Report Overview:
Total Clips (16)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics; Students (3)
Athletics (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Political Science (3)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
FACE IN THE CROWD 08/16/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

ormer Kent State University baseball standout Ryan Bores is currently playing with the Hickory Crawdads, which is a single-A affiliate of the ...


Alumni; Athletics; Students (3)
Kent State campaign takes aim at Heisman glory for star running back Dri Archer 08/16/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

KEVIN KLEPS Kent State running back Dri Archer isn't going to win the Heisman Trophy this season. But when it comes to Heisman campaigns, the best...

Kent State using comic strip to promote speedy RB Dri Archer as Heisman Trophy candidate Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2013/08/14/kent-state-using-comic-strip-to-promote-speedy-rb-dri-archer-as-heisman-trophy/#ixzz2c8fFCSv6 08/16/2013 FOXNews.com Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio – Kent State has launched a comic strip to promote super-speedy running back Dri Archer as a Heisman Trophy candidate. The unique campaign...

Kent State kicks off "comic strip" campaign 08/16/2013 Washington Times Text Attachment Email

KENT, OHIO (AP) - Dri Archer has cartoonish speed. The Road Runner might not be able to outrun Kent State's do-it-all running back. So perhaps it's fitting...


Athletics (1)
KSU baseball coach Jeff Duncan speaks at KACC luncheon (Duncan) 08/16/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State's new baseball coach Jeff Duncan was the featured guest speaker at Thursday's Kent Area Chamber of Commerce luncheon hosted by Water Street...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
Project GRAD prepares parents to prepare children 08/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By Doug Livingston Beacon Journal education writer ___ (PHOTO) Jordan Williams, Kent State University senior in early childhood education, works with...

More News You Should Use. Walking and Disease, Smartphone Fitness Problems, Diet Hero Issues, Moms and Fat Kids, Hot Chocolate and Aging...(Barkley, Lepp) 08/15/2013 Diet Detective, The Text Attachment Email

...decrease fitness. Well, that's what researchers Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, faculty members in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University in Ohio, say. They found that high smartphone use was linked to poor fitness in college students. “More than 300 college students...


Entrepreneurship (1)
Hudson council hears update on business incubator 08/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By M.A. Ferguson-Rich Special to the Beacon Journal HUDSON: TECHudson has enough operating funds to see it through January, Director George Buzzy said...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Back-to-school fashion: Kent State University's J.R. Campbell and Ursuline College's May Beard share style tips for grownups (Campbell) 08/16/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

By Emily Hamlin Smith, The Plain Dealer on August 16, 2013 at 6:00 AM, updated August 16, 2013 at 6:04 AM Hearing that you dress like a schoolteacher...


KSU at Stark (1)
Audition 08/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Published: August 14, 2013 - 06:38 PM AUDITIONS Akron Pops Orchestra — Seeking musicians, especially strings and keyboards, for the volunteer orchestra....


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
'Streetcar' coming to Little Theatre of Tuscarawas County 08/15/2013 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...office hours, are 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday Friday and Saturday and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. Tickets also are available through the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas online or at the box office during its regular hours of 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Little Theatre is at 466 Carrie Ave....


KSU Museum (1)
Art Best Bets 08/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Published: August 14, 2013 - 06:38 PM ART BEST BETS Julian Stanczak: Line, Color, Illusion — Through Oct. 6 at Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St. Also,...


Political Science (3)
U.S. cancels military operation with Egypt, but not aid (Stacher) 08/15/2013 CareerBuilder.com Text Attachment Email

...like too little, too late. “Obama's Egypt policy is always at least two crackdowns behind where it should be,” Joshua Stacher, an Egypt specialist at Kent State University and author of, “Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria,” said on Twitter. State Department spokeswoman Jen...

U.S. response: The president canceled joint exercises but stopped short of calls for a cutoff in aid. (Stacher) 08/15/2013 philly.com Text Attachment Email

...like too little, too late. "Obama's Egypt policy is always at least two crackdowns behind where it should be," Joshua Stacher, an Egypt specialist at Kent State University and author of Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria, said on Twitter. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki...

Egypt's military faces the fallout of Cairo bloodshed (Stacher) 08/15/2013 Christian Science Monitor - Online Text Attachment Email

...push to assert its authority and basically rid any civilian competitors from challenging its power,” says Joshua Stacher, a professor and Egypt expert at Kent State University who recently published a book on autocratic rule in Egypt and Syria. But while that may not have been apparent to some a month...


Town-Gown (1)
Around Kent 08/16/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Put out the welcome mats, Kent! While graduating students will be exiting Kent, new and returning students will be arriving soon! We know that they...


News Headline: FACE IN THE CROWD | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ormer
Kent State University
baseball
standout Ryan
Bores is currently
playing
with the Hickory
Crawdads,
which is a single-A affiliate of the
Texas Rangers in the South Atlantic
League. The 6-foot-3, 190-pound
right-handed pitcher has made 24
appearances this year, starting six
games. His record is 3-2, with one
save and he has an ERA of 4.61
through 681⁄3 innings of work. He
has struck out 34 and walked 20.

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News Headline: Kent State campaign takes aim at Heisman glory for star running back Dri Archer | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KEVIN KLEPS

Kent State running back Dri Archer isn't going to win the Heisman Trophy this season.

But when it comes to Heisman campaigns, the best any other school can hope for is second place.

The Golden Flashes' “Dri4Heisman” push has been incredible — and Kent is still 15 days away from its first game.

Archer's Heisman campaign includes a website, Twitter account and Facebook page.

Those are all typical components of any national award bid. A comic strip, however, is not.

“The Archer” — which debuted Tuesday night — is the campaign equivalent of the flashy back cementing a big game with one of his electric touchdowns.

The comic strip is illustrated by Kent alum Chuck Ayers, who made a name for himself with popular comics “Crankshaft” and "Funky Winkerbean."

The debut comic focuses on colleges recruiting Archer for track and field, before “one football offer did arrive” — a chance to play at Kent State.

In an interview with the Record Courier, Ayers credited Kent State officials for the initial idea, and WhiteSpace Creative — an integrated marketing firm — with the comic concepts.

“I met with the folks that are doing it, a group called (Whitespace Creative) located in Highland Square,” Ayers told the newspaper. “I live and work right here in Highland Square, so it's been real easy to meet with them. They had a basic idea, and we just kicked it around at the first meeting. They said they'd put some words and concepts together for me and let me take off with it. They did a really good job. I think there's a couple of them that are comic book fans, so they've got a good grasp of what we can do and can't do with some of this material.”

The next strip will be released on Aug. 21, and ensuing comics will debut on Wednesdays throughout the football season.

The comics will be posted on Twitter at midnight and published in the Record Courier and Akron Beacon Journal.

Archer rushed for 1,429 yards and caught 39 passes for 561 yards last season. He had 2,577 all-purpose yards, scored 24 touchdowns and averaged 9.0 yards per carry, 14.4 yards per reception and 34.8 yards per kickoff return.

Those stats qualify as Heisman-worthy, but the last player who didn't compete in a power conference to win the trophy was former BYU quarterback Ty Detmer in 1990.

