around. Turns out that these benefits of self-esteem are rather hard to prove. Having high self-esteem has some modest pluses, studies suggest. It makes you more persistent, for example, and boosts performance at school and work ever-so-slightly, writes Jennifer Crocker and Jessica J. Carnevale in the cover story in the current Scientific American Mind (see “Self-Esteem Can Be an Ego Trap”). But those with big heads also seem plagued by a problem: they can't see where they fall short, which makes self-improvement difficult. Worse, Crocker and Carnevale write, a focus on self-esteem lays out a humungous, hard-to-see trap.

Like paparazzi stalking a celebrity, many of us try to chase self-esteem. The hunt often consists of striving for achievements that prove us worthy. But everyone fails sometimes, even at what they do best, so to base your self-esteem on getting an A or winning an award makes you psychologically vulnerable to other, perhaps more likely, outcomes. This attitude also can diminish your chances of success. If you spend your time trying to prove your worth, rather than working to improve your abilities, you are likely to put in less effort toward meeting your goals (because people with this bent often feel that having to work hard is a sign that they are less capable). You may even handicap yourself—staying up late the night before a test, say–so that you will have a ready excuse if you fail. What is more, your desire to demonstrate your excellence makes you a lousy companion, as you are more likely to direct the conversation around this topic.

The point here is not that you shouldn't be ambitious or work toward meaningful ends. It is that you need a less egocentric reason for doing so. Instead of worrying about how you measure up, set your sights on helping your family, friends, or team or working toward the greater good. Try to lose yourself in a project or endeavor or focus on what you might learn from it rather than concentrating on what its outcome means about you. When you fail or fall short, it is natural to feel lousy, but it will feel less lousy if you divorce this result from what it says about you. Add a dollop of compassion for yourself and you will feel even better. What is more, if you can separate mistakes from personal failure, you will be better able to learn from your blunders and find greater success in the future.

How We Learn

Speaking of learning, this issue of Mind includes a Special Report that highlights learning techniques. In the lead article of this section, John Dunlosky, a psychologist at Kent State University, and his colleagues explain how they sifted through hundreds of scientific papers to determine what study methods work best (see “Psychologists Identify the Best Ways to Study”). These techniques cement knowledge in the long run, no matter what the material to be learned or the test used to measure comprehension. Here's the lowdown.

The winners!

Test Yourself. Making flash cards, answering questions at the end of a chapter, or devising your own tests of the material are excellent ways to cement your knowledge.

Spread out Study Sessions. To remember something for a week, rehearse the material in sessions separated by 12 to 24 hours. To retain the information for five years, wait six to 12 months before going back to it.

The losers…

Highlighting. Brandishing those bright pens or underscoring noteworthy phrases doesn't inscribe the information in your brain. Marking up text is only useful if it is combined with a more helpful learning technique.

Rereading. Don't waste time running your eyes over the text again. Instead, engage in more active strategies such as testing yourself or asking yourself why the material makes sense.

Courtesy of CollegeDegrees360 via Flickr.

The in-between

Asking Why. Asking yourself to explain or elaborate on the material you are learning can help you retain it.

Mixing up Lessons. Instead of finishing one type of problem or body of information before moving on to the next, switch off between different subjects or topics more often.

Other articles in this special report discuss the downsides of dispensing with handwriting and a creative new technique for teaching math, which will be the topic of a future blog post. I hope you enjoyed learning about the issue!

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News Headline: Even a pro needs advice for college prep | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Saimi Bergmann
News OCR Text: Saundra Wright is a professional organizer, but found herself floundering this summer when faced with the all the organization decisions needed to get her oldest child ready to leave for college. ?It was a little out of my comfort zone,? she admitted. So she went to fellow organizers for advice, then called moms who already had sent kids to college and picked their brains. ?Who better to ask than those who have already walked this path?? asked Wright, the Jackson Township owner of Organize Wright LLC.

Her first lesson: Knowledge is power. The more you know about your child?s soon-to-be home, the more efficiently you can shop and pack. ?Know everything about the student?s room beforehand ? the layout, dimensions,? Wright said. ?At Kent (State University) they had a mock setup of each of the dorm rooms in the student center, showing what type of furniture is in it. You can take measurements, take pictures.? Knowing the number of dresser drawers and exact size of the closet can prevent overpacking. ?A lot of moms said that kids take too much with them,? Wright said. Check college websites for specific dorm room information. Is there a light built in above the desk, or will a lamp be needed? Is lofting a bed allowed? What size are the beds?

