Report Overview:
Total Clips (42)
Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Alumni; Athletics (3)
Athletics (3)
Board of Trustees (3)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Business (COB); KSU Foundation (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Corporate and Professional Development; Psychology (1)
Dining Services (1)
Enrollment; Residence Services; Students (1)
Enrollment; Students; Town-Gown (1)
Enrollment; Tuition (1)
Higher Education; Office of the President (1)
Human Resources (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (2)
KSU at E. Liverpool (4)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Political Science (1)
Safety; Students (2)
Students (2)
Students; Town-Gown (2)
Town-Gown (3)
University Communications and Marketing (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Art, School of (1)
Karis Art Gallery announces summer event featuring Peter Max 08/23/2013 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...originals! Karis' art has been exhibited throughout the U.S. including the Nabisco Gallery, Cleveland Clinic, Cooperstown Art Museum, Butler Museum and Kent State University. Ever since he was young Peter Karis knew art was his calling, so he attended college studying art at Kent State University...


Alumni; Athletics (3)
Josh Cribbs, former Cleveland Browns kick returner, cut by Raiders 08/25/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...contract was terminated by the Raiders, leaving him free to sign with any team. Cribbs began his NFL career in Cleveland as an undrafted free agent out of Kent State. He is tied for the most kickoff returns for touchdowns in NFL history. The Radiers also released linebackers Keenan Clayton and Eric...

Reports: Cribbs cut by Raiders 08/25/2013 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...injury, and Jacoby Ford will more than likely be named Oakland's number three receiver and return specialist. Cribbs, (an undrafted free agent out of Kent State) is tied for first all time in kickoff returns for touchdowns with eight, but has not taken one all the way since 2009.

Heisman campaigns may be fading, but small schools still find plenty of value (Chimenti) 08/26/2013 Sports Illustrated - Online Text Attachment Email

Earlier this week, Ben Cohen wrote an article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “R.I.P., Heisman Campaigns.” In it, he detailed how the build-up surrounding...


Athletics (3)
Flashes football: Work on the field only half of the story for Kent State players 08/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: It was early August, just the first day of Kent State football's two-a-day practices. The Golden Flashes were finishing up their dinners on the...

Kent State Sports Report: Bahamas tournament a success for Flashes men's hoops (Senderoff, Lawson) 08/26/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State's men's basketball team is back home after a perfect trip to the Bahamas. The Golden Flashes played four games against national teams from...

Watch List: THE Hustle Belt 08/23/2013 Middletown Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...form of a hella big belt. Here are our favorites for our conference MVP award, THE Hustle Belt. 1. Jordan Lynch (Northern Illinois) 2. Dri Archer (Kent State) 3. Khalil Mack (Buffalo) 4. Tyler Tettleton (Ohio) 5. Keith Wenning (Ball State)


Board of Trustees (3)
Ohio Gov. John Kasich appoints three Northeast Ohioans to boards 08/23/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Virginia Albanese of Akron was placed on the Kent State University board of trustees, Keith Burgess of Shaker Heights was put on the Minority Development Financing Advisory Board, and Marlon...

TRUSTEE APPOINTED 08/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Gov. John Kasich named Virginia Albanese of Akron to the 11-member Kent State Board of Trustees through May 16, 2022. Albanese is president and chief executive officer of FedEx Custom Critical, North America's...

Gov. Kasich appoints Virginia Albanese to Kent State Board of Trustees 08/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...express written consent of the Akron Beacon Journal is expressly prohibited. KENT: Gov. John Kasich named Virginia Albanese of Akron to the 11-member Kent State Board of Trustees through May 16, 2022. Albanese is president and chief executive officer of FedEx Custom Critical, North America's...


College of Business (COB) (1)
Directory of the state's MBA programs 08/25/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...of these programs, including such details as class locations, contact information and available specializations. Click Ashland University The University of Akron Baldwin Wallace University Bluffton University Bowling Green State University Case Western Reserve University University


College of Business (COB); KSU Foundation (1)
GAR Foundation awards more than $1.4 million to Akron-area nonprofits 08/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...programming. • Info Line Inc., $25,000 for the Summit County Food Pantry Clearinghouse. • Jewish Family Service of Akron, $25,000 for operations. • Kent State University Foundation, $15,000 for operations of Blackstone LaunchPad. • The Portage Foundation, $50,000, for operations. • Pregnancy...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Charles Platkin: Health tips you should use 08/25/2013 Poughkeepsie Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...reduce fitness levels: That’s what researchers Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, faculty members in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University in Ohio, say. They found that high smartphone use was linked to poor fitness in college students. Try using fitness applications...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Kent State Zombie Outbreak Course (Staley) 08/23/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...title of it is zombie outbreak, but the underlying foundation of the course is introducing students to the public health emergency response system" says Kent State Professor John Staley. The "zombie outbreak" obviously being a hypothetical situation. The course aims to prepare students for...


Corporate and Professional Development; Psychology (1)
Going Places: Aug. 26-30, 2013 08/25/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Center for Corporate and Professional Development — Amy Lane to associate vice president, corporate and professional development...


Dining Services (1)
KENT STATE EXECUTIVE CHEFS SPICE UP CULINARY KNOWLEDGE WITH VISIT TO THE CHEF'S GARDEN (Goehler, Roldan) 08/23/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Aug.23 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University students returning for the Fall 2013 Semester can expect more...


Enrollment; Residence Services; Students (1)
VIDEO: Record enrollment at KSU spells campus housing crunch (Mansfield 08/25/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Record enrollment at Kent State University this year means the school has more students than available dorm rooms. Kent State had so many students applying,...


Enrollment; Students; Town-Gown (1)
Students return to Kent State University (Garcia; Mansfield) 08/26/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Discover Downtown event to help welcome largest, brightest freshman class on record As Kent State University students wrap up their campus move-ins...


Enrollment; Tuition (1)
Channel 3 News at 4:30am 08/26/2013 Channel 3 News at Sunrise - WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

...fidelity investments think parents are actually better now... Than in years past at socking away for their children's higher education record enrollment at Kent State University this year means the school has more students than dorm rooms.the university had to close enrollment for freshman in june, but...


Higher Education; Office of the President (1)
Gee's successor search comes to Wooster 08/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Sept. 16 to outline the steps they will take to replace Luis Proenza, who will step down in July for a year-long paid sabbatical and then teach at UA. Kent State has set up a web site at www.kent.edu/president/presidentialsearch on its search to replace Lester Lefton, who also will retire in July...


Human Resources (1)
Cleveland State University campus-wide tobacco ban is now in effect (poll) 08/26/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...designated parking lots. Central State University became smoke free last November. Several private colleges in the state have smoke-free campuses. A Kent State University committee, which formed last November, recently concluded its study on tobacco use on campus and submitted a report to administrators,...


Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (2)
Exposing too much online can have consequences (Moore, Goodman) 08/26/2013 KUSA-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT - Ivory Byrd is starting his freshman year at Kent State University. He's well aware of the dangers of pictures and social media. That's why he turns...

News21 Students Investigate Plight of Veterans 08/25/2013 PR Newswire Text Email

... Fellows for the 2013 project came from 12 universities: ASU, Central Michigan University, Florida International University, University of Florida, Kent State University, University of Maryland, University of Minnesota, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, University of Oklahoma, University...


KSU at E. Liverpool (4)
Ohio awards $10.5M to improve transportation 08/26/2013 San Francisco Chronicle Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Department of Transportation has awarded $10.5 million in grants to help fund projects aimed at improving mobility and restoring...

Champaign County project receives $780k grant to improve transportation 08/25/2013 Bellefontaine Examiner - Online Text Attachment Email

...bicycle facilities along U.S. Route 36 in Champaign County. Nearly $800,000 of the grant money will be used for a safe pedestrian route connecting Kent State University's east and west campuses to businesses in northeast Ohio's East Liverpool. More than $285,000 will be used to rehabilitate...

21 News 6 P.M. 08/25/2013 WFMJ-TV Text Attachment Email

Students at Kent State in East Liverpool will be getting a new walk way taking them to businesses in the city's downtown. The Ohio Department of Transportation...

Ohio awards $10.5M to improve transportation 08/25/2013 Associated Press (AP) Text Email

...facilities. A total of 20 projects will receive money from the grants. Nearly $800,000 of the grant money will be used for a safe pedestrian route connecting Kent State University's east and west campuses to businesses in northeast Ohio's East Liverpool. More than $285,000 will be used to rehabilitate...


KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Stark announces 2013–14 Featured Speakers Series 08/24/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark has announced the 23rd season of its Featured Speakers Series, highlighting four inspirational and world-renowned individuals....


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
The Big 3, Together Again Concert Aug 31 08/24/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA Kent State University at Tuscarawas will host "The Big 3, Together Again" concert at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 31 at the Performing Arts Center at 330 University...

No plane crash Friday in Phila 08/23/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...plane crash in New Philadelphia on Friday night proved to be unfounded. Police received reports that people saw a plane flying low over the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia at about 7:30 p.m. Emergency radio scanner traffic mentioned the Performing Arts Center,...


Political Science (1)
Bruised Egypt Brotherhood seeks to show street power (Stacher) 08/23/2013 Kuwait Times Text Attachment Email

...will never be an important political player, but symbolically it's a victory dance by the reconstituted old state,” Joshua Stacher, an Egypt expert at Kent State University in the United States, said of the former leader's release. Adding to a sense among some activists that the freedoms won in the...


Safety; Students (2)
5 Things About Classes Resuming at Kent State 08/25/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Classes start for the fall 2013 semester today at .Whether you're a new student or a longtime townie there are a few tricks below you might find helpful...

Kent State Student Raising Awareness After Impostor Steals Social Media Photos 08/26/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...social media as you. Imagine that person took your pictures, developed new context for them, and posted them as their own. That's what happened to Kent State student Allyssa Griffiths. When she started using social media, she heeded all of the normal warnings given at the time about keeping...


Students (2)
Kent Community Dinner celebrates the river, the park, the town 08/25/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The recent Kent Community Dinner was a continuation of Kent's River Day Festivities at Plum Creek Park in Kent. Kent State University's Service Learning...

VIDEO: Supporters wish luck to Miss Ohio at send-off 08/25/2013 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...wardrobe she will wear at Miss America, including her welcome arrival dress, a black, gray and white form-fitting selection. Wells minored in dance at Kent State University and this past June at Miss Ohio she changed her regular, upbeat, high-energy jazz dance routine to a more serious dance selection....


Students; Town-Gown (2)
Downtown event welcomes KSU students to the city (Mansfield) 08/26/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

As Kent State University students wrap up their campus move-ins this weekend, local restaurants and retailers will be ready to show off their goods...

VIDEO: Kent State University students Discover Downtown 08/24/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Thousands of Kent State University students came to downtown Kent by the trolley-load on Saturday, anxious to snap up menus, food and anything else downtown business...


Town-Gown (3)
Historic house to move on Saturday 08/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A group of Kent preservationists, Kent Wells-Sherman, Inc. bought a historic 1858 house from its owner, Kent State University, on Tuesday, August 20 for $1.00, using a Sacajawea dollar coin for the transaction. In early 2012, local Kent historians realized...

Kent Wells Sherman House move delayed 08/26/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

In ongoing lawsuit, structure's preservation group files motion to have attorney fees paid. The relocation of the Kent Wells Sherman House from its...

Sherman Wells House 08/24/2013 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

...long-distance the move which started at seven ians expected to take at least 45 l minutes at the home is linked to the city's founder and a civil war era doctor. Kent state university bought the home and 2011 and agreed to help move the home with the help of a group trying to save it. >>


University Communications and Marketing (2)
How 'Teslanaires' made fortunes (Jivan) 08/23/2013 San Jose Mercury News - Online Text Attachment Email

...bull is Jonathan Jivan, an Iraq War veteran who lives in a suburb of Akron, Ohio. He describes his lifestyle as modest: He works as a videographer at Kent State University and drives a 10-year-old Nissan Altima. But Jivan purchased $2,500 worth of stock in Tesla Motors in April 2011, when it...

How 'Teslanaires' made fortunes on Tesla Motors stock (Jivan) 08/25/2013 Columbus C.E.O. - Online Text Attachment Email

...bull is Jonathan Jivan, an Iraq War veteran who lives in a suburb of Akron, Ohio. He describes his lifestyle as modest: He works as a videographer at Kent State University and drives a 10-year-old Nissan Altima. But Jivan purchased $2,500 worth of stock in Tesla Motors in April 2011, when it...


News Headline: Karis Art Gallery announces summer event featuring Peter Max | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Peter Max
News OCR Text: On Aug. 23, 2013, Karis Art Gallery announced their end of summer event. Attending the event will not only give patrons a chance to enjoy fine art, but they will be able to meet artists Peter Karis and Peter Max as well. The event's date will be Sept. 20-21 and will be held at the art gallery in Hilton Head, S.C.

Karis original paintings will be reduced, and the "special" will include all current gallery inventory of Peter Karis originals!

Karis' art has been exhibited throughout the U.S. including the Nabisco Gallery, Cleveland Clinic, Cooperstown Art Museum, Butler Museum and Kent State University.

