Report Overview:
Total Clips (16)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Art, School of; KSU at Stark (1)
Athletics (5)
Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Hillel (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
May 4 (1)
Students (1)
Town-Gown (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Women are 17% of recent war vets – triple all previous wars (Anderson) 08/29/2013 Pine Tree Watchdog Text Attachment Email

...17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes. It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
HARRISON'S JERSEY TO BE RETIRED AT KENT STATE 08/29/2013 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Text Email

Kent State is retiring NFL star linebacker James Harrison's jersey. Harrison, a longtime star with the Steelers and now with the Cincinnati Bengals,...


Art, School of; KSU at Stark (1)
MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend -- Aug. 30 08/30/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Sundays at the McKinley Presidential Library & Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Drive NW, Canton. Pluto? Again? July 8 through Sept. 8. 330-455-7043. Kent State University at Stark Theatre — Open auditions for The Maiden's Prayer will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in the theater of the...


Athletics (5)
Kent State 17, Liberty 10: Golden Flashes rally for victory despite injury to Dri Archer 08/30/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Published: August 29, 2013 - 11:09 PM | Updated: August 30, 2013 - 08:29 AM By Stephanie Storm Beacon Journal sports writer (PHOTO) Kent State speedster...

fREE fRom UPSET (Haynes) 08/30/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent state escapes scare by Liberty in home opener A day that started with hope and promise oozing from Dix Stadium ended with Kent State's football...

KSU football season opens with a bang 08/30/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

(PHOTO) a skydiver brought the game ball to Dix stadium. also, a large american flag covered the field during the national anthem. --- (PHOTO) A massive...

KENT STATE SURVIVES SCARE FROM FCS LIBERTY IN SEASON OPENER (WITH GALLERY) 08/30/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Allen Moff | Staff Writer Published: August 30, 2013 4:00AM A day that started with hope and promise oozing from Dix Stadium ended with Kent State's...

Kent State wins a close one over Liberty, 17-10; Dri Archer out after three plays 08/30/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

By Elton Alexander, The Plain Dealer on August 29, 2013 at 10:30 PM, updated August 29, 2013 at 10:54 PM (PHOTO) Kent State's Dri Archer was injured...


Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
UNITED WAY KICKS OFF 2013 CAMPAIGN AT KENT STATE FOOTBALL OPENER 08/30/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

By Mike Sever | staff writer Published: August 30, 2013 4:00AM The United Way of Portage County kicked off its 2013 campaign at the Kent State University...


Hillel (1)
Class Notes (Jarvie) 08/30/2013 Cleveland Jewish News - Online Text Attachment Email

(PHOTO) Hillel at Kent State staff, including from left, engagement associate Shiri Akrish, senior Jewish educator Rabbi Lee Moore, executive director...


Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation (1)
KSU Hotel & Conference Center expected to boom (Finn) 08/30/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

by Kyle MCDonalD| Staff writer (PHOTO) the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center is already exceeding expectations. Two months after...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
Ohio DOT Awards $10.5 million for Transportation Alternatives Projects 08/29/2013 Asphalt Contractor - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...connects to school campus, college campus and YMCA. City of East Liverpool was awarded $799,185 to create a safe pedestrian oriented route connecting Kent State east campus to west campus and downtown businesses. Sandusky County Commissioners received $285,792 for the rehabilitation of the Mull...


May 4 (1)
Alcorn McBride Delivers Multimedia for Kent State Visitors Center 08/30/2013 Live Design Text Attachment Email

Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, marked the 43rd commemoration of the tragic events of May 4, 1970, with the dedication of the May 4 Visitors Center....


Students (1)
A young woman's dream comes true: She's the 4-H queen 08/29/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...cowboy hats and bandannas to reflect a âWild Westâ theme â during the Junior Fair Youth Day Program. âIt means a lot,â said Svetlak, a freshman at Kent State University. âIâm grateful for everything Iâve learned, and 4-H has made me a better person.â Both Svetlak and this yearâs king, 19-year-old...


Town-Gown (2)
The new Esplanade symbolizes the connection between Kent State University and downtown Kent 08/30/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

(PHOTO) splanade, the new link that directly connects the Kent State University campus with downtown Kent. The view past the KSU arch looks past the green,...

The new look of downtown Kent 08/30/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

1. The esplanade 2. New courthouse 3. Kent central Gateway 4. KSu Hotel and conference center 5. building c 6. Acorn corner 7. Acorn Alley 1 & 2...


News Headline: Women are 17% of recent war vets – triple all previous wars (Anderson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Pine Tree Watchdog
Contact Name: Asha Anchan
News OCR Text: Editor's note: Few issues are as important to our state and nation as the treatment of our veterans. That's why the Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting is taking the unusual step of distributing and prominently featuring the work of another journalism group, NEWS21. Its groundbreaking series on veterans called, “Back Home: The Challenges Facing Post-9/11 Veterans Returning from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan,” comes to the Center through our membership in the Investigative News Network.

Major portions of the series will be running on our web site, Pinetreewatchdog.org, over the next week. We are also linking to the full series on News21.com.

News21 is a national initiative to train a new generation of journalists capable of reshaping the news industry. The program is headquartered at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. Nearly 500 top journalism students in the U.S. have participated in the landmark national initiative under the direction of nationally recognized professional journalists, including two Pulitzer Prize winners. – John Christie, publisher

The fight to feel like a veteran weighs substantially on female soldiers returning from war, though their numbers have been historic, with more than 280,000 returning from deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade.

A News21 demographic analysis shows that 17.4 percent of post-9/11 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are women, a proportion nearly three times that of all previous veteran populations combined. More than a quarter of those women are black, almost twice the proportion found in the entire U.S. population.

Yet, these same women are less likely to find a job than male veterans and more likely to be a single parent with children to support, interviews and records show.

They return to a nation that historically defines “veteran” as male, which in the post-9/11 era has meant a lack of female-specific resources at VA facilities across the country.

A 2013 Institute of Medicine report found that women in combat-support roles, like men, experience intense warfare and constant threats on their lives, but the implications of this trauma for women has been overlooked.

“Historically, research on the health of veterans has focused on the health consequences of combat service in men, and there has been little scientific research . . . of the health consequences of military service in women who served,” according to the report.

Currently, 360,000 women use VA medical services. But the number is expected to double as more women come home and seek care, many of them relatively new to its services, said Dr. Patricia Hayes, chief consultant of Women's Health Services at the VA in Washington, D.C.

As of 2008, only 33 percent of the 152 VA medical centers had specified “women's clinics,” records show.  Now, about 75 percent offer at least some type of female-specific care, Hayes said.

Sgt. Crystal Sandor

Army National Guard Spc. Crystal Sandor muscled a 5-ton truck through the ragtag roads of Iraq and likely would be dead from an exploding fireball had the 4-foot-10 soldier been just centimeters taller.

She was awarded a Purple Heart, but had to prove to the Army that she deserved it.

Even back home in Ohio, she doesn't feel much like a soldier.

Ohio Army National Guard veteran Crystal Sandor, 28, holds her daughter Makenna in their home. Sandor and her husband are not opposed to their daughter joining the military, but they said they hope the disparity between men and women will be eliminated when, and if, Makenna should choose to enlist. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

“What did you do over there?” some gray-haired male veterans in Akron, Ohio, at the Department of Veterans Affairs asked as they sized up her petite frame. “Did you sell Girl Scout cookies?” one asked.

When Sandor's husband goes to the VA, he gets handshakes and “Thank you for your service” accolades in the waiting room.

Not Crystal.

Sandor has struggled to get the care she expected from the military since the night she nearly died – June 18, 2004.

She was a driver in a 20-truck convoy during a night mission in Iraq.

She laughs just a little, remembering a conversation with a fellow soldier. She was razzing him for spilling sunflower seeds, a staple during their missions together. Then, a fireball from a roadside bomb came head-on toward their truck.

Sandor woke up pounding on her chest to make sure she was alive. She couldn't see, couldn't hear. The voice of a soldier broke the chaos.

“Just keep driving! Just keep driving!”

“If I was that much taller,” Sandor says, putting mere centimeters between her thumb and forefinger, “I wouldn't be alive.”

After the accident and while still in Iraq, Sandor discovered her superiors lost the paperwork documenting the attack, meaning there was no official record that it ever happened.