The University of Mount Union website includes ?what to pack? and ?what not to pack? lists under ?frequently asked questions.? Malone University?s ?student life? web page offers yes, maybe and no lists, and advises students to wait to purchase some items until after they move in.

For more help, Wright suggests checking out the packing lists at www.

collegesupplylist.com.

Space will be limited, no matter where the student lives, so organization counts. Wright suggests space savers like under-bed storage boxes. ?You can create under-bed storage with risers. Some risers on the market now have USB ports built into them.? Consider a back-of-the-door shoe organizer, which can be used for many things other than shoes. ?It can hold office supplies like post-it notes, staplers, tape,? Wright said. ?Girls could use it for hair products, scarves. Even your first aid kit or flashlight could fit.? Because shoe organizers are plastic, they can easily be cut to fit any size door. Students can save space by avoiding duplication. ?Like I said, knowledge is power, so if you have the opportunity to speak with your future roommate and join forces, maybe you can bring only one printer, one TV, one Xbox.?

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News Headline: Even a pro needs advice for college prep | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name: Saimi Bergmann
News OCR Text: Saundra Wright is a professional organizer, but found herself floundering this summer when faced with the all the organization decisions needed to get her oldest child ready to leave for college. ?It was a little out of my comfort zone,? she admitted. So she went to fellow organizers for advice, then called moms who already had sent kids to college and picked their brains. ?Who better to ask than those who have already walked this path?? asked Wright, the Jackson Township owner of Organize Wright LLC.

Her first lesson: Knowledge is power. The more you know about your child?s soon-to-be home, the more efficiently you can shop and pack. ?Know everything about the student?s room beforehand ? the layout, dimensions,? Wright said. ?At Kent (State University) they had a mock setup of each of the dorm rooms in the student center, showing what type of furniture is in it. You can take measurements, take pictures.? Knowing the number of dresser drawers and exact size of the closet can prevent overpacking. ?A lot of moms said that kids take too much with them,? Wright said. Check college websites for specific dorm room information. Is there a light built in above the desk, or will a lamp be needed? Is lofting a bed allowed? What size are the beds?

The University of Mount Union website includes ?what to pack? and ?what not to pack? lists under ?frequently asked questions.? Malone University?s ?student life? web page offers yes, maybe and no lists, and advises students to wait to purchase some items until after they move in.

For more help, Wright suggests checking out the packing lists at www.

collegesupplylist.com.

Space will be limited, no matter where the student lives, so organization counts. Wright suggests space savers like under-bed storage boxes. ?You can create under-bed storage with risers. Some risers on the market now have USB ports built into them.? Consider a back-of-the-door shoe organizer, which can be used for many things other than shoes. ?It can hold office supplies like post-it notes, staplers, tape,? Wright said. ?Girls could use it for hair products, scarves. Even your first aid kit or flashlight could fit.? Because shoe organizers are plastic, they can easily be cut to fit any size door. Students can save space by avoiding duplication. ?Like I said, knowledge is power, so if you have the opportunity to speak with your future roommate and join forces, maybe you can bring only one printer, one TV, one Xbox.?

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News Headline: Even a pro needs advice for college prep | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Saundra Wright is a professional organizer, but found herself floundering this summer when faced with the all the organization decisions needed to get her oldest child ready to leave for college.

“It was a little out of my comfort zone,” she admitted.

So she went to fellow organizers for advice, then called moms who already had sent kids to college and picked their brains.

“Who better to ask than those who have already walked this path?” asked Wright, the Jackson Township owner of Organize Wright LLC.

Her first lesson: Knowledge is power. The more you know about your child's soon-to-be home, the more efficiently you can shop and pack.

“Know everything about the student's room beforehand — the layout, dimensions,” Wright said. “At Kent (State University) they had a mock setup of each of the dorm rooms in the student center, showing what type of furniture is in it. You can take measurements, take pictures.”

Knowing the number of dresser drawers and exact size of the closet can prevent overpacking.

“A lot of moms said that kids take too much with them,” Wright said.

Check college websites for specific dorm room information. Is there a light built in above the desk, or will a lamp be needed? Is lofting a bed allowed? What size are the beds?

The University of Mount Union website includes “what to pack” and “what not to pack” lists under “frequently asked questions.” Malone University's “student life” web page offers yes, maybe and no lists, and advises students to wait to purchase some items until after they move in.

For more help, Wright suggests checking out the packing lists at www.

collegesupplylist.com.

