Report Overview:
Total Clips (42)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Students (1)
Aeronautics; College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (1)
Alumni (5)
Anthropology (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Athletics (1)
Biogeochemistry (1)
Biological Sciences (2)
College of Communication and Information (CCI); Digital Sciences (School of); Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Enrollment (1)
Fashion Design (1)
Fashion Design; Students (1)
Global Education (1)
Higher Education; Office of the President (1)
History (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (4)
KSU Airport (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Museum (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music; Students (2)
Political Science; Students (1)
Small Business Development (2)
Students (3)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Students (1)
Women Veterans Face Stereotypes on and off the Battlefield 09/08/2013 NationofChange Text Attachment Email

...17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes. It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed...


Aeronautics; College of Applied Eng, Sustainability and Tech (1)
New aviation programs taking flight at Kent State 09/09/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Administrators have set lofty goals for Kent State University's aeronautics programs. Evolving industry needs and new technologies have changed the...


Alumni (5)
Changes come to local TV 09/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...Jimmy. Starting Monday night you can add another name to that list: Arsenio. He's no newcomer to the late-night wars. In 1989, Cleveland native and Kent State University graduate Arsenio Hall began a five-year late-night run as the star of the syndicated “The Arsenio Hall Show.” Hall's revival...

Northeast Ohioans on TV, behind the scenes 09/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...speaking of “Community,” the NBC comedy received a surprise renewal for a fifth season. It's waiting in the wings for midseason. East Cleveland native and University of Akron graduate Yvette Nicole Brown returns as Shirley. The Russo brothers are executive producers. Another returning NBC show, “Parenthood,”...

Arsenio Hall returning to late-night talk-show beat: Fall TV preview 2013 09/06/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Jimmy. Starting Monday night you can add another name to that list: Arsenio. He's no newcomer to the late-night wars. In 1989, Cleveland native and Kent State University graduate Arsenio Hall began a five-year late-night run as the star of the syndicated "The Arsenio Hal Show." Syndicated shows...

VIDEO: Cleveland's Own Arsenio Hall Talks to FOX 8 09/09/2013 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND- Cleveland's own Arsenio Hall is returning to late night TV Monday, September 9. Hall recently talked to our own Wayne Dawson about his Cleveland...

Had it. Lost it. Can he have it again? 09/07/2013 Hamilton Spectator, The Text Email

...early '90s, and it still holds true. Born in Cleveland 57 years ago, Hall early found an aptitude for magic, debate - and comedy. After graduating from Kent State, he headed west - first to Chicago, then Los Angeles, in search of a standup career, and landed at West Hollywood's Comedy Store, one of...


Anthropology (1)
Clovis spearpoints likely were all-purpose tools 09/08/2013 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

...Nevertheless, some doubt was cast on the idea that Clovis points were made expressly to kill mammoths and mastodons a few years ago when Mark Seeman, who was a Kent State University researcher, and colleagues identified blood residue from rabbits on Clovis points from the Nobles Pond site in Stark County....


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
ALONG THE WAY: Spotlighting Ravenna history (Steidl) 09/09/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

If architectural history and preservation are your cup of tea, the fund-raising tour of three of Ravenna's hidden architectural treasures that Friends...


Athletics (1)
Kent State star Dri Archer sits out Flashes' loss to Bowling Green (Haynes) 09/07/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State senior speedster Dri Archer did not dress for Saturday's game against Bowling Green due to a left ankle injury suffered in the season-opening...


Biogeochemistry (1)
Environmental Impact of Shale Gas: Does Fracking Help to Save Water? (Lutz) 09/07/2013 Bulk Solids Handling Text Attachment Email

...chemicals produced during ethane cracking could be in short supply in the US. (Picture: BASF, Fotolia; [M]-Herkersdorf) A new research by the Duke and Kent State universities provides surprising results: Although hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") consumes less water than conventional gas wells, the...


Biological Sciences (2)
Cancer survivors celebrate in Warren 09/08/2013 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...so I feel without this, people are going to die unnecessarily." said Jodi Lehman, a 45-year cancer survivor. American Cancer Society researcher and Kent State professor, Dr. Gary Koski was the guest speaker

Cancer survivors gather to celebrate Cancer Survivorship Day 09/08/2013 WKBN-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...about the latest cancer research and resources available to cancer patients. The guest speaker was American Cancer Society researcher and Assistant Kent State Professor, Dr. Gary Koski. “This event I've never been to before,” said cancer survivor Jodi Lehmann. “And I feel it's essential for...


College of Communication and Information (CCI); Digital Sciences (School of); Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Kent State Student Project on Suicide Prevention Earns Innovator of the Year Award (Marino, Zake) 09/09/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Online platform offers a comprehensive look at college suicide and aims to eliminate stigma surrounding mental illness Students from Kent State University's...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Nursing professor awarded Nurse's Touch Award (Snelson) 09/07/2013 UWire Text Email

...get awards; I just teach students the best I can." Speakers from the college spoke of how they have seen Snelson help students during her time at Kent State. Before Snelson received the award, faculty took the time to read some students' comments from when the nominations were submitted. ...


Enrollment (1)
Enrollment at Local Colleges 09/06/2013 WFMJ-TV Text Attachment Email

...in their educational goals. 00:14:05:15 I THINK YOU'RE GOING TO FIND OUT THAT EVENTUALLY STUDENTS WILL START TO COME HERE THEN WILL FILTER OUT TO YSU KENT STATE AND T HE DIFFERENT UNIVERSITIES At the same time, President Dunn wants YSU to grow enrollment by becoming a destination university for...


Fashion Design (1)
Why do costumes cost so much? (Stanforth) 09/06/2013 IOL Text Attachment Email

... "Constructing even a simple swimsuit is every bit as complex as constructing a dress," says Nancy Stanforth, a professor of fashion merchandising at Kent State University. Designers must push the latest trends, while carefully considering fit: A survey by the market research company, NPD Group...


Fashion Design; Students (1)
Highlights from the Supima Spring 2014 Design Competition presentation 09/09/2013 Examiner.com Text Attachment Email

...shirting." This year's eight finalists were: Bradley Mounce and Carly Rosenbrook from the Fashion Institute of Technology; Sylvia Bukowski and Will Riddle from Kent State; Hannah Soukup and Morgan Selin from the Rhode Island School of Design; and Michelle Leal and Rachel Buske from the Savannah College of...


Global Education (1)
Edwise Offers Great Opportunity to Meet 80+ Universities From 8 Countries at the World Education Fair 09/07/2013 AndhraNews.net Text Attachment Email

...Hampshire, Kentucky, James Madison, Long Island,Widener, Colorado State Uni, Marshall, South Florida, Oregon State Uni, Colorado StateUni, Marshall University, Kent State Uni ,Minneapolis College of Art & Design, New YorkFilm Academy, St. John's Uniersity from USA, Camuson College, Centennial College, FraserInternational...


Higher Education; Office of the President (1)
Listen to a Discussion About Replacing College Presidents 09/06/2013 StateImpact Oklahoma Text Attachment Email

Three of Ohio's largest public universities are looking for new leaders. Former Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee retired in July. Kent State University President Lester Lefton will retire next summer. University of Akron President Luis Proenza will retire in June. ...


History (1)
Gukurahundi and apartheid SA (Scarnecchia) 09/06/2013 Zimbabwe Independent Text Attachment Email

THIS is a continuation of the article by Kent State University's Professor Timothy Scarnecchia, an expert on Zimbabwean and African history, on the Zimbabwean government and apartheid South...


Journalism and Mass Communications (4)
Page: Journalism is about the meat, not the medium 09/07/2013 Journal & Courier - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...year. Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students—like I was. That’s...

Clarence Page: Today's kids don't learn news literacy 09/08/2013 Poughkeepsie Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...year. Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students like I was. ...

High school newspapers on the endangered list 09/08/2013 Daytona Beach News-Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...year. Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students — like I was. ...

Page: Journalism is about the meat, not the medium 09/07/2013 Alexandria Daily Town Talk - Online Text Attachment Email

...year. Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students—like I was. That’s...


KSU Airport (1)
Annual Aviation Fair, car show both set for Sept. 14 09/08/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University will host its annual Aviation Heritage Fair on Sept. 14 at its airport from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to aircraft on...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Taste of Hubbard event planned 09/07/2013 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT TO HOLD AWARD RECEPTION: Kent State University at Trumbull will host the scholarship reception at 3 p.m. on Sept. 27 in Room 117 of the Technology Building, campus of Kent...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Musicology: Don't miss chance to see B.B. King at PAC 09/08/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Blues legend B.B. King will be visiting the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16. Someone once told me if ever I had the chance to see King perform I should "do it." King,...

'Guys with Guitars' coming to KSU Tusc 09/06/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA ?Guys with Guitars? will kick off the new Cabaret Series at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 8 p.m. Sept. 14. The show will be performed with the audience seated on stage. A three-course meal is included...


KSU Museum (2)
Stage and screen fashions of legendary actress Katharine Hepburn at heart of Appleton exhibit 09/08/2013 Oshkosh Northwestern - Online Text Attachment Email

Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Fashion Museum, dresses a mannequin with a Valentina dress made for Katharine Hepburn for the 1942 play 'Without Love.' It's...

Hepburn dresses hit art museum 09/06/2013 Province - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...exhibit will feature some of her rarely exhibited costumes from stage, screen and television, along with items from her personal collection on loan from the Kent State University Museum. The exhibit is called Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen. It starts Sept. 13 at The Trout Museum of...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Lights Outs: Physicists Find a Faster Way to Switch LCDs (Lavrentovich) 09/06/2013 Science Magazine Text Attachment Email

...form a picture, bits or "pixels" of the screen are controlled individually. The scheme has a basic limitation, says Oleg Lavrentovich, a physicist at Kent State University in Ohio. The electric field wrenches the molecules into the "on" orientation in nanoseconds. When the power goes off, the molecules...


Music; Students (2)
Mamba Masters, cellist among highlights of Music from the Western Reserve Season 09/08/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...artist," Yang Zeng, performs Nov. 3rd. A rising star and much sought after violinist, Zeng has been studying the violin since the age of 6. A student at Kent State University, Zeng studies with Cathy Meng Robinson and has participated in the Kent Blossom Music Festival residency program for three years....

Mamba Masters, cellist among highlights of Music from the Western Reserve Season 09/08/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...artist," Yang Zeng, performs Nov. 3rd. A rising star and much sought after violinist, Zeng has been studying the violin since the age of 6. A student at Kent State University, Zeng studies with Cathy Meng Robinson and has participated in the Kent Blossom Music Festival residency program for three years....


Political Science; Students (1)
Students and staff remember professor Erik Heidemann 09/06/2013 UWire Text Email

The sudden death of a well-loved Kent State political science professor shook the university, leaving students and faculty to reflect on the legacy he has left. Erik Heidemann,...


Small Business Development (2)
Small Business Development Center at Kent-Tusc gets a boost (Schillig) 09/07/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Eight businesses and organizations have helped fund the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia to enable the center to continue providing consulting and advising services to new small businesses....

Business startup class is Wednesday 09/08/2013 Coshocton Tribune - Online Text Attachment Email

...Chamber of Commerce will host a business startup class from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Coshocton County Progress Center. Jeannie Keenan, of the Kent State Small Business Development Center, will be the instructor. Topics will cover the chance of success of opening a new business, business...


Students (3)
Spuds, art take spotlight in Mantua, Kent 09/07/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...repeated today. Kathy Armstrong was teaching children fiber art, another activity that continues today. Staff members were assisted by two groups at Kent State University, as well as students from James A. Garfield High School. Since this is the festival's first year without strolling poet...

No bugs about it: New website helps users identify Michigan insects 09/09/2013 AnnArbor.com Text Attachment Email

...one of the most simple ways to identify an insect and it's also one of the most accurate," said McKinne, now a public administration graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio. "(Mertz is) making a pool for students and educators to build on." McKinne said he has contributed to the website...

Church celebrates future by investing in children 09/08/2013 Ellwood City Ledger - Online Text Attachment Email

...and continuing into and through the room, walls feature murals painted by Shelby Pflugh of Franklin Township. Pflugh, a sketch artist, is a student at Kent State University. “We asked her to do something entirely different from her work that is lifelike sketches, something completely out of her...


University Press (2)
Del Gizzo, Suzanne and Frederic J. Svoboda, eds. Hemingway's The Garden of Eden: Twenty-Five Years of Criticism. 09/06/2013 Free Library, The Text Attachment Email

...Creation; when they disobeyed and ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were : Twenty-Five Years of Criticism. Kent, OH: Kent State UP, 2012.396 pp. Cloth $55. This anthology, which brings together many of the most influential essays on Hemingway's posthumous novel,...

Shepherd University professor writes book about state's founding 09/09/2013 Shepherdstown Chronicle Text Attachment Email

Dr. John E. Stealey III, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Shepherd University, has written his fourth book, "West Virginia's Civil War-Era...


News Headline: Women Veterans Face Stereotypes on and off the Battlefield | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: NationofChange
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Asha Anchan, Caitlin Cruz and Kelsey Hightower

‘I don't think I've talked to one female veteran who goes to the VA who has had a good experience'.

The fight to feel like a veteran weighs substantially on female soldiers returning from war, though their numbers have been historic, with more than 280,000 returning from deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade.

A News21 demographic analysis shows that 17.4 percent of post-9/11 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are women. More than a quarter of those women are black, almost twice the proportion found in the entire U.S. population.

Yet, these same women are less likely to find a job than male veterans and more likely to be a single parent with children to support, interviews and records show.

They return to a nation that historically defines “veteran” as male, which in the post-9/11 era has meant a lack of female-specific resources at VA facilities across the country.

A 2013 Institute of Medicine report found that women in combat-support roles, like men, experience intense warfare and constant threats on their lives, but the implications of this trauma for women has been overlooked.

“Historically, research on the health of veterans has focused on the health consequences of combat service in men, and there has been little scientific research ... of the health consequences of military service in women who served,” according to the report.

Currently, 360,000 women use VA medical services. But the number is expected to double as more women come home and seek care, many of them relatively new to its services, said Dr. Patricia Hayes, chief consultant of Women's Health Services at the VA in Washington, D.C.

As of 2008, only 33 percent of the 152 VA medical centers had specified "women's clinics," records show. Now, about 75 percent offer at least some type of female-specific care, Hayes said.

Army National Guard Spc. Crystal Sandor muscled a 5-ton truck through the ragtag roads of Iraq and likely would be dead from an exploding fireball had the 4-foot-10 soldier been just centimeters taller.

She was awarded a Purple Heart, but had to prove to the Army that she deserved it.

Even back home in Ohio, she doesn't feel much like a soldier.

“What did you do over there?” some gray-haired male veterans in Akron, Ohio, at the Department of Veterans Affairs asked as they sized up her petite frame. “Did you sell Girl Scout cookies?” one asked.

When Sandor's husband goes to the VA, he gets handshakes and “Thank you for your service” accolades in the waiting room.

Not Crystal.

Sandor has struggled to get the care she expected from the military since the night she nearly died – June 18, 2004.

She was a driver in a 20-truck convoy during a night mission in Iraq.

She laughs just a little, remembering a conversation with a fellow soldier. She was razzing him for spilling sunflower seeds, a staple during their missions together. Then, a fireball from a roadside bomb came head-on toward their truck.

Sandor woke up pounding on her chest to make sure she was alive. She couldn't see, couldn't hear. The voice of a soldier broke the chaos.

“Just keep driving! Just keep driving!”

“If I was that much taller,” Sandor says, putting mere centimeters between her thumb and forefinger, “I wouldn't be alive.”

After the accident and while still in Iraq, Sandor discovered her superiors lost the paperwork documenting the attack, meaning there was no official record that it ever happened.

“The only reason I have the disability (rating) I have is because I was smart enough to have a video camera on me and we recorded the damage to the truck and we took pictures of everything,” she said. “That is the only reason I have a Purple Heart or disability.”

Since Sandor's return home in March 2005, she's been at odds with the Ohio VA system over her treatment.

During her first appointment later that year, she said the VA doctor seemed skeptical of her injuries, treating her as if she never left the base. When she was asked about treatment options, Sandor requested therapy to talk about the attack that injured her. Instead, she left with three prescriptions for anxiety and sleeping. She said she stopped taking the medications because she felt like a “zombie.”

“I don't think I've talked to one female veteran who goes to the VA who has had a good experience, that has been treated and received the care that they deserve,” Sandor said. “I think because the VA has dealt with men for so long, through all the previous wars, they're not set up to handle females. But we've been at this war for 10 years, it's about time they figure it out.”

She tried group therapy at the VA, but was placed in an all-male group. She left each session feeling guilty, not better, about herself because of the horror stories the men told.

For the last eight years, Sandor has bounced between her civilian doctor and the VA to prove the extent of her injuries — such as the post-traumatic stress disorder the VA denied, but her civilian doctor insists she has, along with ringing in her ears, severe arthritis in her knees, hearing and vision loss, herniated disks, a deviated septum and a brain lesion. She has a 40 percent disability rating.

She tries to dismiss her concerns with the VA, keeping her focus on her 17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes.

It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed her, but her PTSD continues to creep into her civilian life both physically and emotionally.

“A lot of people are still like, ‘Why does it bother you? It's been eight years, get over it,' ” Sandor said. “It doesn't go away, it's with you the rest of your life. I mean, the severity of it might – how much you remember of it might — but that feeling, it's always there.”