“The only reason I have the disability (rating) I have is because I was smart enough to have a video camera on me and we recorded the damage to the truck and we took pictures of everything,” she said. “That is the only reason I have a Purple Heart or disability.”

Since Sandor's return home in March 2005, she's been at odds with the Ohio VA system over her treatment.

During her first appointment later that year, she said the VA doctor seemed skeptical of her injuries, treating her as if she never left the base. When she was asked about treatment options, Sandor requested therapy to talk about the attack that injured her. Instead, she left with three prescriptions for anxiety and sleeping. She said she stopped taking the medications because she felt like a “zombie.”

“I don't think I've talked to one female veteran who goes to the VA who has had a good experience, that has been treated and received the care that they deserve,” Sandor said. “I think because the VA has dealt with men for so long, through all the previous wars, they're not set up to handle females. But we've been at this war for 10 years, it's about time they figure it out.”

She tried group therapy at the VA, but was placed in an all-male group. She left each session feeling guilty, not better, about herself because of the horror stories the men told.

For the last eight years, Sandor has bounced between her civilian doctor and the VA to prove the extent of her injuries – such as the post-traumatic stress disorder the VA denied, but her civilian doctor insists she has, along with ringing in her ears, severe arthritis in her knees, hearing and vision loss, herniated disks, a deviated septum and a brain lesion. She has a 40 percent disability rating.

She tries to dismiss her concerns with the VA, keeping her focus on her 17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes.

It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed her, but her PTSD continues to creep into her civilian life both physically and emotionally.

“A lot of people are still like, ‘Why does it bother you? It's been eight years, get over it,' ” Sandor said. “It doesn't go away, it's with you the rest of your life. I mean, the severity of it might – how much you remember of it might – but that feeling, it's always there.”

No job for ex-Marine

When Hannah Siska left the Marines in 2011, she expected to find a job with the skills she acquired during her five years of service. She was a Marine in good standing. She had strong leadership skills. She had high security clearance.

But she couldn't get a job, even with her training as a special communications signals collection operator and analyst.

U.S. Marine Corps veteran Hannah Siska, 29, sits in Spanish class at Kent State University on June 12, 2013 in Kent, Ohio. “I have no friends from high school but tons from the Marine Corps that I will forever be friends with, so, I feel that it is literally a brotherhood and a sisterhood like they say it is, that you cannot get anywhere else.” Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Siska applied for more than 150 jobs posted on Department of Defense websites geared toward applicants with security clearances. The result always was the same.

“They want to hire vets that are males, not females, and that was very apparent,” said Siska, who was deployed to Iraq in 2008 and 2009. “I had everything and my resume looked just like all the other guys that got jobs and I didn't.”

In September 2012, the unemployment rate for post-9/11 female veterans hit a high of 19.9 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The average unemployment rate for female veterans for all of 2012 was 12.5 percent, but that was still 3 percentage points higher than the average for male veterans that year.

“Unfortunately when female veterans come home they aren't perceived as women warriors,” said John Pickens III, a Vietnam veteran and the executive director of VeteransPlus, a nonprofit offering financial counseling to service members.

A woman's military experience isn't seen as suitable for civilian life, despite the fact that they learned the same skills as their male counterparts, he said.

“They can't enjoy the life they've fought to defend and there's a lot of pride there,” he said.

Siska calls it “the boys' club” mentality, a perception she worked against during her time as a Marine. When she joined in 2006, Siska said her superiors and fellow Marines gave her extra responsibilities because they trusted her judgment and work ethic. She sought a higher rank, but was not promoted. So she left the Marines.

“I loved it, and I loved the people, I loved what I did, I just didn't like the political aspect behind being able to move up,” she said.

She described the Marines as “old fashioned,” and based on a ranking system emphasizing running and shooting scores. This mindset hinders the Marines, she said, because it discourages women from joining.

In 2009, women made up 19.5 percent of officers and enlisted members in the Air Force, but only 6.4 percent of all Marines, according to the Pew Research Center.

Now, Siska's working on a biochemistry degree at Kent State University while caring for two young children. Her goal is to go to medical school and serve in the Navy.

“I want to be a career person and I want to accomplish things and feel like I'm contributing to society or a community or just my family,” she said.

Raped by a superior

Other than when she is in a Kent State classroom, Aribella Shapiro is always by herself. She walks everywhere because she doesn't have a car – to school, to Walmart, to the Kent Church of Christ.

Shapiro sings a hymn during a morning worship in Kent, Ohio. "Even if I'm tired, at least once a week I go to church so He knows that I'm grateful to Him," Shapiro said. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

On one Sunday, she leaves at least 45 minutes before the 10:45 a.m. service. The dewy grass sticks to her brown suede and rubber boots with fur around the top. She says the boots remind her of being in the Army.

She cuts across the lawn of another church, passes campus, stops to get a Frappuccino at Starbucks and zigzags past Main Street and over to the church.

They're finishing a Bible study and moving on to the main worship service when she comes in and sits at the back of the 14-pew church. There are fewer than 20 people in the church; Shapiro is one of about three under the age of 35. She said she likes to try out different churches, but wants to connect somewhere so God knows she's thankful.

“I'm proud because I'm alive and I'm all in one piece,” said the 32-year-old. “I have a lot of friends who have died due to the war and I wasn't one of them. I'm proud that I fought for America.”

But she's not proud of everything about the military, namely her rape by a superior officer.

“I didn't tell anyone because I felt embarrassed,” she said, explaining that her rapist threatened to kill her if she said anything. “I cried for months.”

The crying stopped, she explains, because she talked with other women who experienced similar scenarios, and she realized her story was not unique. The Department of Defense's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office estimates that 26,000 cases of sexual assault or unwanted sexual contact occurred in fiscal 2012. Of that estimate, 3,374 cases were reported, according to that office.

Shapiro joined the Army, knowing her decision to serve would pay her way through college. The Post-9/11 GI Bill brought her to Kent and it's where she feels the most confident – sitting in class, studying for an exam or helping other students with their homework.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill offers an education to those who served after Sept. 10, 2001, and has paid for nearly 1 million veterans to go to school.

Post-9/11 female veterans who have a high school equivalent degree outperform non-veterans when it comes to post-secondary degree attainment, according to a News21 analysis.

But many women veterans returning home to student life juggle other challenges. Only 15 percent of student veterans are “traditionally” college-aged students. Another 47 percent have children and nearly that same percentage are married.

“We think that women veterans don't necessarily want to be identified solely as veterans, as a special group, they want to be identified as women students and adult learners,” said Rachel Anderson, director of the Center for Adult and Veteran Services at Kent State University.

The Independent Budget – an annual VA budget and policy analysis prepared by independent veterans service organizations – reported that researchers found women veterans have a difficult time finding support systems upon returning home. Some women reported feeling isolated, and for others this feeling is made worse by the college atmosphere.

But Aribella Shapiro's life is lonelier than she would like. She dreams of getting her bachelor's and master's degrees to teach English overseas, maybe even in Kuwait where she was stationed in 2004. Only this time she wants to go as “friend, not foe.”

Alone in her apartment, Shapiro misses the men and women she served with in the Army. She's trying to make connections with students in her classes, through the roommate she hopes to get by putting up signs around campus and even with the barista at Starbucks.

But going from being in the Army to being by herself is difficult especially, as a single person, she said. And when asked if she felt welcomed home, Shapiro answered immediately: “No.”

She described the TV shows that show soldiers coming home to their families and the emotional reunions that cue tears and hugs.

“What about us soldiers that were single and we don't have a family to come home to? Why can't you appreciate us for what we do too?” she said.

Hoping for a military career

Briana Hawkes' Army dress blues hang pressed and ready in her parents' basement in Bristolville, Ohio.

The basement is where Hawkes is living for the next two-and-a-half years. She converted it into her own studio apartment while she's home and is willing to hang her clothes on a metal rod suspended from the ceiling because she knows it's only temporary.

The 25-year-old single mother served as an E-5 supply sergeant in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2012 and is home to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill to get her degree and join the ROTC program at Kent State University. After she graduates and becomes a commissioned officer, Hawkes plans to re-enter the Army and continue her military career.