Ever since he was young Peter Karis knew art was his calling, so he attended college studying art at Kent State University and earned a B.F.A. degree in painting.Karis is an artist who is known for being an expressionist who works in acrylic. This artist paints people, flowers, trees and other objects.

"I create my art as I interpret the objects versus how others might see them."

Karis is an award-winning artist. One of the awards he has won is the Juno Award, and it is known as the Canadian equivalent of a Grammy (for best album cover design).

Another talented artist is Peter Max. According to Wikipeida he is an illustrator and graphic artist known for the use of psychedelic shapes and color palettes as well as spectra in his work.

Following Max's success with a line of art clocks for General Electric, his art was licensed by 72 corporations, and he became a household name. In 1969, Max appeared on the cover and in an eight page article of "Life" magazine. During that same time frame he was also a guest on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson and "The Ed Sullivan Show."

One can meet both artists by visiting Karis Art Gallery during the end of summer event. Online one can go to Karis Art Gallery.com or petercarisart.com for a greater selection of the art on sale.

Enjoy video clip of Peter Max with Taylor Swift. Also enjoy multiple pieces of art and photos of Max, Karis and Swift in slideshow.

All art seen at links or in slideshow is not necessarily for sale at a reduced fee. For more information in regard to the end of summer event, Peter Karis, Peter Max or about their art refer to contact details below.

End of Summer Sale at Karis Art & Design Gallery will be held on Friday, Sept. 20, 6-9 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 21, noon-2 p.m. Karis original paintings will be 20% off!

1000 William Hilton Parkway

C-4 Village at Wexford

Hilton Head Island, SC 29928

Phone: 843-785-5100

karisartgallery.com

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News Headline: Josh Cribbs, former Cleveland Browns kick returner, cut by Raiders | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cribbs had knee surgery in the offseason and signed with the Raiders after eight seasons with the Cleveland Browns. But the 29-year-old struggled to regain his speed in training camp. He also fumbled a kickoff in Friday's preseason loss to the Chicago Bears.

Cribbs' contract was terminated by the Raiders, leaving him free to sign with any team.

Cribbs began his NFL career in Cleveland as an undrafted free agent out of Kent State. He is tied for the most kickoff returns for touchdowns in NFL history.

The Radiers also released linebackers Keenan Clayton and Eric Harper, fullback Jon Hoese, wide receivers Sam McGuffie, Tray Session and Isaiah Williams, guard Andrew Robiskie, cornerback Cory Nelms and defensive tackle Myles Wade.

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News Headline: Reports: Cribbs cut by Raiders | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sunday, August 25, 2013 4:13 PM EST

Josh Cribbs was a fan favorite during his tenure with the Cleveland Browns, however that didn't keep him on the roster as the free agent signed with the Oakland Raiders this past May. Now, multiple reports say the Raiders released the three time Pro Bowler Sunday.

Cribbs has had problems with a lingering knee injury, and Jacoby Ford will more than likely be named Oakland's number three receiver and return specialist.

Cribbs, (an undrafted free agent out of Kent State) is tied for first all time in kickoff returns for touchdowns with eight, but has not taken one all the way since 2009.

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News Headline: Heisman campaigns may be fading, but small schools still find plenty of value (Chimenti) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Sports Illustrated - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Earlier this week, Ben Cohen wrote an article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “R.I.P., Heisman Campaigns.” In it, he detailed how the build-up surrounding the award has changed, noting that the availability of highlights and statistics have virtually eliminated the existence of dark horse candidates. Fans can Google a given player and find out anything they want to know.

But while it's easy to rattle off players like Johnny Manziel, Jadeveon Clowney, De'Anthony Thomas, Teddy Bridgewater, AJ McCarron, Braxton Miller and Tajh Boyd, among others, there is still a group of equally deserving players who aren't getting any due. For them, Heisman campaigns still present an opportunity to bring more attention to their play and their schools.

Enter Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch, Kent State running back Dri Archer and Utah State quarterback Chuckie Keeton. All three are coming off big seasons in 2012, and all three have mounted minor Heisman campaigns, even if only to celebrate their contributions to their programs.

RICKMAN: Northern Illinois headlines 2013 MAC preview

“We tossed around the idea of promoting Dri last year, especially with the year we had as a team,” Kent State assistant director of communications Aaron Chimenti said. “We reached a level of national attention we'd never had. When coach [Paul] Haynes came in, he was all for putting Dri front and center because he's a human highlight reel, and because of the kind of kid he is. Knowing the Heisman is its own beast, we started pushing. We know it's a long shot, but it gets Kent and Dri more attention. People may not know about him or the kind of year he had last year, but all you need is a couple highlights to know Dri belongs in that conversation.”

NIU, Kent State and Utah State don't have the types of budgets that larger schools typically have to spend on promotional material. That's why, on the surface, it may seem strange for those programs to be allocating those funds toward what amounts to a long shot in the first place. Yet, upon digging a little deeper, it makes sense. A little luck, a little innovation and a lot of promotion can go a long way.

Just look at Archer's cartoon, drawn by Chuck Ayers of Crankshaft and Funky Winkerbean fame. Ayers is a Kent State graduate and a Northeast Ohio resident, and when Kent State was brainstorming ideas for how to give Archer his Heisman push, Ayers signed on.

The best part? He agreed to do it for free.

“That first comic that came out ended up in the AP and then everybody ran it,” Chimenti said. “It was even in [the U.S. Military publication] Stars and Stripes, so you had troops reading it all over the world. And we set up a social media presence as well, on the Dri4Heisman website, Twitter and Facebook. All those things cost next to nothing. We've lined up Kent State celebrities to hold up a Dri Archer jersey and post photos online. We're getting more national media attention in the preseason than we've ever gotten. If this was something we were paying for, you're talking millions of dollars worth of advertising we'd have to pay for. This isn't just great for Dri; it's great for our school.”

It might not work out that way for every school. For example, it's hard to tell just how big of an impact Keeton's trading card has made on the Utah State program.

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News Headline: Flashes football: Work on the field only half of the story for Kent State players | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: It was early August, just the first day of Kent State football's two-a-day practices.

The Golden Flashes were finishing up their dinners on the second floor of the student center.

Bloodshot eyes were evident for many of the 100 players in camp — as well as some of the coaching staff — an indication of how much time and energy was being put into preparation for the season.

The Flashes wouldn't play a game for some time, the opener being weeks away at the time but now just days away with the Flashes set to play against Liberty University at Dix Stadium on Thursday.

Player building, team building, program building: All was under construction.

• • • •

That August day already had included two practices, each running one hour and 45 minutes.

After finishing dinner, the players and coaches made their way over to a large classroom in the M.A.C. Center gym annex for a final 8 p.m. team meeting.

First on the agenda was guest speaker Logan Vance. He served in Afghanistan in 2007 and Iraq in 2009 as a member of the Army's 2nd Ranger Battalion; he also is a Kent State student.

Flashes coach Paul Haynes, in his first year, introduced Vance as coming from “THE Kent State University,” taking a cue from his time as a longtime assistant defensive coach at Ohio State.

Like previous coach Darrell Hazell, Haynes shares an affinity for the men and women who serve their country. Thus, Haynes continued Hazell's implementation of naming the Flashes special teams units after military units: The punt team is named after SEALs, the punt return after the Rangers, the kickoff team is known as Recon and the kickoff return team is Delta.

Vance, sharply dressed in a grayish-silver vest, dress pants and a long-sleeved white button-down shirt, looked more suited for a wedding reception than speaking to a classroom full of young college football players. A dapper native of Ashtabula, he held the team's rapt attention while discussing professionalism and striving to be the best.

“I know this is the first of two-a-days and you're tired and the day is wearing on you,” Vance said in a loud, commanding voice. “I too know what it's like to be out in the hot sun two days at a time. Only difference is, we got shot at and you guys get tackled.

“… I went overseas so that every single one of you — men and women — can sit here. I choose to do that just like you choose to come here to play football. So act professional, strive to be the best and respect and represent this university with pride.”

He spoke for just 15 minutes, but it was a no-holds-barred presentation that ended with thunderous applause as he promptly exited the room as quickly as he had entered it.

• • • •

Most KSU football fans only have the chance to see their favorite players in pads during games. Few are privy to the backpack-toting student side of their lives. In addition to attending the same history, science and math classes of their non-athletic peers, KSU's football players also study plenty of football.

After Vance's powerful speech was a study session in which a handful of assistant coaches gave brief lectures with the aid of an overhead projector on the main points of the team's two-minute offense and defense situations.

Wide receivers coach Doc Gamble was next. After he made his way down the steps and to the front of the room, he slapped a page on the projector screen labeled: Theory of the Two-Minute Offense.

Gamble's outline broke down the subject into three main, albeit obvious, points: 1. Four downs to get a first down. 2. When to call for a timeout — always know where the nearest official is. 3. When the clock is stopped, huddle up.

For a majority of those who played football as far back as the peewee level, it's obvious stuff. But with many kickers coming from soccer backgrounds, it's never a bad idea to make sure everyone has the basics down pat so it doesn't cost the Flashes in a game.

Gamble then explained basic clock operation — when the clock starts, when to take a timeout and ways to conserve time — before turning things over to defensive graduate assistant Eron Hodges.

“The most important part of defense is to be at your best when your best is needed,” Hodges said. “At the end of the first half and in the fourth quarter, this is when your best is needed.”

Hodges then played audio of a rallying speech by former Baltimore Ravens fiery linebacker Ray Lewis regarding team effort. The room fell silent as players listened.

After the two assistant coaches gave their brief presentations, the team's wide receivers got out of their seats and took a turn at the front of the room. Standing in the middle of the group, junior Chris Humphrey read from a page of notes in his hand he made from the team's 406-page Kent State's Winner's Manual. It came from a section titled Humility, which is part of the team's Seven Decisions to Success.

When Humphrey finished, the receivers headed back to their seats and Haynes addressed the group momentarily.

“The point is, the buck stops here,” he said. “Take responsibility. Look in the mirror at yourself.”

• • • •

Last on the agenda before the exhausted players finally got to head back to their dorm rooms and apartments was a portion of the meeting saved for three senior speeches. All 16 seniors on the team were scheduled to make a short presentation throughout camp. They were able to read from their own notes as they stood at the front of the room and spoke to coaches and teammates.

The presentations were made up of their answers to five points: fundamental, core value, hero/winner, real issue and what playing at KSU means to me.

On this night, quarterback David Fisher, defensive back Fabrice Pratt and center Phil Huff shared willingly some rather intimate feelings and poignant life stories with their teammates.

A junior college transfer from Palomar Community College, Fisher left a close-knit circle of family and friends in California before last season. He took a big leap of faith to fly cross country to a school he hadn't heard of until a former teammate mentioned it, all in hopes of finishing his career as a Division I quarterback.

Last season Fisher backed up returning starter Spencer Keith. This season he and redshirt freshman Colin Reardon are vying for time as the quarterback.

Speaking of the many reasons why he has been blessed to become a part of the “Kent State football family,” Fisher shared an incident about stealing in high school as part of his core value.

“I stole and I got caught,” he said. “When I saw the look on my mom's face when she picked me up, I said right then, ‘I don't ever want to see that look on her face again.' ”

Then the fifth-year senior went on to explain why his mother, Phenella Adame, is his hero.

“My biological father wasn't there for me, he had other things to worry about and got into some trouble,” Fisher said. “So my mom got us on a bus and my stepdad [Mario Adame] met us there. Since then, he's been my hero, too. I honestly don't think I'd be here playing Division I football without him and the discipline he gave me.”

After Pratt and Huff's speeches, the team read together out loud an eight-line entry from a final page in the manual. When finished, they slapped their manuals closed in unison, swung out of their seats and wearily filed out of the room to head home for the night for some much-needed rest.

It would be just eight hours until the next day's preseason camp activities would be in full swing again.

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News Headline: Kent State Sports Report: Bahamas tournament a success for Flashes men's hoops (Senderoff, Lawson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's men's basketball team is back home after a perfect trip to the Bahamas.

The Golden Flashes played four games against national teams from the Bahamas last week, winning all four with relative ease as the average margin of victory was nearly 19 points. The Flashes saved their best performance for last, racing to a 60-32 halftime lead en route to a trip-ending 97-73 win over New Providence on Friday.

"I thought the first half was our best defensive half of the four games we played out here," said KSU third-year coach Rob Senderoff. "We had 16 steals at halftime, which is an unbelievable number. The second half got a little bit sloppy. But when you're up 28 points at halftime, sometimes the games tend to get that way. The second half wasn't as crisp on either end of the floor, but it was a good performance overall. We had a number of guys in double-figures again and some different guys in double-figures. It was a nice way to end the trip."

Sophomore guard Devin Carter became the fourth different player to lead Kent State in scoring with a game-high 15 points against New Providence. He also piled up six steals in the first half alone. Redshirt freshman guard Tyler Scott also had his best game of the trip in the finale with 13 points and four offensive rebounds, helping the Flashes dominate the boards 49-29.