Even if the Flashes repeat their 11-win season from 2012 — their first winning campaign since 1987 — Archer isn't going to join that exclusive club.

But he'll always have “The Archer” — which is award-worthy in itself.

Weeden is the one — or is he?
Brandon Weeden has taken every snap with the first team during Browns training camp in Berea.

He posted a 127.7 passer rating, threw a touchdown pass and led the Browns on two lengthy scoring drives on the only possessions in which he played during last week's preseason opener.

But Jason Campbell, according to Browns coach Rob Chudzinski, is “still close” in the team's QB competition.

On the same day Chudzinski didn't endorse Weeden as the starter, Browns CEO Joe Banner did a masterful job of not backing Weeden — and not throwing him under the bus.

“Nobody is going to be negative about it,” Banner told Adam “the Bull” and Dustin Fox” Tuesday afternoon on WKRK-FM, 92.3. “Nobody is ready to endorse it yet. But we're hopeful, and we're seeing a lot of encouraging signs.”

To recap: The Browns aren't committing to Weeden, but they're encouraged.

After last season, you can't blame them.

But if you believe Weeden isn't a shoo-in to start the regular-season opener against Miami, you might also think Trent Richardson and Montario Hardesty are among the most durable running backs in the NFL.

Assist, Andy
If you are ever flying from Hopkins to Brazil and in need of a hand — I realize I'm narrowing the field here — Cavs big man Anderson Varejao is your friend.

As the Stepien Rules blog first reported, Varejao came to the aid of the family of Humberto Kukhyun Choi, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Cleveland Clinic.

Choi's mother and brother had the first leg of their trip — a flight to Miami — canceled, and they speak only Portuguese and Korean. Enter Varejao, who was on his way to Brazil from Cleveland.

The oft-injured, floppy-haired star helped the pair get another flight to Miami and find a hotel room.

“She didn't know his name,” Choi told Stepien Rules founder Brendan Bowers via Facebook of his mother. “She only knew that he was a tall guy, with funny hair who plays basketball. She asked me to thank this guy for his patience and generosity! Well, this guy turned out to be Anderson Varejao!! Man you are awesome! Thank you so much for helping them!”

Varejao has averaged only 1.1 assist per game in his NBA career.

None could have been this worthy.

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News Headline: Kent State using comic strip to promote speedy RB Dri Archer as Heisman Trophy candidate Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2013/08/14/kent-state-using-comic-strip-to-promote-speedy-rb-dri-archer-as-heisman-trophy/#ixzz2c8fFCSv6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: FOXNews.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio – Kent State has launched a comic strip to promote super-speedy running back Dri Archer as a Heisman Trophy candidate.
The unique campaign features "The Archer," a cartoon drawn by school alum Chuck Ayers, who has illustrated the "Funky Winkerbean" and "Crankshaft" comic strips. The weekly strip made its debut on Wednesday and documents Archer's arrival at Kent State. The 5-foot-8, 175-pound Archer rushed for 1,429 yards, scored 16 touchdowns and averaged 9 yards per carry last season for the Golden Flashes. He was one of the nation's leaders in all-purpose yardage.
Along with the comic strip, the school has constructed a "Dri4Heisman" website, Twitter account and Facebook page.
Ayers, a 1971 Kent State graduate, said combining Archer's amazing talents with "the efforts of an old alumnus is pretty cool."

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/sports/2013/08/14/kent-state-using-comic-strip-to-promote-speedy-rb-dri-archer-as-heisman-trophy/#ixzz2c8fDE9zp

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News Headline: Kent State kicks off "comic strip" campaign | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Washington Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OHIO (AP) - Dri Archer has cartoonish speed. The Road Runner might not be able to outrun Kent State's do-it-all running back.
So perhaps it's fitting that the school has kicked off a unique Heisman Trophy campaign to promote the lightning-fast Archer that includes a comic strip depicting him as a college football superhero.
“The Archer” debuted Wednesday and will run on a weekly basis throughout the Golden Flashes' season. It's part of Kent State's push to bring attention to the 5-foot-8, 175-pound Archer who is only small in stature. Everything about his game is huge.
Last season, the senior rushed for 1,429 yards, scored 16 rushing touchdowns and averaged an eye-popping 9 yards every time he carried the ball. Beyond that, he had 39 receptions, 4 TD catches, averaged 34.7 yards on kickoff returns and took three back all the way for scores.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/14/kent-state-kicks-off-comic-strip-campaign/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS#ixzz2c8fd07JJ
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

He was among the nation's leaders in all-purpose yards at 184 per game, and few of his TD scampers were of the did-he-really-just-do-that variety.
Archer's comic strip is being drawn by Chuck Ayers, a Kent State alum known for illustrating the “Funky Winkerbean” and “Crankshaft” cartoons. Ayers was approached by the school's athletic department to assist in promoting Archer and he was happy to help a fellow Golden Flash.
“It definitely was the Kent State connection that made me want to be a part of this project,” Ayers told The Associated Press. “Cartooning is what I do so being asked to draw these promotional strips felt like a perfect fit.”
The comic strip made its debut on a Twitter account ((at)Dri4Heisman) and will be printed in some area newspapers. Along with the strip, the school has constructed a “Dri4Heisman” website and Facebook page.
Each week, Ayers will be sent a storyboard by members of Kent State's communications staff who will focus on their “superhero” taking down the mascot of the upcoming opponent.
Ayers admitted he's not a “rabid sports fan” but he has passionately followed Kent State's football program since graduating in 1971. There were some lean years in the decades in between for the Golden Flashes, who won 11 games last season and made their first bowl game in 40 years.
Ayers went to a couple home games last season, when he marveled at Archer's on-field exploits.
“I'm hoping I'll get a chance to meet him sometime,” Ayers said. “The real attention being attracted to KSU is coming from Dri. He's an amazing player and great fun to watch. The strips are just a little bit of a different way of telling his story. Combining his talents with the efforts of an old alumnus is pretty cool.”

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/14/kent-state-kicks-off-comic-strip-campaign/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS#ixzz2c8fbI6Oy
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

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News Headline: KSU baseball coach Jeff Duncan speaks at KACC luncheon (Duncan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's new baseball coach Jeff Duncan was the featured guest
speaker at Thursday's Kent Area Chamber of Commerce luncheon
hosted by Water Street Tavern. Duncan spoke of the “Championship
Excellence” experience he hopes to build for his players, a vision with
intent to graduate them all with a GPA of 3.0 or higher, personal growth as
an athlete and helping them to become leaders on campus and within the
community. “If you have attitude and enthusiasm, you can do unbelievable
things,” Duncan said. He also introduced his coaching philosophy, which is
highlighted by unselfishness, toughness, curiosity and communication. Pictured
above at the luncheon, from left: Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala, Kent State
Athletic Director Joel Nielsen, McKay Bricker Framing & Black Squirrel Gallery
co-owner Cass Mayfield, Kent State baseball coach Jeff Duncan, McKay
Bricker Framing & Black Squirrel Gallery co-owner Bob Mayfield, Kent Area
Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lori Wemhoff and Water Street
Tavern owner Mike Beder.