Space will be limited, no matter where the student lives, so organization counts. Wright suggests space savers like under-bed storage boxes.

“You can create under-bed storage with risers. Some risers on the market now have USB ports built into them.”

Consider a back-of-the-door shoe organizer, which can be used for many things other than shoes.

“It can hold office supplies like post-it notes, staplers, tape,” Wright said. “Girls could use it for hair products, scarves. Even your first aid kit or flashlight could fit.”

Because shoe organizers are plastic, they can easily be cut to fit any size door.

Students can save space by avoiding duplication.

“Like I said, knowledge is power, so if you have the opportunity to speak with your future roommate and join forces, maybe you can bring only one printer, one TV, one Xbox.”

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News Headline: Kent State Veterans Club hosting 3rd annual Adam Hamilton Scholarship Fund Memorial Cornhole Tourney | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: The Kent State Veterans Club is hosting the 3rd annual Adam Hamilton Scholarship Fund Memorial Cornhole Tournament this Saturday.

With all proceeds for the cornhole tournament donated to the Adam Hamilton Memorial Academic & Athletic Scholarship Fund, gates at the Kent VFW will open at 11 a.m. and the tournament will begin at noon.

U.S. Army Spc. Adam Hamilton was killed in Afghanistan on May 28, 2011 after sustaining wounds from an improvised explosive device. The 2007 Theodore Roosevelt High School graduate and Kent native was 22 years old. Since his passing, his family has held annual fundraising events in Adam's honor.

The tournament will be single elimination with two-man teams. The price for admission for non-participants is $20 and team registration costs $50. First place will win a prize of $100, while second place will walk away with $50. There will be a 50/50 raffle, music, a silent auction and all-you-can-eat food/drink.

For more information on the event and to register, click here.

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News Headline: Prison for former Kent man in sex assault of teenage girl | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A former
Kent man
h a s be e n
sentenced to
nine months
in pr i s o n
and been labeled
a sex
offender after
pleading
guilty to soliciting a 14-yearold
girl for sex and sexually
assaulting her during a slumber
party at his Kimberly
Drive residence in February.
Benjamin R. Schwartz,
20, now living in Kirtland,
according to court records,
pleaded guilty to one count
each of importuning, a fifthdegree
felony, unlawful sexual
conduct with a minor,
a first-degree misdemeanor,
and sexual imposition,
a third-degree misdemeanor,
on June 3, according to
court records. Portage County
Common Pleas Judge
John Enlow sentenced him
to nine months in prison on
the felony.
Enlow also sentenced
Schwartz to 180 days in the
Portage County jail on the
first-degree misdemeanor,
and 60 days in jail on the
third-degree misdemeanor,
to run concurrent to each
other and the prison term,
according to his sentencing
order.
Schwartz, who received
credit for 11 days already
served in jail awaiting trial,
was labeled a Tier I sex offender,
requiring him to register
his address with his local
sheriff's office once a year
for the next 15 years.
Portage County sheriff's
deputies arrested Schwartz
on March 1 and charged him
with rape, a first-degree felony,
and importuning, Sheriff
David Doak said at the
time.The charges resulted
from an investigation
into a slumber party that
Schwartz was chaperoning
at his Kimberly Drive residence
on Feb. 17, during
which he allegedly had sexual
contact with a 14-yearold
girl whom he was able
to separate from the other
girls, the sheriff's office
said.
Detectives also discovered
that Schwartz had
sexual contact with another
14-year-old girl at
his residence on Feb. 16,
Doak said.
At the time of the incident,
Schwartz was a
sophomore biotechnology
major at KSU, according
to the online student
directory.
Contact this reporter

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News Headline: PERSON OF INTEREST: TYLER HANES | Email

News Date: 08/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Contact Name: Aronson, Claire
News OCR Text: Tyler Hanes is drawn to musical theater for the stories. Now, the 20-year-old is writing his story.

The rising junior at Kent State University had met Broadway star Idina Menzel nine other times, but he added a chapter when she invited him on stage for a duet during the encore of her concert at Heinz Hall last month. Mr. Hanes joined Ms. Menzel for "Defying Gravity" from "Wicked," the show that earned her a Tony Award.

"Having me sing 'Defying Gravity' with her was a huge honor," said Mr. Hanes, a Struthers, Ohio, native. "It was literally a tearful moment. I came off stage, and I didn't even realize what happened."