Senderoff was pleased to watch his team play well while still finding some areas of weakness during the trip.

"Overall, I think we got a lot of film to watch to get better," said Senderoff. "You're starting to see some roles get defined and see who can play, and where they can play. We're still missing (sophomore point guard) Kellon Thomas (knee injury, out until early Oct.), which I think will really help shore up our backcourt when we have him. I really liked the leadership that (junior point guard) Kris Brewer showed on this trip and in the practices leading up to the trip. While his numbers weren't off the charts, I think he really established himself as a leader of the team. We obviously know (senior forward Darren (Goodson) is a leader. And (senior forward) Mark Henniger has been really consistent. He has played better and better in our practices and played well out here, like you'd expect a senior to do."

Brewer (9.3 points per game), Goodson (11 ppg) and Henniger (9 ppg, 69 percent shooting from floor) were three of seven players who averaged nine or more points per game on the trip, led by sophomore guard Devareaux Manley at 12.5 points per outing. Carter was second in scoring (11.5), while sophomore guard K.K. Simmons averaged 9.8 points and junior guard Derek Jackson chipped in 9.5 per outing (8-of-12 from 3-point range).

Senior forward Melvin Tabb led the team in rebounding at 6.3 boards per contest, followed by Goodson (5.8), sophomore forward Chris Ortiz (5.5) and Henniger (5.0). Brewer averaged a team-high 5.5 assists per contest and made just three turnovers 88 minutes of action.

Senderoff was pleased to see Brewer step up when his team needed him most.

"The thing I was most pleased to see was at halftime of our second game, we were only up 10, and Kris Brewer huddled the entire team up and did a lot of talking," said Senderoff. "I don't know what was said because I wasn't in there, but at the end of third quarter, we were up by 25."

The Flashes wound up defeating the Bahamas All-Stars 90-75.

"For us to be a good team, (Brewer) has to be not just a really good player, but also a really good leader, and I think he has done that over these 10 practices and this trip," said Senderoff. "Guys follow him and look up to him on the court. That's going to be important going forward for our team."

Brewer and Simmons also were 6-of-6 from the line in Thursday's 94-87 triumph over the Mail Boat Cybots, Kent State's closest contest of the trip. Jackson led the way with 18 points, hitting 5-of-7 shots from 3-point range.

The Flashes will now take some time to focus on fall classes, which begin today, before returning to the hardwood.

"I'm going to give the team at least a week off, probably more," said Senderoff. "These guys have been going since June 10th. I want to let them get established in the classroom, then some time during the second week of September we'll start conditioning and preseason stuff. I'm sure guys will get in the gym on their own, but I'm not going to have much mandatory until after Labor Day."

Kent State opens the 2013-14 campaign Nov. 8 against Ohio Northern.

WOMEN'S SOCCER

Kent State opened the 2013 season with a 3-2 home victory over St. Bonaventure on Friday, then fell to Marshall 3-0 on Sunday.

Freshman midfielder Jenna Hellstrom scored two goals, including the game-winner in the 76th minute of play against St. Bonaventure (0-1). Sophomore Madison Helterbran scored KSU's other goal on a header.

The Thundering Herd (2-0) outshot the Flashes (1-1) 14-4, and put the match away with a pair of second-half goals.

Kent State, picked to finish second in the Mid-American Conference East Division in the league's preseason poll, returns to action Friday at home against Cleveland State.

TRACK & FIELD

Kent State has named Phil Bastron as its new assistant coach. Bastron, who spent the previous two seasons as an assistant coach at Division III Carthage College in Kenosha, Wis., will primarily work with student-athletes in the vertical jumps and combined events.

"Phil's very excited to join a Division I program," said Bill Lawson, Kent State's director of track and field and cross country. "He brings national experience as both a coach and a competitor, and knows what it takes to be at a championship level. Phil also brings great organizational skills and will be a good recruiter for us. We're thrilled to have Phil join our coaching staff."

Bastron was a three-time All-American student-athlete at the University of St. Thomas (Minn.), winning a national title as a member of the 4x400 relay in 2009. He replaces Brooke Demo, who left after three seasons to become an assistant coach at Louisville.

MEN'S GOLF

One current KSU star and one from two seasons ago made strong showings at the PGA Tour Canada's The Great Waterway Classic event this weekend.

Former Kent State standout Mackenzie Hughes finished 10th thanks to a final-round 66 that left him at 16-under for the event (70-67-69-66). Current Flashes sensation Taylor Pendrith, competing as an amateur, wound up 46th at 5-under. He shook off a first-round 75 with a second-round 66, then closes 70-72.

Current Kent State women's star Jennifer Ha competed in the PGA Tour's CN Canadian Women's Open, but failed to make the cut.

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News Headline: Watch List: THE Hustle Belt | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Middletown Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Does anyone care about the Heisman? I do. You probably do, too. But pretend you don't. Because THE Hustle Belt is way more important and I say this because I am awful at math. The Heisman Trophy is boring. It just sits there. They should make it into a big gold chain that you can wear around. Because that's what we do here at Hustle Belt. We want you to wear your successes around in the form of a hella big belt. Here are our favorites for our conference MVP award, THE Hustle Belt.

1. Jordan Lynch (Northern Illinois)

2. Dri Archer (Kent State)

3. Khalil Mack (Buffalo)

4. Tyler Tettleton (Ohio)

5. Keith Wenning (Ball State)

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News Headline: Ohio Gov. John Kasich appoints three Northeast Ohioans to boards | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Virginia Albanese of Akron was placed on the Kent State University board of trustees, Keith Burgess of Shaker Heights was put on the Minority Development Financing Advisory Board, and Marlon Moore of Garfield Heights was appointed to the Ohio Minority Business Advisory Council.

The governor made the appointments on Wednesday and announced in a news release.

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News Headline: TRUSTEE APPOINTED | Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gov. John Kasich named Virginia Albanese of Akron to the 11-member Kent State Board of Trustees through May 16, 2022.

Albanese is president and chief executive officer of FedEx Custom Critical, North America's largest, critical-shipment carrier. Since joining FedEx Custom Critical in 1986, she has served in roles that include director of safety, recruiting and contractor relations and vice president of customer and strategic operations.

She earned a bachelor's degree from KSU in 1985 and an executive master's degree in business administration from KSU in 1995. She is the immediate past chairwoman of the Greater Akron Chamber of Commerce and is on a number of boards that include Akron Children's Hospital.

She replaces Jacqueline Woods, whose term has expired.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Gov. Kasich appoints Virginia Albanese to Kent State Board of Trustees | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: August 23,2013 03:08 PM GMT Beacon Journal staff Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Copyright � 2013 Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Inc and Black Press. All Rights Reserved. Any copying, redistribution or retransmission of any of the contents of this service without the express written consent of the Akron Beacon Journal is expressly prohibited.

KENT: Gov. John Kasich named Virginia Albanese of Akron to the 11-member Kent State Board of Trustees through May 16, 2022.

Albanese is president and chief executive officer of FedEx Custom Critical, North America's largest, critical-shipment carrier. Since joining FedEx Custom Critical in 1986, she has served in roles that include director of safety, recruiting and contractor relations and vice president of customer and strategic operations.

She earned a bachelor's degree from KSU in 1985 and an executive master's degree in business administration from KSU in 1995. She is the immediate past chairwoman of the Greater Akron Chamber of Commerce and is on a number of boards that include Akron Children's Hospital.

She replaces Jacqueline Woods, whose term has expired.

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News Headline: Directory of the state's MBA programs | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 4:30 am, August 25, 2013

More than 40 public and private colleges and universities with locations in Ohio offer master of business degrees. This MBA Guide provides a snapshot of each of these programs, including such details as class locations, contact information and available specializations.

Click

Ashland University

The University of Akron

Baldwin Wallace University

Bluffton University

Bowling Green State University

Case Western Reserve University

University of Cincinnati

Cleveland State University

University of Dayton

DeVry University

University of Findlay

Franciscan University of Steubenville

Franklin University

Heidelberg University

Herzing University

Indiana Wesleyan University

John Carroll University

Kent State University

Lake Erie College

Lourdes University

Malone University

Miami University

College of Mount St. Joseph

Mount Vernon Nazarene University

University of Northwestern Ohio

Ohio Christian University

Ohio Dominican University

Ohio State University

Ohio University

Otterbein University

University of Rio Grande

Tiffin University

University of Toledo

Urbana University

Ursuline College

Walsh University

Wright State University

Xavier University

Youngstown State University

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News Headline: GAR Foundation awards more than $1.4 million to Akron-area nonprofits | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The GAR Foundation awarded more than $1.4 million to 25 Akron-area nonprofits at its August distribution meeting.

The largest award, $450,000, went to United Way of Summit County in the form of a challenge grant.

GAR will match United Way pledges dollar for dollar from new donations from employees and individual donors and businesses running first-time campaigns as the agency strives to meet its goal for this year of $12.3 million.

“United Way is a vital asset to this community,” Kirstin Toth, GAR Foundation senior vice president said in a news release announcing the grants. “The innovative leadership at United Way helps generous people and businesses throughout Greater Akron to contribute meaningfully where the community needs it most.”

Other grants from the GAR Foundation went to:

• Act II Productions, $5,000 for operations.

• Asian Services in Action Inc., $40,000 for the International Community Empowerment Project.

• Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron, $100,000 for operations.

• Building for Tomorrow, $70,000 for the Early Childhood Initiative.

• BVU: The Center for Nonprofit Excellence, $130,000 for operations.

• CASA Board Volunteer Association, $15,000 for operations.

• Child Guidance & Family Solutions, $35,000 for the Toddlers and Preschoolers Succeeding program.

• City of Akron, $15,000 for the Heinz Poll Summer Dance Festival.

• CORE Furniture Bank, $13,000 for operations and for implementation of a new delivery program.

• Downtown Akron Partnership Inc., $20,000 for operations.

• Friends of 91.3, $18,500 for evaluation and the fall membership campaign.

• Girl Scouts of North East Ohio, $40,000, for the Girl Scout Leadership Experience in Barberton.

• Great Lakes Theater Festival Inc., $30,000 for Surround Series programming.

• Great Trail Council, Boy Scouts of America, $60,000 for development of an assessment model for Boy Scouting in collaboration with GAR staff and for the Exploring/Venturing career-based education program.

• Greater Akron Musical Association, $95,000 for operations and governance work.

• ideastream, $55,000 for educational programming.

• Info Line Inc., $25,000 for the Summit County Food Pantry Clearinghouse.

• Jewish Family Service of Akron, $25,000 for operations.

• Kent State University Foundation, $15,000 for operations of Blackstone LaunchPad.

• The Portage Foundation, $50,000, for operations.

• Pregnancy Care of Summit County Inc., $20,000 for operations.

• Tri-County Jobs for Ohio's Graduates, $57,500 for operations and curriculum development

• Tuesday Musical Association, $30,000 for operations.

• Weathervane Community Playhouse Inc., $35,000 for operations.

GAR Foundation is a private, independent foundation established in 1967 as a charitable trust by Galen J. Roush, co-founder and chief executive officer of Roadway Express, and his wife, Ruth.

For information, go to www.garfoundation.org.

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News Headline: Charles Platkin: Health tips you should use | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Poughkeepsie Journal - Online
Contact Name: Charles Platkin
News OCR Text: Walking to work fights disease: It could be better than an apple a day. Researchers at Imperial College London and University College London reviewed data from more than 20,000 people living in the U.K. The researchers found that those who walked to work were about 40 percent less likely to have diabetes and 17 percent less likely to have high blood pressure than those who drove.

Stopping sugar consumption may reduce cancer: A new fruit fly study conducted by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City found that blocking dietary sugar and its activity in tumor cells in the obese or those with diabetes may reduce cancer risk and progression. Your best bet? Cut the added sugar. See: www.dietdetective.com/weekly-column/top-10-tips-you-need-implement-right-now-cut-sugar-your-diet

Not that you needed confirmation, but there is such a thing as food addiction: Did you ever feel as if you were just addicted to certain foods? Well, there’s a good chance that it’s true. According to research from Boston Children’s Hospital appearing in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, substance abuse and eating high-glycemic foods may trigger the same brain mechanism tied to addiction.

Researchers had 12 overweight men consume milkshake meals, the only difference being that one group consumed rapidly digested (high-glycemic index) carbohydrates and the other group consumed slowly digested (low-glycemic index) carbohydrates.

The researchers then measured “blood glucose levels and hunger, while also using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to observe brain activity during the crucial four-hour period after a meal, which influences eating behavior at the next meal.”

The results? “After participants consumed the high-glycemic index milkshake, they experienced an initial surge in blood sugar levels, followed by a sharp crash four hours later. This decrease in blood glucose was associated with excessive hunger and intense activation of the nucleus accumbens, a critical brain region involved in addictive behaviors.”

The authors of the study suggest that limiting high-glycemic index carbohydrates like white bread and potatoes could reduce overall urges.

Poor moms-to-be, the pleasure of eating anything you want is over: The notion of being pregnant used to conjure up images of eating nearly anything you wanted with impunity. Well, put that pickle down and move away from the ice cream container.