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News Headline: Project GRAD prepares parents to prepare children | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Doug Livingston
Beacon Journal education writer
___
(PHOTO) Jordan Williams, Kent State University senior in early childhood education, works with Tamiyah Ray, on story sequencing during Project GRAD's Bridge to Kindergarten program at Schumacher Comunity learning Center on Thursday, in Akron. (Mike CardewAkron Beacon Journal)
-----
If kindergartners can't play together, then they can't learn together.
That was a painful lesson learned Thursday as two young boys — equally teary-eyed after a hapless scuffle over a marble — sat face to face at Schumacher school, one holding an ice pack on the other's head. Their altercation led educators in Project GRAD Akron, a program designed to help students transition through elementary and secondary education, to pull the boys aside until they learned to reconcile and negotiate their differences, instilling in them the social and emotional development necessary to strive in school.
Those boys and 29 other children will attend Crouse or Schumacher when school resumes Aug. 28. In the two-week Bridge to Kindergarten program, they acquire social skills necessary to commingle with their peers and comfortably navigate their first year in school.
The program also introduces students to a more rigorous classroom structure. Students sit through lessons, eat in lunchrooms, meet their principals and generally prepare to get along with other students.
Most of the kids who participate each year already have gained much experience mingling with other kids in preschool; only three students attending the Bridge to Kindergarten program this year did not previously attend a federally funded Head Start program or preschool.
But some Akron parents haven't provided their children an enriching pre-kindergarten experience — one that researchers say fosters positive social and emotional development, without which learning becomes difficult.
Shana Bennett, family coordinator and the only paid employee at the nonprofit Project GRAD, tried to attract some of those parents.
“I reached out to every single registered kindergarten parent. And the sad fact is that the majority who responded were parents who were already motivated to get their kids that kind of enrichment experience,” Bennett said.
She littered day-care centers in West Akron with fliers advertising for the program. No parent responded.
Students who did enroll showed significant academic gains in only two weeks, especially among boys, who learned how to behave accordingly.
The lack of interest from some parents is indicative of another, larger issue: Parents want to help but aren't aware of the resources available.
“That's why we work with the parents all year,” Bennett said.
After the two-week kids' course ends today, learning begins for the parents. Monthly workshops and home visits for parents provide knowledge of, and access to, the many resources available.
“The academic year is given to the parents, because that's where [learning] starts,” Bennett said.
“They're the child's first teacher,” Laurie Curfman, director of programs, said, finishing the thought.
Resources available
Bennett and Curfman have been surprised by the public's view of parents as being apathetic or lazy. They suggested parents would use resources if they knew what was available.
“There's a lot of things that we do for these parents. And for me, that's the most beneficial part of this program,” Bennett said.
“When you help the parents to have a more stable family life, it helps the child. Trying to get the parents involved and understand the importance of participating in their child's education is a big part of what Project GRAD is all about,” Curfman said, adding that other programs like Akron schools' Project Ujima also facilitate conversation about access to resources in the community.
It was in one of these communities that a principal from Buchtel High School asked for help six years ago, inspiring Project GRAD to form the Bridge to Kindergarten program five years ago. It expanded the overall program originally launched in 2002 to help Akron's youngest learners.
A part-time salary for the family coordinator, the nonprofit's sole paid employee, and program supplies are afforded through a yearly $25,000 grant from the Akron Community Foundation.
Roughly another $25,000 in program expenses are composed of in-kind services from Akron schools and Kent State University, which provides graduate students in education paid through an America Reads grant to teach the two-week program.
Doug Livingston can be reached at 330-996-3792 or dlivingston@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: More News You Should Use. Walking and Disease, Smartphone Fitness Problems, Diet Hero Issues, Moms and Fat Kids, Hot Chocolate and Aging...(Barkley, Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Diet Detective, The
Contact Name: Platkin, Charles
News OCR Text: Walking to Work Fights Disease; Smartphones Can Reduce Fitness Levels; Food Addiction; Poor Moms-to-Be, the Pleasure of Eating Anything You Want Is Over; Don't Be a Diet Hero – Toss the Unhealthy Food

Walking to Work Fights Disease

Could be better than an apple a day! Researchers at Imperial College London and University College London reviewed data from more than 20,000 people living in the U.K. The researchers found that those who walked to work were about 40 percent less likely to have diabetes and 17 percent less likely to have high blood pressure than those who drove.

Stopping Sugar Consumption May Reduce Cancer

A new fruit fly study conducted by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City found that blocking dietary sugar and its activity in tumor cells in the obese or those with diabetes may reduce cancer risk and progression. Your best bet? Cut the added sugar. See:http://www.dietdetective.com/weekly-column/top-10-tips-you-need-implement-right-now-cut-sugar-your-diet

Not That You Needed Confirmation, but There Is Such a Thing as Food Addiction

Did you ever feel as if you were just addicted to certain foods? Well, there's a good chance that it's true. According to research from Boston Children's Hospital appearing in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, substance abuse and eating high-glycemic foods may trigger the same brain mechanism tied to addiction.

Researchers had 12 overweight men consume milkshake meals, the only difference being that one group consumed rapidly digested (high-glycemic index) carbohydrates, and the other group consumed slowly digested (low-glycemic index) carbohydrates.

The researchers then measured “blood glucose levels and hunger, while also using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to observe brain activity during the crucial four-hour period after a meal, which influences eating behavior at the next meal.”

The results? “After participants consumed the high-glycemic index milkshake, they experienced an initial surge in blood sugar levels, followed by a sharp crash four hours later. This decrease in blood glucose was associated with excessive hunger and intense activation of the nucleus accumbens, a critical brain region involved in addictive behaviors.”

The authors of the study suggest that limiting high-glycemic index carbohydrates like white bread and potatoes could reduce overall urges.

Poor Moms-to-Be, the Pleasure of Eating Anything You Want Is Over

The notion of being pregnant used to conjure up images of eating nearly anything you wanted with impunity. Well, put that pickle down and move away from the ice cream container. Once again, research is showing that if you gain weight early in your pregnancy it could mean having a fatter baby. According to Margie Davenport, an assistant professor in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta, Canada, moms-to-be who gain too much weight early in their pregnancies are nearly three times as likely to give birth to bigger, fatter babies. Between 1995 and 2011 the researchers looked at 172 healthy expectant mothers living in London, Ontario, who were non-smokers and had a body mass index of at least 18.5. Keep in mind, "Infants who are larger at birth tend to become larger children, and that creates a risk for developing into obese and overweight children and adults."

Choose a Goal Range, NOT a Single Goal for Weight Loss

According to a study appearing in the Journal of Consumer Research, choosing a goal that has a low and high range, such as 2 to 4 pounds, versus choosing a single number, such as 3 pounds, has an impact on diet retention. The study showed that those consumers with high-low range goals continued their diet programs even though there was no difference in actual average weight loss across the two groups.

Good News if You're Old and You Like Hot Chocolate

If you're in your 70s I have some good news: According to research reported in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, drinking two cups of hot chocolate each day may help keep your brain healthy if you have impaired blood flow. “The participants drank two cups of hot cocoa per day for 30 days and did not consume any other chocolate during the study. They were given tests of memory and thinking skills. They also had ultrasound tests to measure the amount of blood flow to the brain during the tests. Of the 60 participants, 18 had impaired blood flow at the start of the study. Those people had an 8.3 percent improvement in blood flow to the working areas of the brain by the end of the study, while there was no improvement for those who started out with regular blood flow. The people with impaired blood flow also improved their times on a test of working memory, with scores dropping from 167 seconds at the beginning of the study to 116 seconds at the end. There was no change in times for people with regular blood flow.”