At the Pittsburgh performance, Ms. Menzel introduced Mr. Hanes, saying that she has known him since he was 5 years old.

"He came backstage to meet me, and I gave him a tour. And then he sang for me, 'One Short Day' from 'Wicked' right on the stage," she said. Ms. Menzel was a few years off about when they had met, but she recalled that he just started singing without a prompt.

Mr. Hanes was introduced to Ms. Menzel when his aunt, Cheryl Joyce, sent a letter to the singer/actress describing her nephew as a "huge 'Wizard of Oz' buff," who loves seeing theater and sang "One Short Day" in the Macy's Day Parade. Mr. Hanes didn't know about the letter, which he read for the first time recently, and it stayed a secret until after a "Wicked" show in New York.

Mr. Hanes, who was 10 at the time, wanted to go to the stage door to meet his favorite character -- "the wicked witch, the green one." He did meet "the green one," but he met her backstage, where Ms. Menzel was waiting for him and his family.

These days, Mr. Hanes studies musical theater, hoping to soon move beyond community theater performances to either a lead in a show at Kent State or performing at a regional level. Mr. Hanes evidently made an impression last month at Heinz Hall, where Ms. Menzel's fans surrounded him when he walked out the stage door.

"I wasn't the main event," he said, laughing.

Although Ms. Menzel never knows in advance that Mr. Hanes will be in the audience, she does recognize the cookies that he always brings -- her favorite is the peanut butter and chocolate treat, the "buckeye."

"This is one of the ways she remembers me," he said. "I only go when I am in driving distance." When Mr. Hanes was taken backstage after the Pittsburgh show, Ms. Menzel already had eaten four of the cookies.

"She was just a sweetheart back there, too," he said.

Singing in front of crowds wasn't always easy for him. His mother, Cathy Hanes, had to bribe him with a milkshake to sing "Hard Knock Life" for his first audition at the age of 7.

"As soon as he started to sing, it was like there was no tomorrow," Ms. Hanes said.

That first audition and the show, "The King and I," at the Trumbull New Theatre in Niles, Ohio, remain his most memorable stage experiences. "It really got me addicted to the theater aspect," he said.

So far, the road hasn't been perfect. For Mr. Hanes, the rejections he has received from amusement parks are the most difficult.

"They take their cookie dough and go, 'Oh, that one's not perfect,' " he said.

But, that is the field he is in, Ms. Hanes said. "You have to be in the right place at the right time and be exactly what they're looking for," she said.

Mr. Hanes tells himself that there is always the next one.

Recently, he got his Zumba license and has been teaching Zumba -- combining Latin and international music with a workout -- three to four nights a week. For now, it is a way to make money to be able to travel to auditions, but for the future, it is his backup plan.

While he would love to be on Broadway, Mr. Hanes just wants to be paid to do what he loves -- singing and acting.

"As long as there is an art form involved and money to survive off of, I'm all for it," he said.

This August, he enters his third year at Kent State, competing against the other 25 people in the musical theater program's junior class for a handful of leads in the school's musicals. And Ms. Menzel continues to mentor him.

"She pushes me to do what I do," Mr. Hanes said. "She inspires me."

Ms. Menzel told Mr. Hanes that he is going to go somewhere in life, Ms. Hanes added.

"She's encouraged him to follow his dream."