Once again, research is showing that if you gain weight early in your pregnancy, it could mean having a fatter baby.

According to Margie Davenport, an assistant professor at the University of Alberta, Canada, moms-to-be who gain too much weight early in their pregnancies are nearly three times as likely to give birth to bigger, fatter babies.

Keep in mind, “Infants who are larger at birth tend to become larger children, and that creates a risk for developing into obese and overweight children and adults.”

Choose a goal range, not a single goal for weight-loss: According to a study appearing in the Journal of Consumer Research, choosing a goal that has a low and high range, such as 2 to 4 pounds, versus choosing a single number, such as 3 pounds, has an impact on diet retention. The study showed that those consumers with high-low range goals continued their diet programs even though there was no difference in actual average weight loss across the two groups.

Good news if you like hot chocolate: If you’re in your 70s, I have some good news: According to research reported in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, drinking two cups of hot chocolate each day may help keep your brain healthy if you have impaired blood flow.

“The participants drank two cups of hot cocoa per day for 30 days and did not consume any other chocolate during the study. They were given tests of memory and thinking skills. They also had ultrasound tests to measure the amount of blood flow to the brain during the tests. Of the 60 participants, 18 had impaired blood flow at the start of the study. Those people had an 8.3 percent improvement in blood flow to the working areas of the brain by the end of the study, while there was no improvement for those who started out with regular blood flow. The people with impaired blood flow also improved their times on a test of working memory, with scores dropping from 167 seconds at the beginning of the study to 116 seconds at the end. There was no change in times for people with regular blood flow.”

The researchers explained that those with impaired blood flow were also more likely to have tiny areas of brain damage.

Smartphones can reduce fitness levels: That’s what researchers Jacob Barkley and Andrew Lepp, faculty members in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University in Ohio, say. They found that high smartphone use was linked to poor fitness in college students. Try using fitness applications for good, not bad. See: www.dietdetective.com/weekly-column/diet-detective-iphone-apps-you-can-use-your-health

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News Headline: Kent State Zombie Outbreak Course (Staley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Matt Hartong
News OCR Text: Area universities will be getting back into the swing of things next week with the start of the fall semester.

It's back to home work, studying for tests, and preparing for a zombie apocalypse?

"The title of it is zombie outbreak, but the underlying foundation of the course is introducing students to the public health emergency response system" says Kent State Professor John Staley.

The "zombie outbreak" obviously being a hypothetical situation.

The course aims to prepare students for events that would effect public health ranging from salmonella outbreaks to natural disasters.

The course also asks an interesting question, "What would really happen if you had to bring everyone to the table? Public health, Law enforcement , Fire, EMS, Health Department" says Staley.

The popular cable show "The Walking Dead" and recent movies such as "World War Z," along with other zombie pop-culture references capture the attention of students and also begs the question, what do you need in case of an emergency?

Staley says "Having students play actual roles in a response. They might play the mayor, or councilmen, or the fire chief or the police chief , and then we bring in people in those actual roles. Then see what the students did, and then offer in-site into how it would play out."

Staley commented on the feed back from students, saying "We've had a lot of really good feed back. We offered the course for the first time in the spring, and we've had fabulous feed back."

You can find more on the web at Kent.edu.

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News Headline: Going Places: Aug. 26-30, 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: Center for Corporate and Professional Development — Amy Lane to associate vice president, corporate and professional development and Corianne Kocarek to program manager.


AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION: Mary Ann Parris Stephens (Kent State University) received the 2013 Developmental Health Award given by the Aging and Health Committee.

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News Headline: KENT STATE EXECUTIVE CHEFS SPICE UP CULINARY KNOWLEDGE WITH VISIT TO THE CHEF'S GARDEN (Goehler, Roldan) | Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Aug.23 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University students returning for the Fall 2013 Semester can expect more variety at the university's dining centers.To expand their knowledge about fruits, herbs and seasonal vegetables, executive chefs from Kent State visited the Culinary Vegetable Institute of the Chef's Garden in Milan, Ohio, where they had a culinary retreat.

The Culinary Vegetable Institute provides the world's most innovative chefs with a place to share knowledge, experiment and discover techniques for growing and preparing flavorful varieties of vegetables.

John Goehler, senior associate director for Kent State's Dining Services, said the visit to the Chef's Garden was informative and helped the Kent State team learn more about different herbs.He added the chefs will now create a weekly chef's special at all the dining centers on the Kent Campus.

"One of the main focuses at the Chef's Garden was using seasonal vegetables to fill the plate, and offering a smaller protein portion as the center of the plate," said Richard Roldan, director of Kent State's Dining Services."Being in Ohio offers seasonal limitations in what's available to us, but we are learning how to better make use of produce that is in season, and make it the star of the plate not the supporting role."

Roldan said the chefs all walked away with an understanding that menus will be adjusted and developed based on what is available and in season.

"We had an opportunity to walk the beautiful herb gardens and taste the different variety of herbs available," Roldan said."Some of those herbs included different varieties of mint, including pineapple mint, chocolate mint and more."

During their visit, the university chefs participated in an herb garden scavenger hunt, where they were given a description of an herb, and were required to go into the garden and harvest them.The group also participated in a team-building exercise where a blindfolded chef was instructed and guided through the steps for making salsa with help from teammates.

The Chef's Garden practices sustainable agricultural methods and safe growing processes that protect the land and consumers.The Chef's Garden delivers healthy produce direct from the farm to chefs and consumers, and serves several local, regional and national clients.

For more information about Kent State's Dining Services, visit www.kent.edu/studentlife/dining.

For more information about the Chef's Garden, visit www.chefs-garden.com.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: VIDEO: Record enrollment at KSU spells campus housing crunch (Mansfield | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Record enrollment at Kent State University this year means the school has more students than available dorm rooms.

Kent State had so many students applying, it had to close enrollment for freshman in June. Even so, it has about 76 kids living in temporary housing. Still, those students won't be staying permanantly.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://news.vocus.com/ct?haid=954a900542e410bc1377484625681e6f46eb38ef64a67&co=f000000013080s-1112359307

Channel 3's Will Ujek reports with more on this housing problem in the video above.

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News Headline: Students return to Kent State University (Garcia; Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Discover Downtown event to help welcome largest, brightest freshman class on record

As Kent State University students wrap up their campus move-ins this weekend, local restaurants and retailers will be ready to show off their goods and services downtown.

Today, the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce and Central Portage County Visitors and Convention Bureau, in collaboration with KSU's Office of Student Success Program, is hosting the annual Discover Downtown event where businesses throughout the city set up tables, tents and booths down Main Street to give the new students a taste of what Kent has to offer.

READ RELATED COVERAGE: Kent State University reaches capacity for freshman enrollment this fall

Chamber Executive Director Lori Wemhoff said downtown businesses are encouraged to participate and take advantage of the target audience being brought to their front doors.

Trolley Tours of Cleveland's Lolly the Trolley will shuttle students downtown from campus via East Erie Street between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., dropping them off at the corner of Water and Main streets.

"Every year Discover Downtown gets bigger and better," said Michelle Hartman, chamber board president. "The feedback we get from the businesses on how great it is to have the students brought downtown to see what's available to them has been extraordinary."

Following tradition, sponsors will be giving away free hot dogs, chips and bottles of water donated by ACME Fresh Market #7. Wemhoff said nearly 800 hot dogs and other snacks along with 45 cases worth of water were handed out last year.

With a maximum freshman enrollment around 4,200 settling at KSU this weekend, the event has potential to be one of the largest yet.

KSU hit capacity for the first-year students in June.

T. David Garcia, Kent State's associate vice president for enrollment management, said earlier this summer the news reflects a slew of firsts for KSU.

The 4,200 freshmen expected for fall 2013 is about 200 more than were accepted in fall 2012.

Applications for freshman enrollment at the Kent campus this fall were at the "highest ever recorded" with about 22,000 received, Garcia said, which is about 900 more than were received last fall.

This fall's freshman class is also the brightest on record.

The incoming group brings a cumulative 3.3 grade-point average, with nearly 75 percent having at least a 3.0. Those figures are also record highs, Garcia said, and "new territory" for the university.

KSU set a record for student enrollment in 2012 after logging 42,513 students throughout its eight-campus system, with more than 27,000 of those at the main Kent campus alone. Those numbers secured KSU's standing as the second-largest public university in the state behind The Ohio State University.

KSU spokesman Eric Mansfield said it's too soon to determine if the school might break total enrollment records again as those numbers aren't officially tallied until the 15th day of class.

"We're energized to see our students return for the fall semester both because of the academic success they bring to the classroom and also because their college experience this year includes exciting changes to our campus, including the opening of the Esplanade, and the continued development of downtown," Mansfield said. "We believe Kent is the America's next great college town, and this year's returning and incoming students will create a unique and positive community on and around our great campus."

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News Headline: Channel 3 News at 4:30am | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Channel 3 News at Sunrise - WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: this semester... Experts say now is the time to review how you might pay to educate any other college-bound kids. The cost of college is something even president obama is complaining about this month. Debt averages close to 35- thousand dollars per graduate. Experts suggest parents start re-thinking how they plan to save.... And consider a 529 savings plan. A 529 plan is an investment account that earns tax-free money that can be spent on a wide variety of college expenses.....which, by the way, have increased 250- percent in the last 30 years. (sot/ keith bernhardt / vp college planning, fidelity investments :40 - :43)"come up with a disciplined approach for getting money into a savings account or a 529 plan" "61% of parents that answered our survey say they do have a saving for college" researchers at fidelity investments think parents are actually better now... Than in years past at socking away for their children's higher education record enrollment at Kent State University this year means the school has more students than dorm rooms.the university had to close enrollment for freshman in june, but it still has about 76 kids living in temporary housing.the school has converted several lounges -- giving students all the same furniture as a normal dorm room.school officials say this has happened for a couple years. In: 23:13:01 we're convenient as we can and as temporary as we can. A little more than 70 students, and every day a few more of them will move into residence halls as some of them don't show up or decide they don't want to live on campus. Out: 23:13:13 3 kids using temporary housing have already moved into permanent rooms. Typically, all of them will be moved within 2 weeks.

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News Headline: Gee's successor search comes to Wooster | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Ohio State University will bring its search for a new president to Wooster on Monday.

The university will hold an open forum from 4 to 5 p.m. at the adjoining OSU properties, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center and Agricultural Technical Institute. The meeting on the OSU search will be in the Fisher Auditorium at 1680 Madison Ave.

The OSU branch campuses are among a dozen sites statewide at which the advisory subcommittee will meet through Sept. 16.

“Clearly, we want to get input from alumni and other constituents,” OSU spokesman Gary Lewis said. “We want to give people in local communities a chance to share their thoughts.”

That input could be a long time in coming — the average national presidential search takes up to 300 days, he said. The OSU search comes as three other local higher education institutions are ramping up their respective quests for a new president.

Gordon Gee stepped down from OSU's top job in June to take a year-long sabbatical and then teach at OSU.

The university has hired R. William Funk and Associates of Dallas to conduct the search for Gee's replacement. Neither the contract nor the size of the award has been finalized, OSU spokeswoman Amy Murray-Goedde said.

The university also will hold a symposium on the college presidency on Friday at the Ohio Union in Columbus. Five current and former presidents from around the country will outline their thoughts about the job.

Meanwhile, at the University of Akron, trustees will meet Sept. 16 to outline the steps they will take to replace Luis Proenza, who will step down in July for a year-long paid sabbatical and then teach at UA.

Kent State has set up a web site at www.kent.edu/president/presidentialsearch on its search to replace Lester Lefton, who also will retire in July and take a year-long paid sabbatical. KSU has hired Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates of Los Angeles and Philadelphia to conduct its search.

In addition, small, private Hiram College in northeastern Portage County is looking to replace Tom Chema, who will step down after the current academic year.

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News Headline: Cleveland State University campus-wide tobacco ban is now in effect (poll) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - Anyone who lights up a cigarette outside a building at Cleveland State University today will be told politely and firmly to snuff out their butt because the entire campus is tobacco-free.

"Boo," said a man holding a cigarette in his car at a traffic light at Euclid Avenue and East 22nd Street Friday as Lisa Sandor, health and well being administrator, pushed in a sign that said "CSU is tobacco free."

About 100 signs have been planted in grass throughout the 85-acre downtown campus. Buildings have banners and window stickers and outdoor cigarette receptacles have been removed.

A few classes began Saturday but fall semester begins today for the majority of students.

CSU likely is the first large public university in the state to prohibit all tobacco products, including chewing tobacco, on university property and in personal vehicles.

Many colleges in Ohio banned smoking in buildings even before a state law went into effect in 2007 that restricts smoking inside most public places and workplaces. But people have been allowed to smoke outdoors.

Officials at nearly all institutions are discussing or have taken action to ban tobacco throughout their campuses to avoid the wrath of the Ohio Board of Regents, which unanimously approved a resolution in July, 2012 asking trustees at two- and four-year campuses to prohibit all tobacco products. Each college?s board of trustees has to create and adopt a policy on tobacco use. They differ on nearly every campus.