The researchers explained that those with impaired blood flow were also more likely to have tiny areas of brain damage.

Smartphones Can Reduce Fitness Levels

Hmm, we've all heard that you can use fabulous smartphone applications to improve your fitness aptitude, but never that smartphones can decrease fitness. Well, that's what researchers Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, faculty members in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University in Ohio, say. They found that high smartphone use was linked to poor fitness in college students. “More than 300 college students from the Midwest were surveyed on their cellphone usage and activity level. Of those students, 49 had their fitness level and body composition tested. The researchers' results showed that students who spent large amounts of time on their cellphones – as much as 14 hours per day – were less fit than those who averaged a little more than 90 minutes of cellphone use daily.” Try using fitness applications for good, not bad. See:http://www.dietdetective.com/weekly-column/diet-detective-iphone-apps-you-can-use-your-health

Don't Be a Diet Hero – Toss the Unhealthy Food

I've said it again and again, and now there is research to support it – “DO NOT BE A DIET HERO!” What's a “Diet Hero”? Someone who thinks sheer willpower alone is enough to conquer those sweet and savory snack attacks. A study on self-control by researchers from the Universities of Cambridge and Dusseldorf published in the journal Neuron compared “the effectiveness of willpower versus voluntarily restricting access to temptations, called 'precommitment' … and the mechanisms in the brain that play a role in precommitment.”

They found that “the most effective way to beat temptations is to avoid facing them in the first place."

Additionally, the researchers found that precommitment activates the frontopolar cortex, the brain region that is involved in thinking about the future. And when the frontopolar cortex is engaged during precommitment, “It increases its communication with a region that plays an important role in willpower, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.”

Best advice: Toss out the unhealthy food from your house and don't rely on willpower alone.

Created: August 15, 2013 Last Reviewed: August 15, 2013

CHARLES PLATKIN, Ph.D., M.P.H., THE DIET DETECTIVE is one of the country's leading nutrition and public health advocates, whose syndicated health, nutrition and fitness column, the Diet Detective appears in more than 100 daily newspapers and media outlets nationally. Dr. Platkin is also the founder of DietDetective.com, which offers nutrition, food, and fitness information. Platkin is a health expert and blogger featured on Everydayhealth.com, Active.com and Fitnessmagazine.com. Additionally, Platkin is a Distinguished Lecturer at the Hunter College School of Urban Public Health and CUNY School of Public Health in New York City.

The information provided on this site is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her existing physician.

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News Headline: Hudson council hears update on business incubator | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By M.A. Ferguson-Rich
Special to the Beacon Journal

HUDSON: TECHudson has enough operating funds to see it through January, Director George Buzzy said as he made his quarterly report to City Council on Tuesday.
The future beyond that remains uncertain, Buzzy said, as he seeks the financing to keep the city-sponsored business incubator alive.
“We need about $150,000 per year,” he said.
That amount would enable the nonprofit to do more than provide a low-cost business location to start-up companies. With more funding, TECHudson could conduct training classes and provide marketing support, which Buzzy sees as vital to the survival of its new businesses.
TECHudson recently instituted one change, with its financial uncertainty in mind, that will take effect in September: It will begin leasing its space on Executive Parkway on a month-to-month basis.
A company, whose names will be announced when it moves in next month, will leave TECHudson with vacancy in only one office, Buzzy said.
He told the council the look of TECHudson must change. When questioned about that statement, he said the nonprofit must involve not only Hudson, but must move beyond the city limits to include Summit and Portage counties in order to attract outside funding.
He said he is in discussions with Kent State University and a Youngstown business incubator about developing partnerships or becoming a satellite of these organizations.
Council member Alex Kelemen quizzed Buzzy as to whether the original business model, the idea of Hudson “going it alone” with its incubator, no longer was viable.
Buzzy said that absent forming alliances with an academic institution, he did not think outside funding would be obtainable and agreed with Kelemen's conclusion that the original model might no longer be viable.

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News Headline: Back-to-school fashion: Kent State University's J.R. Campbell and Ursuline College's May Beard share style tips for grownups (Campbell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Emily Hamlin Smith, The Plain Dealer
on August 16, 2013 at 6:00 AM, updated August 16, 2013 at 6:04 AM

Hearing that you dress like a schoolteacher is hardly a good thing, unless the teacher we're talking about is Ursuline College's fashion educator May Beard or Kent State University's fashion school director J.R. Campbell.

These two style experts know how to put an outfit together that is fabulous and functional, whether you're standing at a chalkboard or playing with preschoolers.

So much attention gets focused on what the kids will be wearing this back-to-school season, that we thought grown-ups deserve a little fashion help, too. So we asked Beard and Campbell to share some tips that will have us all looking smart this fall.

(PHOTO) May Beard, who worked in New York for Tommy Hilfiger, jazzes up her black-and-white ensemble with a pop of color -- those bright red shoes. (Allison Carey, The Plain Dealer)

May Beard's 5 tips for women:

1. Pick comfortable fabric. "Very rarely to teachers' days end when the bell rings," Beard says. "They're in meetings, or off to soccer practice." So their clothes need to be comfortable all day long. Beard suggests ponte knits, which have the perfect amount of stretch for a great fit, such as the one-button jacket and pants at The Limited. She also like fit and comfort of the Zoe bootcut pants at Ann Taylor Loft. Shirt dresses are also make an easy, all-day option.

2. Choose versatile pieces. Staples such as solid-color dress pants and pencil skirts can pair with an infinite number of tops. Beard loves her black low-waisted pants and fitted black jacket because she can wear them with so many other items in her closet. The jacket dresses up a go-to-work outfit and then can turn casual when she wears it over a T-shirt with jeans.

3. Spend less on trends. Beard recognizes that teachers often work in a messy environment. "There's paint, there's glue, there are markers," she says, "and they don't want to make the investment because they've gotten burned. I know I have." So it's OK to get your trendy pieces from places such as Old Navy or Target. You'll look fabulous, Beard says, and you can relax a little around the finger paint.

4. Add pops of color. "Maybe it's all those years in Manhattan, but I wear a lot of black," says Beard, who lived in New York for 13 years where she worked for several fashion companies, including Tommy Hilfiger. To help juice up her wardrobe, she works in splashes of color, like with her red heels. Scarves are another great way to punch up an outfit.

5. Get the most out of your summer favorites. Wear a cardigan or a denim jacket over your sundresses to help stretch your back-to-school budget. Beard found great shawl cardigans at Target and a denim jacket she loves at Talbot's.

(PHOTO) J.R. Campbell, the director of Kent State University's fashion school, knows the importance of finding the proper fit. And, as you can tell by the green pants, he's not afraid of color. (Gus Chan, The Plain Dealer)

J.R. Campbell's 5 tips for men:

1. Get slim fit trousers. “Guys don't know how to wear trousers,” Campbell says. “They get away with sloppy cuts.” Slim fit doesn't mean tight, so relax. A narrow leg will look so much sharper than the baggy pair you've been wearing.

