Report Overview:
Total Clips (4)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Mathematical Science (1)


Headline Date Outlet

College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
The RackIs Your Smartphone Keeping You Out of the Gym? 08/19/2013 Men's Fitness - Online Text Attachment Email

...after season of your favorite TV show doesn't do much for your physical fitness. But your smartphone may be making you sloth-like, too. New research from Kent State University discovered a link between high cell phone use and poor fitness. Despite the fact that you can use your smartphone from almost...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Kent State professor gets state grant for employment program 08/20/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) has announced that the state has released $125,000 for the Institute on Outcome Analysis in Ravenna. The funds will...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
State gives $635,710 to Liquid Crystal Institute, Davey Resource Group projects 08/20/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A slew of state funds awarded to Kent State University's Liquid Crystal Institute and Davey Resource Group in Kent will enhance the mission of each...


Mathematical Science (1)
Cleveland State University's Math Emporium aims to help students conquer remedial math (Tonge) 08/20/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Cleveland State University students who need to take remedial math classes this fall will be directed to its new Math Emporium, a computer...


News Headline: The RackIs Your Smartphone Keeping You Out of the Gym? | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Men's Fitness - Online
Contact Name: Jenna Haines
News OCR Text: We know you love your iPhone, but it could be keeping you from reaching your fitness goals, according to a new study.

You know that playing video games or marathoning season after season of your favorite TV show doesn't do much for your physical fitness. But your smartphone may be making you sloth-like, too. New research from Kent State University discovered a link between high cell phone use and poor fitness.

Despite the fact that you can use your smartphone from almost anywhere, prolonged use increases the likelihood of a sedentary lifestyle, according to the study. More than 300 college students were asked about their activity level and their time spent on their cellular devices (49 students had their fitness and body composition tested as well). Researchers found that the students who spent the most time on their phones—up to 14 hours a day—were less fit than those who limited their smartphone use to approximately 90 minutes per day.

This effect is attributed to smartphones' function as an entertainment device, which decreases the need for users to go out and enjoy themselves in more active ways. Side note: Some low-frequency users said that their cell phones actually made them want to be more active by allowing them to connect with fitness-minded friends.

College student or not, if you suspect that your electronic addiction is affecting your fitness, take note of these two tips:

Take a break. Every now and then, it's good to just put the phone down and go out—whether you're going to the gym or catching up with some friends. Sure, you might go a little nuts when you can't check your Facebook newsfeed every five seconds, but your brain and body will thank you later.

Download productive apps. If you can't slash the time you spend plugged in, try downloading health and fitness applications that'll motivate you to hit the gym. Need ideas? Start with the 64 Best Health and Fitness Apps.

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News Headline: Kent State professor gets state grant for employment program | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) has announced that the state has released $125,000 for the Institute on Outcome Analysis in Ravenna.

The funds will be used to evaluate the impact of the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities "Employment First" pilot program.

The Institute on Outcome Analysis is headed by Dr. Robert Cimera, Associate Professor of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences at Kent State University. At Kent State, Cimera focuses on public policy relating to people with disabilities and has authored more than 60 publications, including seven books, in the field. Cimera also works to find strategies that make special education transition programs most efficient and effective.

The institute will develop a data collection system to help analyze the work of the "Employment First" pilot program, started in 2012.

The institute will train statewide providers on the system and analyze findings to determine information on how many people with developmental disabilities are employed, their occupations and their vocational outcomes and the pilot program's return to taxpayers. The institute will submit findings over the course of a two-year period.

"Connecting people with disabilities to careers that match their skills and interests offers greater independence and empowerment," Rep. Clyde said. "By analyzing the impact of our state's services, we can help provide professional growth for all Ohioans in the most efficient and effective way possible."

Ohio's "Employment First" pilot program works to improve collaboration among Ohio's Departments of Developmental Disabilities, Mental Health, Education, and Job and Family Services, as well as the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission to provide community employment opportunities to young people and adults with developmental disabilities.

Rep. Clyde represents the 75th Ohio House District, serving Kent, Ravenna, Streetsboro, and Central and Southern Portage County.

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News Headline: State gives $635,710 to Liquid Crystal Institute, Davey Resource Group projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A slew of state funds
awarded to Kent State University's
Liquid Crystal Institute
and Davey Resource
Group in Kent will enhance
the mission of each respective
entity.

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde
(D-Kent) announced the
release of $635,710 to the
groups Monday. Of the total,
$459,000 will go to the LCI
and the remaining $176,710
will go to DRG.

The LCI's funds will cover
the cost of some new equipment
enabling KSU to expand
into biomedical liquid
crystal research. Earlier
this year, the university announced
the creation of new
bioengineering research program
that will collaborate
with the LCI and to spur the
development of biomedical
applications for liquid crystals
and other advanced materials.

Meanwhile, the $176,000
for Davey, which is headquartered
in Kent, will pay for a
comprehensive analysis of the
Ohio Department of Transportation's
current roadside
vegetation practices.

The purpose of the study
is to provide recommendations
to improve safety, cost
effectiveness, environmental
compliance, and efficiency,
according to the release.

“Davey's collaboration
with ODOT will make an important
impact on the safety,
efficiency and environmental
sustainability of roadways
throughout the entire state
of Ohio,” Clyde said.

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News Headline: Cleveland State University's Math Emporium aims to help students conquer remedial math (Tonge) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Cleveland State University students who need to take remedial math classes this fall will be directed to its new Math Emporium, a computer learning center on the second floor of the library.

The $700,000 facility with 132 computer stations and a lounge is modeled on Kent State University's Math Emporium, which opened in its library two years ago.

CSU officials hope to also replicate Kent State's success.

The 70 percent of Kent students who receive As, Bs or Cs in the Math Emporium courses is 10 percent higher than when such students were taught in classrooms, said Andrew Tonge, chair of the university's mathematics department.

“And preliminary data is showing the students who move on from the remedial courses [into college math] are doing as well as those who go to those classes directly from high school,” he said. “In the past they have done worse.”

Students at math emporiums are generally freshmen who enroll in developmental courses after being tested.

They follow a computer program at their own pace and are aided by online help, workbooks and graduate assistants or undergraduate tutors who can answer questions, said John Holcomb, chairman of CSU's math department.

“The model allows them to go quickly through the math they already know and slow down for the parts they don't,” he said. He said many students in a standard remedial math course became bored and stopped going to class if they knew some of the material. That led to failure when they returned and took tests covering material they didn't know.

“One key issue with the emporium is instead of listening to a teacher explain, they get in there and do the work and that is the only way to do math – hands on,” Holcomb said. “That is why it probably seems to be more successful.”

CSU ran a pilot program this summer in a computer lab and the 50 students in two courses did very well, he said.

About 650 students, roughly one-third of expected freshman, will enroll in one of two developmental math classes this fall, Holcomb said.

Kent State's Math Emporium has 247 computer stations and about 3,000 students will enroll in its remedial math courses this fall, Tonge said.

Because students are working on computers, faculty can monitor how they are progressing, if they are going to class and how much time they spend on assignments, Tonge and Holcomb said.

“One of the great things about the system is we know exactly what the students are doing and what they worked on,” Tonge said. “We can track what they do and figure out when they are having problems.”

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