According to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), many women carry the burden of caring for children while they are deployed. More than 40 percent of women on active duty have children and more than 30,000 single mothers have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan since 2009.

“Especially as more women are involved and we see continued deployments we need to be cognizant how deployments are impacting families,” said Kate O'Gorman, political director at IAVA. “We have to make sure that service members that deploy can't be worried about their kids constantly. There needs to be a strong system at home so they can execute their job overseas.”

But parents still will worry – both during and after deployment.

Hawkes is young to hold the rank of E-5 supply sergeant. She's typically in charge of soldiers with at least six years on her, she said, and it hasn't been easy to achieve this level of leadership. “It's really cut-throat out there,” Hawkes said, describing the way some sergeants stop soldiers from moving up in rank because they don't want to be passed up. “I've seen it and I've been through it and I've conquered it.”

Coming home to get a degree and care for her daughter is a major contrast to the rigor of her military lifestyle. She is used to straight lines, strict rules and order. But on campus, students walk around wearing whatever they want, smoking and talking on their cell phones.

You're not allowed to do that in the Army.

Thinking about going back to the Army in two-and-a-half years is hard, especially after spending concentrated time with her 3-year-old daughter, but Hawkes knows it's a decision she's going to stand by.

“I plan on going until there's no more go in me,” she said. “If that is one star, two star, I'm not stopping . . . I have a daughter to take care of and I know she's going to have needs and college so I'm going to provide.”

Gallery

Army veteran Aribella Shapiro, 32, writes about the intersection of the military, the Middle East and God during morning bible study at Church of Christ on June 9, 2013, in Kent, Ohio. Shapiro said she wants to return to the Middle East to teach English. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Shapiro sings a hymn during Sunday worship service at Church of Christ in Kent, Ohio. She was not religious until after her deployment to Kuwait, she said, but now counts God as an important part of her daily life. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Shapiro sings a hymn during a morning worship in Kent, Ohio. "Even if I'm tired, at least once a week I go to church so He knows that I'm grateful to Him," Shapiro said. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Shapiro searches for the Gospel reading at during Sunday morning worship in Kent, Ohio. Church of Christ is one of several places of worship Shapiro attended since moving to Kent in May 2013. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

U.S. Army veteran Briana Hawkes, 25, picks up her daughter Aubrey, 3, from Champion Day School June 10, 2013, in Warren, Ohio. Hawkes was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan in April 2012, months before Aubrey's second birthday. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Briana Hawkes straps her daughter Aubrey, 3, into her car seat in Hawkes' Dodge Nitro. Hawkes deployed shortly before Aubrey's second birthday. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Briana Hawkes' dress blues, or formal military, jacket hangs at the end of her closet in the basement of her parents' home in Bristolville, Ohio. Sgt. Hawkes is a reservist and she attends Kent State University. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Hawkes prepares a dinner of for her daughter after a day at daycare. After Hawkes left active duty, she returned to Ohio to live with her parents and her daughter and to earn a bachelor's degree at Kent State University. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Army veteran Briana Hawkes, 25, goes through the contents of her "go box," June 10, 2013, in Bristolville, Ohio. The box holds clothes and shoes for physical training and patrol, blankets, jackets and other Army essentials. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Army veteran Briana Hawkes, 25, cuts olives into bite-size pieces for her daughter, Aubrey, 3, for dinner June 10, 2013, in Bristolville, Ohio. “I know that I feel good about myself because I know if my daughter was able to figure out what I do, or what I have done or who I've become, she'd be proud of me,” Hawkes said. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Aubrey Hawkes, 3, eats dinner at her grandparents' house while her mother, Briana, asks about her time at daycare. Aubrey's attention could not be taken from an episode of “Dora the Explorer.” Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

A newspaper clipping from the Fort Hood Sentinel with a quotation from Hawkes, then an Army private, hangs on her parents' refrigerator. "I plan I going until there's no more go in me," Hawkes, now a sergeant, said. "If that is one star, two star, I'm not stopping at 13 more years." Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Army veteran Briana Hawkes, 25, sits with her daughter Aubrey, 3, outside Hawkes' parents' home in Bristolville, Ohio. When Hawkes was deployed, Aubrey “was trying to reach her hands out to hold me or for me to pick her up and I was like, ‘I can't!' It's hard for you to explain something like that to a 1-year-old child,” she said. But now she's used to it, she understands a lot more.” Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Ohio Army National Guard veteran Crystal Sandor, 28, sits in her living room June 11, 2013, in Canton, Ohio. Sandor served in Iraq from February 2004 to March 2005. She received a Purple Heart after an IED detonated near her truck, which caused multiple injuries including back pain, arthritis in her knees, Tinnitus, PTSD and hearing and vision loss. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Photos of Sandor's husband, Tony, and daughter, Makenna, sit on an end table in their townhome. Sandor met her husband while on active duty. He is still enlisted. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Ohio Army National Guard veteran Crystal Sandor, 28, holds her daughter Makenna in their home. Sandor and her husband are not opposed to their daughter joining the military, but they said they hope the disparity between men and women will be eliminated when, and if, Makenna should choose to enlist. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Sandor plays with her young daughter Makenna, in their living room. “If (Makenna) came to me with evidence of this is why I want to (enlist), this my plan and this is how it's going to help me, then I would consider it and probably support her and allow her to do it,” Sandor said. “But if she came to me and said, ‘You and Dad were in the military so I want to.' I'd say, umm I don't think so, find something else.” Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Crystal Sandor sits in her living room of her home. Sandor and her convoy were hit by an IED in June 2004 in Iraq, causing multiple injuries including back pain, arthritis in her knees, Tinnitus, PTSD and hearing and vision loss. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

A photo of Sandor, her husband, Tony, and daughter Makenna, 17 months, sits in their home in Canton, Ohio. “I don't regret joining because I have a whole family through the military, I have so many connections and I have my husband,” Sandor said. “And because I have my husband, I have my daughter and I would not give her up for anything.” Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Hannah Siska, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, sits in her dining room on June 9, 2013 in Ravenna, Ohio. Siska, 29, deployed twice to Iraq from February to September 2008 and February to September 2009. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Hannah Siska holds her daughter Aurora, 1, in the dining room of their home in Ohio. After her second deployment to Iraq, Siska had a “quarter-life crisis” and realized she wanted kids; she also has a 3-year-old son, Ethan. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Aurora Siska's stuffed monkey lies on the hallway floor during the early morning of June 10, 2013 in Ravenna, Ohio. Siska's children have identical monkeys, but only Aurora carries hers daily. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

U.S. Marine Corps veteran Hannah Siska, 29, prepares breakfast for her 1-year-old daughter Aurora on June 10, 2013 in Ravenna, Ohio. “I purposely waited to have kids after I knew I was done with deployments,” Siska said. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Ethan Siska, 3, looks out his bedroom window before breakfast. “I'm happy that I had two kids, I didn't want them to grow up alone,” Hannah Siska said of her two young children. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Hannah Siska walks to Spanish class on the main campus of Kent State University in Ohio. After two deployments to Iraq, the 29-year-old veteran decided to return to school after she was unable to find employment. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

A note written by Hannah Siska hangs from the refrigerator on her first day of classes in the summer session. Her younger brother watched her children while she attended classes. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

U.S. Marine Corps veteran Hannah Siska, 29, sits in Spanish class at Kent State University on June 12, 2013 in Kent, Ohio. “I have no friends from high school but tons from the Marine Corps that I will forever be friends with, so, I feel that it is literally a brotherhood and a sisterhood like they say it is, that you cannot get anywhere else.” Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Kim Talentino, an adjunct Spanish instructor at Kent State University, explains how to conjugate reflexive verbs to a class that includes Siska. After completing her bachelor's degree, Siska said she wants to enter the Navy and attend medical school to become a coroner. Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21

Photo galleries from four very different post-9/11 female veterans. Crystal Sandor is a Purple Heart recipient who served with the Ohio Army National Guard as a tank driver. Her convoy was hit with an IED and she now suffers from PTSD and numerous physical repercussions. Briana Hawkes is a reservist with the Army who is attending Kent State University. After she graduates, she will return to the military because she knows it will be a lifelong career that will allow her to provide as a single mother for her daughter. Hannah Siska is a former Marine with two children and a husband still on active duty. Following an honorable discharge, Siska couldn't find a job and is now enrolled in school. Aribella Shapiro enlisted in the Army, served a tour in Kuwait and was sexually assaulted. After coming home, she now counts religion as one of the most important aspects in her life.