2. Find the right fit. This goes far beyond pants. Men tend to wear sport coats and dress shirts that are far too big. “And that's not flattering, at least not professionally,” Campbell says. Well-fitting clothes are the key to a smart-looking wardrobe, Be patient until you find something that looks great, Campbell says. “If it doesn't fit right, don't buy it,” he says. “Wait, keep searching -- what you want is out there.”

3. Embrace color. Start small, such as a pair of colorful socks or -- Campbell's favorite -- a bright bow tie. The ties are practical for him because he bikes to work, but he also likes them because they let him push the limits of color and patterns. “You can get away with a lot more because it's color in such a small place.” But Campbell doesn't shy away from color doses of color either. He owns pairs of muted red and bright green jeans, and he's searching stores for the right shade of orange to add to his closet.

4. Dress up. Come on, gents. Button back up and put a tie on. “There's a place for being a little more casual, but for me, this gives me a chance to look dressier and accent myself,” Campbell says. And let's face it, when you look good you feel good.

5. Invest. That's how you get the right fit, Campbell says. And by “invest,” he doesn't mean go broke. Know what you can afford and spend it building a wardrobe of solid pieces. Yes, you can find $5 shirts and $10 pants, but odds are the quality and fit will be all wrong, and it won't be long until you're tossing them out and buying something new. “The quantity of waste I see out there is depressing,” Campbell says. “As an educator and as a personal consumer, I value reducing quanity and focusing on quality.”

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News Headline: Audition | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: August 14, 2013 - 06:38 PM

AUDITIONS
Akron Pops Orchestra — Seeking musicians, especially strings and keyboards, for the volunteer orchestra. Rehearsals are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Quirk Cultural Center, 1201 Grant Ave., Cuyahoga Falls. Most concerts are on Thursday evenings, with a few weekend concerts. Contact Kristan Crane at 330-203-1926 or www.akronpops.org.
Canal Fulton Players — Auditions for Wizard of Oz will be held 7-9 p.m. Monday-Wednesday at Northwest High School, 8574 Erie Ave. N., Canal Fulton. All roles are available. For more information, call 330-494-1022 or 330-854-4387.
Canton Youth Symphony — Auditions for the 2013-2014 season for string players will be held 4-8 p.m. Sept. 4 and 5, and for woodwinds, brass and percussion at 1 p.m. Sept. 8. Auditions will be held at Cable Recital Hall, Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Ave. N., Canton. To schedule an audition, call Lisa Boyer at 330-452-3434, ext. 604.
City of Flags Chorus — Seeking women who enjoy singing a cappella, four-part harmony. Rehearsals are at 7 p.m. Mondays at Greenwood Christian Church, 44th Street Northwest and Frazer Avenue, Canton. 800-793-3805.
Cuyahoga Falls Community Chorus — Openings for all voice parts for adults of all ages from Cuyahoga Falls and surrounding communities. Rehearsals are at 7 p.m. Mondays at Summit Christian School at Newberry Park, 2800 13th St., Cuyahoga Falls. Email info@cfchorus.com, call Ted Shure at 330-920-8598 or visit www.leonardshure.com.
Derbytown A Cappella Men's Chorus — Seeking new members to sing four-part harmony. Practices are at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Fellowship Hall of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 50 N. Prospect St., Akron. Enter through Park Street Cloister entrance. 330-849-3372.
Forever Harmony Singers of the Akron Area — Seeking women 16 or older to sing a cappella, four-part harmony from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays at the Tallmadge Oaks Club House, 120 North Ave. 330-784-2756 or 330-923-7438.
Friends Community Chorus — Rehearsals are held 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays at the Brewster Friends Church, 139 W. Main St. Contact conductor Steven Tharp Jr. or secretary Brandy Vanegas at 330-418-4006 or email friends chorale@gmail.com.
Great Lake Theater — Local Seasonal Equity Auditions will be held 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 11 and 12 at Great Lakes Theater at PlayhouseSquare, Rehearsal Halls, 1650 Chester Ave., Cleveland. To schedule an appointment, visit www.greatlakestheater.org.
Kent State University at Stark Music Department — Auditions for the Kent State Stark Concert Band will be held 6-8 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Aug. 26 in the Fine Arts Building on the Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. To schedule an audition, contact conductor Thomas Holliday at thollid3@kent.edu.
Laurel Lake Encore Chorale — Seeking adults age 55 and older to join the 50-member chorale that performs a large range of musical styles. Participation is open to the public. Rehearsals are held at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays at Laurel Lake Retirement Community, 200 Laurel Lake Drive, Hudson. Call director Donna Anderson at 330-655-1436.
Stow Players — Auditions for Drop Dead will be held at 7 p.m. Aug. 25 and 26 at the Stow Acme Freshmarket Community Room, 4445 Kent Road. Looking for seven men and three women in a variety of ages. Auditioners will read from the script. For more information, call Dave Sherman at 330-687-4872 or email davesherman74@yahoo.com.
Wadsworth Community Band — Seeking new members on all instruments. No audition required. Rehearsals are 7-9:15 p.m. Thursdays in the Wadsworth Middle School band room. http://wadsworthcommunityband.com or 330-336-1290.
Wolf Creek Players — Auditions for Dearly Departed will be held 2-4 p.m. Sunday and 6-8 p.m. Monday at Houston Hall, 3069 Houston Road, Norton. Casting roles for seven men and eight women ages 20-70. For more information, call Jim Trenta at 330-808-3910.
Need performers or behind-the-scenes specialists? Send details — two weeks before the date — to Auditions, Features Department, Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309-0640; fax 330-996-3033 or email newsroomemail@thebeaconjournal.com.

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News Headline: 'Streetcar' coming to Little Theatre of Tuscarawas County | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tennessee Williams? Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, ?A Streetcar Named Desire,? will open Aug. 23 in a Black Box venue at Little Theatre of Tuscarawas County. A ?season extra,? the show will run for six performances, Aug. 23 through Sept. 1, with matinees Aug. 25 and Sept. 1.

Black Box is a form of experimental theater, using a simple, unadorned space with very little set, simple furniture and only platforms to define spaces.

The play, on which the movie, starring Marlon Brando and Vivian Leigh was based, is a story of conflicting values, and echoes the decadence and downfall of the Old South. It is set shortly after the end of World War II in New Orleans, where Blanche, a former socialite from a grand-old plantation, comes, lonely and penniless, to visit her sister, Stella, and her rough-mannered husband, Stanley. The mix is devastating to all.

Featured in the cast are Elizabeth Lawson Holmes as Blanche; Amanda Larkin, Stella; Don Irven, Stanley; and Josh Larkin as Mitch. Other characters are played by Kait Gallagher Wilsterman, Farrah Derr, Pam Douglas, Aubrey Gealsha, Michael Gray, Mike Taylor, Nathan Wenger and David Taylor.

Staffing the production are Lee Elliott, director; Pat Potter, assistant director; Alex Allesandri-Bruce, costumes; Debi DeVore, hair and makeup, Pam Douglas, stage manager and props, Kenn Holmes set design and construction, and Farrah Derr, assistant to the directors.