When Hannah Siska left the Marines in 2011, she expected to find a job with the skills she acquired during her five years of service. She was a Marine in good standing. She had strong leadership skills. She had high security clearance.

But she couldn't get a job, even with her training as a special communications signals collection operator and analyst.

Siska applied for more than 150 jobs posted on Department of Defense websites geared toward applicants with security clearances. The result always was the same.

“They want to hire vets that are males, not females, and that was very apparent,” said Siska, who was deployed to Iraq in 2008 and 2009. “I had everything and my resume looked just like all the other guys that got jobs and I didn't.”

In September 2012, the unemployment rate for post-9/11 female veterans hit a high of 19.9 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The average unemployment rate for female veterans for all of 2012 was 12.5 percent, but that was still 3 percentage points higher than the average for male veterans that year.

“Unfortunately when female veterans come home they aren't perceived as women warriors,” said John Pickens III, a Vietnam veteran and the executive director of VeteransPlus, a nonprofit offering financial counseling to service members.

A woman's military experience isn't seen as suitable for civilian life, despite the fact that they learned the same skills as their male counterparts, he said.

“They can't enjoy the life they've fought to defend and there's a lot of pride there,” he said.

Siska calls it “the boys' club” mentality, a perception she worked against during her time as a Marine. When she joined in 2006, Siska said her superiors and fellow Marines gave her extra responsibilities because they trusted her judgment and work ethic. She sought a higher rank, but was not promoted. So she left the Marines.

“I loved it, and I loved the people, I loved what I did, I just didn't like the political aspect behind being able to move up,” she said.

She described the Marines as “old fashioned,” and based on a ranking system emphasizing running and shooting scores. This mindset hinders the Marines, she said, because it discourages women from joining.

In 2009, women made up 19.5 percent of officers and enlisted members in the Air Force, but only 6.4 percent of all Marines, according to the Pew Research Center.

Now, Siska's working on a biochemistry degree at Kent State University while caring for two young children. Her goal is to go to medical school and serve in the Navy.

“I want to be a career person and I want to accomplish things and feel like I'm contributing to society or a community or just my family,” she said.

Other than when she is in a Kent State classroom, Aribella Shapiro is always by herself. She walks everywhere because she doesn't have a car — to school, to Walmart, to the Kent Church of Christ.

On one Sunday, she leaves at least 45 minutes before the 10:45 a.m. service. The dewy grass sticks to her brown suede and rubber boots with fur around the top. She says the boots remind her of being in the Army.

She cuts across the lawn of another church, passes campus, stops to get a Frappuccino at Starbucks and zigzags past Main Street and over to the church.

They're finishing a Bible study and moving on to the main worship service when she comes in and sits at the back of the 14-pew church. There are fewer than 20 people in the church; Shapiro is one of about three under the age of 35. She said she likes to try out different churches, but wants to connect somewhere so God knows she's thankful.

“I'm proud because I'm alive and I'm all in one piece,” said the 32-year-old. “I have a lot of friends who have died due to the war and I wasn't one of them. I'm proud that I fought for America.”

But she's not proud of everything about the military, namely her rape by a superior officer.

“I didn't tell anyone because I felt embarrassed,” she said, explaining that her rapist threatened to kill her if she said anything. “I cried for months.”

The crying stopped, she explains, because she talked with other women who experienced similar scenarios, and she realized her story was not unique. The Department of Defense's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office estimates that 26,000 cases of sexual assault or unwanted sexual contact occurred in fiscal 2012. Of that estimate, 3,374 cases were reported, according to that office.

Shapiro joined the Army, knowing her decision to serve would pay her way through college. The Post-9/11 GI Bill brought her to Kent and it's where she feels the most confident — sitting in class, studying for an exam or helping other students with their homework.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill offers an education to those who served after Sept. 10, 2001, and has paid for nearly 1 million veterans to go to school.

Post-9/11 female veterans who have a high school equivalent degree outperform non-veterans when it comes to post-secondary degree attainment, according to a News21 analysis.

But many women veterans returning home to student life juggle other challenges. Only 15 percent of student veterans are “traditionally” college-aged students. Another 47 percent have children and nearly that same percentage are married.

“We think that women veterans don't necessarily want to be identified solely as veterans, as a special group, they want to be identified as women students and adult learners,” said Rachel Anderson, director of the Center for Adult and Veteran Services at Kent State University.

The Independent Budget — an annual VA budget and policy analysis prepared by independent veterans service organizations — reported that researchers found women veterans have a difficult time finding support systems upon returning home. Some women reported feeling isolated, and for others this feeling is made worse by the college atmosphere.

But Aribella Shapiro's life is lonelier than she would like. She dreams of getting her bachelor's and master's degrees to teach English overseas, maybe even in Kuwait where she was stationed in 2004. Only this time she wants to go as “friend, not foe.”

Alone in her apartment, Shapiro misses the men and women she served with in the Army. She's trying to make connections with students in her classes, through the roommate she hopes to get by putting up signs around campus and even with the barista at Starbucks.

But going from being in the Army to being by herself is difficult especially, as a single person, she said. And when asked if she felt welcomed home, Shapiro answered immediately: “No.”

She described the TV shows that show soldiers coming home to their families and the emotional reunions that cue tears and hugs.

“What about us soldiers that were single and we don't have a family to come home to? Why can't you appreciate us for what we do too?” she said.

Briana Hawkes' Army dress blues hang pressed and ready in her parents' basement in Bristolville, Ohio.

The basement is where Hawkes is living for the next two-and-a-half years. She converted it into her own studio apartment while she's home and is willing to hang her clothes on a metal rod suspended from the ceiling because she knows it's only temporary.

The 25-year-old single mother served as an E-5 supply sergeant in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2012 and is home to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill to get her degree and join the ROTC program at Kent State University. After she graduates and becomes a commissioned officer, Hawkes plans to re-enter the Army and continue her military career.

According to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), many women carry the burden of caring for children while they are deployed. More than 40 percent of women on active duty have children and more than 30,000 single mothers have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan since 2009.

“Especially as more women are involved and we see continued deployments we need to be cognizant how deployments are impacting families,” said Kate O'Gorman, political director at IAVA. “We have to make sure that service members that deploy can't be worried about their kids constantly. There needs to be a strong system at home so they can execute their job overseas.”

But parents still will worry — both during and after deployment.

Hawkes is young to hold the rank of E-5 supply sergeant. She's typically in charge of soldiers with at least six years on her, she said, and it hasn't been easy to achieve this level of leadership. “It's really cut-throat out there,” Hawkes said, describing the way some sergeants stop soldiers from moving up in rank because they don't want to be passed up. “I've seen it and I've been through it and I've conquered it.”

Coming home to get a degree and care for her daughter is a major contrast to the rigor of her military lifestyle. She is used to straight lines, strict rules and order. But on campus, students walk around wearing whatever they want, smoking and talking on their cell phones.

You're not allowed to do that in the Army.

Thinking about going back to the Army in two-and-a-half years is hard, especially after spending concentrated time with her 3-year-old daughter, but Hawkes knows it's a decision she's going to stand by.

“I plan on going until there's no more go in me,” she said. “If that is one star, two star, I'm not stopping ... I have a daughter to take care of and I know she's going to have needs and college so I'm going to provide.”

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News Headline: New aviation programs taking flight at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Administrators have set lofty goals for Kent State University's aeronautics programs.

Evolving industry needs and new technologies have changed the future job landscape for aviation professions, said Maureen McFarland, academic program director of aeronautics for KSU's College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

In response, the university has charged the college with expanding programming to meet the needs of the industry.

According to a 2013 economic report from Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, for example, industries related to commercial unmanned aircraft vehicles -- aka drones -- are expected to grow exponentially in jobs and spending in the coming years.

Part of the reason is because Congress mandated the Federal Aviation Administration to open airspace for commercial UAV operations by the end of 2015.

"(Industry experts) anticipate that will result in hundreds of thousands of new jobs and billions in revenue," McFarland said.

Next fall, KSU will offer a minor in unmanned aircraft systems for the first time.

"We are looking at it less from an operational pilot perspective and more from a systems perspective," McFarland said.

John Duncan, an assistant professor who will be teaching some of UAV classes, noted many people are primed to think of military drones when UAVs comes to mind. While military demand is high, Duncan emphasized commercial drones have increasingly significant uses for civilians in public safety and surveying.

First responders can fly small UAVs with cameras to scan a burning building for survivors. A contractor could use a UAV to check a high rise for hail damage. And in a region devastated by a natural disaster, drones equipped with antennae could serve as mobile communication relays where cell towers have been destroyed.

McFarland said many industry projections suggest nearly 80 percent of future UAV jobs will be in the agriculture industry as the machines provide an efficient method to survey land.

And KSU will soon be able to train students not only on flying UAVs, but engineering them as well.

"That's why we're looking into this, because it's our jobs to get our students jobs," she said.

As drones are rolled out more extensively in the commercial sector in the coming years, a need for employees in related fields will rise as well -- and Kent State is prepared. Besides a greater focus on engineering concentrations, KSU is also enhancing its aeronautics management and flight technology programs.

This semester, KSU began offering new minors aircraft dispatch and aviation weather that support students focusing on air traffic control and flight technologies, among the five overall aeronautics concentrations. And McFarland said the response in those related classes already has been strong.

KSU's air traffic control school is the only FAA certified Collegiate Training Initiative (CTI) program of its kind in Ohio and one of just 37 in the country.

Considering the college's existing success and the budding expansion plan, McFarland said the outlook for KSU's aeronautics programs and its students is flying higher than ever.

"It's all getting bigger, better and broader," McFarland said, noting more faculty is being hired as a result of the curricular enhancements.

Jason Boergerhoff, KSU assistant professor who works in the air traffic control lab at Van Deusen Hall, calls the school's growth "exciting" for faculty and students alike.

"As far as the future, we have a lot of different directions we're planning on going," he said. "Right now in we're a point of discovery, and I'm looking forward to see where it all leads."

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or jnobile@recordpub.com

Facebook: Jeremy Nobile, Record-Courier

Twitter: @jnobile_RPC

KSU AERONAUTICS PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

1. Only program in the state accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI)

2. Only Air Traffic - Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) school, so designated by the Federal Aviation Administration, in the state and one of 37 in the country.

3. The program offers one bachelor's degree with five areas of concentration (aeronautical studies, aeronautical systems engineering technology, air traffic control, aviation management and flight technology). The program houses four minors (aircraft dispatch, aviation weather, unmanned aircraft systems and flight technology)

4. The Aeronautics Program has grown from 230 students in 2005 to 566 students in 2012 (growth primarily due to air traffic control).

5. 68 percent of the undergraduate population within the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology is attributable to the Aeronautics Program.

6. In 2010 the Aeronautics Program was awarded the Leoning Trophy, is awarded annually to the outstanding all-around collegiate aviation program in the nation.

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News Headline: Changes come to local TV | Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Dawidziak, Mark
News OCR Text: There are no more absolute rulers in the increasingly divided TV kingdoms. With the audience splintered in more and more directions, all you can hope to claim is a prized corner of the mighty kingdoms that once were.

The most-watched prime-time shows have an average viewing audience that is less than 7 percent of the population. The same pattern holds in late-night, which once had an actual king. His name was Johnny Carson.

Since his May 1992 retirement, the kingdom has been sliced and diced by fellows with names like Jay, Dave and Jimmy. Starting Monday night you can add another name to that list: Arsenio.

He's no newcomer to the late-night wars. In 1989, Cleveland native and Kent State University graduate Arsenio Hall began a five-year late-night run as the star of the syndicated “The Arsenio Hall Show.”

Hall's revival of that talk show begins at 11 p.m. Monday on WJW Channel 8. A 1973 Warrensville Heights High School grad, he set up this late-night return with a May 2012 victory on NBC's “Celebrity Apprentice.” He can only hope to do as well as another comedian from Cleveland, Steve Harvey, whose successful daytime talk show premiered last September on Channel 8.

The 1974 Glenville High School graduate jumped into the fray with an executive producer from Parma, Alex Duda, and the two have fashioned a syndication ratings winner that continues its Channel 8 run at 2 p.m. weekdays.

Harvey has been the host of the syndicated game show “Family Feud” since September 2010. But “Family Feud,” dropped from the WUAB Channel 43 lineup last year, still hasn't found a new home here.

Yet another funny fellow from the Cleveland area, Drew Carey, also is doing well on the daytime front. He's starting his seventh year as the host of the CBS daytime game show “The Price is Right” (11 a.m. on WOIO Channel 19).

With much of its schedule taken care of by CBS programming, local news and last year's 7-8 p.m. addition of “Wheel of Fortune” and “Jeopardy!”, Channel 19 is making no significant changes for the fall season. Sister station Channel 43 is making only one big move, adding syndicated repeats of “Modern Family” at 7 and 7:30 weeknights.

Channel 8's schedule, though, is seeing some revamping. The Cleveland Fox affiliate added the “Wendy Williams” talk show at 11 a.m. on Sept. 2. “The Test,” a talk show featuring conflicts resolved by DNA results and lie detectors, premieres at 1 p.m. Monday. And with the addition of “The Arsenio Hall Show,” syndicated repeats of “The Big Bang Theory” move to midnight. Syndicated repeats of “The Cleveland Show” will air at 3:30 a.m.

You'll also notice some changes on WKYC Channel 3's daytime schedule: 7-11 a.m., “Today Show”; 11 a.m.-noon, “Rachel Ray”; noon-12:30 p.m., “Live On Lakeside”; 12:30-1 p.m., “Days of Our Lives”; 2-3 p.m., “The Doctors”; 3-4 p.m., “Bethenny”; 4-5 p.m., “Ellen”; and 5-6 p.m., “Dr. Phil.”

The weekday changes at WEWS Channel 5 begin Monday: a new time, 10-11 a.m., for “Right This Minute” and “Newschannel 5 at Noon” expanding to an hour. At 1 p.m. is “The Chew” with Cleveland native Michael Symon (“Iron Chef America”). At 1:35 a.m., Channel 5 will add a repeat of Cleveland native and Oprah protégé Mehmet Oz's 4 p.m. show, “Dr. Oz.”

Starting Monday, Sept. 16, syndicated repeats of Bay Village native Patricia Heaton's “The Middle” will air at 7 and 7:30 p.m. weekdays and Saturday on WBNX Channel 55. Syndicated repeats of “Community,” starring East Cleveland native Yvette Nicole Brown, will air at 6:30 and 11:30 p.m. Monday-Friday (Sundays at 6 and 6:30 p.m.). And starting Monday, Sept. 23, “Paternity Court” will air at 2 and 2:30 p.m. weekdays on Channel 55.

A new PBS math series, “Peg + Cat,” will premiere Oct. 7 on both WVIZ Channel 25 and WEAO Channel 49.

And the new season of Channel 25's locally produced series geared for middle schoolers, “Newsdepth,” begins its new season at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18.

Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Northeast Ohioans on TV, behind the scenes | Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Dawidziak, Mark
News OCR Text: “Animal Practice” was one of the first rookie shows canceled last year. It featured Kym Whitley, who grew up in Shaker Heights, as receptionist Juanita. Cleveland's filmmaking Russo brothers, Joe and Anthony, were directors and executive producers on the failed NBC comedy.

It wasn't the only canceled freshman series featuring an actor from Northeast Ohio. ABC's “Last Resort,” which cast former Clevelander Robert Patrick (“The Unit,” “The X-Files”) as Master Chief Joseph Prosser, didn't make it past midseason. And NBC didn't give a second season to “Go On,” with Cleveland native Bill Cobbs as therapy group regular George.

Fox gave a short run to “The Goodwin Games,” the offbeat comedy co-created by Shaker Heights native Carter Bays. NBC gave an even shorter run to “Save Me,” the comedy starring Aurora native Anne Heche.

Still, even with these cancellations, Northeast Ohio will continue to be well-represented on all kinds of shows during the 2013-14 television season.

A fall 2012 starter that will be back this season is Fox's “The Mindy Project.” Strongsville High School graduate Matt Warburton (“The Simpsons,” “Community”) is the executive producer and show runner on the comedy starring Mindy Kaling. It begins its second season at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17.

And speaking of “Community,” the NBC comedy received a surprise renewal for a fifth season. It's waiting in the wings for midseason. East Cleveland native and University of Akron graduate Yvette Nicole Brown returns as Shirley. The Russo brothers are executive producers.

Another returning NBC show, “Parenthood,” features Euclid High School graduate Monica Potter, who richly deserved (but didn't get) an Emmy nomination for her work last season as Kristina Braverman. The outstanding and underappreciated drama starts its fifth season at 10 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26.

Vanessa Bayer, an Orange High School graduate, returns for a fourth season on “Saturday Night Live,” which kicks off its 39th NBC year on Sept. 28. Cleveland native James Pickens continues his long run as Richard Webber when ABC's “Grey's Anatomy” begins operating on its 10th season at 9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26. Bays' CBS comedy, “How I Met Your Mother,” starts its ninth and final season at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23.

And Lakewood native Denise M. Sirkot, a Kent State University graduate who grew up in Parma Heights, is a producer on Fox's “The Simpsons” (beginning its 25th season at 8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29).

ABC's “The Middle,'' starring Bay Village native Patricia Heaton, starts its fifth season at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25. Later that evening, at 9, Youngstown native Ed O'Neill returns as Jay Pritchett in the fifth season of ABC's “Modern Family” (former Clevelander Dan O'Shannon is one of the executive producers).