Ohio State University will become tobacco free on January 1. Miami University, which had banned smoking on campus prior to the regent?s vote, became tobacco free August 1, but will allow people to smoke in their personal vehicles until January 1.

The University of Toledo bans all tobacco products but allows their use in seven huts around campus and in personal vehicles. Bowling Green State University will become smoke-free on January 1 but will have smoking areas in designated parking lots. Central State University became smoke free last November.

Several private colleges in the state have smoke-free campuses.

A Kent State University committee, which formed last November, recently concluded its study on tobacco use on campus and submitted a report to administrators, a spokesman said. But the University of Akron has not studied the issue.

Medical facilities at public universities previously banned tobacco on their grounds. The Northeast Ohio Medical University in Portage County banned all tobacco use on its campus last November.

There have been no problems with students and faculty although a few off-campus visitors needed to be informed of the policy, said a NEOMED spokeswoman.

Nearly 1,200 colleges nationwide have gone tobacco or smoke-free as concerns are raised about the detrimental effects of tobacco on the health of employees and students, according to the American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation.

Exceptions at most campuses include tobacco use for research, clinical or religious ceremonial purposes, with prior approval.

CSU, like other colleges, will provide smoking cessation programs for faculty, staff and students. An estimated 4,400 CSU students ? or 25 percent ? and 300 faculty and staff smoke, officials have said.

CSU trustees and officials said one of the biggest challenges will be enforcing a ban on its sprawling urban campus with no definitive border. People can be on or off campus within a few steps at many locations, including near PlayhouseSquare.

Businesses on the south side of Euclid Avenue will be given placards to post that say they support the tobacco-free policy in an effort to keep students and faculty from smoking outside their doors, said Gerry Modjeski, director of employee benefits and wellness.

But that's where one female employee she plans to go.

The woman, who did not want to give her name, was smoking at a table outside the student center Friday. She admitted she needs to quit but until then will cross Euclid Avenue to light up.

Institutions with tobacco or smoking bans do not strong-arm those who light up. But they do say those who continually violate the rules could be subject to the university?s standard disciplinary procedures.

At CSU it is expected that fellow students and faculty will politely ask those who light up to put out their cigarettes, said spokesman Joe Mosbrook. ?We will ask people to respect the rules,? he said. ?We don?t expect there will be strong enforcement.?

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News Headline: Exposing too much online can have consequences (Moore, Goodman) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: KUSA-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT - Ivory Byrd is starting his freshman year at Kent State University. He's well aware of the dangers of pictures and social media. That's why he turns off the GPS function on his camera phone.

"Bad people can find you," Ivory says.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://www.9news.com/money/351677/344/Exposing-too-much-online-can-have-consequences

Kent State journalism professor and social media expert Stefanie Moore says the metadata on pictures can help strangers find you. There are even websites that help lead the way.

"People are actually checking into their homes which is disturbing to me letting anyone know where you live, so I think we have to be a little more cautious about what we're sharing online," Moore says.

And young people are sharing way too much intimate information.

"Sexting is an everyday occurance. Everyone does it," Ivory says.

But when those relationships fail or the couple fights, those pictures often become public on websites that cater to revenge.

"I can't even count on both my hands how many times I've seen naked pictures on Twitter of people that have just broken up or gotten in fights," Ivory says.

And options for removal are limited.

"Legally if these photos were taken with the understanding that they would not be shared with anyone else she probably does have the ability to bring an invasion of privacy claim,"

But it won't stop the pictures from being public and forever circulated on the internet. And the website is usually protected, too.

Bottom line: Those private pictures may last a lot longer than the relationship.

"If you take naked pictures you run the risk of them getting out," Ivory says.

Copyright ©2013 wkyc-tv, Inc.. All rights reserved.

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News Headline: News21 Students Investigate Plight of Veterans | Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: PR Newswire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PHOENIX, Aug. 25, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multi-university reporting initiative, today released a major national investigation into the enduring battles facing post-9/11 veterans.

In dozens of stories, videos, photos and interactives, the multimedia project documents the experience of veterans as they negotiate a federal bureaucracy that is often overwhelmed and ill-equipped to deal with them. The students analyzed suicide rates among veterans and the problems facing female veterans. They also investigated the records of charities that raise money for veterans' causes and examined inefficiencies in government programs to process disability payments, improve tracking of health care records and bolster veteran businesses.

Major media partners expected to publish parts of the project include The Washington Post, nbcnews.com, Center for Public Integrity, Scripps Howard News Service, Digital First Media, The Philadelphia Inquirer and a number of nonprofit online news sites affiliated with the Investigative News Network.

The was produced by 24 students from 12 universities working under the direction of a team of editors led by Jacquee Petchel, executive editor of News21 at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

The work began in January with a video-conferenced seminar on post-9/11 veterans taught by Leonard Downie Jr., former executive editor of The Washington Post and Weil Family Professor of Journalism at the Cronkite School. The students heard from multiple experts, conducted interviews and did extensive research on the country's response to returning veterans and the challenges ahead.

Starting in May, they participated in an intensive 10-week investigative reporting fellowship based out of a newsroom at the Cronkite School in downtown Phoenix. The fellows traveled to more than 60 cities and 20 states, conducted hundreds of interviews and reviewed thousands of public records and government reports. Their most ambitious effort was to gather, organize and analyze all reported veterans suicides from health records in every state in the nation. Not even the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has completed such an exhaustive analysis.

Downie said student reporters produced "a wealth of stories and innovative multimedia that greatly add to Americans' understanding of the challenges facing the nearly 2 million young post-9/11 veterans returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan. Evocative stories, photographs and video bring these veterans to life for the great majority of people who have had little connection to the two long-running wars. And original investigative reporting, with illustrative interactive databases and graphics, holds government agencies and private organizations accountable for their obligations to the veterans."

News21 is supported by grants from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The work of individual students was supported by the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, the Hearst Foundations, the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, the Peter Kiewit Foundation and Women & Philanthropy, part of the ASU Foundation.

The program is designed to give students experience producing in-depth news coverage on critical issues facing the nation, using innovative digital methods to distribute the content on multiple platforms. Previous projects have included investigations into voting rights, food safety and transportation safety in America.

Last year's voting rights project received national attention for revealing only 10 documented cases of voter impersonation in the U.S. since 2000. The results were widely cited across the country and published in news outlets that included The Washington Post, nbcnews.com and National Public Radio. The project has been recognized with multiple awards, including the National Association of Black Journalists' award for top online news project of the year, an EPPY Award for best university investigative or documentary report from Editor & Publisher magazine and a special First Amendment Award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

The veterans' project is the first under the direction of Petchel, who took over as News21 executive editor this year after a long career heading investigations for newspapers and television stations around the country.

"Where else in America could a group of 24 budding journalists come together for 10 weeks and produce a project of this magnitude?" she said. "It was a phenomenal endeavor that resulted in enterprising investigative stories and innovative multimedia elements that any editor would be proud to have supervised. Luckily for me, I was that editor. To the naysayers of the future of journalism, I say, 'If 24 exceptional students can do this, so can we all.'"

Chase Cook, a News21 Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation fellow and recent graduate of the University of Oklahoma, said, "Joining the News 21 project was the best decision of my young career. I firmly believe the product will change the lives of veterans and inform the world of the struggles and triumphs of America's post 9/11 veterans. This project reinforced my belief that good investigative journalism is an investment (that is) desperately needed."

Fellows for the 2013 project came from 12 universities: ASU, Central Michigan University, Florida International University, University of Florida, Kent State University, University of Maryland, University of Minnesota, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, University of Oklahoma, University of Oregon and University of Texas.

Individual students are funded by their universities and by several foundations. This year's Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation fellows were ASU students Peter Haden, Rachel Leingang and Mauro Whiteman and University of Oklahoma students Bonnie Campo, Chase Cook and Kelsey Hightower.

Hearst Foundations fellows were ASU students Andrew Knochel and Jacob Stein, and the Reynolds business journalism fellow, who reported on veterans' economic issues, was ASU student Chad Garland. Women & Philanthropy fellows, who specifically reported on issues related to women veterans, were ASU students Caitlin Cruz and Mary Shinn.

The Peter Kiewit Foundation of Omaha, Neb., provided funding for University of Nebraska fellows Ashley Anchan and Riley Johnson.

A full list of the 2013 News21 fellows follows:• Arizona State University: Caitlin Cruz, Chad Garland, Peter Haden, Andrew Knochel, Rachel Leingang, Mary Shinn, Jacob Stein and Mauro Whiteman• Central Michigan University: Catey Traylor• Florida International University: Anthony Cave• University of Florida: Meg Wagner and Hannah Winston• Kent State University: Daniel Moore• University of Maryland: Greg Kohn and Jessica Wilde• University of Minnesota: Jeff Hargarten• University of Missouri: Steven Rich• University of Nebraska: Ashley Anchan and Riley Johnson• University of Oklahoma: Bonnie Campo, Chase Cook and Kelsey Hightower• University of Oregon: Colton Totland• University of Texas: Forrest Burnson

Copyright © 2013 PR Newswire

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News Headline: Ohio awards $10.5M to improve transportation | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: San Francisco Chronicle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Department of Transportation has awarded $10.5 million in grants to help fund projects aimed at improving mobility and restoring historic transportation facilities in some local communities.

The grants announced last week will be used to help communities finance projects for non-motorized transportation such as bikes and for recreational facilities. A total of 20 projects will receive money from the grants.

Nearly $800,000 of the grant money will be used for a safe pedestrian route connecting Kent State University's east and west campuses to businesses in northeast Ohio's East Liverpool.

More than $285,000 will be used to rehabilitate the Mull Covered Bridge in Sandusky in northern Ohio.

The state agency says it worked with various organizations in local communities to find projects in need of additional funding.

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News Headline: Champaign County project receives $780k grant to improve transportation | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Bellefontaine Examiner - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS (AP) — The Ohio Department of Transportation has awarded $10.5 million in grants to help fund projects aimed at improving mobility and restoring historic transportation facilities in some local communities.

The grants announced last week will be used to help communities finance projects for non-motorized transportation such as bikes and for recreational facilities. A total of 20 projects will receive money from the grants.

The city of Urbana was awarded $780,515 to install new sidewalks to improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities along U.S. Route 36 in Champaign County.

Nearly $800,000 of the grant money will be used for a safe pedestrian route connecting Kent State University's east and west campuses to businesses in northeast Ohio's East Liverpool.

More than $285,000 will be used to rehabilitate the Mull Covered Bridge in Sandusky in northern Ohio.

The state agency says it worked with various organizations in local communities to find projects in need of additional funding.

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News Headline: 21 News 6 P.M. | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Kent State in East Liverpool will be getting a new walk way taking them to businesses in the city's downtown. The Ohio Department of Transportation awarded 800 thousand dollars for the safe pedestrian route. That grant money is part of a total 10.5 million dollars awarded across the state to finance projects for non- motorized transportation such as bikes and recreational buildings.

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News Headline: Ohio awards $10.5M to improve transportation | Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Associated Press (AP)
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Department of Transportation has awarded $10.5 million in grants to help fund projects aimed at improving mobility and restoring historic transportation facilities in some local communities.

The grants announced last week will be used to help communities finance projects for non-motorized transportation such as bikes and for recreational facilities. A total of 20 projects will receive money from the grants.

Nearly $800,000 of the grant money will be used for a safe pedestrian route connecting Kent State University's east and west campuses to businesses in northeast Ohio's East Liverpool.

More than $285,000 will be used to rehabilitate the Mull Covered Bridge in Sandusky in northern Ohio.

The state agency says it worked with various organizations in local communities to find projects in need of additional funding.

Copyright © 2013 AP

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News Headline: KSU Stark announces 2013–14 Featured Speakers Series | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark has announced the 23rd season of its Featured Speakers Series, highlighting four inspirational and world-renowned individuals.

Each season, nearly 2,500 campus and community members take advantage of an opportunity to be introduced to national and international experts on a wide range of topics.

Speakers include innovative educator John Hunter, legendary tennis champion Billie Jean King, best-selling author Jodi Picoult and art preservationist Robert Edsel. Programs begin at 7:30 p.m. in The University Center's Timken Great Hall, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

All lectures are free and open to the public, but tickets are required. Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, at 8 a.m. on a specific date. No phone reservations will be taken. Tickets will be limited to four per person. The University Center will open at 6:45 p.m. prior to each event.

Speakers include:

• John Hunter, a teacher, musician and filmmaker and inventor of the World Peace Game, will speak Oct. 8 about his documentary “World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements.”  Tickets are available Sept. 16.

• Tennis champion and activist Billie Jean King will present Pressure is a Privilege and Other Lessons in Business and Life on Nov. 12. Tickets will be available Oct. 21.

• Best-selling author Jodi Picoult will present The Facts Behind the Fiction on Feb. 25. Tickets will be available Feb. 3.

• Author and philanthropist Robert Edsel's presentation of Monuments Men is April 7. Tickets for Edsel will be available March 17.

For more information, visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/events/featuredspeakers.