Tickets are $13 and can be reserved by calling the theater box office at 330-343-4012. Box office hours, are 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday Friday and Saturday and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. Tickets also are available through the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas online or at the box office during its regular hours of 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Little Theatre is at 466 Carrie Ave. NW.

The show is sponsored by Joel Pomerene Memorial Hospital and Marlowe Compounding.

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News Headline: Art Best Bets | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: August 14, 2013 - 06:38 PM

ART BEST BETS
Julian Stanczak: Line, Color, Illusion — Through Oct. 6 at Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St. Also, Real/Surreal through Nov. 3, and With a Trace: Photographs of Absence through Jan. 26. 330-376-9185.
Well-Guarded and Institutionalized: Works by Akron Art Museum Staff — On view through Sept. 15 at Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., Akron. www.akronareaarts or 330-376-8480.
Henry Gardner Exhibit — Through Aug. 31 at Gallery 732 at Akron Woman's City Club, 732 W. Exchange St.
Digital Infrared Photography: Stephen Paternite — Through Sept. 14 at Box Gallery, third floor Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., Akron. Also, Digital Composites: Thomas Reiderman through Sept. 14; and Streetscapes: Akron in Plein Air through Aug. 31. 330-376-8480.
The Sky's the Limit/Summer in Ohio Show — Through Aug. 22 at Cuyahoga Valley Art Center, 2131 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. 330-928-8092.
A Walk on the Wild Side — Through Sept. 10 at the Studios of Jack Richard, 2250 Front St. Cuyahoga Falls. Also, Possibilities through Aug. 28. 330-929-1575.
10th annual Juried Fiber Arts Show — Through Aug. 30 at Peninsula Library, 6105 Riverview Road. 330-657-2681.
Fashion Timeline — Through June 28, 2015, Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive. Also, Pretty Pleats through March 16, 2014; Undress: Shaping Fashion and Private Life through Sept. 1; Fandemonium through Oct. 6; Glass: Selections From the Kent State University Museum Collection through June 28, 2015, Rainment for Liturgy: Vestments in the Kent State University Collection through Feb. 9, 2014. 330-672-3450.
Processes of Transformation in Kent by Ken Gessford — Through Aug. 30 at Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. 330-673-4414.
Amber Myers: Subtle Escape — Through Sept. 14 at North Water Street Gallery, 257 N. Water St., Kent. 330-673-4970.
Snap! In the Photobooth With Andy Warhol and Friends — Through Oct. 13 at Massillon Museum, 121 Lincoln Way E. Also, Along the Lincoln Highway: Photographs by Andrew Borowiec through Oct. 13; and Art Out Loud: Psychedelic Posters of the 1960's through Sunday. 330-833-4061 or www.massillonmuseum.org.
James Hoban: White House Architect — Through Oct. 27 at McKinley Presidential Library & Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Drive NW, Canton. Also, White House Horses through Oct. 27; and The West Wing: Workshop of Democracy through Oct. 27. 330-455-7043.
The View From Now: New Photographs by Linda Butler, Jennie Jones, Judith McMillan — Through Aug. 31 at Heights Arts, 2175 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-371-3457.
Damian Ortega: The Blast and Other Embers — Through Sept. 29 at Cleveland Museum of Art, 11150 East Blvd. Also, Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video continues through Sept. 29; Less Is More: Minimal Prints through Oct. 20; Tantra in Buddhist Art through Sept. 15; and Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads through Jan. 26. 888-262-0033 or www.ClevelandArt.org.
Realization Is Better Than Anticipation — Through Oct. 13 at Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland, 11400 Euclid Ave. 216-421-8671 or www.MOCACleveland.org.
Rolling Stones: 50 Years of Satisfaction — Through March at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, 1100 Rock and Roll Blvd., Cleveland. For more information, call 216-515-1939 or go to www.rockhall.com.
Rags Make Paper: 2013 Morgan Conservatory Juried Exhibition — Through Sept 14 at Morgan Conservatory, 1754 E. 46th St., Cleveland. 216-361-9255 or www.morganconservatory.org.
Photorealism Revisited: The Louis & Susan Meisel Collection — Through Sept. 29 at Butler Institute of American Art, 524 Wick Ave., Youngstown. Also, 77th National Midyear Exhibition through Sunday. 330-743-1107, ext. 123.

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News Headline: U.S. cancels military operation with Egypt, but not aid (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: CareerBuilder.com
Contact Name: Lesley Clark and Hannah Allam
News OCR Text: 9 minutes ago

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By Lesley Clark and Hannah Allam — McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — The United States on Thursday advised Americans to leave Egypt and canceled a joint military training exercise, but stopped short off cutting off aid, reflecting the Obama administration's attempt to retain some influence as the situation continued to deteriorate following a lethal crackdown on supporters of the country's deposed president.

President Barack Obama interrupted a vacation on Martha's Vineyard to issue the administration's sharpest criticism yet of the escalating conflict, condemning the violence and calling for the military to lift martial law.

“While we want to sustain our relationship with Egypt, our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets and rights are being rolled back,” Obama said, announcing the suspension of Bright Star, a September training exercise.

“The Egyptian people deserve better than what we've seen over the last several days," Obama said. "And to the Egyptian people, let me say, the cycle of violence and escalation needs to stop."

Obama didn't mention the $1.3 billion in military assistance that the U.S. provides the country, but said he's asked his national security team to "assess the implications of the actions taken by the interim government and further steps that we may take as necessary with respect to the U.S.-Egyptian relationship.”

The military crackdown and ouster last month of President Mohammad Morsi have posed a vexing problem for Obama and some in Congress who have considered aid to Egypt's military key to U.S. interests in the Middle East. The U.S. has provided military and economic assistance to Egypt since the late 1970s aimed at sustaining the 1979 Camp David Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.

Although U.S. law calls for foreign aid to be suspended following coups, the White House and State Department have gone to great lengths to avoid using the word. Obama on Thursday insisted that “after the military's intervention several weeks ago, there remained a chance for reconciliation and an opportunity to pursue a democratic path.”

Some lawmakers renewed a call for cutting off aid in the wake of the attacks, including Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, who accused Obama of “skirting the issue.”

And Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., called the cancelling of the war games an “important step,” but added, “our law is clear: aid to the Egyptian military should cease unless they restore democracy."

Obama's muted rebuke of the military drew criticism from Middle East analysts who've monitored the U.S. response to Egypt's upheaval, and say the administration has been a step behind.

They said the administration was slow to condemn Morsi's authoritarian tendencies, looked absurd in refusing to declare a coup, and then refused to go much further than expressing “deep concern” over the fact that Egypt's first democratically elected president was held without charges for weeks.

While Obama's remarks Thursday included direct criticism of the Egyptian military, analysts said it still sounded like too little, too late.

“Obama's Egypt policy is always at least two crackdowns behind where it should be,” Joshua Stacher, an Egypt specialist at Kent State University and author of, “Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria,” said on Twitter.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki defended the administration.

In addition to dispatching State Department No. 2 William Burns to Cairo for crisis talks, Psaki said, the U.S. stopped the delivery of four F-16 fighter planes, canceled the military exercises and was reviewing the aid issue.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said he told Egypt's defense minister, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, in a telephone call that although the department would maintain a relationship with Egypt's military, “the violence and inadequate steps towards reconciliation are putting important elements of our longstanding defense cooperation at risk.”