Tomorrow: Who's using the new G.I. Bill

Asha Anchan was a Peter Kiewit Foundation Fellow, Kelsey Hightower an Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Fellow and Caitlin Cruz a Women & Philanthropy Fellow for News21 this summer.

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News Headline: HARRISON'S JERSEY TO BE RETIRED AT KENT STATE | Email

News Date: 08/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State is retiring NFL star linebacker James Harrison's jersey.

Harrison, a longtime star with the Steelers and now with the Cincinnati Bengals, will be honored at the Golden Flashes' season opener tonight against Liberty. Harrison, who wore No. 16 in college, is the fifth Kent State player to have his jersey retired, joining Jim Corrigall, Hall of Famer Jack Lambert formerly of the Steelers, Eric Wilkerson and Josh Cribbs.

Harrison will not be able to attend the game because the Bengals are playing host to their final exhibition game tonight against the Indianapolis Colts. Harrison's parents will be presented with a framed No. 16 jersey on his behalf.

Louisville

Junior defensive end Lorenzo Mauldin was released from a hospital and the school said in a release that "evaluations continue to be positive" after he was hit by a vehicle while riding his Moped on campus. The release states that Mauldin's availability for the Cardinals' season opener Sunday against Ohio will be determined over the next few days. He is listed as the starter on the depth chart.

Copyright © 2013 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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News Headline: MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend -- Aug. 30 | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: August 27,2013 06:24 PM GMT

Once again, the Ohio.com staff has complied a list of local upcoming events for this Labor Day weekend and beyond. So check out a few things going on in your community or nearby neighborhoods.

For more things to do, visit Enjoy.Ohio.com.

BARBERTON

Magic Mayhem — Tailgating event for the Barberton Magics from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Barberton Middle School parking lot, 477 4th Street N.W.

A New Beginning Social Group for Widows and Widowers — 9 a.m. Saturday at Thano's Restaurant, 71 Fifth St. SE, Barberton. 330-745-6239.

BATH

4th Annual Made in Ohio Art & Craft Festival — 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at Hale Farm & Village, 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath Township. Over 100 vendors with Ohio-made, Ohio-grown, and Ohio-produced arts, crafts, and foods will be in tents throughout the grounds. Admission is $5. For more information, go to www.wrhs.org.

Fun on the Farm: Meet a Potter, Pinch a Pot — 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sept. 7 at Hale Farm & Village, 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath Township. This early-childhood education program features a craft, story, rhyme or song and snack. $5-10. (330) 666-3711.

COPLEY-FAIRLAWN

Ballroom Dancing — 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Sherwood Dance Club, 960 Jacoby Road, Copley Township. $7. 330-864-4484.

Food Preservation by canning— 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Akron Fossils & Science Center, 2080 S. Cleveland-Massillon Road, Copley. Pre-registration $18, at the door $20, call (330) 665-3466.

CUYAHOGA FALLS

Rockin' on the River — 5 to 11:30 p.m. Friday Sun Rising and Tim “Ripper” Owens will perform at the Falls River Square District. Free.

A Walk on the Wild Side — Art show through Sept. 10 at the Studios of Jack Richard, 2250 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. 330-929-1575.

GREEN

Dance With Kent Le Mar — 9 a.m. Saturdays, Theatre Dance Centre, 4800 Massillon Road, Green. For ages 30 or older. $10 per class. 330-899-9655.

Medicare Basics — 7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Green branch of the Akron-Summit County Public Library, 4046 Massillon Road. Free. (330) 896-9074.

HUDSON

Western Reserve Academy Antiques Festival — 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday at the Western Reserve Academy campus, centered around the intersection of College and Chapel streets in Hudson. Tickets are $8. For more information, go to www.antiquesfestival.com.

Black and Blue by Mark Spisak — Through Oct. 6 at Western Reserve Academy's Moos Gallery, 115 College St., Hudson. 330-650-4400.

JACKSON

Hoover-Price Planetarium Shows — 1 p.m. Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays at the McKinley Presidential Library & Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Drive NW, Canton. Pluto? Again? July 8 through Sept. 8. 330-455-7043.

Kent State University at Stark Theatre — Open auditions for The Maiden's Prayer will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in the theater of the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Auditions are open to everyone, including students and community persons. Roles are available for three men and two women. For more information, call 330-244-5151.

KENT

Processes of Transformation in Kent by Ken Gessford — Art show through Friday at the Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. 330-673-4414.

Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham — Wednesday through Oct. 5 at Kent State University Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. There will be an opening reception 5-7 p.m. on Sept. 5. 330-676-1549. Room of Relief an Installation Designed by Three Master Printmakers: Curlee Raven Holton, Veronica Ceci and Francine K.

STOW

Stow Sunset Blast — from 5-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Silver Springs Park, 5238 Young Road, Stow. www.stow.oh.us.

Jazz Concert — The Community Jazz band will perform at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday at Stow-Munroe Falls Public Library, 3512 Darrow Road. (330) 688-3295.

WADSWORTH

The Medina Chorus — Is seeking singers for its Winter Concert. Rehearsals begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Medina Presbyterian Church, 5020 Burgundy Bay Road. Rehearsals will be held 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Sign ups will be a half hour before start of rehearsals through Sept. 23. Cost for music is $40, $65 per couple, and a maximum of $80 per family. For more information, call David Shepley at 330-225-8335, Kurt Sauer at 330-225-0049 or go to www.medinachorus.com. ;;

Wadsworth Community Band — Seeking new members on all instruments. No audition required. Rehearsals are 7-9:15 p.m. Thursdays in the Wadsworth Middle School band room. http://wadsworthcommunityband.com or 330-336-129

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News Headline: Kent State 17, Liberty 10: Golden Flashes rally for victory despite injury to Dri Archer | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: August 29, 2013 - 11:09 PM | Updated: August 30, 2013 - 08:29 AM
By Stephanie Storm
Beacon Journal sports writer

(PHOTO) Kent State speedster Dri Archer hurt his right ankle on this run in the first quarter against Liberty at Dix Stadium on Thursday, in Kent. (Phil Masturzo/Akron Beacon Journal)