Two prime-time veterans with strong regional connections play major roles in new prime-time network shows: former Akronite and five-time Emmy winner John Lithgow as the voice of the White Rabbit on ABC's “Once Upon a Time in Wonderland,” and Martin Mull, who grew up in North Ridgeville, as one of the title characters in Fox's “Dads.”

Over in the cable realm, Akron native Rachel Sweet continues as a writer-producer on TV Land's “Hot in Cleveland,” and Western Reserve Academy graduate Jeff Schaffer, who grew up in Warren, is the co-creator and executive producer of FX's “The League” (which began its fifth season on FX's spinoff cable channel, FXX, on Wednesday).

Chesterland native Nick Gehlfuss plays Ross Kessler on HBO's “The Newsroom.” And Whitley, Yvette Nicole Brown's good friend, continues to provide the voice of Honeybee on “Black Dynamite,” the Cartoon Network's animated series version of the 2009 film.

Keep in mind that this is by no means a complete list of Northeast Ohio contributors working in front of and behind the TV cameras. It's just a representative sample of how much the area contributes to the medium.

Among those representing Cleveland on the daytime front are comedians Drew Carey, continuing as the host of CBS' “The Price is Right,” and Steve Harvey, whose hit 2 p.m. talk show begins its second season on WJW Channel 8.

Another comedian from Cleveland, Arsenio Hall, also is getting a regular spot on the Channel 8 lineup. He returns to the late-night talk-show circuit with “The Arsenio Hall Show,” premiering at 11 p.m. Monday.

Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: Arsenio Hall returning to late-night talk-show beat: Fall TV preview 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Mark Dawidziak, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Cleveland, Ohio -- There are no more absolute rulers in the increasingly divided TV kingdoms. With the audience splintered in more and more directions, all you can hope to claim is a prized corner of the mighty kingdoms that once were.

The most-watch prime-time shows have an average viewing audience that is less than 7 percent of the population. The same pattern holds in late-night, which once had an actual king. His name was Johnny Carson.

Since his May 1992 retirement, the kingdom has been sliced and diced by fellows with names like Jay, Dave and Jimmy. Starting Monday night you can add another name to that list: Arsenio.

He's no newcomer to the late-night wars. In 1989, Cleveland native and Kent State University graduate Arsenio Hall began a five-year late-night run as the star of the syndicated "The Arsenio Hal Show." Syndicated shows are sold to stations market by market by production companies.

Hall's revival of that talk show begins at 11 p.m. Monday on WJW Channel 8. A class of '73 graduate of Warrensville Heights High School, he set up this late-night return with a May 2012 victory on NBC's "Celebrity Apprentice." He can only hope to do as well as another comedian from Cleveland, Steve Harvey, whose successful daytime talk show premiered last September on Channel 8.

Harvey's hit show went a long way in claiming a part of the daytime empire once ruled by Oprah Winfrey. The queen abdicated in May 2011 to start her own cable channel, OWN.

The class of 1974 Glenville High School graduate jumped into the fray with an executive producer from Parma, Alex Duda, and the two of them have fashioned a syndication ratings winner that continues its Channel 8 run at 2 p.m. weekdays.

Harvey, who grew up on Cleveland?s east side, has been the host of the syndicated game show "Family Feud" since September 2010. But "Family Feud", dropped from the WUAB Channel 43 lineup last year, still hasn't found a new home on a Northeast Ohio station..

Yet another funny fellow from the Cleveland area, Drew Carey, also is doing quite well on the daytime front. He's starting his seventh year as the host of the CBS daytime game show "The Price is Right" (airing at 11 a.m. on WOIO Channel 19).

With much of its schedule taken care of by CBS programming, local news and last year's 7-8 p.m. addition of "Wheel of Fortune" and "Jeopardy!", Channel 19 is making no significant changes for the fall season. And its sister station, Channel 43, is making only one big move, adding syndicated repeats of "Modern Family," with Youngstown native Ed O'Neill, at 7 and 7:30 weeknights.

Channel 8's schedule, though, is seeing some revamping because "Judge Joe Brown" and the talk shows helmed by Ricki Lake and Jeff Probst have been canceled by their syndicators. The Cleveland Fox affiliate added the "Wendy Williams" talk show at 11 a.m.. on Sept. 2. "The Test," a talk show featuring conflicts resolved by DNA results and lie detectors, premieres at 1 p.m. Monday. And with the addition of "The Arsenio Hall Show," syndicated repeats of "The Big Bang Theory" move to midnight. Syndicated repeats of "The Cleveland Show" will air at 3:30 a.m.

You'll also notice some changes on WKYC Channel 3's daytime schedule: 7-11 a.m., "Today Show"; 11a.m.-noon, "Rachel Ray"; Noon-12:30 p.m., "Live On Lakeside"; 12:30-1p.m., "Days Of Our Lives"; 2-3 p.m., "The Doctors"; 3-4 p.m., "Bethenny"; 4-5 p.m., "Ellen"; and 5-6 p.m., "Dr. Phil."

The weekday changes at WEWS Channel 5 begin tomrrow: a new time, 10-11 a.m., for "Right This Minute" and "Newschannel 5 at Noon" expanding to an hour. So Channel 5 will continue to have its own Northeast Ohio connections on the daytime schedule, starting at 1 p.m. with "The Chew," featuring Cleveland native Michael Symon ("Iron Chef America"). At 1:35 a.m., Channel 5 will add a repeat of Cleveland native and Oprah prot�g� Mehmet Cengiz Oz's 4 p.m. show, "Dr. Oz."

Starting Monday, Sept. 16, syndicated repeats of Bay Village native Patricia Heaton's "The Middle" will be airing at 7 and 7:30 p.m. weekdays and Saturday on WBNX Channel 55. Syndicated repeats of "Community," starring East Cleveland native Yvette Nicole Brown, will air at 6:30 and 11:30 p.m. Monday-Friday (Sundays at 6 and 6:30 p.m.). And starting Monday, Sept. 23, "Paternity Court" will air at 2 and 2:30 p.m. weekdays on Channel 55.

A new PBS math series, "Peg + Cat," will premiere Oct. 7 on both WVIZ Channel 25 and WEAO Channel 49.

Channel 25 is adding the British comedy-drama "Doc Martin" at 8 p.m. Saturday. It stars Martin Clunes. And the new season of Channel 25's locally produced series geared for middle school students, "Newsdepth," begins its new season with anchors Rick Jackson and Ida Lieszkovszky at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Cleveland's Own Arsenio Hall Talks to FOX 8 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND- Cleveland's own Arsenio Hall is returning to late night TV Monday, September 9.

Hall recently talked to our own Wayne Dawson about his Cleveland roots and his brand new talk show.

57-year-old Arsenio Hall graduated from Warrensville Heights High School in 1973 and went on to graduate from Kent State University.

Click here to view video: http://fox8.com/2013/09/06/clevelands-own-arsenio-hall-talks-to-fox-8/

During the interview, Wayne asked Arsenio about his connection to Elizabeth Baptist Church.

Arsenio told Wayne, “That's my dad's church. I think it was those Sundays in Cleveland watching my dad do his thing made me wanna work a crowd. I'm not the man my dad was, so I couldn't be a preacher. But, I found my way of working the crowd. I'll make them laugh instead of make them shout.”

Arsenio revealed during the interview that fatherhood became the dominant thing that took over his life during his time away from late night TV. “Part of when I came back had a big part to do with my son turning 13 and feeling like it's a good time to come back,” said Hall.

“The Arsenio Hall Show” will air weeknights at 11 p.m., right after FOX 8 News at 10 p.m.

His show debuts Monday Sept 9.

“The Big Bang Theory” will follow Arsenio at midnight.

And, the re-broadcast of FOX 8 News at 10 p.m. will now air at 2 a.m

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News Headline: Had it. Lost it. Can he have it again? | Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hamilton Spectator, The
Contact Name: Newsday, Verne Gay
News OCR Text: A flashback.

Make that a very distant flashback - to May 27, 1994.

"I'd like to thank America," said the gifted, black late-night host in a sharply bespoke suit - mauve, if memory serves, however dimly - on the last night of his celebrated show, where he liked to say "Hollywood meets the 'hood."

"But most of all, I'd like to thank God: This has been the greatest five and a half years anyone could ever hope for." Then, turning his eyes to the camera, this:

"I won't see you in 23 hours, but I will see you again."

Promise kept.

Arsenio Hall returns with a new late-night show beginning Sept. 9. In a recent phone interview about his hopes (and dreams) for this return, Hall almost reflexively said, "I don't need to be on the cover of Time magazine, but I'd love to just be in the game."

About that magazine: On Nov. 13, 1989, when such coronations really mattered, Time crowned Hall with a cover declaiming him the coolest kid on the late-night TV block. The Arsenio Hall Show, which launched Jan. 3, 1989, had brought an urban party-every-night vibe to a moment of the TV day that been dominated by Johnny Carson for nearly three decades. About four million tuned in every night, denting Carson's Tonight ratings and even - if you believed some of the hype at the time - accelerating his retirement plans. Hall's show didn't feel like an alternative as much as a movement, to bring black culture into an all-white club. Studio audiences loved it. So - for a time - did audiences at home.

Then, on May 27, 1994, the party ended. Hall had it all, then lost it all - unless you count a few episodes of Martial Law, assorted cameos and a Celebrity Apprentice victory over the intervening years as "found."

Why did he leave Stage 29 on the Paramount lot in the first place, and why is he back on another stage? (The new show will be taped at the Sunset Bronson Studios in Hollywood.) The saga is complicated, but it's also clear that the answers to both questions are related. Hall thrived, then left as the tectonic plates of late-night TV shifted. They are about to shift once again. Jay Leno will leave Tonight in February, while the future of Late Show With David Letterman - though certainly secure for now - is a question. Audiences tend to check around when hosts change; that was true in the early '90s, and it still holds true.

Born in Cleveland 57 years ago, Hall early found an aptitude for magic, debate - and comedy. After graduating from Kent State, he headed west - first to Chicago, then Los Angeles, in search of a standup career, and landed at West Hollywood's Comedy Store, one of the première venues for budding and established comics, and where former club MC and future Hall writer Steven Alan Green recalled Hall as someone with "incredible positive energy."

That energy landed gigs on TV - including a voice on the animated kid hit The Real Ghostbusters - and ultimately Fox's The Late Show, where he was the show's last host before it ended in 1988. While there, he established some of the late-night trademarks, notably the audience's "woof woof" arm pump, that were to become signatures of his next late-night show. (The "dog pound," comprising particularly enthusiastic woofers, came later.)

Fox wanted him to stick around, but after Late Show, Hall signed a deal with Paramount to star in Eddie Murphy's Coming to America. After that, Paramount created his late-night syndicated vehicle, which Hall was prescient enough to secure an ownership stake in. It was an instant success. For a brief moment, the show was believed to be Paramount's most financially successful TV venture, a $40-million-a-year machine.

Then, those tectonic plates shifted. CBS, which launched Letterman's show in '93, pulled Arsenio off some of its own big stations for the new venture. (Fox did the same with many of its stations for The Chevy Chase Show in the fall of '93.) Arsenio's ratings, which already had been dropping, plummeted. Hall now insists there was "never anything negative" in the split, but that he told Paramount, "I needed balance in my life. Not only personally, but professionally. I wanted to try other things."

Newsday

Memories from the first time around

Five and a half years yielded more than a few memorable moments from The Arsenio Hall Show (1989-94). Here are six:

Candidate Bill Clinton plays Heartbeak Hotel on his sax, in one of the most memorable moments of the 1992 campaign. It was followed by a thoughtful Q&A about voter apathy, and a discussion of the deep-seated problems of South Central Los Angeles, parts of which were still in ruins after recent riots.

Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan - immediately after repudiating anti-Semitic remarks made by an aide - agrees to appear on the show, but the resulting hour-long edition turned out to be a skate for Farrakhan.

Hall berates representatives of Queer Nation, who, as audience members, shouted out questions over why he did not have gay guests on the show. "Now, this ain't Merv (Griffin)," he shot back. "I ain't gonna run from it." And then he lost his temper: "You think I didn't have someone on the show because they're gay? What's wrong with you, man? I'm black."

Jim Henson is a guest on the show in early May 1990 - shortly before his death on May 16. This was believed to be one of his last TV appearances.

Muhammad Ali is interviewed by Hall, while Sugar Ray Leonard and Mike Tyson make surprise appearances. Who - Hall asks Ali - would have won had Tyson and Ali stepped into a ring? Ali points to Tyson.

Magic Johnson, in his first late-night TV interview shortly after revealing he was HIV-positive, appears in 1991.

Copyright © 2013 The Hamilton Spectator

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News Headline: Clovis spearpoints likely were all-purpose tools | Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Lepper, Bradley
News OCR Text: Clovis spearpoints, named for Clovis, N.M., where they were found among the bones of mammoths, represent the epitome of North American Stone Age weaponry.

They tend to be large, finely crafted and made from high-quality flint. Although they were long thought to be specialized mammoth-killing weapons, new research suggests they were more like general purpose Boy Scout knives.

If Clovis points were specialized tools designed specifically to kill big-game animals such as mammoths and mastodons, then the special kinds of flint used in their manufacture along with the exquisite craftsmanship simply might have been practical necessities for producing a reliable instrument used to kill big game.

It also is possible that the special qualities of Clovis points were due to ritual practices the makers believed would help to ensure the success of high-risk hunting ventures.

Clovis points certainly were used at times to kill both mammoths and mastodons. In addition to the original site, Clovis points have been found at 11 other sites with mammoth remains and two sites with mastodon bones.

Nevertheless, some doubt was cast on the idea that Clovis points were made expressly to kill mammoths and mastodons a few years ago when Mark Seeman, who was a Kent State University researcher, and colleagues identified blood residue from rabbits on Clovis points from the Nobles Pond site in Stark County.

Now Logan Miller, an Ohio State University graduate student studying archaeology, has observed microwear traces on a Clovis point from the Paleo Crossing site in Medina County. His results, which indicate the tool was used to cut soft plants, were recently published in the journal Lithic Technology.

Using high-power magnification, Miller examined a sample of 10 stone tools, including two Clovis points, and identified a variety of polishes that are indicative of different uses. This microwear reveals both the ways in which the tools were used, such as cutting versus scraping, and also the type of material on which they were used, such as meat, hide, bone or soft plant.

Miller reported that one of the Clovis points exhibited "linear striations near the tip" -- the type of microwear pattern you would expect to find on a spearpoint used to kill an animal. Unfortunately, the microwear can't tell us whether that animal was a mastodon, a rabbit or a deer.

The other Clovis point had two kinds of microwear on its sides and edges -- a "dull greasy polish," which indicates that it was used to cut meat or fresh hide, and an overlay of a "very bright, smooth polish," which indicates that it was last used to cut soft plant material.

Finding evidence that a Clovis point was used to cut soft plants does not necessarily mean that Paleoindian hunters were stalking wild asparagus. The point might have been used to process plant fibers to make cordage or basketry.

Nevertheless, it does suggest that far from being specialized mammoth-hunting weapons, Clovis points were the equivalent of Paleolithic all-purpose utility knives.

Such a versatile tool would have been handy for hunter-gatherers, who had to carry all their possessions around with them as they roamed across their Ice Age world.

Bradley T. Lepper is curator of archaeology at the Ohio Historical Society.

Copyright © 2013 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: Spotlighting Ravenna history (Steidl) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: If architectural history and preservation are your cup of tea, the fund-raising tour of three of Ravenna's hidden architectural treasures that Friends of the Flagpole has set up for Sunday afternoon, Oct. 6, is a not-to-be missed experience.

It combines community, good food --all of it donated -- learned discussion and a visit to three historic buildings in downtown Ravenna, all for the price of a $50 donation to Friends of the Flagpole to help repair the 150-foot tall historic flagpole in front of the Portage County Courthouse.

Business executive Jack Schafer and Attorney Peggy DiPaola are spearheading the event.

Jack holds a degree in architecture from the University of Cincinnati. Prior to returning to Ravenna to help run his family's business, Trexler Rubber, he had a career in architectural preservation out West.

Peggy, an attorney who became general counsel for GoJo Industries in Akron, is passionate about preservation and helped secure National Historic Register designation for her family's home, Byers Castle, in Ravenna Township. To purchase tickets and for more information, call Peggy at 330-297-7387. Space is limited.

The three sites selected for the event are Riddle Block No. 9, the handsome yellow-brick building at the corner of Main and North Chestnut streets, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows meeting room on the third floor of the 1853 Phenix Block and the Converse-Bentley home at 224 S. Chestnut St., a large brick Italianate house with 12-foot ceilings and a spiral staircase.

The Odd Fellows are a benevolent fraternity order that began in England in the 1700s. Dedicated to helping others, its members because of their altruistic mission were considered odd in England, where charity in those days was rare, and that's how the name was acquired.

Editor Roger Di Paolo tells me the last time the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows meeting room was open to the public was in 1992. He was in on that event and found the interior a remarkable journey into the past.

Notes provided by Jack Schafer explain the IOOF has "occupied the third floor meeting room of the 1853 Phenix Block since the block was built. The third floor meeting room features a 12-foot ceiling and large pictorial wall and ceiling murals in oil with decor virtually unchanged since 1875. ... For decades this area was accessible only to members of the IOOF. This is only the second time the public has been allowed inside to view the spectacular interior. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places."