But until real action is taken on the aid, analysts said Obama's steps aren't enough to send a serious message to Cairo.

“It's more, he had to do something,” said Samer Shehata, a specialist on Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood who teaches at the University of Oklahoma. “The real question is the military aid and what kind of diplomatic cover and support the United States gives Egypt in the future.”

U.S. standing in Egypt has suffered greatly in recent months. However, Shehata said the U.S. was not starting from neutral, as Egyptians remember the U.S. aiding Hosni Mubarak's authoritarian regime and calling for his resignation only after protests in 2011 gathered steam.

American diplomats grumble privately that they're “damned if we do, damned if we don't” in post-Mubarak Egypt. But analysts said that some of the tension was exacerbated by an activist American ambassador, a failure to stress civil liberties and human rights during the post-Mubarak transition, and other missteps as the U.S. struggled to revamp a policy that had been frozen for decades.

Repairing relations would take time, analysts said, but there's fresh opportunity now that the unpopular U.S. ambassador Anne Patterson, is returning to the State Department in Washington. Her replacement hasn't yet been named, though news reports have suggested a likely nominee is Robert Ford, a veteran diplomat who served in wartime Iraq and as ambassador to Syria.

Other analysts said that by not canceling aid, the U.S. hasn't closed itself off.

“Had he suspended aid, the president would not have fundamentally changed the dynamics of the conflict between the military and the Brotherhood,” said Eric Trager, a fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy. “He would have wasted an opportunity to use that card when it might actually make a difference. You'd want to believe that if we suspend the aid, the violence would stop, but that's highly unlikely.”

Manal Omar, associate vice president of Middle East and North Africa programs at the U.S. Institute of Peace, a Washington think tank, said that the U.S. still wields influence in Egypt, though the days of “calling and saying, ‘We need this to happen,'” are over.”

Omar, who returned this week from a research trip to Egypt, said Egyptian political actors who still hope for a U.S. rescue wouldn't dare express that before a seething and polarized public.

“Whereas people may want U.S. intervention, whereas they may want the U.S. to be involved, it would be very difficult for them to say that out in public and to have legitimacy within the streets,” Omar said.

Obama acknowledged U.S. distrust – and perhaps limited U.S. influence – in his remarks, insisting that the U.S. is a neutral party, despite accusations of taking sides. He called on the military to cease violence – and called on protestors to protest peacefully.

"We've been blamed by supporters of Morsi. We've been blamed by the other side as if we are supporters of Morsi," Obama said. "We want Egypt to succeed. We want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous Egypt. That's our interest. But to achieve that, the Egyptians are going to have to do the work."

Matthew Schofield contributed to this report.

Email: lclark@mcclatchydc.com, hallam@mcclatchydc.com; Twitter: @lesleyclark, @hannahallam

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News Headline: U.S. response: The president canceled joint exercises but stopped short of calls for a cutoff in aid. (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: philly.com
Contact Name: Lesley Clark and Hannah Allam, McCLATCHY WASHINGTON BUREAU
News OCR Text: President Obama, on Martha's Vineyard, said, "The cycle of violence and escalation needs to stop."

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WASHINGTON - The United States on Thursday advised Americans to leave Egypt and canceled a joint military training exercise, but stopped short of cutting off aid, reflecting the Obama administration's attempt to retain some influence as the situation continued to deteriorate after a lethal crackdown on supporters of the country's deposed president.

President Obama interrupted a vacation on Martha's Vineyard to issue the administration's sharpest criticism yet of the escalating conflict, condemning the violence and calling for the military to lift martial law.

"While we want to sustain our relationship with Egypt, our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets and rights are being rolled back," Obama said, announcing the suspension of Bright Star, a September training exercise.

"The Egyptian people deserve better than what we've seen over the last several days," Obama said. "And to the Egyptian people, let me say, the cycle of violence and escalation needs to stop."

Obama did not mention the $1.3 billion in military assistance that the United States provides the country, but he said he had asked his national security team to "assess the implications of the actions taken by the interim government and further steps that we may take as necessary with respect to the U.S.-Egyptian relationship."

The military crackdown and ouster last month of President Mohammed Morsi have posed a vexing problem for Obama and some in Congress who have considered aid to Egypt's military key to U.S. interests in the Middle East. The United States has provided military and economic assistance to Egypt since the late 1970s aimed at sustaining the 1979 Camp David Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.

Although U.S. law calls for foreign aid to be suspended after coups, the White House and State Department have gone to great lengths to avoid using the word. Obama on Thursday insisted that "after the military's intervention several weeks ago, there remained a chance for reconciliation and an opportunity to pursue a democratic path."

Some lawmakers renewed a call for cutting off aid. Among them, Sen. Rand Paul (R., Ky.) accused Obama of "skirting the issue."

Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D., Vt.) called the canceling of the war games an "important step" but added, "Our law is clear: Aid to the Egyptian military should cease unless they restore democracy."

Obama's muted rebuke of the military drew criticism from Middle East analysts who have monitored the U.S. response to Egypt's upheaval and who say the administration has been a step behind.

They said the administration was slow to condemn Morsi's authoritarian tendencies, looked absurd in refusing to declare a coup, and then refused to go much further than expressing "deep concern" over the fact that Egypt's first democratically elected president was held without charges for weeks.

While Obama's remarks Thursday included direct criticism of the Egyptian military, analysts said it still sounded like too little, too late.

"Obama's Egypt policy is always at least two crackdowns behind where it should be," Joshua Stacher, an Egypt specialist at Kent State University and author of Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria, said on Twitter.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki defended the administration.

In addition to dispatching the State Department No. 2 William Burns to Cairo for crisis talks, Psaki said, the United States stopped the delivery of four F-16 fighter planes, canceled the military exercises, and was reviewing the aid issue.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said he told Egypt's defense minister, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, in a telephone call that although the department would maintain a relationship with Egypt's military, "the violence and inadequate steps toward reconciliation are putting important elements of our long-standing defense cooperation at risk."

But until real action is taken on the aid, analysts said, Obama's steps aren't enough to send a serious message to Cairo.

"It's more. He had to do something," said Samer Shehata, a specialist on Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood who teaches at the University of Oklahoma. "The real question is the military aid and what kind of diplomatic cover and support the United States gives Egypt in the future."

U.S. standing in Egypt has suffered greatly in recent months.American diplomats grumble privately that they're "damned if we do, damned if we don't" in Egypt since the fall of Hosni Mubarak.

Repairing relations would take time, analysts said, but there's fresh opportunity now that the unpopular U.S. ambassador, Anne Patterson, is returning to the State Department in Washington. Her replacement hasn't been named, though news reports have suggested a likely nominee is Robert Ford, a veteran diplomat who served in wartime Iraq and as ambassador to Syria.

Other analysts said that by not canceling aid, the United States hasn't closed itself off.

"Had he suspended aid, the president would not have fundamentally changed the dynamics of the conflict between the military and the Brotherhood," said Eric Trager, a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

"He would have wasted an opportunity to use that card when it might actually make a difference," Trager said. "You'd want to believe that if we suspend the aid, the violence would stop, but that's highly unlikely."