KENT: The early scene Thursday night at Dix Stadium lined up perfectly for a successful evening for Kent State in its season-opening game against Liberty.
More than 7,000 students had already packed into the student section behind the Golden Flashes' bench before kickoff. Loads of other fans were still filing through the gates during introductions.
Outside, local police were busy directing long lines of waiting cars into overflow parking behind the stadium in the fieldhouse lot, with the main parking lot filled to capacity.
With all the excitement, the Golden Flashes responded instantly to the rare show of student and community support.
Redshirt freshman quarterback Colin Reardon led a 14-play, 75-yard touchdown drive on KSU's opening series and then later pieced together an eight-play, 88-yard drive in the fourth quarter to send the Flashes' faithful home happy with a 17-10 victory.
“I was surprised when I came out how many fans there were,” Flashes receiver Chris Humphrey said of the crowd of 20,790. “It was a really good turnout for our first game. I hope they keep coming back.”
The end result was positive, but the Flashes had to endure their share of setbacks before the comeback was secured.
Senior running back Dri Archer suffered an ankle injury in the first quarter that left him a bystander in the second half. The extent of Archer's injury remains unknown but KSU coach Paul Haynes doesn't think it is serious.
The Flashes also committed nine penalties for 70 yards and the offense was stagnant for two quarters. As a result, the Flashes trailed the Flames, a Football Championship Series member, by three points in the fourth quarter.
“It wasn't pretty, but a win's a win,” said Haynes, a former Kent State defensive back and assistant coach who was given the game ball to commemorate his first head-coaching victory. “It was a lot of getting first-game mistakes out of the way. We killed ourselves with penalties. Those are things we've got to get cleaned up, but the guys stepped up when they had to and we got the win.”
The Flashes' impressive first series was capped by Reardon's 6-yard pass to receiver Casey Pierce, which survived a review by officials. Kicker Anthony Melchiori tacked on the extra point to give the Flashes a 7-0 lead.
But all the energy spurred by last season's record 11-win season and GoDaddy.com Bowl game appearance that halted a 40-year bowl drought came close to being deflated when Archer came up limping on the opening drive.
Archer was denied the opportunity to return Liberty's first kick because of a touchback so the first time he touched the ball came on the second play of the first drive — a rush for no gain.
Six plays later, Archer injured his left ankle on second-and-four, after gaining six yards out of a surprise Wildcat formation. Archer carried the ball one more time, for four yards, on the Flashes' first play of the second quarter.
“Of course when you don't have Dri out there for a lot of different reasons, you have to change up [the game plan] a little bit,” Haynes said.
Archer, the Flashes' 5-foot-8, 175-pound speed demon spent the rest of the first half on the sideline being attended to by trainers, with a white towel wrapped around his neck. When Kent State's players and coaches ran from the sideline across the field with a 7-3 halftime lead, Archer followed with an excruciatingly slow stroll.
When the second half started, Archer was again on the sideline — this time without pads and with a walking boot on his left foot.
“I do not know yet,” Haynes said of the severity of Archer's injury. “From what [the medical staff] just sat there and said, he'll be fine.”
With Archer sidelined, the Flashes settled into a mode of conservative play-calling, coupled with little use of running back Trayion Durham and fifth-year senior receiver Tyshon Goode, the team's other playmakers.
With the Flashes stalled, Liberty took a 10-7 lead midway through the third quarter, converting an 11-yard touchdown on a pass from quarterback Josh Woodrum to receiver Gabe Henderson.
The Flashes' offense jolted back to life midway through the fourth quarter with a 74-yard drive capped by kicker Anthony Melchiori's 39-yard field goal that tied the score with 10:57 to go.
Six and a half minutes later, KSU capped an 88-yard drive with a 42-yard touchdown pass down the sideline from Reardon to Humphrey.
“We realized that late in the game, the corner that was on me was getting a little tired,” Humphrey said. “So [Reardon] threw a simple, three-step throw and it's been drilled into my head from all the coaches I've had in my career that you always make the first guy miss. So that's what I did. It was a great read and I couldn't have asked for a better ball. I knew we needed [the score] bad.”
The most impressive showing of the night came from Reardon, who finished with a veteran-like stat line that belied his inexperience: 21-for-28 for 194 yards and two touchdowns. The former Poland Seminary standout also rushed 10 times for 38 yards.
“For his first start as a young kid out there, to drive the team down [field] on the last drive, that's huge,” Haynes said.
Stephanie Storm can be reached at sstorm@thebeaconjournal.com. Read the Kent State blog at http://www.ohio.com/flashes. Follow her on Twitter at www.twitter.com/SStormABJ and on Facebook www.facebook.com/sports.abj.

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News Headline: fREE fRom UPSET (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent state escapes scare
by Liberty in home opener

A day that started with hope and promise oozing from Dix Stadium ended with Kent State's football team narrowly avoiding disaster in its 2013 opener against Liberty.
The Golden Flashes needed a 42-yard touchdown pass from redshirt freshman quarterback Colin Reardon to junior wide receiver
Chris Humphrey with 4:28 remaining, and a pair of huge plays by senior cornerback Darius Polk in the closing minutes to eke out a comefrom-behind 17-10 victory over the FCS Flames before a large and vibrant crowd of 20,790 Thursday
night in Kent.
But all's well that ends well according to head
coach Paul Haynes, who was both thrilled and relieved after becoming the first Kent State head
coach to win his opener since Dick Crum in 1988 — when Haynes
was a sophomore cornerback at KSU.
“It wasn't pretty, but you know a win's a win,” said a red-eyed Haynes
afterward. “We knew we would have to face adversity, it wasn't gonna go perfect. It's always good to see a team fight through adversity
and not give up when it's down. We had a lot guys out there playing
their first college game and it was a tough game, we knew Liberty
was going to be a good team. To see us fight through that and get
the win ... we'll only get better.”
---
(PHOTO)
Kent State senior running back dri archer (1) is pulled down to the ground by his
ankle during the first quarter of Thursday's game in Kent. archer was injured on
the play and spent the second half on the sidelines out of pads and with a walking boot on his right foot.

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News Headline: KSU football season opens with a bang | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) a skydiver brought the game ball to Dix stadium. also, a large american flag covered the field during the national anthem.
---
(PHOTO) A massive fireworks show sponsored by Ametek, the United Way of Portage County and the Portage Foundation capped the Kent State University Golden Flashes football team's 17-10 victory over Liberty University
at Dix Stadium on Thursday. For more coverage, see page B1.
---
(PHOTO) hAYNES' fIRST NIghT, B4
the Golden Flashes survived on thursday night to deliver win no. 1 to first-year
head coach Paul Haynes against an Fcs-level school. the night very nearly was
spoiled in Haynes' official homecoming to Kent, but KsU prevailed.
---
(PHOTO) jAmES hARRISoN hoNoREd, B4
James Harrison got his start with the Kent state Golden Flashes after graduating from
coventry High school. Harrison became a starter with the Flashes in his junior season
(2000), when he led the team in total tackles with 106, with 13 of those for a loss. He
also had an interception and three fumble recoveries. in his senior season, Harrison had
98 tackles and 15 sacks. on thursday night, KsU retired his no. 16.

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News Headline: KENT STATE SURVIVES SCARE FROM FCS LIBERTY IN SEASON OPENER (WITH GALLERY) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Allen Moff | Staff Writer Published: August 30, 2013 4:00AM

A day that started with hope and promise oozing from Dix Stadium ended with Kent State's football team narrowly avoiding disaster in its 2013 opener against Liberty.

The Golden Flashes needed a 42-yard touchdown pass from redshirt freshman quarterback Colin Reardon to junior wide receiver Chris Humphrey with 4:28 remaining, and a pair of huge plays by senior cornerback Darius Polk in the closing minutes to eke out a come-from-behind 17-10 victory over the FCS Flames before a large and vibrant crowd of 20,790 Thursday night in Kent.

Click here to buy photos from the Kent State-Liberty game

But all's well that ends well according to head coach Paul Haynes, who was both thrilled and relieved after becoming the first Kent State head coach to win his opener since Dick Crum in 1988 -- when Haynes was a sophomore cornerback at Kent State.

"It wasn't pretty, but you know a win's a win," said a red-eyed Haynes afterward. "We knew we would have to face adversity, it wasn't gonna go perfect. It's always good to see a team fight through adversity and not give up when it's down. We had a lot guys out there playing their first college game and it was a tough game, we knew Liberty was going to be a good team. To see us fight through that and get the win ... we'll only get better."

Averting the upset was huge for a Golden Flashes team coming off the best season in school history, but it came with a price as senior speedster Dri Archer left the game in the first quarter after just three carries (10 yards) with an ankle injury and did not return.

Archer, who scored at least one touchdown in every Kent State game last season, appeared to be injured after he attempted to lunge over a pile of defenders during a 6-yard run on Kent State's opening possession. He returned to the game and carried the ball for four yards on the Flashes' next series, then left the game for good. He emerged for the second half without pads sporting a walking boot on his left foot.

Haynes had no details on Archer's injury afterward, but wasn't overly concerned.

"I do not know yet," said Haynes, when asked for an injury report on Archer, who also failed to complete his previous game in a Kent State uniform (last year's GoDaddy.com Bowl) due to injury. "They said he'll be fine."

After an impressive opening drive, Kent State's offense stalled without Archer until late in the third period.

Trailing 10-7, the Flashes took over at their own 4 having failed to produce points on six consecutive drives but proceeded to march 74 yards in 14 plays. A third-and-2 run by junior Trayion Durham was stuffed, but former Aurora High School star Anthony Melchiori lined his first collegiate field goal through the uprights from 39 yards out to knot the game 10-10 with 10:57 to play.

After Kent State's defense forced a punt, Humphrey made the play that sent his teammates home happy. He caught a short pass from Reardon near the sidelines, shook loose from a tackle attempt by Flames senior cornerback Walt Aikens at the 35 and sprinted into the end zone to give the Flashes a 17-10 lead with 4:28 to play.

"We realized that late in the game their corner that was on me was getting tired, so we just threw a simple three-step throw," said Humphrey. "It's been drilled into my head by all the coaches I've had in my career that you always make the first guy miss. That's what I did. Colin made a great read, threw it perfect, couldn't ask for a better ball, and I made the first guy miss and just got upfield. I knew we needed it bad."