The Bietz family, one of Portage County's premier artistic families in its day, left its mark in the IOOF meeting room. The late Hugo Bietz is remembered for his wonderful murals in the Venice Cafe in Kent. His father, Otto, painted the murals in the IOOF meeting hall in Ravenna.

Tom Riddle, a gifted photographer, provided Jack Schafer with photographs of the IOOF meeting room and one accompanies this column. The other illustration is the Phenix Block as it looked in the 19th century. Coleman Professional Services is now trying to acquire and remodel most of the Phenix Block.

Douglas Steidl, dean of Kent State's School of Architecture and Urban Design, during a Ravenna visit a few weeks ago noted that an unusual number of buildings in the downtown, built between the 1850s and the 1920s, were constructed of brick instead of wood. The buildings, he said, have suffered few alterations and stand today with their architectural integrity largely intact.

Few towns in Northeastern Ohio have an ensemble of such quality and it makes downtown Ravenna an excellent site for his students of American architectural history, he said.

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News Headline: Kent State star Dri Archer sits out Flashes' loss to Bowling Green (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Allen Moff
News OCR Text: Kent State senior speedster Dri Archer did not dress for Saturday's game against Bowling Green due to a left ankle injury suffered in the season-opening victory over Liberty on Aug. 29.

Archer, who scored a school-record 23 touchdowns last season, dressed but did not practice on Tuesday and Wednesday and had been considered “day-to-day” all week by Golden Flashes first-year head coach Paul Haynes.

Haynes said the decision for Archer not to play on Saturday was made “before the game,” but he then refused to elaborate on the injury.

“I want to talk about the guys that played, not the ones that didn't play,” Haynes said. “And that's not just because we lost, that's forever.”

Senior left guard Pat McShane (knee) did return to the starting lineup, but seemed to be experiencing some pain and was spelled by freshman Reno Reda for most of the second half.

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News Headline: Environmental Impact of Shale Gas: Does Fracking Help to Save Water? (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Bulk Solids Handling
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There is a close relationship between butadiene production and naphtha steam cracking. In the future, one of the chemicals produced during ethane cracking could be in short supply in the US. (Picture: BASF, Fotolia; [M]-Herkersdorf)

A new research by the Duke and Kent State universities provides surprising results: Although hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") consumes less water than conventional gas wells, the waste water can still overstress local disposal and cleaning systems...

The advent of shale gas has shaken the global economy: While Europe and Asia groan under the burden of high energy prices, America eyes for total independence from oil and gas imports. While the geopolitical consequences of this development remain unclear, the economic potential is game–changing: The US could well face a decade of reindustrialisation, analysts expect.

Despite these potentials, critics blame shale gas production to pose a serious thread to ecosystems and ground water. As the nonporous shales have to be fractured with a mixture of water and highly aggressive chemicals ("cracking"), shale gas is indeed no green choirboy. In terms of water consumption, it could nevertheless be better than its reputation, a new study shows.

Shale Gas Produces Less Wastewater than Conventional LNG

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells are producing less wastewater per unit of gas recovered than conventional wells would. Nevertheless, the enormous scale of the shale gas revolution poses serious challenges for water and waste water management systems: The scale of fracking operations in the Marcellus shale region (in the North American Appalachian Basin) is so vast that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by researchers at Duke and Kent State universities.

Plus 30 % Gas Per Well – Shale Gas Efficiency Beats Water consumption

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells in the Marcellus shale region of Pennsylvania produce only about 35 percent as much wastewater per unit of gas recovered as conventional wells, according to the analysis, which appears in the journal Water Resources Research. "We found that on average, shale gas wells produced about 10 times the amount of wastewater as conventional wells, but they also produced about 30 times more natural gas," said Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State, who led the analysis while he was a postdoctoral research associate at Duke. "That surprised us, given the popular perception that hydraulic fracturing creates disproportionate amounts of wastewater."

Yet, the gas boom in the region stresses the water network, which has become a bit long in the tooth, insiders believe... More on page 2!

Additional Information

Process Technology Reduces Water Consumption for Shale Gas

Process Technology Reduces Water Consumption for Shale Gas

High water consumption is an Achilles heel of hydrofracking. Most of the water is returned to the surface with the gas which is extracted. It then has to be treated, recycled or disposed of. Process improvements can be particularly helpful in alleviating the problems.

Siemens Water Technologies has introduced the new Frac Treat product line for mobile water treatment in the oil & gas industry. Designed especially with shale gas production in mind, the range includes mobile systems for continuous precipitation and flotation as well as a mobile combination pilot unit.

BASF also markets a range of waste water treatment solutions including process chemicals and filter membrane materials such as Multibore membranes which trap particles and microorganisms.

Linde has developed technology for adding liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide to the water which is used for hydrofracking. Both gases reduce water consumption and increase the volume of gas extracted.

Taken from The New Gold Rush: Benefits and Risks of the US Shale Gas Boom?

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News Headline: Cancer survivors celebrate in Warren | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WARREN, Ohio - Sunday was a day of celebration for people who are surviving cancer.

The 24th Annual Cancer Survivorship Day was sponsored by Trumbull Memorial Hospital and the American Cancer Society.

The free community event at Lincoln School gave cancer survivors a chance to connect, celebrate milestones and recognize those who supported them along the way. "It's essential for this area because Trumbull County has the largest for the state of Ohio for breast cancer diagnoses, so I feel without this, people are going to die unnecessarily." said Jodi Lehman, a 45-year cancer survivor.

American Cancer Society researcher and Kent State professor, Dr. Gary Koski was the guest speaker

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News Headline: Cancer survivors gather to celebrate Cancer Survivorship Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKBN-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cancer survivors from across the Valley gathered in Warren Sunday for the 24th Annual Cancer Survivorship Day.

Trumbull Memorial Hospital sponsored the event, with help from the American Cancer Society and the Trumbull Memorial Health Foundation.

About 50 cancer survivors and their family members showed up at the Lincoln School to share their stories of survival and learn more about the latest cancer research and resources available to cancer patients.

The guest speaker was American Cancer Society researcher and Assistant Kent State Professor, Dr. Gary Koski.

“This event I've never been to before,” said cancer survivor Jodi Lehmann. “And I feel it's essential for this area, because Trumbull County has one of the largest in the state of Ohio for breast cancer diagnosis.”

The event was free and open to the public.

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News Headline: Kent State Student Project on Suicide Prevention Earns Innovator of the Year Award (Marino, Zake) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Online platform offers a comprehensive look at college suicide and aims to eliminate stigma surrounding mental illness

Students from Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication and School of Digital Sciences won the Associated Press Media Editors' (APME) Innovator of the Year for College Students award for a class project that examines issues surrounding college suicide.

The APME is an association of editors at newspapers, broadcast outlets and journalism educators and student leaders in the United States and Canada who work closely with the Associated Press to foster journalism excellence.

Twenty-one students enrolled in the Web Programming for Multimedia Journalism class this past spring created “Campus Lifeline: A Report on College Suicide,” which combines in-depth articles, infographics and data-driven interactives to explore the complex issues relating to college suicide. Since September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, the students hope that by creating this project, future tragedies will be prevented by openly discussing suicide.

“Campus Lifeline” was a collaborative effort with journalism students researching and writing stories, and programming and design students creating the look, feel and functionality of the project's platform atwww.campuslifeline.com.

The students examined why data on college suicide is underreported and unreliable, the struggles of at-risk groups of students, including returning veterans and international students, gun control as a suicide-prevention method, the role of social media as both an aid and a threat to suicide prevention, and offered recommendations on how to reduce suicides and improve the overall mental health of college students.

The course was taught by Kent State Associate Professor Jacqueline Marino and Assistant Professor Sue Zake, both from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Josh Talbott, senior media specialist in the College of Communication and Information.

“Journalism and mass communication faculty involved with ‘Campus Lifeline' recognize the importance of this achievement and its impact on students,” Marino said. “I'm thrilled that the APME recognized this project. College suicide as a public health issue is rarely covered, and our students covered it in an innovative way. Good things happen when you put journalists, designers and programmers together in the classroom.”

Through “Campus Lifeline,” the students sought to create awareness and proffer solutions to an often stigmatized issue on college campuses. As part of the project, the students collected data and consulted with psychiatrists, researchers, crisis-intervention specialists and family members of college students who have died by suicide.

“The great thing about this project and this course is that it combines the work of multiple disciplines – journalism, digital science, visual communication design – and requires students to work together to figure out how to make it all work,” Zake said. “This is exactly what students will experience in the real world.”

The Web Programming for Multimedia Journalism course will be offered again in spring 2014.

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News Headline: Nursing professor awarded Nurse's Touch Award (Snelson) | Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cathy Snelson, associate lecturer in the College of Nursing, received the ATI Nurse's Touch Award on Friday in front of her senior-level nursing class in Henderson Hall.

Snelson was one of four educators in nursing awarded the honor in the United States.

"I am very honored and humbled," Snelson said. "I don't do my job expecting [to] get awards; I just teach students the best I can."

Speakers from the college spoke of how they have seen Snelson help students during her time at Kent State. Before Snelson received the award, faculty took the time to read some students' comments from when the nominations were submitted.

"Cathy's office serves as a trusted source of exceptional one-on-one tutoring for scared nursing students," one of the nominating students said. Snelson was honored for expressing professional values to nursing students and for advancing leadership and communication skills for life to her students, according to a press release from ATI Nursing Education.

"Nurse Educators with the Nurse's Touch" is an award that recognizes educators who excel at preparing their students for the real world of being a nurse practitioner. Snelson received a paid trip to Orlando, FL to attend the 2014 ATI National Nurse Educator Summit for professional development, according to the press release.

Once Snelson received the award, the classroom erupted in applause and smiles for her, and she said she is honored to be at Kent State to help the nursing students of the future.

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: Enrollment at Local Colleges | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: start-up in the valley in 20-09 has created greater accessibility for young people, and the President of YSU says that is absolutely a a good thing for the valley. 00:07:11:25 MORE STUDENTS COMING TO SCHOOLS SO WHAT THAT MEANS IS WERE GOING TO SEE HIGHENTED ECOMONIC DEVELOPMENT MORE JOB CREATION MORE EDUCATION IS A GOOD THING While YSU is grappling with a threreyear enrollment decline, Dr. Dunn believes it's important that they provide the best advisement for all prospective students. 00:09:31:17 FOR SOME IT WILL BE COMING TO US FOR OTHERS IT WILL BE STARTING AT EASTERN GATEWAY AND LOOKING AT US A YEAR OR TWO DOWN THE LINE The operations manager at Eastern Gateway agrees that some students need the community college experience to be better prepared to move forward in their educational goals. 00:14:05:15 I THINK YOU'RE GOING TO FIND OUT THAT EVENTUALLY STUDENTS WILL START TO COME HERE THEN WILL FILTER OUT TO YSU KENT STATE AND T HE DIFFERENT UNIVERSITIES At the same time, President Dunn wants YSU to grow enrollment by becoming a destination university for it's specialty programs and recognition for excellence. 00:10:59:19 I'M CONVINCED THAT WE CAN DRAW FROM A MULTI STATE AREA FOR THOSE STUDENTS TO COME TO YOUNGSTOWN STATE BECAUSE OF THE EXELLENCE OF THOSE PARTICULAR PROGRAMS

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News Headline: Why do costumes cost so much? (Stanforth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: IOL
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Washington - It's a summer ritual: walk into a clothes shop, pick up a swimsuit, flip over the price tag and hastily return the suit to its rack. How can a scant handful of fabric squares, strings, and clasps be so expensive?

Swimsuits are complicated garments whose prices are tied up in the complexities of global manufacturing, seasonal retailing and designing for a range of activities and body types.

"Constructing even a simple swimsuit is every bit as complex as constructing a dress," says Nancy Stanforth, a professor of fashion merchandising at Kent State University.

Designers must push the latest trends, while carefully considering fit: A survey by the market research company, NPD Group showed that fit outranked comfort, style, quality, and price for women when buying a swimsuit.

Ideally a swimsuit will compress some places and reveal others. It won't ride up and won't come undone with the first wave or jump off the diving board all while making the wearer feel comfortable and confident.

Another reason swimsuits are costly? They're stretchy. Stretchable fabrics are more expensive than other materials. Manufacturers need special machines to handle the spandex, Lycra and similar fabrics typically used in women's swimwear.

Swimsuit material is also expensive because much is required of it. The fabrics and other components, such as underwires, must stand up to many elements water, chlorine, sand, salt, sun and activities. "It is just as important that the style looks great as it is that the item is technically stable and able to withstand sunbathing, swimming, etc," says Samara Fetto, a manager at ModCloth, an online swimsuit retailer.

The relatively brief amount of time swimsuits spend on store shelves also contributes to higher prices. Peak customer demand is limited to a few months of the year, so designers have less leeway on the time needed to get garments made. Seasonality may slap a little extra on to the price of your new bikini, but it's not as hard as it used to be to find a swimming costume off-season. Online shopping has made swimwear a year-round venture.

Web-based stores can also offer more sizes, particularly plus sizes. "Plus-size swimwear has been a huge growth opportunity and something we have seen success with," Fetto says.

Unfortunately for consumers, longer shopping seasons and a greater range of sizes haven't translated into lower prices.

But swimwear, like swimming itself, has long been democratic, says Christine Schmidt, author of The Swimsuit: Fashion From Poolside to Catwalk.

The swimwear industry a $3.5-billion-a-year-and-growing business (R30.5bn), according to the NPD Group, with women's swimwear accounting for 70 percent of the market is rife with competition.

There are lower-cost alternatives for even the most basic of suits that retail for double at Victoria's Secret or tenfold with a Dolce & Gabbana tag. More competition brings lower prices and more excuses to hang out at the pool. Just don't forget the sunscreen. Slate / The Washington Post News Service

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News Headline: Highlights from the Supima Spring 2014 Design Competition presentation | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Examiner.com
Contact Name: Jessica Stam
News OCR Text: Examiner.com was on the scene for the Supima Design Competition runway presentation on Thursday at the Studio at Lincoln Center. "Supima is America's luxury cotton: founded in 1954, the Supima brand designates an elite variety of pima cotton grown only in California and the Southwestern U.S. and prized the world over by designers and retailers who value its luster, strength, and superior softness. Begun in 2008, the annual Supima Design Competition was created to give runway exposure to emerging talent," according to the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week web site.

Rachel Zoe served as the host for the event and the judges included Janie Bryant, Douglas Hannant, Fern Mallis, Buxton Midyette, Rachel Roy, Jessica Stam and Alexandra Wilkis Wilson. "Four of America's top design schools were asked to select two finalists from among their graduating seniors. Each finalist was asked to create a capsule collection of women's eveningwear gowns from premium Supima denims, knits, corduroys, twills, and shirting." This year's eight finalists were: Bradley Mounce and Carly Rosenbrook from the Fashion Institute of Technology; Sylvia Bukowski and Will Riddle from Kent State; Hannah Soukup and Morgan Selin from the Rhode Island School of Design; and Michelle Leal and Rachel Buske from the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Buxton S. Midyette, the Vice President of Marking for Supima, introduced the presentation. "We are so excited to have everyone here today to see our rising talents in the industry. Supima has once again partnered with the leading design schools in the U.S. for this program...We're so fortunate and so pleased to be working with these schools and their finalists. They've nominated two of their top graduating seniors to be with us here today and all the fabrics you're going to see on the runway are made of Supima cotton. Little note of interest, the fabrics that they've worked with...they were not dyed, they were unfinished, so everything you see on the runway is cause of these students working and slaving for the past three months to show to you all of the colors, all the details. It's very impressive and we're so excited to show their work to you. " Brooks Brothers, AG Adriano Goldschmeid, Agave, Bloomingdale's and Kurabo all provided fabrics, while Tumbling Colors mentored the students on dying and coloration.

Next guests had the opportunity to see of the collections on the runway and then Rachel Zoe announced the winner. "How incredible was that you guys? Applause for you guys, that was out of control. I can't do any of that, I just want to say. That was extraordinary, thank you so much. Such incredible talent and I am so honored to be here today. I couldn't be more honored to announce the winner of the Supima Design Competition today and $10,000 to...Morgan Selin of Rhode Island School of Design."

Guests at the show left with swag from Brooks Brothers, Zonin, Smartwater, Splendid, Michael Stars, Hanky Panky, CC Corso Como and AG Adriano Goldschmied.

Congrats Morgan!

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News Headline: Edwise Offers Great Opportunity to Meet 80+ Universities From 8 Countries at the World Education Fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: AndhraNews.net
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: To help you choose the right university, Edwise, India's leading overseas educationconsultants that represents over 525 universities worldwide, is organising the 17th WorldEducation Fair at Ahmedabad - 7th Sep @ The Pride, Delhi - 8th Sep @ The Park, Cochin -9th Sep @ Abad Plaza, Coimbatore - 10th Sep @ The Residency, Pune - 12th Sep @ LeMeridien, Bangalore - 14th Sep @ Vivanta By Taj, Chennai - 15th Sep @ Hyatt Regency,Mumbai - 16th Sep @ J W Marriott, Hyderabad - 17th Sep @ Taj Deccan, and Chandigarh - 20thSep @ Mount View from 11am to 5pm. Delegates from many prestigious universities from theUK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland and France will be presentfor interactions, counseling and admissions.

Queries related to the bouquet of courses available, admission requirements,accommodation etc will be answered by the delegates. For personal interview with theuniversity delegates, it's important to do a pre-event registration with Edwise. The fairwill also help avail on-the spot offers, scholarships that will be given to meritoriousapplicants and application fee waiver (up to Rs 35,000) among other things. Edwise hasbeen helping students in pursuing higher studies abroad for the last 23 years. Candidatesintending to attend the fair can register for the event by bringing academic originalswith five sets of photocopies for spot offers.