Copyright © 2013 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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News Headline: Building Better Neighborhoods Special | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Building Better Neighborhoods Special - WEWS-CLE (ABC)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: And our continuing effort to build better neighborhoods, tonight we take a look at three come back communities. Areas of cities where time and money have been invested to draw people back in. You might say the lights have been turned back on in these communities. If you haven't been to kent will lowby or cleveland flats what's happening in these areas will surprise you. First, let's take a look at kent. This is known as the tree city. It's the largest city. If you haven't been to kent late or perhaps you went to kent state and haven't been back in a long time, you won't believe the transformation taking place in the downtown area. [ music ] >> They're singing the blues in kent. I believe, I believe, I believe my time has come >> And that's a sweet tune. >> A lot of people are rediscovering it. Even the naysayers have to know kind of this is pretty neat. >> Reporter: a store called pop, a popcorn store. The area is busting with small stores and businesses. >> I've lived in kent 20 years and they haven't been downtown in 20 years and they're coming in and checking it out and it's beautiful. >> Reporter: like acorn alley, the hotel and conference center is another jewel. It's sits directly across the street from the transit center, a sparkling 350-space parking garage. The massive makeover is five years in the making at a cost of 110 million dollars, money many say is well spent. >> It's pretty dingy and getting a little run down and with all this new building, I think it's really giving it a total rebirth. >> Reporter: the city says the rebirth created nearly 1,000 construction jobs in the past four years. And 700 permanent new jobs downtown. >> We were dying on the vine rapidly and couldn't get any good businesses in town. Now we have very little space, if any, available. >> Reporter: for the first time kept state university's main campus is connected directly to downtown by a sidewalk called the esplanade. >> It's an actual pathway that takes you t's attracting people from all over. >> As they say, we're now a destination place. A woman called my office. She wanted to know if the parking deck was open. She was coming down for a concert and they started to say live in leave land and are talking about moving to kent. >> Because kent is open for business and appears to be hitting all the right notes. Joining me now is kent and mary fialla. Great to see you. This incredible. How proud are you of what's transfired? >> I'm very proud. We've got a rebirth of our downtown. Consequently, like everybody in northern ohio, they are kind of losing their way, and we've done that. We came from a railroad town to a business town. >> Ongoing businesses, adding to the tax base which is for our public services, residents in the city of kent. It's just delightful. >> Mayor, what message does this send, not only here in kent but really the surrounding community and all of northeast ohio? >> I think the message I have, and I want to get out there, if you think positive, you have a good group of people that have the same ideas, they want something to happen, and not dwell on negativity, you can do it. We're an entertainment district. We're a destination waiting to happen for everybody. >> Talk about this rebirth and how you hope that gap between the university and the downtown city, how the gap is narrowing, now you have one community. >> It's part of our history. It was a bad time for everybody. We lived through it, but I think everybody recognizes there's only one way to go and that's put it behind us. But right now the university and the town are closer together than they ever were. >> Where do you see kent, 25, 50 years down the road? >> Well, I want to see more of kept develop. I mean, even though we built this new area, it isn't actually our center of kent. Our center downtown is actually one block over. And what I want to see is the flourish that so it all blends in so this is one big

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News Headline: EDITORIAL: A good time to catch a college movie | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: System Administrator
News OCR Text: Dear Would-Be College Presidents,

I know many of you are looking closely at all the changes in Northeast Ohio, including at Kent State and the University of Akron, and seeing opportunities. As someone who has been both a student and teacher at UA, I very much believe in the importance of strong local colleges. I hope that you will have the wisdom and vision that all schools need to make it through difficult times.

And as you assemble your ideas for a great college administration, maybe you should catch a movie.

Or watch some TV.

After all, everything you need to know in life comes from movies and TV. Sometimes you can even learn from what isn't there. For instance, scripted movies with heroic college administrators can be found — We Are Marshall includes one — but are still relatively rare.

More often in college movies — including the greatest of all such films, Animal House — administrators are more likely to be the villains. Heroes are far more often the students and teachers, especially when they work together. That alone should tell you something about who is most important to a university.

But you can still learn from all those movies about students and teachers as you chart your course.

Take a look at films like Accepted, the Justin Long comedy where students create their own (fake) university as an alternative to an established one. Does your view of university life take into consideration what all students want and need? To look at Animal House again, are you looking only at the privileged and popular denizens of Omega House — or are you making a good place for the Deltas, too?

Turn to Back to School, the Rodney Dangerfield classic, as a reminder that you'll be dealing with nontraditional students. In fact, you may also want to pick up the DVDs of the TV series Community, which shows an array of students from different backgrounds trying to find success in college. It's a comedy, sometimes absurd, often extreme — but isn't that how college is for a lot of students?

When you are negotiating for a mid-six-figure salary and bonuses and perks, ask yourself if that's the best place for the university to spend. Movies like 21, Rounders and even Caddyshack (where one caddy is trying to earn money for college) touch on what students have to do to afford college tuition and expenses. Do you really need more money when it could just as easily be used for scholarships?

Films like Higher Learning and School Daze are reminders of the challenges of campus diversity — and School Daze especially shows how diversity is not only interracial but intrracial — that African-Americans, or any other ethnic or economic group, should not be seen as having a single position or point of view.

As much as we talk about race, class is also a constant issue in the culture. Don't forget students who come to college in need of academic help.

How would you handle TV's Buffy Summers, a student whose work — as a vampire slayer, in this case — has kept her from preparing well for a university education? Buffy got more than a little lost after high school; how would you put her on a path to success?