Liberty threatened to tie the game on its following series, converting a third-and-5 with a 23-yard strike from sophomore quarterback Josh Woodrum to Darrin Peterson. Facing another third-and-5 at the KSU 40, the Flames twice attempted to attack Kent State senior cornerback Darius Polk, who earlier let a 58-yard bomb from Woodrum to Peterson (5 catches, 106 yards) get over his head to set up an 11-yard strike to Gabe Henderson that put Liberty on top 10-7.

Polk first pried Peterson's arms away on a slant on third down, then knocked the ball away from Peterson from behind on a similar fourth-down route to effectively seal the victory.

"I was sick to my stomach that I let that deep ball go over my head," said Polk. "I knew they were coming at me cause I gave up that deep ball, so I knew I had to keep my composure and have a short-term memory, let that play go. I knew my team needed me in the clutch."

Reardon was clutch in both the beginning and ending of his first game as a collegiate quarterback. He wound up completing 21-of-28 passes for 194 yards with no interceptions, but he did have the ball knocked loose while he was scrambling in the second quarter for a fumble that set up Liberty's first score, a 20-yard John Lunsford field goal that made it 7-3 late in the second quarter.

Reardon played like a poised veteran in the game's opening series, completing 5-of-5 passes for 35 yards. He saved his best throw for last, threading the needle to junior tight end Casey Pierce in the back of the end zone for a 6-yard score to complete an impressive 14-play 75-yard drive in the game's opening possession that lasted just over eight minutes.

"I haven't played since my senior year in high school, so I was really anxious," said Reardon. "I was really surprised I wasn't nervous really, I was just anxious to get the first snap. I knew since (Wednesday) that we were gonna pass the ball. Once I got that ball into (senior wideout Tyshon Goode) on the first play of the game, things were feeling good. We were doing everything in our gameplan in that (opening) drive, no penalties. It felt great. Everything worked."

That early momentum quickly stalled thanks in major part to penalties. Kent State was flagged eight times for 71 yards in the first half, and never seriously threatened to score again until late in the third quarter.

But Reardon, with the aid of bullish veteran back Durham (21 carries, 92 yards), was able to regroup and deliver late in the game when it mattered most. Reardon was 4-of-4 in the final stanza for 68 yards and a score in the final period.

"I think Colin played well," said Haynes. "The great thing about Colin is he'll be his worst critic. He'll look at the things he's gotta get better at. When you have your first start as a young kid and you go out there and drive the team down on the last drive, that's huge."

Thanks to the rally, and the incredible postgame fireworks display, the Flashes and their fans went home happy. Haynes hopes they all come together again when Kent State hosts Bowling Green (1-0) in a huge early-season Mid-American Conference matchup on Sept. 7.

"I thought (the atmosphere) was great," said Haynes. "Our student section was packed -- that's exactly what we've talked about, it all starts with our students. If we can get them to continue to buy into what we're doing and keep coming back, we'll have an awesome year. We'll get better for them to give them a better show."

KSU NOTEBOOK

GOODE RETURN: Senior wide receiver Tyshon Goode, who missed all of last year with a hamstring injury, caught three passes on Kent State's first series. He wound up catching a game-high eight passes for 75 yards and made some huge fourth-quarter catches despite battling cramps.

"It's huge having him back," said Haynes. "He got cramped up and kept going back in. There were a lot of times where I said get him out and he wouldn't go out."

STARTERS SIDELINED: Starting senior left guard Pat McShane and starting senior free safety Calvin Tiggle did not dress for the opener. McShane suffered a knee injury during practice on Aug. 8, and just this week began working some with trainers during practice but has not been full-go. Tiggle suffered a foot injury during Kent State's Jersey Scrimmage on Aug. 17, and has also dressed for practices since then but has not been able to make it the entire way.

Redshirt freshman Redo Reda started in place of McShane, while sophomore Keenan Stalls was in the lineup for Tiggle.

STREAKS IN TACT: Kent State earned its 11th straight regular season win and ninth in a row at home. The Flashes have also won 12 in a row against FCS teams.

•••

Email: amoff@recordpub.com
Phone: 330-541-9445
Twitter: @AllenMoff_RC
Facebook: Allen Moff, Record-Courier

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News Headline: Kent State wins a close one over Liberty, 17-10; Dri Archer out after three plays | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Elton Alexander, The Plain Dealer
on August 29, 2013 at 10:30 PM, updated August 29, 2013 at 10:54 PM

(PHOTO) Kent State's Dri Archer was injured on this play early in the first quarter but the Flashes held on for a 17-10 win over Liberty on Thursday. (Akron Beacon-Journal / Phil Masturzo)

KENT, Ohio -- Clutch passing from freshman quarterback Colin Reardon, robust running from tailback Trayion Durham, a stout defense and more lifted Kent State to a narrow 17-10 victory over the Liberty Flames Thursday night in Dix Stadium.

A crowd of 20,790 fans came to see the electricity provided by senior speedster Dri Archer to kick off the first season for head coach Paul Haynes. But the second time Archer carried the ball -- as a wildcat quarterback -- he hurt his ankle. Archer would get one more touch then was sidelined for the game.

Kent would take a 7-0 lead to start the game, hold a 7-3 edge at halftime, then trail, 10-7 going into the fourth quarter as Liberty's lone big drive of the game, 88 yards fueled in part by Kent penalties, ended with an 11-yard Josh Woodrum to Gabe Henderson touchdown.

But Kent is still a big-play outfit, and even without getting a turnover several Flashes flashed. Sophomore punter/kicker Anthony Melchiori hit a big 39-yard field goal for Kent to tie the score, 10-10, after the Flames had taken a lead.

It was Melchiori's first made field goal made, and only the second attempt in his career. It came with Kent in Durham territory, facing a fourth-and-two after Durham was stopped for no gain on third down at the Liberty 22.

"He's a gamer,'' Haynes said of the Aurora native. "I wouldn't have done it if I wasn't comfortable with it."

Senior receiver Tyshon Goode, who missed last season with a hamstring injury, returned for a clutch 75 yards on eight receptions, including big plays on Kent's first two scoring drives.

"It's huge having him back,'' Haynes said. "He kept cramping up, and he kept going right back in.''

And to end the game senior defensive back Darius Polk, who had been beaten several times on Liberty scoring drives, stepped up big to shut the door on a potential upset. On third down and fourth down, inside the Kent 50, Liberty attacked with deep slants in front of Polk. He broke up both plays allowing Kent to run out the clock for the win.

"The whole time I said to myself, 'I know they are coming at me,''' Polk said. "I know they're coming at me."

And then there was Reardon, who justified his selection as Kent's starter with a stellar 21 of 28 for 194 yards and two touchdowns. There were clearly a lot of dinks and dumps. But he threaded the needle with a back-of-the-end zone touchdown to Casey Pierce that gave Kent a 7-0 lead the first drive of the game.

And he threw a sideline strike to Chris Humphrey with 4:28 to play in the game that Humphrey took cleanly, then dashed down the sideline for a 42-yard game-winning score.

"Make the first guy miss then get upfield,'' Humphrey said of his six reception, 88-yard night.

It was all needed for Kent as the Flashes -- without a turnover and without Archer, big play keys to an 11-3 2012 season -- had to be sound to pull out this victory. Kent dominated the time of possession, 37:20 to 21:10, and held the Flames to 222 yards on 44 plays including just 33 yards rushing.

"There weren't a lot of holes in the first half, it didn't matter who the running back was,'' Liberty head coach Turner Gill said.

The same could not be said for Durham. Now a junior, Kent still has yet to get the 6-1, 240-pound bruiser the ball at least 25 carries in the game. But he took full advantage of his 21 totes for 92 yards averaging 4.4 yards per carry.

Kent had 20 first downs in the game and Durham was responsible for eight of them, six coming on third-down plays.

"He's a fullback at running back,'' Reardon said. "Those third-and-shorts, we shouldn't be stopped."

Haynes said Archer should be OK, which is crucial as he will be needed in next Saturday's Mid-American Conference opener against Bowling Green, which won its opener with ease over Tulsa Thursday night.