Chirag Gupta pursuing Masters in Advanced Computing from Kings College London says, "Ihad applied on my own but had faced many problems. Then I visited the World Education Fairwhich helped in solving all my queries. It helped me in reducing the confusion that I hadwith regards to my higher studies and saved a lot of my time. I am currently in UK andsettled with my program."

Edwise, a pioneer in the field of 'Global Education', dispels all the myths usuallyassociated with 'Study Abroad' and have brought the concept of overseas education to thedoorstep of every student, by making it affordable and devoid of cumbersome procedures.

The various universities present at the fair include Cardiff, Coventry, De Montfort,Lancaster, Leeds Metropolitan, Middlesex, Kingston University ISC, Liverpool John MooresUniversity ISC, Northumbria, Oxford Brookes, Sheffield Hallam, Bristol, Bolton, Universityof the Arts London, University of Central Lancashire, University of East London,Nottingham, Portsmouth, Sheffield from UK, Academy of Art University, California State UniEast Bay, Full Sail, HULT International Business School, University of Massachusetts(Boston/Dartmouth/Lowell), Southern New Hampshire, Kentucky, James Madison, Long Island,Widener, Colorado State Uni, Marshall, South Florida, Oregon State Uni, Colorado StateUni, Marshall University, Kent State Uni ,Minneapolis College of Art & Design, New YorkFilm Academy, St. John's Uniersity from USA, Camuson College, Centennial College, FraserInternational College, International College of Manitoba, Royal Roads University,Conestoga College, Fanshawe University, Fleming College, George Brown College, HumberCollege, Royal Roads, Thompson Rivers from Canada, Bond, Deakin, Griffith, Le Cordon Bleu,Macquarie, Swinburne, Uni of Queensland, Wollongong from Australia, Massey, PIHMS,Southern Institute of Technology, Victoria University Wellington, Unitec Institute ofTechnology, Waikato from New Zealand, Curtin Singapore, James Cook, Lasalle College ofArts, Management Development Institute of Singapore, Singapore Institute of Managementfrom Singapore, European, HTMI, SHMS from Switzerland, Esigelec from France, and manymore.

Mayuresh Vedpathak a student who pursued his MSc in Computer from Cardiff Universitysays, "Edwise gives excellent personalized counseling. Their counselors gave sound adviseand directed me through all the procedures personally and took care of all the minutedetails."

For free registration please call: 08600911333 or 1-800-200-3678.

Visit www.worldeducationfair.com [http://www.worldeducationfair.com ].

Living in the fantasy of scaling the peaks of success in your professional life orbuilding castles of success in the air, only proving to be an illusion? Then we must admitthat the world is expanding with the advent of communication and technology and itsnecessary to be different and be competitive in everything one aims to pursue. The skillof perfection can only be mastered by the right kind of exposure and knowledge. Aprofessional degree from a recognized world class foreign university is the undisputedanswer as it not only confers the required skills but renders an inexplicable globalexperience that can be added to your resume. The rewards of a foreign education arepriceless and is gradually becoming a part of every lifestyle.

Today, Edwise has a wide portfolio of reputed international institutions and worksclosely with several organizations, high commissions and education bodies. Edwise is oneof the largest education consultancy and has helped thousands of students achieve theirdreams. For more information, visit www.edwiseinternational.com[http://www.edwiseinternational.com ]

Primary Media Contact: Vaishali Kochher, media@edwiseinternational.com,91-22-40813451

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News Headline: Listen to a Discussion About Replacing College Presidents | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: StateImpact Oklahoma
Contact Name: Molly Bloom
News OCR Text: Three of Ohio's largest public universities are looking for new leaders.

Former Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee retired in July.

Kent State University President Lester Lefton will retire next summer.

University of Akron President Luis Proenza will retire in June.

So how do you find three new leaders to head up institutions with combined budgets topping $XXX?

WOSU's All Sides with Ann Fisher took on the topic of picking a college president recently:

It's a time of transition for Ohio colleges and universities. Kent State and the University of Akron will bid farewell to their presidents next summer, as will several community colleges, and OSU has hired a consulting firm to help with their current presidential search. This hour we'll look at the changing role of university presidents, and discuss whether schools should be run more like Wal Mart or the Red Cross.

Guests included Chronicle of Higher Education reporter Jack Stripling, college president head hunter Jessica Kozloff, and Denison University President Emeritus Dale Knobel.

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News Headline: Gukurahundi and apartheid SA (Scarnecchia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Zimbabwe Independent
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: THIS is a continuation of the article by Kent State University's Professor Timothy Scarnecchia, an expert on Zimbabwean and African history, on the Zimbabwean government and apartheid South Africa's role in the Gukurahundi campaign.

Timothy Scarnecchia

Historian Sue Onslow has investigated South Africa's role in trying to make sure Robert Mugabe and Zanu PF did not come to power in 1980.

Onslow sums up South Africa's strategy after Mugabe's electoral victory and its impact on the conflict between Zanu and Zapu.

“Mugabe's victory shocked Pretoria. This drove South Africa back onto violence and subversion in neighbouring countries, rather than trying to manipulate the political process,” she says.

Onslow argues that the involvement of South Africa in supplying a small amount of weapons to Super-Zapu dissidents “rebounded on Zapu/Zipra forces” in the Gukurahundi “as the Mugabe government … was able to stigmatise the disaffected Zipra combatants as stooges of the apartheid state, manipulated by a malevolent and oppressive foreign power”.

South Africa did more to destabilise Zimbabwe in these years, but the support for Super-Zapu dissidents proved to be the most important factor in helping the Zanu PF government rationalise the Gukurahundi.

South Africa's apartheid president PW Botha launched his “total strategy” to defend South Africa from communist aggression in 1981.

As Stephan Chan describes it, Zimbabwe was not the main military target. Angola and Mozambique were. The idea was to make Zimbabwe and Zambia feel as if they were caught, west and east, in a pincer — so anxious they dared not look south.

This is an important point to remember, how in a Cold War context, Zimbabwe's relative insignificance in South Africa's “total strategy” permitted Zanu PF to take advantage of the South African threat internationally while avoiding a direct conflict through co-operation at the highest levels. The Zimbabwean economy was still almost 75% dependent on South African trade in these first few years, so there was little alternative, but to co-operate with Pretoria.

As Stephen Ellis and Tsepo Sechaba have shown, the South African military attacked ANC targets in Zimbabwe with little opposition. Such attacks included the assassination of the ANC's Joe Gqabi in Harare in July 1981.

South African agents made a series of bomb attacks against the Zimbabwean government. One of these attacks, in December 1981, was an unsuccessful attempt to kill the Zanu PF central committee members in their Harare headquarters. The bomb was detonated in a room above, but the central committee had postponed the meeting.

Given the ability by South Africa to act with impunity in Harare, there was little chance that Zanu PF would be able to confront South Africa militarily.

The Zimbabwean government responded by using the existence of these attacks to consolidate power internally by arresting those former white officers allegedly serving as South African agents, Zapu leaders and attacking the party's supporters.

By 1982 South Africa's strategy to attack Mugabe had begun to create its desired effects.

As Jocelyn Alexander, JoAnn McGregor, and Terence Ranger argue in their history of Matabeleland, of all the South African acts of sabotage between 1981 and 1982, the most important for understanding the Gukurahundi was “Operation Drama” of late 1982, an effort which involved recruiting and arming a Zimbabwean insurgent group dubbed Super-Zapu.

Various South African agents, many of them recruited from the Rhodesian intelligence service, also played a key role in fomenting distrust.

Alexander et al describe the conflict between these South African-trained and armed Super-Zapu and the “pure Zapu” dissidents between 1982 and 1983 with the South Africans supported ones “never more than 100 (and probably substantially fewer) inside the country”.

Although outnumbered by the “pure Zapu” who wanted nothing to do with South Africa, these Super-Zapu dissidents had better weapons and more ammunition, which was in short supply by 1983. The former Zipra fighters who became dissidents never totalled more than 400.

Joseph Hanlon suggested that the Super-Zapu developed as a response to the deployment of the Fifth Brigade, as South Africa took advantage of the growing anger of former Zipra fighters and civilians living in refugee camps in Botswana.

While Alexander et al stress the small numbers of South African-trained and supplied Super-Zapu, and the response to them by former Zipra dissidents, the reality was that public knowledge of South African support supplied Mugabe, in the Cold War and regional context, the necessary pretext to rationalise the attack on Zapu and Zipra as primarily a response to an external intervention.

In January 1983, the Fifth Brigade of the Zimbabwe National Army (ZNA), consisting of between 2 500 and 3 500 soldiers, was deployed by Mugabe in Matabeleland and the Midlands provinces to “crush” the dissidents.

Made up almost entirely of former Zanla fighters, the Fifth Brigade's operation was called Gukurahundi, a Shona term that translates as “the early rain which washes away the chaff before the spring rains”.

It proceeded to terrorise the populations of the Midlands and Matabeleland provinces, leaving thousands of dead civilians and many others traumatised by their terror tactics.

Mugabe's ability to contain information about Gukurahundi was one reason for the lack of international outcry. The Zimbabwean state invoked curfews and denied the media access to those areas witnessing the worst atrocities.

The state also used Rhodesia-era laws to impose a state of emergency, arrest and detain Zapu leaders, and deport international journalists for exposing human rights abuses.

But another reason was the general sympathy most informed Westerners had for Mugabe and Zanu PF given its role as a Frontline State. The Zanu PF official line — that given the South African support for the dissidents, the response of the Fifth Brigade was warranted — fits well with the anti-apartheid movement's solidarity with the Frontline States.

But stories of the Fifth Brigade's atrocities did manage to get out to the wider world. One of the most perceptive commentaries came from the Guardian's Nick Davies: “The slaughter of innocent villages in Matabeleland is only the most bloody symptom of a government clampdown which has seen thousands detained without trial, opponents tortured, the press muzzled, the courts defied and trade unions brought to heel.

“The rebellion of armed ‘dissidents' in Matabeleland is a direct challenge to the government's whole posture. The government's response has been equally direct — a deliberate and determined campaign to wipe out the dissidents, to liquidate Nkomo's Zapu party accused of directing them, and to cause such terror among ordinary civilians that their popular support will wither.”

Davies' reporting presented the realpolitik behind the rhetoric. It shows that there were brave reporters willing and quite capable of unmasking the masquerade at work in the rhetoric and propaganda produced in Harare and echoed in London and Washington.

The views expressed in South African Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) files for 1983 pointed out the failure of Western Cold War powers to criticise Mugabe for the Gukurahundi, but there is also a sense that the Gukurahundi was viewed as a “success” from the South African point of view.

It offered a number of “benefits”, first and foremost making it difficult for the ANC's military wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe to use Matabeleland as a base for training and attacks across the border into South Africa. It also worked to discredit Mugabe's international reputation as a prime minister representing a party committed to national reconciliation.

It also, paradoxically, pushed Zimbabwe to co-operate with South Africa on military and intelligence issues, however tentatively and mistrustingly.

Bi-annual meetings between the intelligence staff of Zimbabwe's Central Intelligence Organisation (CIO) and their counterparts in the South African Defence Force (SADF) were held in 1982 and 1983. The SADF notes of a February 7 and 8 1983 meeting in Harare are in the DFA files.

The minutes of this meeting, which took place one month after the Fifth Brigade had been deployed in Matabeleland North, indicate a much less strident tone concerning South Africa's role in supporting dissidents than that heard in the Zimbabwean media.

The joint intelligence leaders talked about the “role of communist powers in Southern Africa”, “internal terrorism”, and the “security situation in Angola, Mozambique, Botswana and Zimbabwe”. The discussion reportedly noted that “Botswana is falling heavily under the influence of the USSR and accommodating Zipra, ANC and Swapo, which is a cause for common concern” and that “Zimbabwe does not consider political support of the ANC in the same category as military support.

For this reason, they provide office facilities to the ANC in Harare but do not allow them to infiltrate over the RSA/Zimbabwe border”.

At the same time, the CIO stated that the so-called dissident problem in Matabeleland was serious and that the rift between Zanu PF and PF Zapu was deep. They conceded that the Lancaster House formula was partly to blame for this situation.

The Zimbabweans repeated the caveat that “although Mr Mugabe was an outspoken Marxist, it did not necessarily mean that he was in the USSR camp”. The South Africans proposed the formation of a “Joint Crisis Committee” to handle “any matter which caused tension to the relations between the two countries and needed prompt rectification to diffuse the situation”.

The Zimbabweans' reply was that “such a committee is not deemed necessary as no conflict existed between the two countries”. The South Africans suggested the Zimbabweans should accept Prime Minister PW Botha's “offer to sign a non-aggression pact and the deployment of monitoring teams on either side of the Zimbabwe border”.

Zimbabwe's Minister of State for Security, Emmerson Mnangagwa, met personally with the SADF team. According to the SADF report, Mnangagwa took personal credit for obtaining “permission from the Prime Minister (Mugabe) for the SADF visit to Harare and for future intelligence meetings of a similar nature.

He claimed that he initiated the RSA/Angola and RSA/Mozambique dialogue”. Mnangagwa also stated that “there were no matters in the Zimbabwe/ RSA relations that were so serious that it required meetings at ministerial level.”

Mnangagwa's lack of interest in addressing Zimbabwe's issues with South Africa directly with the SADF demonstrates the inequality of the relationship between South Africa's military and Zimbabwe's, as well as the fear that any formal co-operation would be detrimental to Zimbabwe's image internationally.

In September 1983 American diplomat Robert Cabelly told the South Africans that “Zimbabwe felt that Mozambique and Angola had in fact let them down by having ministerial meetings with South Africa”.

This is an interesting example of how the Americans and South Africans were hearing different things from the Zimbabweans, especially given Mnangagwa's taking credit for initiating ministerial dialogue between South Africa and the two countries most affected by South African military intervention. Cold War and regional diplomacy were obviously not on the same channel.

Later, in October 1983, Mnangagwa held a press conference reported in Zimbabwe's state-controlled Herald newspaper and recorded with commentary in the DFA files. Mnangagwa presented two young Zimbabweans, one 16 and the other 18 years old, who were allegedly trained by South Africa to return to Zimbabwe to fight as dissidents.

These two young men were described as having confessed to murdering “a white farmer, his children and the foreman in the Gwanda area”, of ambushes on government vehicles, of “cutting off the hands of two ZNA soldiers and shooting them west of Beitbridge”, and the “destruction of DDF tractors, caterpillars etc near Kezi.”

Mnangagwa reported that these two young men had admitted to being in South Africa for four months, where they were allegedly trained to go to Zimbabwe “to unseat Mugabe's government as he was not fit to rule”.

Their trainers allegedly told them Nkomo was “the right man to govern Zimbabwe” and instructed them to return to “destroy everything and murder farmers as they were the ones who grow food that is eaten by Mugabe's dogs”.

The DFA commentary pointed out “the fact that Zimbabwe authorities did not raise the matter through the normal channels and instead called an international press conference indicates that this was yet another propaganda exercise to reinforce the destabilisation theme.

The extent of international media coverage will be an indication of the effectiveness of this attempt to prove SA complicity in dissident activities based on dubious circumstantial evidence”.

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News Headline: Page: Journalism is about the meat, not the medium | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Journal & Courier - Online, The
Contact Name: Clarence Page
News OCR Text: I was thumbing through my old “Class of 1965” high school yearbook one day when I was stopped dead cold by an autograph left by one of my teachers: “Dear Clarence: All I ask is that you mention my name when you win your first Pulitzer Prize. Don’t forget. Mary Kindell.”

I was stunned because it was 1989 and I had just won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary. While I was getting over the shock, reporters were calling with the usual reporter questions: “How’d you get started?” “Who was your inspiration?”

That’s why I was looking at my old yearbook to refresh my memory. It’s embarrassing to blow facts, especially the facts of your own life.

My life in journalism began at our high school student newspaper under Mrs. Kindell’s supervision at Middletown High School in Ohio, where she also taught a journalism class.

My initial media goals were modest. I didn’t have much of a social life. Journalism, a field that compensates articulate nosiness, was a good way for me to meet people. Mrs. Kindell encouraged me to pursue my media interests and, just as important, helped to pacify my alarmed parents who wanted me to be a doctor.

I put down my yearbook and called Mrs. K. She didn’t sound surprised to hear what she had written. “I always knew you could do it,” she said.

I thought she probably issued that challenge to all of her young aspiring journalists, I said. Maybe, she responded, “but you’re the only one who has taken me up on it.”

I apologize to Mrs. K for tooting my own horn with this anecdote. She encouraged modesty and humility in her aspiring journos. Put the story first, she said, not your egos.

But I have a couple of good reasons for this deep dive into my anecdotage. For one, Mrs. Kindell turned 99 in August and deserves this shout-out: Happy birthday, Mrs. K!

At a reception with four birthday cakes in her honor at Middletown’s First Presbyterian Church, she told me she feels fine. Her only complaint was a persistent numbness in her hands that makes it hard to type or use the phone, a poignantly cruel twist, in my view, for someone who helped to improve my skills on typewriters and telephones.

My other justification for these memories is to sound an alarm for the endangered state of high school journalism. Opportunities for today’s aspiring or potential high school journalists to receive on-the-job learning like Mrs. Kindell offered are slim and getting slimmer.