Of course, you can also look at movies that celebrate what can come from college life: the comradeship, the shared success. I'm thinking Drumline, for one. But such celebrations go hand-in-hand with the tremendous challenges you face. So perhaps I will see you at the movies.



Kickstarting. Akron native and Tallmadge High School graduate Steven Marten aims to make a movie called Kloon, from a story by Ross Mihalko about a young boy adopted into a secret society of clowns. He has lined up some collaborators, including painter Felipe Echevarria and Antoine de Cazotte, an executive producer of Oscar-winning movie The Artist. Now he wants to get money people interested.

To do that, Marten and associates plan to put together a 48-page hardcover book of art and other material about the movie, providing a tangible demonstration of the project for studios, agents, actors and directors.

He would like to print 1,000 of these books and estimates the cost at about $33,600. So he has turned to — what else? — Kickstarter for help.

As of Thursday, the campaign had raised about $10,000, so it's still awaiting donations. The deadline for contributions is Monday,

If this intrigues you, head to www.kickstarter.com/projects/486483079/kloon. There you will find more about the film, a video by Marten and the incentives attached to various contribution amounts.



Kings Again. The Kings of Summer, the comedy-drama shot in the Chagrin Falls area (and which opened the 2013 Cleveland International Film Festival), comes to DVD and Blu-ray on Sept. 24. It involves three teens who decide to build a house in isolated woods and live there for the summer. I highly recommend it.

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News Headline: Cleveland author James Jessen Badal featured on episode of 'Haunted History' | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Cleveland writer and teacher James Jessen Badal, author of "In the Wake of the Butcher: Cleveland's Torso Murders," will be featured on the episode of "Haunted History" airing at 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, on History Channel 2 (H2). The episode primarily will focus on the Cleveland Torso Murders of the 1930s.

Published in 2001 by the Kent State University Press, Badal's true-crime book examines the unsolved murders committed by a killer dubbed the Mad Butcher of Kingsbury Run. The murderer preyed mostly on the makeshift shantytowns -- shack cities that sprung up in major urban areas during the Great Depression. The unidentified Mad Butcher killed and dismembered at least 12 victims over a three-year span (1935-38).

"Haunted History," which premiered on July 12, puts the spotlight on allegedly haunted locations, usually ones connected with an infamous murder investigation.

Eliot Ness, best known for bringing down crime boss Al Capone in Chicago, was Cleveland's Public Safety Director during the investigation of the murders. The "Haunted History" description of the episode: "Today, spirits of the dismembered victims and of the killer himself offer clues that might finally help solve a case that stumped Eliot Ness. ... Who was the Mad Butcher, and is he responsible for another famous unsolved murder as well? The ghosts of history bring the past alive, and offer clues to those able to listen that may finally give peace to the restless dead."

The episode also will make a side trip to New Castle, Pa., because Peter Merylo, the lead detective on the Cleveland investigation, believed that several murders in that area were the work of the Mad Butcher. Badal was interviewed last year for "Haunted History."

An assistant professor of English and journalism at Cuyahoga County Community College, Badal is the author of several books published by the Kent State University Press. His other works include "Recording the Classics: Maestros, Music, and Technology" (1996), "Twilight of Innocence: The Disappearance of Beverly Potts" (2005), "Though Murder Has No Tongue: The Lost Victim of Cleveland's Mad Butcher" (2010), "Hell's Wasteland: The Pennsylvania Torso Murders" (2013).

Badal has served on the board of trustees of the Cleveland Police Historical Society since 2001. His articles have appeared in many music and entertainment publications, among them High Fidelity, Symphony, Fanfare, Cleveland Edition, and Northern Ohio Live.

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News Headline: EDITORIAL: You're the U in OSU and KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The bumper sticker reads: "My Kid and My Money go to Ohio State."
For most parents who mount the tuition treadmill, it's not funny.
It's the truth.
As college tuition and fees skyrocket, bow-tied brainiacs such as former Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee pull down super-star salaries. You, meanwhile, spoil yourself with a second helping of Hamburger Helper.
Not that there's anything wrong with that.
But now you can actually influence who replaces Gee at OSU and Lester Lefton, who is retiring as president of Kent State University next July.
And you should.
As a taxpayer and parent, or someone who knows a parent, or someone who may become a parent, you have a vested interest in the leadership of both these public institutions of higher learning.
To weigh-in on the OSU presidential candidate, go to: http://trustees.osu.edu/presidentialsearch/
For the KSU, search: http://www.kent.edu/president/presidentialsearch.
Why not help select the best brain for your buck?

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