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News Headline: UNITED WAY KICKS OFF 2013 CAMPAIGN AT KENT STATE FOOTBALL OPENER | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Mike Sever | staff writer Published: August 30, 2013 4:00AM

The United Way of Portage County kicked off its 2013 campaign at the Kent State University football opener Thursday evening.

This year's campaign goal of $1.1 million arrived written on a football passed to Flash, the Kent State mascot, at the start of the third quarter of play at Dix Stadium.

Click here to buy photos from the Kent State-Liberty game

The campaign kickoff came as part of a tailgate celebration of the start of the football season and to mark the continued development of downtown Kent. The evening ended with a massive fireworks display sponsored by Ametek, United Way and The Portage Foundation.

Honorary campaign chairman is Jack Vresics, CEO of Step2 LLC in Streetsboro.

Phil Faluotico, director of motor engineering at Ametek and a member of the campaign committee of United Way, said he urges businesses to support the campaign because "it benefits their employees, family, friends and neighbors. Most people never imagine themselves in a position of needing United Way."

Matt French, vice president and general manager of Ametek's Kent division and honorary campaign chairman the previous two years, said he tells business people, "You don't only work here, you live here. You could be just one step away from needing help. That's why it's important" to support United Way.

French said any successful community needs four things: "A strong community, a strong economy, a strong governmental structure and strong education." He said the United Way helps support a successful community.

Brian D. Duchon, new president and CEO of United Way, said the goal is the same as last year's. The 2012 campaign fell just short, raising $1.075 million and encouraging officials that the community effort was recovering. Previous campaigns had fallen below the $1 million mark.

The United Way of Portage County funds 43 partner programs within 14 social service agencies in the county that touch thousands of residents. Duchon noted money raised in Portage County stays in the county, and decisions about funding are made by local community members.

"We're really covering a broad spectrum of services that form the foundation of a successful life," Duchon said.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1125 or msever@recordpub.com

Facebook: Mike Sever, Record-Courier

Twitter: @MikeSever_RC

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News Headline: Class Notes (Jarvie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland Jewish News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) Hillel at Kent State staff, including from left, engagement associate Shiri Akrish, senior Jewish educator Rabbi Lee Moore, executive director Jennifer Chestnut and development associate Jacob Rosen, receive the "Indispensable University Partner" award at the Hillel Institute in St. Louis.

BY SUE HOFFMAN
CJN STAFF REPORTER | 0 comments
Hillel at Kent State University recently received an “Indispensable University Partner” award from Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life.
The honor was one of five Vision and Values awards presented July 30, at the Hillel Institute, an annual weeklong professional development conference, held at Washington University in St. Louis. Hillel at Kent State and the Santa Barbara Hillel in California were the two “Indispensable University Partner” award winners. The award is given to a Hillel that demonstrates full immersion in university life, and is regarded as a valued partner by the campus community and administration.
Hillel at Kent State is the home-away-from-home for 1,500 Jewish students at Kent State and The University of Akron and is one of 550 college campus Hillels. The staff received a plaque and a banner that states: “For exemplifying the spirit of genuine partnership by embracing campus life” at both universities.
“We are really proud of this meaningful award,” said Jennifer Chestnut, who is entering her 15th year as Hillel at Kent State's executive director. “But this is really a recognition for all to share, as it shows the genuine partnerships that we have at both campuses.”
“It is my honor to recognize the Hillel at Kent State for their commitment to being a vital campus partner and leader in the areas of diversity, tolerance and multiculturalism,” said former Clevelander Scott Brown, Hillel's vice president of talent, as he presented the award.
Kent State administrators assisted with the application process. Highlighted were Hillel's long tradition of holding May 4 commemoration events; the fact that the Cohn Jewish Student Center was the first Hillel building to be erected on state land; and Hillel's many co-sponsorship events on campus, such as the Just 4 Day service initiative.
“I have worked closely with the Kent State Hillel for the last 25 years,” said Greg Jarvie, Kent State University's vice president of enrollment management. “Their commitment to inclusiveness in regards to scholarship, leadership, cultural and religious awareness has been a major influence in the entire university community.”

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News Headline: KSU Hotel & Conference Center expected to boom (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: by Kyle MCDonalD| Staff writer
(PHOTO) the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center is already exceeding expectations.
Two months after opening,
business is surpassing projections for the Kent State
University Hotel and Conference Center, and expected to
boom with a new school year
around the corner.
“In just the first two
months of operation, the hotel and conference center has
already exceeded the proforma study that was compiled prior to the opening
of the hotel,” said Eugene
Finn, KSU's vice president
of institutional advancement and executive director of the KSU Foundation.
“We have every reason to expect that the hotel and conference center will be in great
demand as we enter the new
school year.”
After breaking ground on
Sept. 19, 2011, the KSU Hotel and Conference Center
officially opened its doors for
business on June 14.
The $16-million project is
a partnership between the
Kent State University Foundation and the Pizzuti Companies of Columbus.
The new hotel, bordered
by Haymaker Parkway and
South DePeyster and East
Erie streets, has 94 guest
rooms, a restaurant and
lounge, an indoor pool and
workout facility, a 24-hour
business center, and 5,000
square feet of event space
with an executive boardroom.
The hotel's restaurant,
Zenas, is named after Zenas
Kent, father of Kent's namesake, Marvin Kent, while the
name of the lounge, 1910,
comes from the year the university was established as
Kent State Normal School.
So far, the hotel's guests
and visitors have had good
things to say about their stay,
Finn noted. “To date, the
positive feedback from the
guests of the new hotel has
far exceeded even our own
expectations, so we know
we've achieved what we've
set out to do.”
Finn said KSU's board of
trustees saw the importance
of building a hotel in downtown Kent as part of the $110
million in public/private investment, which includes
the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority's Kent Central Gateway
facility; two phases of Acorn
Alley retail; the Fairmount
project, which includes retail and offices for the Davey Tree Expert Co. and Ametek; and revitalization of the
old Kent Hotel.
“The KSU Foundation was
proud to participate in the
overall downtown redevelopment by funding and building the new hotel and conference center,” he said. “The
board viewed the hotel as a
key piece of the redevelopment of downtown Kent to
ensure that our alumni, parents and friends had a firstrate facility at which to stay
while visiting campus and
the city.”
Finn said the hotel will also
add to both Kent's mission
to become a destination
city and KSU's more than
$170-million Foundations of
D12 FriDay, August 30, 2013 Record-Courier www.recordpub.com
KSU Hotel & Conference Center expected to boom

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News Headline: Ohio DOT Awards $10.5 million for Transportation Alternatives Projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Asphalt Contractor - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Source: Ohio Department of Transportation

Funds will advance construction of non-motorized transportation and recreational facilities such as bike paths, safe routes for non-drivers and the restoration of covered bridges

Related Content

Related Terms

The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) awarded $10.5 million for Transportation Alternatives Projects in communities all over Ohio.

The awards will be used to help communities advance projects for non-motorized transportation and recreational facilities, by creating bicycle and pedestrian paths, safe routes for non-drivers and the restoration of historic transportation facilities like Ohio's covered bridges.

Transportation Alternative project must demonstrate a clear public benefit.

Some examples of selected projects:

Pickaway County received $297,600 to construct a multi-use path that connects to school campus, college campus and YMCA.

City of East Liverpool was awarded $799,185 to create a safe pedestrian oriented route connecting Kent State east campus to west campus and downtown businesses.

Sandusky County Commissioners received $285,792 for the rehabilitation of the Mull Covered Bridge.

Local governmental entities, regional transportation authorities, transit agencies, and natural resource or public land agencies are eligible to apply for funding. 

What is TAP?

The Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) provides funds for projects that advance non-motorized transportation and recreational facilities, historic transportation preservation, and environmental aspects.

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News Headline: Alcorn McBride Delivers Multimedia for Kent State Visitors Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Live Design
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, marked the 43rd commemoration of the tragic events of May 4, 1970, with the dedication of the May 4 Visitors Center.

Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, marked the 43rd commemoration of the tragic events of May 4, 1970, with the dedication of the May 4 Visitors Center. This center includes multimedia exhibits that inform guests about what led to the confrontation between students and the National Guard during the Vietnam War. This historical event left four students dead and nine wounded. The university selected Alcorn McBride's A/V Binloop to playback the audio and video in the exhibit.