Even in New York, the media capital, only one-in-eight public high schools has a student newspaper, The New York Times reported in May, and many publish only a few times a year.

Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students—like I was.

That’s sad because, as Robert Fulghum titled his best seller, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” I often feel as though I learned all I really needed to know about journalism in high school.

Newspapers of all sorts have been battered for decades by television and widespread illiteracy. At least the popularity of online news encourages kids to read, in-between their views of Miley Cyrus videos.

But as they add to today’s explosion of Internet traffic, too few youngsters are learning good news literacy. As Mrs. Kindell taught, you need to be a good reporter before you start giving your opinion. Today’s world of blogging and tweeting encourages the opposite. Too bad we don’t have more Mrs. Kindells to go around.

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News Headline: Clarence Page: Today's kids don't learn news literacy | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Poughkeepsie Journal - Online
Contact Name: Clarence Page
News OCR Text: _ I was thumbing through my old Class of 1965 high school yearbook one day when I was stopped dead cold by an autograph left by one of my teachers: Dear Clarence: All I ask is that you mention my name when you win your first Pulitzer Prize. Dont forget. Mary Kindell.

I was stunned because it was 1989 and I had just won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary. While I was getting over the shock, reporters were calling with the usual reporter questions: Howd you get started? Who was your inspiration? etc., etc.

Thats why I was looking at my old yearbook to refresh my memory. Its embarrassing to blow facts, especially the facts of your own life.

My life in journalism began at our high school newspaper under Mrs. Kindells supervision at Middletown High School in Ohio, where she also taught a one-credit-hour journalism class.

My initial media goals were modest. I didnt have much of a social life. Journalism, a field that compensates articulate nosiness, was a good way for me to meet people. Mrs. Kindell encouraged me to pursue my media interests and, just as important, helped to pacify my alarmed parents, who wanted me to be a doctor.

I put down my yearbook and called Mrs. K. She didnt sound surprised to hear what she had written.

I always knew you could do it, she said.

I thought she probably issued that challenge to all of her young aspiring journalists, I said. Maybe, she responded, but youre the only one who has taken me up on it.

I apologize to Mrs. K for tooting my own horn with this anecdote. She encouraged modesty and humility in her aspiring journos. Put the story first, she instructed us, not your egos.

But I have a couple of good reasons for this deep dive into my anecdotage. For one, Mrs. Kindell turned 99 in August and deserves this shout-out: Happy birthday, Mrs. K.

At a reception with four birthday cakes in her honor at Middletowns First Presbyterian Church, she told me she feels fine. Her only complaint was a persistent numbness in her hands that makes it hard to type or use the telephone, a poignantly cruel twist, in my view, for someone who helped to improve my skills on typewriters and telephones.(Page 2 of 2)My other justification for these memories is to sound an alarm for the endangered state of high school journalism. Opportunities for todays aspiring or potential high school journalists to receive on-the-job learning like Mrs. Kindell offered are slim and getting slimmer.

Even in New York, the media capital, only one in eight public high schools has a student newspaper, The New York Times reported in May, and many publish only a few times a year.

Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students like I was.

Thats sad because, as Robert Fulghum titled his best-seller, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, I often feel as though I learned all I really needed to know about journalism in high school.

Newspapers of all sorts have been battered for decades by television and widespread illiteracy. At least the popularity of online news encourages kids to read, in between their views of Miley Cyrus videos.

But as they add to todays explosion of Internet traffic, too few youngsters are learning good news literacy. As Mrs. Kindell taught, you need to be a good reporter before you start giving your opinion. Todays world of blogging and tweeting encourages the opposite. Too bad we dont have more Mrs. Kindells to go around.

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News Headline: High school newspapers on the endangered list | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daytona Beach News-Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: That's why I was looking at my old yearbook to refresh my memory. It's embarrassing to blow facts, especially the facts of your own life.

My life in journalism began at our high school student newspaper under Mrs. Kindell's supervision at Middletown High School in Ohio, where she also taught a one-credit-hour journalism class.

My initial media goals were modest. I didn't have much of a social life. Journalism, a field that compensates articulate nosiness, was a good way for me to meet people. Mrs. Kindell encouraged me to pursue my media interests and, just as important, helped to pacify my alarmed parents who wanted me to be a doctor.

I put down my yearbook and called Mrs. K. She didn't sound surprised to hear what she had written. “I always knew you could do it,” she said.

I thought she probably issued that challenge to all of her young aspiring journalists, I said. Maybe, she responded, “but you're the only one who has taken me up on it.”

I apologize to Mrs. K for tooting my own horn with this anecdote. She encouraged modesty and humility in her aspiring journos. Put the story first, she instructed us, not your egos.

But I have a couple of good reasons for this deep dive into my anecdotage. For one, Mrs. Kindell turned 99 in August and deserves this shout-out: Happy birthday, Mrs. K!

At a reception with four birthday cakes in her honor at Middletown's First Presbyterian Church, she told me she feels fine. Her only complaint was a persistent numbness in her hands that makes it hard to type or use the telephone, a poignantly cruel twist, in my view, for someone who helped to improve my skills on typewriters and telephones.

My other justification for these memories is to sound an alarm for the endangered state of high school journalism. Opportunities for today's aspiring or potential high school journalists to receive on-the-job learning like Mrs. Kindell offered are slim and getting slimmer.

Even in New York, the media capital, only one in eight public high schools has a student newspaper, The New York Times reported in May, and many publish only a few times a year.

Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students — like I was.

That's sad because, as Robert Fulghum titled his best seller, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” I often feel as though I learned all I really needed to know about journalism in high school.

Newspapers of all sorts have been battered for decades by television and widespread illiteracy. At least the popularity of online news encourages kids to read.

But as they add to today's explosion of Internet traffic, too few youngsters are learning good news literacy.

As Mrs. Kindell taught, you need to be a good reporter before you start giving your opinion. Today's world of blogging and tweeting encourages the opposite. Too bad we don't have more Mrs. Kindells to go around.

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News Headline: Page: Journalism is about the meat, not the medium | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Alexandria Daily Town Talk - Online
Contact Name: Clarence Page
News OCR Text: I was thumbing through my old “Class of 1965” high school yearbook one day when I was stopped dead cold by an autograph left by one of my teachers: “Dear Clarence: All I ask is that you mention my name when you win your first Pulitzer Prize. Don’t forget. Mary Kindell.”

I was stunned because it was 1989 and I had just won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary. While I was getting over the shock, reporters were calling with the usual reporter questions: “How’d you get started?” “Who was your inspiration?”

That’s why I was looking at my old yearbook to refresh my memory. It’s embarrassing to blow facts, especially the facts of your own life.

My life in journalism began at our high school student newspaper under Mrs. Kindell’s supervision at Middletown High School in Ohio, where she also taught a journalism class.

My initial media goals were modest. I didn’t have much of a social life. Journalism, a field that compensates articulate nosiness, was a good way for me to meet people. Mrs. Kindell encouraged me to pursue my media interests and, just as important, helped to pacify my alarmed parents who wanted me to be a doctor.

I put down my yearbook and called Mrs. K. She didn’t sound surprised to hear what she had written. “I always knew you could do it,” she said.

I thought she probably issued that challenge to all of her young aspiring journalists, I said. Maybe, she responded, “but you’re the only one who has taken me up on it.”

I apologize to Mrs. K for tooting my own horn with this anecdote. She encouraged modesty and humility in her aspiring journos. Put the story first, she said, not your egos.

But I have a couple of good reasons for this deep dive into my anecdotage. For one, Mrs. Kindell turned 99 in August and deserves this shout-out: Happy birthday, Mrs. K!

At a reception with four birthday cakes in her honor at Middletown’s First Presbyterian Church, she told me she feels fine. Her only complaint was a persistent numbness in her hands that makes it hard to type or use the phone, a poignantly cruel twist, in my view, for someone who helped to improve my skills on typewriters and telephones.

My other justification for these memories is to sound an alarm for the endangered state of high school journalism. Opportunities for today’s aspiring or potential high school journalists to receive on-the-job learning like Mrs. Kindell offered are slim and getting slimmer.

Even in New York, the media capital, only one-in-eight public high schools has a student newspaper, The New York Times reported in May, and many publish only a few times a year.

Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students—like I was.

That’s sad because, as Robert Fulghum titled his best seller, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” I often feel as though I learned all I really needed to know about journalism in high school.

Newspapers of all sorts have been battered for decades by television and widespread illiteracy. At least the popularity of online news encourages kids to read, in-between their views of Miley Cyrus videos.

But as they add to today’s explosion of Internet traffic, too few youngsters are learning good news literacy. As Mrs. Kindell taught, you need to be a good reporter before you start giving your opinion. Today’s world of blogging and tweeting encourages the opposite. Too bad we don’t have more Mrs. Kindells to go around.

Return to Top



News Headline: Annual Aviation Fair, car show both set for Sept. 14 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University will host its annual Aviation Heritage Fair on Sept. 14 at its airport from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

In addition to aircraft on display, there will be exhibitors, airplane rides and a pancake breakfast in cooperation with the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club. The band FenderJet will be entertaining during the day.

The Kiwanis Club will be serving the pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. for a cost of $6 per person.

There will also be crafts and facepainting for the kids.

Exhibitors will include the United States Army, United States Air Force ROTC, Air Heritage Museum, MAPS Air Museum and Corsair Modelers Club.

Airplane rides will be offered to the public during the Heritage Fair, utilizing Kent State University's Fleet of Cessna 172s.

Rides will be offered (weather permitting) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost is $25 per person or $70 for three people.

The Kent State Precision Flight Team will be conducting the rides, with the proceeds going to help run its competitive program. The Flight Team is currently preparing to host the NIFA SAFECON Regional Competition this fall at the Kent State University Airport.

For more information, visit the website www.kentstateaviationheritagefair.org or the Facebook page, 2013 Aviation Heritage Fair

Annual car show

at Stow-Glen

The 13th Annual Stow Glen Charity Car Show will take place Sept. 14 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Stow Glen Retirement Village, 4285 Kent Road, Stow (across from the Kent State University Airport).

The event is free of charge. Car registration fee is $5.

The event will include 50/50 Raffle Prize Giveaways, DJ, music and food.

Proceeds will go to American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association.

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News Headline: Taste of Hubbard event planned | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: Tribune Chronicle
News OCR Text: KENT TO HOLD AWARD RECEPTION: Kent State University at Trumbull will host the scholarship reception at 3 p.m. on Sept. 27 in Room 117 of the Technology Building, campus of Kent State Trumbull, 4314 Mahoning Ave. N.W., Warren. The 2012-13 event saw a group of over 160 Kent State Trumbull students honored as recipients of a variety of scholarships. Among the scholarships awarded were 34 donor-supported, 31 external and seven campus-based scholarships.

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News Headline: Musicology: Don't miss chance to see B.B. King at PAC | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name: Joe Wright
News OCR Text: Blues legend B.B. King will be visiting the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16. Someone once told me if ever I had the chance to see King perform I should "do it."

King, 87, has compiled more than 60 albums throughout his career and has been ranked in the top 10 of the greatest guitarists of all time by Rolling Stone magazine.

King, known for doing more than 300 shows a year up until his 70s, still manages to do at least 100 performances a year now.

King has been an influence on so many musicians and one of my favorite songs is "When Love Comes to Town." It was written by U2's Bono for King back in the late 80s and King performs with the group on the song. Here are a couple of interesting videos of that song. One with U2 and one on his own for a special show. Check them out.

Tickets for the show are on sale but you better hurry. They will go fast. Tickets are available for purchase online, by phone, in-person or by mail. Call or visit the Box Office for questions and more information: 330-308-6400, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, located in the Performing Arts Center.

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News Headline: 'Guys with Guitars' coming to KSU Tusc | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA ?Guys with Guitars? will kick off the new Cabaret Series at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 8 p.m. Sept. 14. The show will be performed with the audience seated on stage. A three-course meal is included in the $40 ticket. Seating is limited to 120. ?Guys with Guitars? is made up of Doug Wood, a progressive instrumental guitarist; Ben Lapps, an acoustic fingerstyle guitarist; and Darren Frate on bass guitar. Each of these guitarists has his own established and accomplished solo careers.

Wood was awarded the 2013 Community Partnership for Arts and Culture Artist in Residence grant for the northeast shores of Cleveland. His song ?Cat Dance? was featured on ?Late Night Show with David Letterman.? He has toured with Eclectica.

Lapps, 19, has released three albums and performed hundreds of concerts, gaining a great deal of international attention as a fingerstyle guitarist.

Frate is a graduate of Berklee College of Music, Boston Mass. He has toured with Gary Lewis and the Playboys, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Martha Reeves, Tommy Roe and Lesley Gore, among others. Buy tickets for ?Guys with Guitars? at the Performing Arts Center box office, at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Free parking is available for all shows. The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Stage and screen fashions of legendary actress Katharine Hepburn at heart of Appleton exhibit | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Oshkosh Northwestern - Online
Contact Name: Cheryl Anderson Post
News OCR Text: Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Fashion Museum, dresses a mannequin with a Valentina dress made for Katharine Hepburn for the 1942 play 'Without Love.' It's part of the 'Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage & Screen' exhibit that opens later this week at the Trout Museum of Art in downtown Appleton. / Dan Powers/Post-Crescent Media

What: “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage & Screen” exhibit

Where: The Trout Museum of Art, downtown Appleton

Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-4p.m. Sunday

Admission: Adults, $9, seniors, $7, and students, $5 (children 10 and under free with an adult).

• Katharine Hepburn Film Series, 4-6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month through December at the Appleton Public Library.

• Join Post-Crescent Media reporter Maureen Wallenfang at The Art of Conversation at The Trout Museum of Art, 111 W. College Ave., at 11 a.m. Sept. 13

• “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?” outdoor movie, 8:30 p.m. Sept. 20 in Houdini Plaza, downtown Appleton

• “Capturing Modernity: Art, Fashion and Artiface,” Sept. 27-Nov. 27 at Leech Gallery of the Wriston Art Center Galleries, Lawrence University. Free. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and noon-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

• Fashion Show and Luncheon to benefit the Fox Cities Building for the Arts, 11 a.m. Oct. 14 at the Radisson Paper Valley Hotel, downtown Appleton. Tickets are $65, which includes lunch, fashion show and exhibit admission. Also a chance to win a $500 wardrobe, courtesy of fashion show presenters Younkers, Boston Store and Carson’s.

• To plan a brunch, tea or cocktails event to see the Hepburn exhibit, go to www.troutmuseum.org for details on menus and costs.

“Life is to be lived,” Katharine Hepburn once said. “If you have to support yourself, you had bloody well better find some way that is going to be interesting. And you don’t do that by sitting around.”

Hepburn, one of Hollywood’s most iconic figures, certainly didn’t sit around — with 12 Oscar nominations in 48 years and four wins for leading roles in “Morning Glory,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” “The Lion in Winter” and “On Golden Pond.”

Playing a supporting role in Hepburn’s films were her personal collection of rarely exhibited performance clothes, which will be on view starting Friday when the “Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage & Screen” exhibition takes over the Trout Museum of Art in downtown Appleton.

The exhibit, to be on display through Dec. 15, features 46 rarely exhibited costumes — including Hepburn’s much-loved slacks — from her stage, screen and television days on loan from the Kent State University Museum in Ohio.

“It was her intent, per her executors, that her personal collection of performance clothes (kept in her closet over the years) be given to an educational institution,” said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which has housed the Hepburn collection since 2010.

Druesedow was in Appleton in late August to dress the exhibit.

“We chose things for the exhibition that people had a chance to recognize from her very famous stage performances.”

A fashionable trend

Over the last few years, international museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Chicago Art Institute, have been procuring hauté couture designers such as Alexander McQueen and Versace to display their design work, said Pamela Williams-Lime, executive director of the Trout Museum of Art and president of the Building for the Arts.

“Those exhibits have been drawing beyond anyone’s expectations,” she said.

That’s a big reason Hepburn is being exhibited in Appleton. Another reason, Williams-Lime said, is that since the Trout opened its doors, most exhibits have been traditional in nature.

“We were looking to expand our audience by bringing diverse kinds of arts exhibits into the building,” she said. “This particular exhibit, because of Katharine’s name recognition through all her movies and theater and personal presence, is an opportunity to reach that expanded audience.

“People are always interested in fashion trends and how they evolve. And people are always interested in iconic people like movie stars — people who are in the public eye. And Katharine Hepburn was such an icon and had such a strong sense of personal style and had a real strong voice when they were designing costumes for her movies.”

As an individual, Hepburn’s public image was of comfort and sensibility.

“‘I want to wear slacks. It’s a style I like and I’m going to stick with it,’” Druesedow said of Hepburn’s take on fashion. “Those are attitudes that were not common among the Hollywood movie stars. The designers who worked with (Hepburn) had to understand she had very definite ideas about what kinds of clothes would support her dramatic persona, her characterization.

“Edith Head once said, ‘You don’t design for Miss Hepburn, you design with her because she has a very strong feeling about what’s best for the character, what’s best for the story,’ and then, in her personal life, what’s best for her. And she wasn’t afraid to voice those opinions.”

In her mid-50s, for example, Hepburn believed her neck was aging faster than the rest of her, and demanded costumes cover her neck.

“I’ve learned to admire her and have a certain affection for her even though I have no idea what it would have been like to know her in person,” Druesedow said.