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News Headline: Egypt's military faces the fallout of Cairo bloodshed (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Christian Science Monitor - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Egypt's image of civilian governance has evaporated after yesterday's clashes, but the military said its actions headed off an even greater disaster. The true toll of yesterday's crackdown on two protest camps became more apparent today as the number of dead rose above 500. While the military oversaw cleanup of the smoldering debris at the site where thousands of supporters of the former President Mohamed Morsi had camped for a month and a half, and where more than 200 people were killed yesterday, the interim government began to deal with the repercussions of the crackdown. Nobel laureate and interim deputy vice president Mohamed ElBaradei, who opposed a violent crackdown on the protesters, resigned yesterday, and US President Barack Obama interrupted his vacation to criticize Egypt's actions and announce the cancellation of joint military exercises. Egypt's government appeared to be losing the sheen of civilian credibility it had worked hard to project after the military deposed Mr. Morsi in response to massive protests against the former president. RECOMMENDED: “The unfortunate aspect of the June 30 protests and July 3 coup is that this was always a military push to assert its authority and basically rid any civilian competitors from challenging its power,” says Joshua Stacher, a professor and Egypt expert at Kent State University who recently published a book on autocratic rule in Egypt and Syria. But while that may not have been apparent to some a month and a half ago, it is now, he says. “It doesn't mater how many civilians they dress it up with, it's incredibly clear and naked now who's running the show in Cairo.” Security forces attacked the two protest camps yesterday after weeks of warnings that they would forcibly clear them. The Ministry of Health said 638 people were killed in the operation and the ensuing wave of violence across the country, which included attacks by angry citizens on police stations and churches. The death toll is expected to rise further. The interim president, Adly Mansour, today accepted the resignation of Mr. ElBaradei, who had been a key source of international credibility for the government. And President Obama, speaking from Massachusetts's Martha's Vineyard, announced that the biannual joint military exercises called Bright Star will be canceled and said his national security team would evaluate possible further action. US aid to Egypt (around $1.5 billion every year, most of it military aid) will still flow, at least for now. After the military deposed Morsi, “there remained a chance for reconciliation and an opportunity to pursue a democratic path. Instead, we've seen a more dangerous path taken,” Obama said. The US “strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by Egypt's interim government and security forces,” including violence against civilians, he said, and criticized the Egyptian government's declaration of emergency law. “But while we want to sustain our relationship with Egypt, our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets and rights are being rolled back.” But the cancellation of the joint military exercises, which were scheduled to take place next month, was not a significant step, says Mr. Stacher. The military exercises, he says, are essentially a trade show for US military hardware, so the cancellation "probably costs the US arms manufacturers some business, but overall the joint military exercises didn't happen in 2011, so it's not he first time they've been canceled." Given the level of instability in Egypt, it would likely be difficult to hold the exercises anyway, he says. In a briefing for international reporters today, Foreign Ministry officials countered criticism, saying that pro-Morsi protesters fired at police, and police responded with maximum restraint. They objected to media coverage that portrayed the police attacks as a massacre. The officials showed footage of the operation, some of which showed armed protesters shooting assault rifles and pistols over the sandbag barricades at the edge of the protest camps. “This is was a true recipe for disaster, and leaving it unattended would have caused the country to get into a real civil war,” said Assistant Foreign Minister Hatem Seif El Nasr. “An end had to be put to that. And that was the public sentiment, the vast majority of Egyptians felt, of course everyone wanted this to be done without any loss of life, any casualties, and I think that maximum restraint and techniques were put in place so that inevitable casualties would be put to the minimum. But it doesn't only depend on the security forces, it also depends on the other side, how they engage the security forces.” Foreign Ministry Spokesman Badr Abdelatty added, “The issue here is who started firing. This is the most important issue.” They also highlighted the 21 police stations attacked throughout the country yesterday, as well as the 43 police officers killed, including 11 killed in an attack on one police station. A finance ministry building and other government buildings were also stormed, and 22 churches were attacked, with seven of them fully or partially burned. Today, hundreds of people attacked a government headquarters building in Giza, west of Cairo, and some attacks on police stations and churches continued. Yet if the government was worried about foreign criticism, its actions today did not show it. In a statement earlier, the Ministry of Interior announced that police would use live ammunition to repel attacks on buildings, and the state news service said that 84 people had been referred to military prosecution. During the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) rule following the 2011 uprising, military trials were a key point of criticism against its leadership. At the mosque where the dead from the larger protest camp were collected, family members called the police attack a massacre. Hundreds of shrouded bodies lay in rows on the carpeted floor. Doctors keeping count said 294 bodies had been brought to the mosque by this afternoon, and it was unclear how many of those were counted in the official death toll. On an intensely hot afternoon, volunteers methodically sprayed the bodies with disinfectant and perfume and sprayed air freshener into fans in attempts to keep the stench of death at bay. Family members brought blocks of ice and placed them on the bodies in a bid to keep them intact for burial. Some bodies were burned beyond recognition. Some relatives of the dead said the government was refusing to issue burial permits unless the families stated that their loved ones committed suicide or were killed in a car accident, avoiding the real cause of death on official paperwork. The delay in attaining the right paperwork was one of the reasons that hundreds of bodies sat for more than 24 hours without refrigeration on a hot summer day. Mohamed Mahdy sat near the body of his brother-in-law, waiting for the proper paperwork. His sister's husband, Mohamed Yaqout, was not a participant in the protest, but was shot in the chest by police when he went to deliver medical supplies to the camp, said Mr. Mahdy. His family learned of his death when a nameless voice, likely a volunteer at a field hospital, called Mahdy's phone from Mr. Yaqout's phone. “The owner of this phone is dead,” he said. “No more peaceful demonstrations will be happening,” said Mahdy. “These families will take revenge for themselves, especially from the police officers. My family – I guess we will go to court, and find justice through the law. But many people will not do this.” At the site of the protest camp where Yaqout died, the tents were gone, their only remains the smoldering debris that workers were carting away. The Rabaa el Adawiya mosque, which had been the focal point of the protest camp, was burned out, the white bricks scorched and debris littering the ground in front of it. On a gate in front of the mosque, where pictures of Morsi once hung, someone had hung a picture of Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the military chief who ousted him. RECOMMENDED

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News Headline: Around Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Put out the welcome mats, Kent! While graduating
students will be exiting Kent, new and returning
students will be arriving soon! We know
that they will get a great education from Kent
State University.

Try to remember that for new students the university
is a really big place. Some students are
away from home for the very first time, so when
you see them at the grocery store, gas station, or
even the post office, give them a friendly smile.
This will be their home away from home for the
next four years. I hope that we can make it a good
memory for them. Help them feel comfortable and
proud of this town, just like we are.

New students will begin moving in during their
“Welcome Weekend” beginning Aug. 22. This four day
orientation program will include “Discover
Downtown” on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
This tour of downtown event is sponsored by the
Kent Area Chamber of Commerce. The weekend
concludes with a laser lights show on Sunday
night.

General classes start on Aug. 26. Kent will be
bustling once again! (So remember to be watching
for pedestrians.)

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