The dedication ceremony featured film director/producer Oliver Stone and PBS news anchor Gwen Ifill; Ifill moderated a panel discussion on the "Historical Significance of May 4 and the Visitors Center" and Stone shared his thoughts on "History and Memory in Film."

Bryan Molnar, electronics technician supervisor with Kent State who oversaw the integration of the technology for the May 4 Visitors Center, chose the A/V Binloop for Gallery 1: The Context. This space delivers background information on the Vietnam War: A Nation Divided; the Generation Gap between students and their elders; and the Struggle for Social Justice.

"There are three CRT TVs," Molnar explains, "each one playing a nine-minute video loop about the war, generation gap and social justice. Visitors can see all three TVs at once. But the audio changes to a different TV every three minutes, so the programs loop with two three-minute videos with audio and one three-minute video without audio."

The A/V Binloop's four video cards accommodate these requirements with the first three slots in the Binloop playing back the video feeds to the TVs and the fourth slot the audio. "Thinking about getting all that synched was crazy," Molnar recalls. "That's why the A/V Binloop was perfect - it's designed to do exactly that. Most players don't have this type of synchronization, but the Binloop could handle all the displays at once. And it can be adjusted any way I need."

Alcorn McBride's A/V Binloop is the ultimate frame-accurate synchronized audio and video player. With no moving parts, it provides up to 16 channels of ultra reliable playback that outlasts any other.

"Alcorn McBride was great working with us," says Molnar, to ensure the equipment delivered the functionality that Gallery 1 demanded. "The system is working beautifully. The A/V Binloop comes on every morning and goes to sleep every night. I've never had a problem with it."

The designers of the May 4 Visitors Center are Cybelle Jones and Carl Rhodes of Gallagher & Associates. For more information about Kent State's May 4 Visitors Center, visit www.kent.edu/may4.

About Alcorn McBride:
Founded in 1986, Alcorn McBride is the leading manufacturer of show control, audio and video equipment for the themed entertainment industry, and a rapidly growing provider of audio and video systems for retail environments and transportation applications. Staffed by some of the industry's best engineers and backed by outstanding customer support, the company has demonstrated great agility in bringing new designs to market. A hallmark of Alcorn McBride products is their durable, zero maintenance design. The company's products provide consistent, reliable operation for audio and video playback applications worldwide. For more information, visit www.alcorn.com.

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News Headline: A young woman's dream comes true: She's the 4-H queen | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/29/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By EMMALEE C. TORISK

etorisk@vindy.com

CANFIELD

Even at 8 years old, Meghan Svetlak dreamed of one day being chosen to represent Mahoning County in the best possible way: as 4-H queen.

The 18-year-oldâs dream came true Thursday afternoon, when she was crowned queen on the Canfield Fairâs Concourse Stage â decorated with cowboy hats and bandannas to reflect a âWild Westâ theme â during the Junior Fair Youth Day Program.

âIt means a lot,â said Svetlak, a freshman at Kent State University. âIâm grateful for everything Iâve learned, and 4-H has made me a better person.â

Both Svetlak and this yearâs king, 19-year-old Brandon Benson, have each been members of 4-H for nine years, and said they plan to give back to the 4-H community by becoming advisers for the youth organization.

Benson, a senior at TRECA Digital Academy and two-year member of the 4-H Royal Court, said he was shocked to learn that heâd been picked as king.

âI love 4-H,â Benson said. âIâd like to see more people do 4-H, and go out and have fun.â

Janice Hanna, 4-H educator at the Ohio State University Extension Office in Canfield, introduced this yearâs members of the 4-H Royal Court: Tara Balsinger, Benson, Hanna Bond, Emily Erb, Joe Fagano, Wesley Miller, Christian Moore, Levi Smith, Jena Styka, and Svetlak.

âI know theyâre all very talented,â Hanna said. âWhatâs impressive is the wide range of activities in which theyâve participated.â

Last yearâs king and queen, Sam Barnhouse and Michele Awad, also were on hand for Thursdayâs coronation, as was Leland Knauf, of Canfield, who was selected as the first 4-H king in 1954. Knauf presented Svetlak and Benson trophies.

Shortly afterward, 19-year-old David Corll, a 14-year member of Grange, and 19-year-old Colleen Maskarinec, an eight-year member of 4-H, won Junior Fair Outstanding Youth.

Maskarinec, a freshman at Youngstown State University, encouraged others to become involved with 4-H, and said the organization was a great experience.

âIâm sad itâs my last year,â she said. âBut it was worth it.â

Though Corll, a sophomore at Ohio State Universityâs Agricultural Technical Institute, said he was thrilled to win, he acknowledged the hard work and contributions of others, explaining that any of the candidates would have deserved the award.

Itâs a big accomplishment,â he said. âIâm proud and honored to get it.â

Junior Fair Outstanding Youth candidates were Alyssa Armstrong, Maryssa Barnett, Benson, Bond, Corll, Maggie Dangerfield, Donald Duda III, Greta Frost, Maskarinec, Logan Moff, Patrick OâBrien, Jake Smith, Styka, and Svetlak.

The Royal Court consists of only 4-H members, but Junior Fair Outstanding Youth candidates can be involved in any of the seven Junior Fair organizations: Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Camp Fire, Farm Bureau, 4-H, Future Farmers of America, and Grange.

Other stories of interestYoungstown to events: Shhhh after 11 p.m.Brine dumper agrees to cooperate with U.S. AttorneyEast Side dog attack puts mail carrier in hospitalEx-Trumbull engineer DeChristofaro gets public reprimand

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News Headline: The new Esplanade symbolizes the connection between Kent State University and downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: (PHOTO) splanade, the new link that directly connects the Kent State University campus with downtown Kent. The view past the KSU arch looks past the green,
across Haymaker Parkway, and directly down the revamped erie Street.
---
by Jeremy Nobile | STaFFwriTer

A decades-long vision of
physically tying together
downtown Kent with its adjacent university is now a
reality.
That vision has come to
fruition in the Kent State
University Esplanade, where
a $3.4-million project to extend the pedestrian-minded walkway to the edge of
Kent's budding downtown
has been under way since
last fall.
Work on the Esplanade itself was originally projected
to be finished in July, but the
walkway was officially completed when a new archway
facing Haymaker Parkway at
one end of the path was completed in August.
The Esplanade now
stretches about one mile
through the KSU campus
and funnels pedestrians into
downtown via a new crosswalk at Haymaker Parkway,
signifying both a tangible
and symbolic connection between the city and the university.
“We're trying to make it as
easy as possible for the campus and its resources to enjoy the downtown, and likewise, to have the downtown
feel connected to this wonderful campus we have here,”
said City Manager Dave Ruller in the spring.
He added that the city is
excited to see “that parade
of people in both directions.”
On campus, the Esplanade begins near KSU's
Liquid Crystal Institute. The
path ends downtown at Haymaker Parkway, across the
street from the new KSU
Hotel and Conference Center and near the new green, a
lawn about the size of a football field.
Michael Bruder, Kent
State executive director of
facility planning and design,
described the lawn as an “urban park” in the middle of
downtown.
“People who might be at
the conference center grabbing lunch could walk across
Haymaker and then have the
park to eat in right in downtown,” Bruder said. “We're
hoping a lot of our students
use it, and the general public as well.”
KSU spent about $10 million on real-estate acquisitions on the northwest edge
of campus to clear the way
for the Esplanade. Walkers
heading from downtown toward campus will be first
greeted by KSU's Franklin Hall. The unobstructed
view underscores the link between city and college.
Also along the Esplanade,
the historic May Prentice
house will eventually house
the Wick Poetry Center.
Meanwhile, KSU's new
College of Architecture
building will also be on the
northwest edge of campus
near the Esplanade path.
That building, Bruder said,
is projected to be finished in
late 2015 and open for class
for the 2016 spring semester.
“That will be kind of an
iconic building for campus,”
Bruder said. “It'll be the first
building you see when you
approach campus from the
west.”

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News Headline: The new look of downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 08/30/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 1. The esplanade
2. New courthouse
3. Kent central Gateway
4. KSu Hotel and
conference center
5. building c
6. Acorn corner
7. Acorn Alley 1 & 2
8. The Kent Stage
9. Ametek + more
10. davey resource
Group + more

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