An iconic history

After graduating from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, the Connecticut-bred Hepburn began her foray into acting with small roles in plays on Broadway and elsewhere. She broke into stardom with her role as Antiope in “A Warrior’s Husband” in 1932. Other films quickly followed: “A Bill of Divorcement,” “Morning Glory” and “Little Women.”

Soon, stories began to leak out about Hepburn’s refusal to play the “Hollywood game,” according to www.imbd.com. She was labeled box-office poison after a series of flops in the mid-1930s, and in 1938 decided to go back to Broadway to star in “The Philadelphia Story.”

It was a smash hit. Hepburn bought the film rights and negotiated her way back to Hollywood, this time on her terms. The film version of “The Philadelphia Story” also was a hit, earned her an Oscar nomination and proved she was a force to be reckoned with.

In 1942, she starred in “Woman of the Year” with Spencer Tracy, which began a string of nine films and a love affair that lasted nearly 30 years.

“Her career was 66 years long,” Druesedow said. “It spanned not only those romantic comedies of the ’30s and ’40s, but also the great performances — think about the ‘African Queen,’ think about ‘Lion in Winter,’ think about her playing Mary Tyrone in ‘Long Day’s Journey into Night’ — those are powerful, powerful roles.”

A Hepburn celebration

In addition to the exhibition, a host of other Hepburn events have been planned in Appleton including an art exhibit called “Capturing Modernity: Art, Fashion and Artiface,” Sept. 27-Nov. 27 in the Leech Gallery of the Wriston Art Center Galleries at Lawrence University.

“The connection to the Hepburn exhibition at the Trout is the interest in and display of women’s fashions — fashion being an exciting new direction in art museum exhibitions,” said Beth Zinsli, curator and director of the Wriston Art Center Galleries.

The exhibition, curated by Lawrence associate professor of art history Elizabeth Carlson, features 19th century American and European works of art from the university’s permanent collection paired with commercial fashion plates from 19th century periodicals.

And speaking of the ladies, Williams-Lime said there’s an opportunity for groups of 20 to 56 to schedule a brunch, tea or cocktails event to see the Hepburn exhibit.

“The exhibit will appeal to women on a number of levels,” Williams-Lime said. “One is the aura of Katharine Hepburn. Her roles on stage and film resonate with women today. She was known for her strength and beauty, but Hepburn had control of her image; she didn’t allow the studios to dictate that to her. For the first time you really saw a woman taking control of her total self — both personally and career-wise.”

Fashion design is always topical, particularly to women.

“Our show is opening during Fashion Week — that was intentional on our part,” Williams-Lime said.

Fashion Week in New York, featuring previews of spring 2014 fashions, opened Thursday and runs through most of this week.

Hepburn’s sense of style continues to influence design and styling details, which will be demonstrated during the Oct. 14 fashion show to benefit the Fox Cities Building for the Arts.

Finally, Williams-Lime said, the exhibit allows fans to view Hepburn’s personal collection, with many pieces designed by acclaimed fashion designers.

“Last but not least, it’s right here in downtown Appleton,” she said. “You don’t have to travel anywhere to go see it.”

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News Headline: Hepburn dresses hit art museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Province - Online, The
Contact Name: The Associated Press
News OCR Text: Exhibit will feature rarely seen clothing

Clothes worn by late actress Katharine Hepburn will soon be on display at an Appleton museum.

The exhibit will feature some of her rarely exhibited costumes from stage, screen and television, along with items from her personal collection on loan from the Kent State University Museum.

The exhibit is called Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen. It starts Sept. 13 at The Trout Museum of Art in Appleton.

The exhibition will be curated by Jean Druesedow, director of The Kent State University Museum and author of Rebel Chic, which is about Hepburn's style.

The museum acquired Hepburn's performance clothes from her estate. Before her 2003 death, she said she wanted her collection of performance clothes to be given to an educational institution.

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News Headline: Lights Outs: Physicists Find a Faster Way to Switch LCDs (Lavrentovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Science Magazine
Contact Name: Adrian Cho
News OCR Text: Light spigot. In a conventional liquid crystal display, rodlike molecules reorient to block (left) or allow (right) the passage of light. But physicists have found a way switch a liquid crystal that does not turn the molecules and is much faster.

Physicists have invented a much faster way to switch off liquid crystals, the materials that control light in many computer screens and televisions. The new technique probably won't end up in liquid crystal displays (LCDs), as the switching is far faster than needed in those devices. But it puts a new twist on the concept of an LCD.

"This is something new and very fresh," says Tigran Galstian, an engineering physicist at Laval University in Quebec, Canada. "People must think about this to see if there is some practical application."

Liquid crystals resemble both of their namesakes. As in a liquid, molecules in a liquid crystal jumble about freely and flow. But as in a crystal, the rodlike molecules orient themselves in the same direction. The alignment defines an optical axis and gives the liquid crystal unusual properties. A key one is the way it affects polarized light—light whose electromagnetic waves ripples in a single direction. As it passes through a liquid crystal, light polarized parallel to the optical axis travels at a different speed than light polarized perpendicular to it. And because of that speed difference, or birefringence, light polarized at an angle to the material's optical axis can have its polarization rotated.

That rotation makes an LCD work. The display consists of a layer of liquid crystal between two plates of glass, which sit between two more plates of polarizing glass. The polarizers are set at a 90° angle, so that light that enters the display from behind and passes through the first polarizer is blocked by the second. In the "off" state, the liquid crystal is aligned so that it does nothing to the light and leaves the screen dark (see figure). When flipped "on," however, an electric field reorients the molecules so that collectively they rotate the polarization of the light, allowing it to pass through the second polarizer and out of the screen. To form a picture, bits or "pixels" of the screen are controlled individually.

The scheme has a basic limitation, says Oleg Lavrentovich, a physicist at Kent State University in Ohio. The electric field wrenches the molecules into the "on" orientation in nanoseconds. When the power goes off, the molecules relax back into their original orientation, which is set by a pattern etched into the confining glass—but they do so 1000 times more slowly, in milliseconds. "That's the Achilles' heel of liquid crystals," Lavrentovich says.

Now, he and Kent colleagues Volodymyr Borshch and Sergij Shiyanovskii have demonstrated a faster way to switch a liquid crystal, as they report today in Physical Review Letters. They begin with the usual crossed polarizers and a liquid crystal called CCN-47. In the experiment, in the off state the molecules start out in an orientation that lets light through. Lavrentovich and colleagues then apply an electric field. But they do it in a way that does not rotate the molecules but instead changes the amount of birefringence.

Here's how that happens. The molecules in CCN-47 aren't cylindrical, but are shaped like planks. Normally, the planks all point in the same direction lengthwise, but neighboring molecules twist randomly in all directions, as thermal energy keeps the individual molecules jiggling. The electric field overcomes the twisting and stacks the planks like lumber. In that more orderly state, the liquid crystal has a slightly different birefringence, which changes the angle by which the light's polarization rotates and the amount of light allowed through the cell. When the electric field vanishes, thermal jiggling of the individual molecules restores the liquid crystal to its initial condition in just 30 nanoseconds.

The change in birefringence doesn't shut off light completely, so the display is only dimmed rather than darkened. But the contrast could be heightened by adjusting the geometry and materials, Lavrentovich says. He says the technique might find uses in steering laser beams like the ones that can carry signals between satellites or in creating ultrafast shutters.

The real value in the work may be the new approach, which relies on the collective behavior of the molecules to turn the polarization of light and their individual jiggling to flip between on and off configurations, Galstian says: "It's a clever idea."

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News Headline: Mamba Masters, cellist among highlights of Music from the Western Reserve Season | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Music from The Western Reserve's upcoming season includes six concerts from September through April.

The concerts are presented in Christ Church Episcopal in Hudson.

The season opens Sept. 15 with Caroline Oltmanns, International Steinway artist and Hudson resident. Oltmanns has performed extensively on three continents. In addition to a wide variety of piano solo and concerto repertoire, Oltmanns frequently performs and premieres works by contemporary composers. Oltmanns is a Fulbright Scholar and native of Germany where she earned her diploma at the Staatliche Musikhochschule, Freiburg and her master's and doctoral degrees at the University of Southern California.

She is professor of piano at Youngstown State University.

Brian Thornton, cello, takes the stage Oct. 20. A member of The Cleveland Orchestra, Thornton has performed and conducted in hundreds of venues around the world, from the White House to the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. Thornton has taken part in premiering more than 100 new works of music as a soloist or in collaboration with chamber ensembles, and has performed as a soloist with more than 30 orchestras across the United States.

The 2013-14 season's "featured young artist," Yang Zeng, performs Nov. 3rd. A rising star and much sought after violinist, Zeng has been studying the violin since the age of 6. A student at Kent State University, Zeng studies with Cathy Meng Robinson and has participated in the Kent Blossom Music Festival residency program for three years.

Pianist, singer, songwriter, composer, arranger and bandleader, Mike Petrone returns to the series Feb. 23. A career that spans more than 25 years, Petrone's jazz piano trio has received acclaim throughout the world.

On March 16, Music from the Western Reserves presents Marimba Masters of Cleveland. Five accomplished percussionists including founder, Joseph Adato, retired Cleveland Orchestra percussionist, Donald Miller, percussionist with The Cleveland Orchestra, Bruce Golden, former percussionist with the Toledo Symphony, Andrew Pongracz, member of the Cleveland Pops and Matt Hunsaker, freelance percussionist.

The season closes April 27 with Michael Sachs, principal trumpet with The Cleveland Orchestra. A member of the orchestra since 1988, Sachs is recognized internationally as a leading soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, teacher, author and clinician.

Season tickets are $75; single tickets, $18 and students, free. Tickets can be purchased at www.MFTWR.org, the Learned Owl in Hudson or at the door concert night.

For more information on the 2013-14 season, follow Music from the Western Reserve on

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News Headline: Mamba Masters, cellist among highlights of Music from the Western Reserve Season | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Music from The Western Reserve's upcoming season includes six concerts from September through April.

The concerts are presented in Christ Church Episcopal in Hudson.

The season opens Sept. 15 with Caroline Oltmanns, International Steinway artist and Hudson resident. Oltmanns has performed extensively on three continents. In addition to a wide variety of piano solo and concerto repertoire, Oltmanns frequently performs and premieres works by contemporary composers. Oltmanns is a Fulbright Scholar and native of Germany where she earned her diploma at the Staatliche Musikhochschule, Freiburg and her master's and doctoral degrees at the University of Southern California.

She is professor of piano at Youngstown State University.

Brian Thornton, cello, takes the stage Oct. 20. A member of The Cleveland Orchestra, Thornton has performed and conducted in hundreds of venues around the world, from the White House to the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. Thornton has taken part in premiering more than 100 new works of music as a soloist or in collaboration with chamber ensembles, and has performed as a soloist with more than 30 orchestras across the United States.

The 2013-14 season's "featured young artist," Yang Zeng, performs Nov. 3rd. A rising star and much sought after violinist, Zeng has been studying the violin since the age of 6. A student at Kent State University, Zeng studies with Cathy Meng Robinson and has participated in the Kent Blossom Music Festival residency program for three years.

Pianist, singer, songwriter, composer, arranger and bandleader, Mike Petrone returns to the series Feb. 23. A career that spans more than 25 years, Petrone's jazz piano trio has received acclaim throughout the world.

On March 16, Music from the Western Reserves presents Marimba Masters of Cleveland. Five accomplished percussionists including founder, Joseph Adato, retired Cleveland Orchestra percussionist, Donald Miller, percussionist with The Cleveland Orchestra, Bruce Golden, former percussionist with the Toledo Symphony, Andrew Pongracz, member of the Cleveland Pops and Matt Hunsaker, freelance percussionist.

The season closes April 27 with Michael Sachs, principal trumpet with The Cleveland Orchestra. A member of the orchestra since 1988, Sachs is recognized internationally as a leading soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, teacher, author and clinician.

Season tickets are $75; single tickets, $18 and students, free. Tickets can be purchased at www.MFTWR.org, the Learned Owl in Hudson or at the door concert night.

For more information on the 2013-14 season, follow Music from the Western Reserve on

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News Headline: Students and staff remember professor Erik Heidemann | Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: UWire
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The sudden death of a well-loved Kent State political science professor shook the university, leaving students and faculty to reflect on the legacy he has left.

Erik Heidemann, assistant political science professor, died from a sudden heart attack caused by a defect in his heart on Tuesday, Sept. 3, Merlinda Heidemann, mother of Erik said. Students and faculty remember him for his intelligence and his benevolent approach to teaching.

"Dr. Heidemann was inspirational to his students. He was always willing to go the extra mile, both in and outside of the classroom, to guarantee that each of his students fully understood and appreciated what he was teaching," said Christopher Clevenger, president of the political science club, in an e-mail. "He made himself relatable."

According to Kent State's website, "[Heidemann's] work focused on elite deicison-making in presidential nominations, the role of legislative party 'voter contracts' on electoral outcomes, the changing nature of grassroots mobilization of the electorate, and mass-based restrictive attitudes towards electoral participating."

Heidemann left behind his mother, Merlinda Heidemann, his father, David Heidemann, and his sister, all who remember him as an intelligent, well-spoken man.

"He was so smart and had a way with words. I was always impressed with his vocabulary," Merlinda said. "We just really loved him, and it was just so sad for him to pass."

Heidemann was respected by his colleagues as well.

"What we were most amazed by was the fact that he could get students excited about Political Methods," associate political science professor Andrew Barnes said. "And that's not an easy thing to do."

His students are grateful for his hard work and effort to help them understand the content of his classes.

"Erik Heidemann was a dedicated educator who actually cared about the successes of his students, and went out of his way to guarantee that success," Clevenger said.

"While he only spent a year here with our students, his legacy and education style will live on in the hearts of Golden Flashes for years to come."

Contact Hilary Crisan at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

(Distributed for UWire via M2 Communications (www.m2.com))

Copyright © 2013 U-Wire

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News Headline: Small Business Development Center at Kent-Tusc gets a boost (Schillig) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eight businesses and organizations have helped fund the Ohio Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia to enable the center to continue providing consulting and advising services to new small businesses.

The OSBDC is the lead center for the 10-county region of Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Coshocton, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, Muskingum and Tuscarawas counties.

In addition to Kent State-Tuscarawas, the businesses and organizations providing funding for this fiscal year are Kent State-Salem, Consumers National Bank, PNC, Coshocton County Port Authority, First National Bank of Dennison, First Federal Community Bank and First Merit Bank. ?Funding was again a challenge for our center,? said Steve Schillig, OSBDC region director at Kent State Tuscarawas. ?We learned early in the year that the federal sequester was to have a direct impact on our program. If it wasn?t for the continued support from our longstanding contributors and the addition of several new ones this year, our organization would have been forced to cut services.? The OSBDC provides services to assist small business through advising, assistance, training and development and networking. Center personnel provide assistance to move businesses through all stages of development ? from a new idea, through start-up, development and into growth and expansion.

The center is located on the campus at 330 University Drive NE in New Philadelphia.

For more information about the OSBDC at Kent State-Tuscarawas, contact Schillig at 330-308-7479, by email at sschil10@kent.edu or visit the OSBDC website at www.tusc.kent.edu/bcs/smallbusiness.

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News Headline: Business startup class is Wednesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Coshocton Tribune - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Coshocton County Chamber of Commerce will host a business startup class from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Coshocton County Progress Center.

Jeannie Keenan, of the Kent State Small Business Development Center, will be the instructor. Topics will cover the chance of success of opening a new business, business planning and financing.

The cost is $20. Walk-ins are welcome.

To make a reservation, call the chamber at 740-622-5411 or the development center at 330-308-7434.

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News Headline: Spuds, art take spotlight in Mantua, Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Diane Smith
News OCR Text: Potatoes, fine art, and some artistically dressed potatoes made for a busy Saturday at opposite ends of Portage County.

The Mantua Potato Festival and Kent's Art in the Park competed for the attention of area residents Saturday.

Both events continue today at Buchert Park in Mantua and Fred Fuller Park in Kent.

Both events also are marking milestones, with the Potato Festival celebrating its 40th anniversary, and Art in the Park marking its 20th.

Organizers of both events said each included vendors who had been there since the beginning.

Linda Schilling, Mantua Potato Festival coordinator, said Saturday's warm weather drew a steady crowd to the festival grounds.The spud was the theme of the day, with the Potato Stomp race, a french fry eating contest, potato sack race and a bake off, featuring a variety of baked goods, all with a potato theme.

Vendors served up food featuring potatoes and numerous other options, and vendors such as Goodell Farms featured potato-themed items alongside its maple-based products.

The french fry eating contest had contestants young and old competing to see who could consume a plate of fries first, without using their hands. Jason Perez, who won Thursday's potato chip eating contest, was winner of the first round, polishing off his plate in one minute and 27 seconds.

Perez said this was the fourth competitive eating contest he's taken part in.

Hunter Adkins, 11, of Mantua, walked away from the picnic table, carrying his unfinished plate as a consolation prize. Hunter, who won a trophy in the contest last year, succinctly summed up his strategy. "Pour lots of vinegar on them, eat them," he said.

Volunteers from the Mantua Historical Society and the Mantua Restoration Society showed off historical artifacts and a coverlet being sold to raise money for restoration efforts. Ellie Monroe also sold tickets for two quilts she had designed for the cause.

Monroe said she also is spearheading an effort to use the old Center School in Mantua Township as a community center."It's a beautiful building," she said.