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News Headline: The Big 3, Together Again Concert Aug 31 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA
Kent State University at Tuscarawas will host "The Big 3, Together Again" concert at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 31 at the Performing Arts Center at 330 University Drive NE. The concert will feature performances by gospel artist Larnelle Harris, vocalist Sandi Patty and pianist Dino. Producer and conductor Thurlow Spurr will direct a local mass choir to accompany the performers. Local singers may sign up to join the choir. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $24, $32 and $59 for reserved seating options. For more information, to sign up for the choir or to purchase tickets, call 866-848-7569 or visit www.thurlowspurr.com.

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News Headline: No plane crash Friday in Phila | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Lee Morrison
News OCR Text: A report of a plane crash in New Philadelphia on Friday night proved to be unfounded.

Police received reports that people saw a plane flying low over the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia at about 7:30 p.m.

Emergency radio scanner traffic mentioned the Performing Arts Center, and that emergency personnel were dispatched.

However, police said that the plane landed safely at nearby Harry Clever Field.

Firefighters were called off en route. However, Fire Capt. Jim Sholtz said he went to the campus and talked to the people who reported it.

“They were going to the show and saw the plane, which they thought was flying abnormally low and that the wing appeared to wobble just a little bit,” Sholtz said. “I just wanted to confirm that it was the same plane that actually landed safely.”

The comedy “Parents Night Out” was presented at the Performing Arts Center, with a 7:30 p.m. starting time.

Box Office Manager Tom Flood said that the report didn't disturb the performance.

“I only heard about it,” he said. “I'd be surprised if many people in the building were even aware of it.”

Reach Lee at 330-364-8402 or lee.morrison@timesreporter.com

On Twitter: @lmorrisonTR

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News Headline: Bruised Egypt Brotherhood seeks to show street power (Stacher) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kuwait Times
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CAIRO: Egyptian troops and police stood ready in Cairo to foil Muslim Brotherhood plans for “Friday of Martyrs” protests against the army's bloody crackdown on followers of ousted President Mohamed Morsi yesterday. The Brotherhood, hounded by Egypt's new army-backed rulers, has called for marches from 28 mosques after midday prayers in Cairo, testing the resilience of its battered support base.

Security precautions appeared relatively low-key, even near the Fateh mosque in the heart of the capital where gun battles raged last Friday and Saturday, killing scores of people. The mosque's metal gates and big front door were locked and chained. A doorman said prayers had been cancelled. Two armored personnel carriers were parked down the street, where people shopped at a bustling market.

Egypt has endured the bloodiest civil unrest in its modern history since Aug 14 when police destroyed protest camps set up by Morsi's supporters in Cairo to demand the reinstatement of the Islamist president, who was deposed by the army on July 3 after huge demonstrations against his first year's rule. Only one riot police truck was parked near the Rabaa Al-Adawiya square in northeastern Cairo, home to the Brotherhood's biggest protest vigil until police and troops stormed in, killing hundreds of people, bulldozing barricades and burning tents.

The mosque there was closed for repairs. Workmen in blue overalls stood on scaffolding as they covered its charred walls with white paint. Children scavenged through piles of garbage. Troops used barbed wire to block off a thoroughfare leading to Nahda Square, the site of the smaller of the two Brotherhood sit-ins. Traffic moved freely around the huge Nour mosque in the Abbaseya neighborhood. There were no armored vehicles or barbed wire, but Friday prayers there had also been cancelled.

The authorities declared a month-long state of emergency last week and they enforce a nightly curfew. The state news agency said the armed forces had strengthened their presence around the presidential palace and the defense ministry. The Muslim Brotherhood, which won five successive votes held in Egypt after the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in 2011, is reeling from a week of bloodshed and the arrest of many of its leaders in what the authorities call a battle with terrorism.

In a symbolic victory for the army-dominated old order, Hosni Mubarak, the ex-military former president who ruled Egypt with an iron fist for 30 years before a popular uprising toppled him in 2011, was freed from jail on Thursday. His successor Mursi, Egypt's first freely elected president, remains behind bars. The Brotherhood's “General Guide” Mohamed Badie, who was arrested on Tuesday, is due to go on trial tomorrow along with his two deputies, Khairat Al-Shater and Saad Al-Katatni, on charges that include incitement to violence.

REMAIN STEADFAST
At least 900 people, including about 100 soldiers and police, have been killed in violence across Egypt since Aug. 14, officials say. Brotherhood supporters say the toll is higher. The Brotherhood, founded in 1928, could once mobilize vast crowds, drawing on the same organizational strength it wielded at the ballot box, but its protests have dwindled this week in the face of the security crackdown.

“We will remain steadfast on the road to defeating the military coup,” the pro-Morsi National Coalition to Support Legitimacy and Reject the Coup said in a statement. Graffiti on a mosque wall in central Cairo illustrated the deep divisions that have emerged since army chief Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi ousted Morsi. The spraypainted message “yes to Sisi” had been crossed out and painted over with the word “traitor.” Slogans elsewhere read “Morsi is a spy” and “Morsi out”. Someone had also written “Freedom, Justice, Brotherhood.”

The Brotherhood survived for generations as an underground movement before emerging as Egypt's best-drilled political force after Mubarak fell. But its popularity waned during Morsi's year in office when critics accused it of accumulating power, pushing an Islamist agenda and mismanaging the economy. The Brotherhood, which Egypt's new army-backed rulers have threatened to dissolve, says Morsi's government was deliberately undermined by unreconstructed Mubarak-era institutions.

Mubarak, 85, still faces retrial on charges of complicity in the killings of protesters, but he left jail on Thursday for the first time since April 2011 and was flown by helicopter to a plush military hospital in the southern Cairo suburb of Maadi. The authorities have used the state of emergency to keep him under house arrest, apparently to minimize the risk of popular anger if he had been given unfettered freedom. Local newspapers on Yesterday focused on the latest arrest of Brotherhood leaders, giving scant coverage to the former strongman's exit from jail.

“Mubarak will never be an important political player, but symbolically it's a victory dance by the reconstituted old state,” Joshua Stacher, an Egypt expert at Kent State University in the United States, said of the former leader's release. Adding to a sense among some activists that the freedoms won in the 2011 revolt are in danger, planned amendments to the constitution leaked to the media this week appear designed to place limits on political parties and ease restrictions on the participation of Mubarak-era officials in politics.- Reuters

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News Headline: 5 Things About Classes Resuming at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Classes start for the fall 2013 semester today at .Whether you're a new student or a longtime townie there are a few tricks below you might find helpful for navigating the first day of fall classes—often the busiest day of the year on campus.

Traffic—Avoid Summit Street if you can all day Monday. If you can't, at least try to avoid it during peak rush hours in the morning and afternoon.
Pedestrian Safety—With thousands of students descending on campus today there's going to be a huge number of people walking around town. So if you're driving around, particularly around lunch time, take it slow and keep your eyes open for kids running across the street at random.
Student Survival Guide—The Daily Kent Stater publishes an annual College Survival Guide, which you can .
Parking—Whether on campus or around town there's bound to be an absence of available parking spaces. Park in the new and ride a bus around campus or use your bicycle to help you avoid getting stuck in traffic.
Lunch—The majority of downtown Kent's eateries are bound to be swamped for lunch time Monday. If you want to eat at your favorite spot plan on taking an early or late lunch. Trying to eat at noon means you probably won't get your food until 1p.m.

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News Headline: Kent State Student Raising Awareness After Impostor Steals Social Media Photos | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Jasen Sokol
News OCR Text: This social media profile was created using Allyssa Griffiths' stolen photos. The man in the photo is a friend, not her brother. Screenshot courtesy Allyssa Griffiths

Imagine finding out that someone that someone had written the same things on social media as you. Imagine that person took your pictures, developed new context for them, and posted them as their own.

That's what happened to Kent State student Allyssa Griffiths.

When she started using social media, she heeded all of the normal warnings given at the time about keeping personal information private.

“I was very cautious about telling people my information,” Griffiths said. “But I never considered my pictures to be some kind of a use to somebody else.”

All that changed as Griffiths was getting ready for her first round of final exams during her freshman year in 2011. She clicked on a hashtag she used in a tweet and found that an account with the name “Lauren Ashley Cook” had not only reposted the exact same tweet, but used Griffith's picture as its profile picture.

“I thought maybe my Twitter had a bug or I duplicated my account somehow,” Griffiths said. “A lot of the tweets were the exact same tweets that I had posted.”

But it was no mistake. Not only had “Lauren” duplicated Griffiths' social media accounts, but those of Griffiths' friends as well. The impostor also placed some of the photos out of context, including writing that a picture of Griffiths and a friend was of “Lauren” and her brother who had died. Griffiths discovered that “Lauren” had been taking her social media content since 2007, when she was just 14 years old.

Catfishing

“Lauren” was also using the pictures to lure men into online relationships. She eventually began communicating with a man named Mike. He didn't know it at the time, but Mike had fallen victim to catfishing.

The practice takes its name from the documentary film “Catfish” which eventually spawned a series on MTV. It is defined on the show as “to pretend to be someone you're not online by posting false information, such as someone else's pictures, on social media sites usually with the intention of getting someone to fall in love with you.”

Mike may never have found out he was being catfished unless Griffiths reached out to him.

“When I asked him about (“Lauren”), he started rattling off facts about her,” Griffiths said. “But they were all about me.”

Mike initially thought that Griffiths, rather than “Lauren,” was fake. Once Mike learned the truth, Griffiths found out that Mike had been talking to “Lauren” for about a year. They even said they loved each other.

“He was so hurt by it,” Griffiths said of Mike's reaction.

A Chance Meeting

Griffiths met Mike earlier this summer during a vacation to the Jersey Shore. Their meeting wasn't planned, but their paths crossed while they were walking on the boardwalk.

“We passed each other and I said hi,” Griffiths said. “He was in complete shock.”

The two talked for about 45 minutes, during which time Griffiths showed Mike the real profiles of many of her friends who had their pictures stolen by “Lauren.”

“He kept saying ‘this is so weird because I feel like I know all of you but I don't'” Griffiths said.

She does not expect to ever see Mike again.

“There's Nothing That Can Be Done”

In June 2011, Allyssa Griffiths received a string of disturbing, sexually-oriented text messages from a number she had never seen before. After she warned the person that she would call the police if the texts continued, they stopped. But Griffiths held onto the number in case it ever happened again.

After talking to Mike, she asked for the phone number “Lauren” was using to contact him. When she put the number into her phone, she discovered the number was the same one from which she received the inappropriate texts.

Griffiths decided it was time to go to the police. But when she did, she found that the law couldn't help her..

“You allowed someone access to your pictures, it's not illegal for them to take them,” Griffiths said of what she was told. “Unless they threaten you or they're using your name, there's nothing that can be done.”

There are several states in which instances of catfishing may be punishable under the law. Ohio is not one of them. The identity theft laws in Ohio deal only with instances where personal information such as social security numbers or credit card numbers are taken. And because “Lauren” stopped sending suggestive texts once Griffiths asked for them to stop, Ohio's telecommunications harassment law was not broken, either.

Not A Victim

While the law may not be able to help her, Griffiths is using the very social media sites she had her photos stolen from to build awareness. She's launched a Facebook page called “Raise Internet Stalking Awareness” to help prevent what happened to her from happening to anyone else. She also shared her story with the website HerCampus.

Griffiths made it clear that she does not want to be seen as a victim.

“If one person can make a difference in their life in how they use social media, then I feel like this whole experience wasn't a waste.”

As for “Lauren,” she continues to post Griffiths' pictures as her own. But Griffiths doesn't hold ill will toward her.

“I want to apologize for whatever they've gone through in their life,” she said. “I tried giving her my advice. Just be yourself, I'm

sure you're a great person.”

Protecting Your Social Media Content

Griffiths' Facebook page is emblazoned with the mantra “social media isn't the problem, how people use it is.” A recent Pew Research Center study backs up that statement. According to the study, just nine percent of teenagers are very concerned about third parties accessing their social media content. Griffiths and others have made recommendations to help people avoid having their content taken.:

Know your settings. Most social networking sites have privacy settings that allow users to control what other people can see. Griffiths specifically pointed to a setting that allows users to remove their Facebook profiles from Google searches. Regardless of what social networks you use, become familiar with and utilize the privacy settings.

Be careful who you friend. Griffiths thinks her Facebook content was stolen after she friended the profile of a fake person with whom she had several mutual friends. If you don't know a person, do not add them. Go through your social media followers and remove those you do not know.