Today's events continue from noon to 7 p.m., with the parade highlighting the day of activities. Carl Zeleznik of Sierra Inc. in Mantua will be grand marshal of the parade, which starts at 2 p.m. at Crestwood High School and ends at the festival grounds.

Art in the Park

Art in the Park welcomed 9,000 people Saturday to Fred Fuller Park off Middlebury Road in Kent. The event continues from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. today.

Judy Taylor, artist liaison, said 99 artists were showing their wares. There also was entertainment on two stages, children's activities and a dozen food vendors.

Taylor said Art in the Park started in 1994 with 35 artists, and only popcorn and water being served by vendors. The event has grown steadily over the years, and some volunteers, such as Taylor, have been there 20 years.

"We've had a lot of kids come back and bring their kids," said Taylor, who started out coordinating activities for the younger set.

Cathy Ricks said some children at the children's pavilion were making pottery, crafting pots, unicorns, spaghetti and waffles. Others were pouring color on hats to make a tie-dye design. Earlier in the day, children spilled more than 40 cups of paint over wooden towers, an activity that will be repeated today.

Kathy Armstrong was teaching children fiber art, another activity that continues today. Staff members were assisted by two groups at Kent State University, as well as students from James A. Garfield High School.

Since this is the festival's first year without strolling poet Merle Mollenkopf, who died earlier this year, Ricks said children paid tribute to him through a "Po Tree." Children made "helicopters" with words on them resembling magnetic poetry. Some words came from poems Mollenkopf had written or recited, while others came from the children themselves. After making the helicopters, children had the option of hanging them from a tree or flying them on their own.

"The words are floating through the air in tribute to him," she said.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1139 or

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News Headline: No bugs about it: New website helps users identify Michigan insects | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: AnnArbor.com
Contact Name: Andrea Signor AnnArbor.com Freelance ReporterComment Now
News OCR Text: For Dr. Leslie Mertz, the crawlers and flyers of the insect world are a source of fascination.

"My favorite insect is whichever one I looked at last," she said, chuckling.

To share her passion for nature's smaller creatures, Mertz, a lecturer in the biology department at Eastern Michigan University, helped launch an interactive website, www.knowyourinsects.org, to help Michiganders identify the orders and suborders of insects in the state.

A slender clearwing moth pauses near a flower in Benzie County, Mich., June 12, 2012.

"This website allows users to rekindle their love of insects," said Mertz.

As an easy-to-use guide to identifying the creepy-crawlies, the site prompts users to answer two-choice questions to help narrow down the type of creature they've discovered.

"Most available insect keys are either too simple or too complex," Mertz said. "This bridges that gap. ... It's something anybody can use without being watered down."

The website includes diagrams and photographs along with scientific terms to help users hone their search and learn more about the world of entomology. Users may also upload their own photographs of their discoveries.

Mertz hopes the guide will become a resource for parents and teachers.

"Kids inherently love insects ... This site helps parents build on that intense curiosity," she said. "As we head back to school I think this will help teachers and students make the transition from summer break to the classroom."

Madison Preparatory High School teacher Ivanna Yavorenko said she plans to incorporate the new site into her curriculum.

"This will be perfect for (the students)," said Yavorenko, a biology teacher for grades 9-12. "It introduces them to different ecosystems. It's useful and it's free."

Yavorenko said she intends to integrate the site into the ecology and evolution units of her biology courses, getting students outside and exploring the world around them.

"I think they'll enjoy it," she said.

The site isn't limited to K-12 students. Mertz has her students conduct fieldwork and identify their finds.

"At first, many of them are too cool for it, but give a 22-year-old a net to catch a dragonfly and it's amazing to see that switch back to being a kid," she said.

EMU graduate Kelly McKinne said he enjoyed Mertz's courses and respects the work she's doing to build a comprehensive, user-friendly guide.

"(The website) is one of the most simple ways to identify an insect and it's also one of the most accurate," said McKinne, now a public administration graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio. "(Mertz is) making a pool for students and educators to build on."

McKinne said he has contributed to the website by providing photographs of his finds. For him, the interactive component of the site is especially unique and important.

"One of the best ways to identify a species is to sketch it in order to record it and compare it to a field guide," he said, adding that photographs taken by amateur biologists take the place of sketches and the "Know Your Insects" guide helps the budding scientists make their identification.

"People really get excited," he said. "They are becoming a part of this website."

Mertz said she hopes "Know Your Insects" continues to grow with more user participation and she plans to continue building on the already extensive database.

She also hopes the site helps users recapture their youth.

"Most people have little interest in insects other than to swat them, but give them a half hour or an hour inspecting insects and they're right back to where they were when they were 6 years old," she said. "I hope this site helps folks rediscover their love of insects and nature and their love of the outdoors."

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News Headline: Church celebrates future by investing in children | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Ellwood City Ledger - Online
Contact Name: Louise CarrollFor The Ledger
News OCR Text: The Rev. Todd Onink, pastor of the Free Methodist Church on Glen Avenue in Ellwood City, stands in front of a mural of Noah's Ark painted on a basement wall.

Murals decorate the walls of the children's area of the Free Methodist Church in Ellwood City. 

One of the biblical murals in the basement of the Free Methodist Church in Ellwood City. By Louise Carroll For The Ledger EllwoodCityLedger.com | 0 comments

ELLWOOD CITY — The Free Methodist Church in Ellwood City is celebrating its 100th anniversary by investing in its future — its children.

“We thought about what we could do to commemorate our 100 years, and it was decided that our church has a long history of children's ministries, so focusing on children seemed the appropriate way to celebrate,” said the Rev. Todd Onink, church pastor.

“Many times, churches wait until they have a lot of children before they invest in children's ministry, but we have decided to step out in faith and prepare a place for children to come and be ministered to in their own space.”

An area in the church's basement has been revamped and dedicated to ministering to children with a place for crafts, games and even their own restrooms.

Beginning in the hall and continuing into and through the room, walls feature murals painted by Shelby Pflugh of Franklin Township. Pflugh, a sketch artist, is a student at Kent State University.

“We asked her to do something entirely different from her work that is lifelike sketches, something completely out of her comfort zone. We asked her to paint murals on the block walls and paint them in a cartoon-type art that would appeal to children,” Onink said. “She did it, and the murals are outstanding.”

Stories from the Bible are the general themes of the murals. Pflugh used her creativity and imagination to paint them in a way to communicate to children. The biblical stories include Adam and Eve, the parting of the Red Sea, the Ten Commandments, the Crucifixion of Jesus and the empty tomb.

“The murals are beautiful,” said Jody Cooper of North Sewickley Township, director of the church's children's ministry. “They are so much more than we envisioned. They bring the Bible to life for the children.”

Soon, the children's handprints will be added to the wall by dipping them in paint and touching the wall.

The murals and children's ministry space will be dedicated on Sept. 11.

The church also offers a Christian club for children ages 4 through the fifth grade on Wednesdays from fall through spring. The club features interactive technology including videos, games and lively music. And it has an annual vacation Bible school.

The Youth Ministry for sixth grade and up, directed by Michelle Boggs of Ellwood City, is in the Free Methodist Fellowship Hall across the street from the church on Glenn Avenue.

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News Headline: Del Gizzo, Suzanne and Frederic J. Svoboda, eds. Hemingway's The Garden of Eden: Twenty-Five Years of Criticism. | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Free Library, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Del Gizzo, Suzanne and Frederic J. Svoboda, eds. Hemingway's The Garden of Eden Garden of Eden

See Eden.

Noun 1. Garden of Eden - a beautiful garden where Adam and Eve were placed at the Creation; when they disobeyed and ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were : Twenty-Five Years of Criticism. Kent, OH: Kent State UP, 2012.396 pp. Cloth $55.

This anthology, which brings together many of the most influential essays on Hemingway's posthumous novel, may well become as important to scholarship on The Garden of Eden as the novel itself has been to our understanding of Hemingway and his most controversial literary work. Compiled by two of our leading Hemingway critics, this anthology can serve as a handy resource for both beginning and advanced Hemingway scholars. In their informative introduction, Del Gizzo and Svoboda explain two chief goals that they subsequently achieve: "We have gathered in one place what we believe to be the most important criticism published on The Garden of Eden to date in an effort to provide an overview of the trends in and the contours of the critical conversations over the past twenty-five years as well as to indicate possibilities for future scholarship" (x).

Also in their introduction, the editors point out that they have included one previously unpublished entry, Tom Jenks's "The Garden of Eden at Twenty-five," a very appropriate inclusion given the critical attention Jenks's editing of Garden has attracted since its publication. Among Jenks's most revealing anecdotes is his account of flying out to Bozeman with Charles Scribner Charles Scribner is the name of several members of a New York publishing family associated with the company bearing their name. Charles Scribner

Charles Scribner , Jr. to gain Patrick Hemingway's permission to publish the edited version of the novel, an account that includes Jenks's rendition of Patrick's story about surprising his father and Martha Gellhorn Martha Gellhorn (8 November 1908 - 15 February 1998) was an American novelist, travel writer and journalist, considered to be one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century. She reported on virtually every major world conflict that took place during her 60-year career. in their bedroom at the Finca Vigia vi·gi·a

A warning on a navigational chart indicating a possible rock, shoal, or other hazard, the exact position of which is unknown.

[Spanish vigía, from Portuguese vigia, from , "making love in a position that Patrick suggested they must have learned from a marriage manual" (6).

Del Gizzo and Svoboda next provide two insightful responses to Jenks's version of Garden: E. L. Doctorow's "Ernest Hemingway Noun 1. Ernest Hemingway - an American writer of fiction who won the Nobel prize for literature in 1954 (1899-1961)

Hemingway : R. I. P." and John Updike's "The Sinister Sex" Whereas Doctorow essentially dismisses Hemingway's characterization of Marita ("She is colorless and largely inarticulated") (19) as well as David's elephant story ("it is bad Hemingway") and concludes that "this cannot be the book Hemingway envisioned" (20), Updike observes that "the book, as finally presented, is something of a miracle, a fresh slant on the old magic ..." (23).

In the next section, "Editing and Manuscript Issues" Robert E. Fleming's "The Endings of Hemingway's Garden of Eden" and K. J. Peters's "The Thematic Integrity of The Garden of Eden," provide useful analyses of Jenks's version of the novel. While Fleming feels that Jenks did a creditable editing job, nevertheless he also feels that Jenks's "soothing ending" does not suggest the more complex, tragic sense of Hemingway's "provisional" ending, wherein David agrees to a suicide pact with Catherine (39-40). Critical of Jenks's exclusion of the Sheldon-Murray plot and his removal of the religious and metamorphosis themes, Peters believes the published version "is only a patchwork of what appears in the manuscript" (55).

The "Narrative Structure" section which follows includes essays that effectively examine important narrative issues in Garden. Robert B. Jones, in "Mimesis mimesis /mi·me·sis/ (mi-me´sis) the simulation of one disease by another.mimet´ic

mi·me·sis

1. The appearance of symptoms of a disease not actually present, often caused by hysteria. and Metafiction in Hemingway's The Garden of Eden," explains that on a mimetic mimetic /mi·met·ic/ (mi-met´ik) pertaining to or exhibiting imitation or simulation, as of one disease for another.

mi·met·ic

1. Of or exhibiting mimicry.

2. level the novel's two principal characters are not dissimilar from Hemingway code heroes (81, 85), while on the metafictional level David's honeymoon narrative is, in fact, The Garden of Eden that we are reading (88). Beatriz Penas Ibanez, in "Looking through The Garden's Mirrors: The Early-Postmodernist Hemingway Text," points out that Garden's modernist style is developed within a post-modernist text, one that "denaturalizes both reality and the self by means of its masterly exploitation of specularity, which substitutes endless mirror images for reality and lets the game of fiction overtake the game of life" (138). Both James Nagel, in "The Hunting Story in The Garden of Eden," and Rose Marie Burwell, in "Hemingway's Garden of Eden: Resistance of Things Past and Protecting the Masculine Text" associate the novel's main plot with David's African story. Nagel, however, observes that David cannot write about his "earlier break with his father" until he has "come to terms with the painful realities of his marriage" (102), while Burwell explains that "by the final page, David has regressed from the protesting, masculinist vision that condemns his father to a masculine position that expresses gratitude that his father was a complex man" (110).

A number of selections in the lengthy "Sexuality, Gender, and Race" section feature important discussions of how Garden addresses the art of writing. In "Hemingway's Barbershop Quintet: The Garden of Eden Manuscript" Mark Spilka asserts that David, with regard to the women in his life, reflects Hemingway's "androgynous an·drog·y·nous

1. Biology Having both female and male characteristics; hermaphroditic.

2. Being neither distinguishably masculine nor feminine, as in dress, appearance, or behavior. complicity with their several obsessions with hair, skin, dress, gender, and lesbian attachments that makes for his strength as a creative writer" (156). J. Gerald Kennedy, in "Hemingway's Gender Trouble," counters Spilka's argument by noting that in the end, "writing, not androgyny Androgyny

Hermaphrodites

half-man, half-woman; offspring of Hermes and Aphrodite. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 153]

Iphis

Cretan maiden reared as boy because father ordered all daughters killed. [Gk. Myth. , is ... David's solution to emptiness, hollowness, loneliness--to the incurable longing of the self for completion" (182). Nancy R. Comley and Robert Scholes, in "Tribal Things: Hemingway's Erotics of Truth," observe that while in the published version David's liaison with Marita restores him to a more '"normal' erotic life," in the manuscript version "it is precisely the 'abnormality' of their relationship that has refreshed and renewed his creative energies" (203). However, Daniel Kempton, in "Sexual Transgression and Artistic Creativity in The Garden of Eden," challenges Comley and Scholes's view by asserting that David's rewriting of the African stories "recovers his youth, recuperating all losses inflicted by time or ... by the transgressive feminine, specifically Catherine" (296).

Three additional essays in this section provide very sophisticated analyses of Hemingway's use of race in Garden. In '"Come Back to the Beach Ag'in, David Honey!': Hemingway's Fetishization of Race in The Garden of Eden Manuscripts," Carl Eby explains early on that he plans to extend Toni Morrison's study in Playing in the Dark of "the eroticization of race by white male authors"--that is, of the way "American authors have traditionally defined themselves as 'white' and 'male' in relation to an insistent and ever-present racial and sexual otherness ..." (239). In "Fathers, Lovers, and Friend Killers: Rearticulating Gender and Race via Species in Hemingway," Cary Wolfe, also responding to Morrison's work, points out that David's "cross-species identification makes him more critically aware of the father's imperialist and patriarchal relationship to the discourse of Africanism ..." (340). However, Ira Elliot, in his "In Search of Lost Time In Search of Lost Time or Remembrance of Things Past (French: À la recherche du temps perdu) is a semi-autobiographical novel in seven volumes by Marcel Proust. : Reading Hemingway's Garden," believes that Catherine, by taking "control of her body--its colour and its uses--threatens the primacy of man in the patriarchal order" (309).

In the anthology's final section, "The Fitzgerald Connection," Robert E. Fleming Robert E. Fleming is an American literary critic and professor emeritus at the University of New Mexico. He recently co-edited (with Robert W. Lewis) an edition of Ernest Hemingway's Under Kilimanjaro. , in "The Garden of Eden as a Response to Tender Is the Night," demonstrates persuasively that Garden's uniqueness in the Hemingway canon can be attributed to Hemingway's "taking so much of the basic premise" of Fitzgerald's Tender for his novel. Nancy Comley, in "Madwomen on the Riviera: The Fitzgeralds, Hemingway, and the Matter of Modernism,' shows that Garden, as the anthology's editors point out, "is a rewriting of Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night and, to a lesser degree, Zelda Fitzgerald's Save Me the Waltz Save Me the Waltz is an autobiographical novel by Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald that was published in 1932.

Fitzgerald wrote the novel in six weeks while recovering from a schizophrenic attack. " (359).

While we could argue at length over which other studies of Garden might have been selected in place of the essays included here, I feel the editors have included those essays most representative of the key critical issues involving Garden over the past quarter century. This collection provides a sound basis for the next twenty-five years of studying the novel.

Dennis B. Ledden
Indiana University of Pennsylvania History

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News Headline: Shepherd University professor writes book about state's founding | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Shepherdstown Chronicle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. John E. Stealey III, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Shepherd University, has written his fourth book, "West Virginia's Civil War-Era Constitution: Loyal Revolution, Confederate Counter-Revolution, and the Convention of 1872," which was published by Kent State University Press June 7.

It took the author 40 years to research and write the 831-page study about the state's early history when it separated from the Commonwealth of Virginia. It examines Virginia loyalists, state confederates, and the establishment of a state constitution.

"This, I firmly believe, will be the most substantial volume to appear about West Virginia's creation in West Virginia's sesquicentennial year," Stealey said.

In his writing, the author looks at the biographies of the members of the constitutional convention of 1872, examining wealth, familial relations, slave ownership, professions, and political affiliations and opinions. The volume relates all the debates and actions of the convention that wrote the state's present constitution.

"West Virginians don't know themselves as well as they should," he said. "The work on the Civil War era was badly needed. This is the most thorough study about that period."

Though Stealey started college in pursuit of a law degree, he said a class about West Virginia history and Appalachia he took in his junior year changed his course.

"I was interested in Appalachia and the problems of Appalachia," he said. "I wanted to be a college history professor specializing in that field."

Doing so at Shepherd allowed him to conduct research and write, as well.

Of completing his latest work he said, "It shows you what you can do if you have diligence. If you have a goal in mind you can attain it."

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