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News Headline: Kent Community Dinner celebrates the river, the park, the town | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The recent Kent Community Dinner was
a continuation of Kent's River Day Festivities
at Plum Creek Park in Kent.
Kent State University's Service Learning
Center provided students who helped
make the potluck possible.
Boy Scout Troop No. 253 served throughout
the evening potluck, and later made
and tended the fire that the dancers danced
around.
All Together Now, Inc. coordinated this
Kent Community Dinner.
The Native American Indian and Veterans
Center participated in the daytime
event with displays and native storytelling
as well as the evening events by providing
a short statement by Chief Cochise, displays,
the sale of native-made items, and a
talk on the river by president Jack Lyons.
Through the efforts of the Portage County
Historical Society's anthropologist, Dr.
Robert Kunst, and its president, Wayne
Enders, the community was given the
chance to see an authentic teepee and grass
loom, two items that are part of a prehistoric
village at the society in Ravenna.
Kent Floral made sure fresh flowers were
on the dinner tables. Christina Vaught arranged
the flowers.
Photojournalist Sam Verbuletz made sure
the events were documented for posterity.
Christie Anderson prepared all the beverages.
John and Nikki Haynes prepared and
grilled chicken.
Baked in the Village Cafe provided the
ceremonial bread.
Numerous volunteers helped as well.
During the meal, Jon Mosey and John
Reynolds, representing the Crooked River
Stompers, played guitar, mandolin, violin
and sang for the fourth year.
After the meal, the Celebration of Running
Water was organized by Victoria Humphreys,
president of KSU's Native American
Student Association. Humphreys coordinated
the dancers and the Fire River Singers,
a local Native American drumming and
singing group, to lead a drum circle in honor
of the Cuyahoga.

During the last official event of River Day, the Fire River Singers perform at the
Kent State University Native American Student Association Celebration of Running
Water, which followed the dinner. Some of their songs are not sung with lyrics but
use vocables, words without any real translation or meaning. This is to create a
sort of universal language to let anyone sing along without a language barrier.

Dave Shaffer, head singer of the Fire River Singers, explained the significance of
the drum circle. “The drum represents the heartbeat of the Earth,” said Shaffer. On
his left are 7-year-old Sadona Holm, wearing a traditional ribbon dress, and Victoria
Humphreys, president of the Native American Student Association.

In traditional regalia, 11-year-old Lucy Beck
dances to the music of the drum circle.

Victoria Humphreys, president of the Native American
Student Association, dances to the music performed
by the Fire River Singers drum circle.

Heike Seel, a German exchange student at KSU, and Muhammad Sohaib, a KSU
exchange student from Pakistan, attend their second Kent Community Dinner.

Nine-year-old Sheban Hamed plays Frisbee with a small group of friends as they
wait for dinner to be served.

Drew Wilson of Akron warmed a 13-sided moon drum
by the fire. The heat improves the quality of sound the
drum produces.

T.J. Catron, a KSU student, prepares to dance. Catron's
American Indian ancestry includes Iroquois, Cherokee
and Sioux.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Supporters wish luck to Miss Ohio at send-off | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Wells leaves soon for Miss America pageant

CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO: http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/article/20130825/NEWS01/308250036/?nclick_check=1

Miss Ohio Send-Off : Miss Ohio Heather Wells modeled some of the apparel she will wear at Miss America Scholarship Program in Atlantic City in September.

Miss Ohio 2013 Heather Wells models one of her dresses during her send off party at Westbrook Country Club on Sunday.

Miss Ohio 2013 Heather Wells receives a hug during her send-off party at Westbrook Country Club on Sunday.

M iss Ohio Heather Wells has been to the Atlantic City Boardwalk once before, when she was only 7 years old and competing in a dance competition.

On Labor Day, the dancer from Warren will head to Atlantic City, where she will compete in the Miss America Scholarship Program.

“I did my very own version of the Miss America toe dip and it was like May so the water was ice cold and it was really salty. I had never been to an ocean before,” Wells told media Sunday of her first experience in Atlantic City.

Miss Ohio’s Send-Off Celebration to Miss America is a tradition. Wells, 23, received a $10,000 scholarship from Newman Technology and other gifts and awards at Miss Ohio Scholarship Program in June. She is competing to win $50,000 at the Miss America program.

Several Miss Ohio contestants came to perform at her send-off at the Westbrook Country Club, including vocalists Meggie Wittman and Cayla Hellwarth.

Wells modeled some of her wardrobe she will wear at Miss America, including her welcome arrival dress, a black, gray and white form-fitting selection.

Wells minored in dance at Kent State University and this past June at Miss Ohio she changed her regular, upbeat, high-energy jazz dance routine to a more serious dance selection. She performed to Cece Winans’ song, “Alabaster Box.”

She said she has modified the dance for the big venue, adding a new costume. She said Catalina Swimwear provides the Miss America contestants with their swimsuits.

Wells is obtaining a master’s degree at Kent State University in nutrition. She intends on becoming a dietitian and working as a broadcast health correspondent.

Wells said she has been busy preparing for Miss America, watching TV news, keeping up on current events, working out for the swimsuit segment of the pageant and practicing her talent.

This month she traveled to Disney World in Florida with the other 52 Miss America contestants and said she had a blast.

She said she will be in Atlantic City for 13 days. The final night of competition is televised nationally on ABC on Sept. 15.

“Going into Miss Ohio this year I was just really relaxed and I was confident. I called myself ‘confidently calm,’ and I though if I can just replicate that for Miss America then I would have the same enjoyable experience that I did at Miss Ohio,” she said Sunday.

“Winning and competing, that’s just icing on the cake. These memories last forever and only one girl wins, so just enjoy it. I like to live in the moment,” Wells said.

Also during the afternoon send-off, Miss Ohio’s Outstanding Teen Olivia Thoroughman of Portsmouth told the crowd she won more than $100,000 in scholarships while competing at the national pageant in Orlando, Fla.

Roughly 80-plus well-wishers are expected to be in the audience from Ohio on the final night of the Miss America competition.

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News Headline: Downtown event welcomes KSU students to the city (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As Kent State University
students wrap up their
campus move-ins this weekend,
local restaurants and retailers
will be ready to show
off their goods and services
downtown.
Today, the Kent Area
Chamber of Commerce and
Central Portage County Visitors
and Convention Bureau,
in collaboration with
KSU's Office of Student
Success Program, is hosting
the annual Discover Downtown
event where businesses
throughout the city set
up tables, tents and booths
down Main Street to give the
new students a taste of what
Kent has to offer.
Chamber Executive Director
Lori Wemhoff said downtown
businesses are encouraged
to participate and take
advantage of the target audience
being brought to their
front doors.
Trolley Tours of Cleveland's
Lolly the Trolley will
shuttle students downtown
from campus via East Erie
Street between 11 a.m. and
2 p.m., dropping them off at
the corner of Water and Main
streets.
“Every year Discover
Downtown gets bigger and
better,” said Michelle Hartman,
chamber board president.
“The feedback we get
from the businesses on how
great it is to have the students
brought downtown
to see what's available to
them has been extraordinary.”
Following tradition,
sponsors will be giving
away free hot dogs, chips
and bottles of water donated
by ACME Fresh Market
#7. Wemhoff said nearly
800 hot dogs and other
snacks along with 45 cases
worth of water were handed
out last year.
With a maximum freshman
enrollment around
4,200 settling at KSU this
weekend, the event has
potential to be one of the
largest yet.
KSU hit capacity for the
first-year students in June.
T. David Garcia, Kent
State's associate vice president
for enrollment management,
said earlier this
summer the news reflects
a slew of firsts for KSU.
The 4,200 freshmen expected
for fall 2013 is about
200 more than were accepted
in fall 2012.
Applications for freshman
enrollment at the
Kent campus this fall
were at the “highest ever
recorded” with about
22,000 received, Garcia
said, which is about 900
more than were received
last fall.
This fall's freshman class
is also the brightest on record.
The incoming group
brings a cumulative 3.3
grade-point average, with
nearly 75 percent having
at least a 3.0. Those figures
are also record highs, Garcia
said, and “new territory”
for the university.
KSU set a record for student
enrollment in 2012
after logging 42,513 students
throughout its eightcampus
system, with more
than 27,000 of those at the
main Kent campus alone.
Those numbers secured
KSU's standing as the second-
largest public university
in the state behind
The Ohio State University.
KSU spokesman Eric
Mansfield said it's too soon
to determine if the school
might break total enrollment
records again as
those numbers aren't officially
tallied until the 15th
day of class.
“We're energized to see
our students return for the
fall semester both because
of the academic success
they bring to the classroom
and also because
their college experience
this year includes exciting
changes to our campus, including
the opening of the
Esplanade, and the continued
development of downtown,”
Mansfield said. “We
believe Kent is the America's
next great college
town, and this year's returning
and incoming students
will create a unique
and positive community
on and around our great
campus.”

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News Headline: VIDEO: Kent State University students Discover Downtown | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Diane Smith
News OCR Text: Thousands of Kent State University students came to downtown Kent by the trolley-load on Saturday, anxious to snap up menus, food and anything else downtown business owners were giving away for free.

Encouraged by bright, sunny weather, the students walked East Main Street to visit Discover Downtown, where business owners set up tables, tens and booth to show off their wares.

The event was sponsored by the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce and Central Portage County Visitors and Convention Bureau, in collaboration with KSU's Office of Student Success Program.

Lori Wemhoff, executive director of the chamber, said just before noon that the sixth trolley full of students had arrived, bringing a total of 1,000 students so far. The event, she said, was on track to exceed last year's turnout of 3,000, she said.

The trolley drivers and downtown greeters directed students to Erie Street so they could visit the businesses that weren't there last year, she said. Some Erie Street businesses, like UniversiTees and Carnaby Street Style, set up tables on Main Street to call more attention to their storefronts.

Chips and 50 cases of water given to students were donated by Acme Fresh Market in Kent, while hot dogs and granola bars were purchased at Walmart, using donations by the Visitors and Convention Bureau.

"You know college students, they love anything for free," Wemhoff said. "Hopefully this is going to be their home away from home for the next four years."

Mayor Jerry Fiala was among the volunteers at the chamber's booth giving away hot dogs.

"It's just wonderful to see the students coming in," he said. "This is their home for nine months out of the year."

Main Street Kent invited students to participate in a Savenger Hunt to win gift cards to local shops and restaurants. To enter, they needed to collect information from eight of the companies participating.

Freshman nursing students Amanda Battoliga of Rochester, New York and Destiny Walton of Columbus, said they appreciated getting the information from the downtown businesses, and planned to use the menus to bring food to their dorm rooms in the future.

Walton said she especially appreciated information on how to call the police if necessary.

"It was very informative," she said. "It's good to know all the things that are down here."

Emma Day, owner of Carnaby Street, said she was happy to see lots of new faces. She used the event to spread the word about her upcoming style show on Sept. 13.

"It's the perfect day for this," she said.

Marc Jacobson said he had handed out 300 slices of pizza in the first hour of the event, and could have handed out another 100 judging by the line and crowd when supplies ran temporarily low.

His business opened in January, and this was his first time participating in the event.

"It's a beautiful day for it," he said. "There's not just students here, but a lot of people from the community as well."

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News Headline: Historic house to move on Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Sally Burnell
News OCR Text: A group of Kent preservationists, Kent Wells-Sherman, Inc. bought a historic 1858 house from its owner, Kent State University, on Tuesday, August 20 for $1.00, using a Sacajawea dollar coin for the transaction. In early 2012, local Kent historians realized that the historic home stood in the way of the planned joint Kent/Kent State project, the “Esplanade”. Research into its provenance revealed that it was built in 1858 for Frances Kent Wells, daughter of Kent patriarch Zenas Kent and on land sold to George Wells by Marvin Kent, her brother and city namesake. Preservationists worked for over a year to save, purchase and move the house to new property and safety. The house will be moved in the early morning hours of Saturday, August 24th, starting at 7:00 a.m. on a 45 minute journey from where it has been stored for the past year on the west end of College Street to its new location at 247 North Water Street. It will pass the place where it was originally built, the NE corner of South Water and Erie Streets. The home was moved in 1924 to Erie Street to make room for a business building and now it will move again for the third and final time.

For more information, please contact Kent Wells-Sherman House Vice President, Roger Thurman, at 330-554-6909.

This story was provided by an individual or organization for use on the Ohio.com community site, http://www.ohio.com/upublish. We do not endorse and cannot guarantee the accuracy of this posting, though we do reject announcements with inappropriate content. You can read our full user agreement here.

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News Headline: Kent Wells Sherman House move delayed | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In ongoing lawsuit, structure's preservation group files motion to have attorney fees paid.

The relocation of the Kent Wells Sherman House from its temporary location on College Street to a lot on North Water Street has been delayed until further notice.

READ PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Moving date set for Kent Wells Sherman House

Kent Service Director Eugene Roberts said an issue with utilities at the 247 N. Water St. address caused the holdup.

The house was scheduled to be moved beginning at 7 a.m. today. Kent State University is footing the costs.

READ PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Court rules in favor of Kent Wells Sherman House relocation to North Water Street

Roberts said utility lines in the air need to be dropped temporarily so the house can be moved over them and onto its new lot.

However, there is a scheduling conflict with that work, Roberts said. A new move date and time has not been set. He said the soonest the move could happen would be the second weekend in September.

The Kent Wells Sherman House, which has been the subject of an eight-month legal battle, has been sitting for more than a year on College Avenue.

The house was slated for demolition by KSU as the university planned the expansion of its Esplanade, a walkway that runs through campus and connects to downtown.

Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. was formed to preserve the house, which was built in 1858 and has links to Kent patriarch Zenas Kent and Civil War-era surgeon Dr. Aaron Sherman. The university offered to pay for the relocation if the group could secure a new location, which was found in the North Water Street lot. KSU sold the house to the group for $1.

A lawsuit seeking to prevent the Kent Wells Sherman House from relocating to the lot on North Water Street was filed against the city and the Sherman House group by the citizen group Save the Standing Rock Garden, whose legal counsel is attorney John Plough. They argued the house would disturb the flora at the lot, prevent Standing Rock Cultural Art's use of the property and obscure the view of a mural on the north facing wall of Scribbles Coffee Co., among other claims.

In July, a Portage County Common Pleas Court magistrate ruled in favor of the move after finding the opposing group had no legitimate claim to the property.

On Aug. 15, attorney J. Michael Gatien, representing the Kent Wells Sherman House group, filed a motion requesting the Standing Roch group pay attorney fees.

"The law provides for recovery for cases that have no merit," Gatien said. "This case had absolutely no merit."

"They never had a legitimate claim to the property," he added. "This lawsuit should've never been brought."

Plough has 14 days to file a response to the claim. As of Friday, a response had not been filed.

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News Headline: Sherman Wells House | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >> A historic home and can't is on the kent is on the move this morning. Ath the kent wells sherman house is being moved from college avenue to north water streetrmol while it is not a long-distance the move which started at seven ians expected to take at least 45 l minutes at the home is linked to the city's founder and a civil war era doctor. Kent state university bought the home and 2011 and agreed to help move the home with the help of a group trying to save it. >>

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News Headline: How 'Teslanaires' made fortunes (Jivan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: San Jose Mercury News - Online
Contact Name: Dana Hulldhull
News OCR Text: In June of last year, Patrick Hop poured his life savings -- $30,000 -- into Tesla Motors (TSLA) stock, then trading at about $32 per share. When the stock hit $115 this July, he dumped all his shares and invested in options on Tesla stock, which are high-risk bets on the stock's future performance.

Now Hop, a 22-year-old senior from Millbrae studying applied math at UC Berkeley, estimates he's made about $250,000 -- at least on paper.

"I have a high risk tolerance, but I don't think the stock is that risky," he said.

Hop is far from alone in being David Wexler's Tesla Model S has a license plate that says "THX ELON," and is on display at the TESLIVE conference event at the Crowne Plaza San Jose Silicon Valley in Milpitas, Calif. on Saturday, July 13, 2013. (LiPo Ching /Bay Area News Group) ( LiPo Ching )bullish on Tesla, which has developed a cultlike following not seen since the early days of Apple (AAPL). The company's stock has skyrocketed nearly 300 percent this year thanks to a string of successes, from a rave review in Consumer Reports to better-than-expected sales of the all-electric Model S sedan and, this week, five-star safety ratings in federal crash tests. The Palo Alto-based electric-carmaker, whose stock closed Wednesday at $147.86 per share, now has a market cap of about $18 billion, and some analysts say shares could double again within the next three to four years as Detroit races to play catch-up.

Along the way, scores of individual investors have placed heavy -- and extremely risky, many experts would warn -- bets on Tesla's stock, which is one of the most volatile on the Nasdaq.

Some bought Tesla stock as a way to finance their purchase of the Model S, which has a base price of $70,000. Many are convinced that Tesla is the next big growth stock, like Apple or Google (GOOG), and they don't want to miss out, pouring their life savings into the company against the advice of family, friends and financial advisers.

The Tesla Motors Club forum, an online bulletin board for Tesla owners and fans, is filled with posts and message threads about the "Teslanaires" -- those who have realized $1 million in paper gains through Tesla stock trades.

"There is a bull market in Tesla right now, but don't confuse a bull market with genius," warned Manny Schiffres, executive editor of Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine. "As long as Tesla keeps going up, people will think they aren't vulnerable. A year ago Apple peaked at $705; now it's around $500. You should never put a disproportionate amount of your wealth into one stock."

Many Tesla investors, like Hop, engage in options trading, which involves pledging to buy or sell stock at a specific price by a specific date. Timing is everything, making options trading a risky bet that can rack up big gains or gut-wrenching losses.

"Options are derivatives," Schiffres said. "You have to be right on the company, the direction of the stock and the duration, because options expire. It's very much like being in a casino. Trading options is pretty much like gambling."

Financial consultants typically advise against heavily investing in one stock, yet it is advice easily ignored by Tesla fans like Rod UC Berkeley senior Patrick Hop is photographed on Monday, Aug. 12, 2013 in Berkeley, Calif. Hop estimates he's made a quarter million dollars buying Tesla Motor's stock. (Aric Crabb/Bay Area News Group) ( ARIC CRABB )Stelling, a 69-year-old retired microbiologist who lives in Napa Valley.

Stelling paid $40,000 to reserve a Model S three years before the car was built, got the 64th vehicle off the Fremont assembly line, then promptly had it custom-painted chocolate brown. He has "100 percent confidence" in Tesla and says that two rides in the Model S are all it takes to be convinced that CEO Elon Musk and his executive team know what they are doing.

"As soon as I could buy stock, I bought stock," said Stelling, who got in close to the IPO price, which was $17 in June 2010. "My brother-in-law is still convinced they are going to fold. My money manager thinks I am crazy. He says we should diversify, but I'm not going to do that. I've made $250,000 on this. My car is paid for. Of course you haven't really earned anything until you sell, but I'm holding on. The stock may go over $200 this year."

Another Tesla bull is Jonathan Jivan, an Iraq War veteran who lives in a suburb of Akron, Ohio. He describes his lifestyle as modest: He works as a videographer at Kent State University and drives a 10-year-old Nissan Altima.

But Jivan purchased $2,500 worth of stock in Tesla Motors in April 2011, when it was trading around $25 a share. In January of this year, when it was trading in the $30 range, he invested another $5,000. Now Jivan has seen his original investment balloon to more than $100,000.

"I just had a hunch that electric cars would be the future," said Jivan, 30, who spends countless hours researching Tesla. "Back in January, I knew Tesla's stock was going to go up because they were saying they were going to become profitable. When companies become profitable, the stock always explodes. That's the point where people realized that Tesla actually knows what it's doing."

His biggest splurge so far: a new LCD television.

"I've made twice my yearly salary in six months," Jivan said. "My wife doesn't even know how much money we have."

Kevin Weng, 40, a software architect who works in Palo Alto and owns a Model S, invested a significant chunk of his self-directed retirement account in Tesla when it was trading at $35 a share in March and now is a member of the Teslanaire club.

"I spend a couple of hours a day researching the company," Weng said. "Sometimes I get up at 4 or 5 a.m. just to read about the company and then think about how I want to manage the trading that day."

Bob Gotchall wanted to buy a Model S but couldn't justify the cost to his wife. So he figured that if he invested $50,000 in the stock and doubled his money, he could then afford to buy the car.

"I figured if the car was a good buy, the stock was an even better buy," said Gotchall, 40, of Austin, Texas. As the stock began to rise, Gotchall started adding more and more Tesla options to his portfolio. "I started to have days where my balance would go up by $10,000. I sold and bought, panicked and re-bought and watched a ticker way too much during the day."

Gotchall recently had to come clean with his wife.

"I said, 'I don't want to alarm you, but we have hundreds of thousands of dollars more than we did last week,' " he told her in May, after Tesla reported its first quarterly profit in 10 years.

Gotchall, who on some days now is a Teslanaire, said the good days for Tesla are far from over.

"The stock is still totally cheap," he said. "It's a growth stock. Buy the stock in a retirement account and just let it go."

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News Headline: How 'Teslanaires' made fortunes on Tesla Motors stock (Jivan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus C.E.O. - Online
Contact Name: By Dana Hull
News OCR Text: In June of last year, Patrick Hop poured his life savings — $30,000 — into Tesla Motors Inc. stock, then trading at about $32 per share. When the stock hit $115 this July, he dumped all his shares and invested in options on Tesla stock, which are high-risk bets on the stock's future performance.

Now Hop, a 22-year-old senior from Millbrae, Calif., studying applied math at the University of California-Berkeley, estimates he's made about $250,000 — at least on paper.

“I have a high risk tolerance, but I don't think the stock is that risky,” he said.

Hop is far from alone in being bullish on Tesla, which has developed a cultlike following not seen since the early days of Apple. The company's stock has skyrocketed more than 300 percent this year thanks to a string of successes, from a rave review in Consumer Reports to better-than-expected sales of the all-electric Model S sedan and, last week, five-star safety ratings in federal crash tests. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based electric-carmaker, whose stock closed Friday at $161.84 per share, now has a market cap of about $18 billion, and some analysts say shares could double again within the next three to four years as Detroit races to play catch-up.

Along the way, scores of individual investors have placed heavy — and extremely risky, many experts would warn — bets on Tesla's stock, which is one of the most volatile on the Nasdaq.

Some bought Tesla stock as a way to finance their purchase of the Model S, which has a base price of about $70,000, before a federal subsidy. Many are convinced that Tesla is the next big growth stock, like Apple Inc. or Google Inc., and they don't want to miss out, pouring their life savings into the company against the advice of family, friends and financial advisers.

The Tesla Motors Club forum, an online bulletin board for Tesla owners and fans, is filled with posts and message threads about the “Teslanaires” — those who have realized $1 million in paper gains through Tesla stock trades.

“There is a bull market in Tesla right now, but don't confuse a bull market with genius,” warned Manny Schiffres, executive editor of Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine. “As long as Tesla keeps going up, people will think they aren't vulnerable. A year ago Apple peaked at $705; now it's around $500. You should never put a disproportionate amount of your wealth into one stock.”

Many Tesla investors, like Hop, engage in options trading, which involves pledging to buy or sell stock at a specific price by a specific date. Timing is everything, making options-trading a risky bet that can rack up big gains or gut-wrenching losses.

“Options are derivatives,” Schiffres said. “You have to be right on the company, the direction of the stock and the duration, because options expire. It's very much like being in a casino. Trading options is pretty much like gambling.”

Financial consultants typically advise against heavily investing in one stock, yet it is advice easily ignored by Tesla fans like Rod Stelling, a 69-year-old retired microbiologist who lives in California's Napa Valley.

Stelling paid $40,000 to reserve a Model S three years before the car was built, got the 64th vehicle off the Fremont, Calif., assembly line, then promptly had it custom-painted chocolate brown. He has “100 percent confidence” in Tesla and says that two rides in the Model S are all it takes to be convinced that CEO Elon Musk and his executive team know what they are doing.

“As soon as I could buy stock, I bought stock,” said Stelling, who got in close to the IPO price, which was $17 in June 2010. “My brother-in-law is still convinced they are going to fold. My money manager thinks I am crazy. He says we should diversify, but I'm not going to do that. I've made $250,000 on this. My car is paid for. Of course you haven't really earned anything until you sell, but I'm holding on. The stock may go over $200 this year.”

Another Tesla bull is Jonathan Jivan, an Iraq War veteran who lives in a suburb of Akron, Ohio. He describes his lifestyle as modest: He works as a videographer at Kent State University and drives a 10-year-old Nissan Altima.

But Jivan purchased $2,500 worth of stock in Tesla Motors in April 2011, when it was trading around $25 a share. In January of this year, when it was trading in the $30 range, he invested another $5,000. Now Jivan has seen his original investment balloon to more than $100,000.

“I just had a hunch that electric cars would be the future,” said Jivan, 30, who spends countless hours researching Tesla. “Back in January, I knew Tesla's stock was going to go up because they were saying they were going to become profitable. When companies become profitable, the stock always explodes. That's the point where people realized that Tesla actually knows what it's doing.”

His biggest splurge so far: a new LCD television.

“I've made twice my yearly salary in six months,” Jivan said. “My wife doesn't even know how much money we have.”

(EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE)

Kevin Weng, 40, a software architect who works in Palo Alto and owns a Model S, invested a significant chunk of his self-directed retirement account in Tesla when it was trading at $35 a share in March and now is a member of the Teslanaire club.

“I spend a couple of hours a day researching the company,” Weng said. “Sometimes I get up at 4 or 5 a.m. just to read about the company and then think about how I want to manage the trading that day.”

Bob Gotchall wanted to buy a Model S but couldn't justify the cost to his wife. So he figured that if he invested $50,000 in the stock and doubled his money, he could then afford to buy the car.

“I figured if the car was a good buy, the stock was an even better buy,” said Gotchall, 40, of Austin, Texas. As the stock began to rise, Gotchall started adding more and more Tesla options to his portfolio. “I started to have days where my balance would go up by $10,000. I sold and bought, panicked and re-bought and watched a ticker way too much during the day.”

Gotchall recently had to come clean with his wife.

“I said, ‘I don't want to alarm you, but we have hundreds of thousands of dollars more than we did last week,' ” he told her in May, after Tesla reported its first quarterly profit in 10 years.

Gotchall, who on some days now is a Teslanaire, said the good days for Tesla are far from over.

“The stock is still totally cheap,” he said. “It's a growth stock. Buy the stock in a retirement account and just let it go.”

©2013 San Jose Mercury News

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