Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Athletics (1)
History; KSU at Stark (1)
Human Resources; Sustainability; Town-Gown (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Political Science (1)
Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (3)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Women Veterans Face Stereotypes on and Off the Battlefield (Anderson) 09/09/2013 Cutting Edge News, The Text Attachment Email

...17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes. It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed...


Alumni (1)
Arsenio Hall picks up right where he left off 09/09/2013 Star-Ledger Text Email

...doesn't have a late-night host." Born in Cleveland 57 years ago, Hall early found an aptitude for magic, debate -- and comedy. After graduating from Kent State, he headed west -- first to Chicago, then Los Angeles, in search of a stand-up career, and landed at West Hollywood's Comedy Store, one...


Alumni; Athletics (1)
Former Kent State golfer Mackenzie Hughes now ranked No. 1 in PGA Tour Canada's rankings 09/10/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Former Kent State men's golf star Mackenzie Hughes, of Ontario, captured his first PGA Tour Canada victory on Sunday, shooting a 66 to win the inaugural...


Athletics (1)
Kent State's Corey Conners wins Gopher Invitational for second straight year 09/10/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Flashes' Conners wins Gopher Invitational for 2nd straight year Kent State senior Corey Conners became the first back-to-back individual champion in...


History; KSU at Stark (1)
Constitution Day Events at Colleges 09/09/2013 North Neighbor News - Online Text Attachment Email

...WALSH HOSTS LECTURE Walsh University's Phi Alpha Theta, the Honor Society of History, will host Dr. Leonne M. Hudson, associate professor of history at Kent State University. He will present "The Constitution and the Emancipation Proclamation" at 7 p.m. in the David Center Auditorium. The presentation...


Human Resources; Sustainability; Town-Gown (1)
Local news briefs -- Sept. 10 09/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT Esplanade event KENT: Kent State University will host a Let's Take a Ride/Walk event at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 19. Students, faculty and staff are invited to walk or ride...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
High school newspaper ink drying up 09/09/2013 Las Vegas Sun - Online Text Attachment Email

...year. Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students — like I was. ...

Students miss out on high school newspaper experience 09/09/2013 Daytona Beach News-Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...year. Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students — like I was. ...


KSU at Stark (1)
College students are looking to rent textbooks (Leitner) 09/09/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...buying. In response, stores are offering more and more titles for rent. "We've gone full-steam ahead with rentals," said Kevin Leitner, bookstore manager at Kent State University's Stark campus. "We quadrupled the number of rental offerings from last semester to this semester. We've made it a priority."...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Enrollment virtually unchanged at Kent State Trumbull campus (Palmer, Ritter) 09/09/2013 WFMJ-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

WARREN, Ohio - Fall enrollment at Kent State University's Trumbull campus fell less than one-half of one percent compared to one year ago. A news release from the university says...


Political Science (1)
Memorial page set up for Kent State prof Erik Heidemann 09/10/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A memorial page for Erik Heidemann, a 35-year-old Kent State University assistant professor in the political science department who died unexpectedly last...


Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies (TLCS) (3)
Scientific Learning Announces New White Paper and Webinar on Reading Fluency and Comprehension by Dr. Timothy Rasinski (Rasinski) 09/09/2013 iStockAnalyst Text Attachment Email

...their reading, (OTCQB:SCIL) will release a new white paper and present a free webinar by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic. "Fluency is an important predictor of reading comprehension and a key element...

Scientific Learning Announces New White Paper and Webinar on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) 09/09/2013 Stockhouse Publishing Ltd. Text Attachment Email

...Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) will release a new white paper and present a free webinar by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic. "Fluency is an important predictor of reading comprehension and a key element...

Scientific Learning Announces New White Paper and Webinar on Reading Fluency and Comprehension by Dr. Timothy Rasinski (Rasinski) 09/09/2013 Yahoo! Finance Text Attachment Email

...Scientific Learning Corp. (SCIL) will release a new white paper and present a free webinar by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic. "Fluency is an important predictor of reading comprehension and a key element...


University Press (1)
Organic Valley tour, cask tastings, cows with names: Cleveland Local Food Calendar, Sept. 11-18 09/09/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...lumber. Email Morgan or call 216-324-5036. Name that cow Randy James, author of the new book, "Why Cows Need Names and More Secrets of Amish Farms," (Kent State University Press) will speak 6:30-8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 at West Woods Nature Center, 9465 Kinsman Road (Ohio 87), Russell Township. ...


News Headline: Women Veterans Face Stereotypes on and Off the Battlefield (Anderson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cutting Edge News, The
Contact Name: Asha Anchan, Kelsey Hightower and Catlin Cruz
News OCR Text: The fight to feel like a veteran weighs substantially on female soldiers returning from war, though their numbers have been historic, with more than 280,000 returning from deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade.

A News21 demographic analysis shows that 17.4 percent of post-9/11 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are women. More than a quarter of those women are black, almost twice the proportion found in the entire U.S. population.

Yet, these same women are less likely to find a job than male veterans and more likely to be a single parent with children to support, interviews and records show. They return to a nation that historically defines “veteran” as male, which in the post-9/11 era has meant a lack of female-specific resources at VA facilities across the country. A 2013 Institute of Medicine report found that women in combat-support roles, like men, experience intense warfare and constant threats on their lives, but the implications of this trauma for women has been overlooked.

“Historically, research on the health of veterans has focused on the health consequences of combat service in men, and there has been little scientific research ... of the health consequences of military service in women who served,” according to the report.

Currently, 360,000 women use VA medical services. But the number is expected to double as more women come home and seek care, many of them relatively new to its services, said Dr. Patricia Hayes, chief consultant of Women's Health Services at the VA in Washington, D.C.

As of 2008, only 33 percent of the 152 VA medical centers had specified "women's clinics," records show. Now, about 75 percent offer at least some type of female-specific care, Hayes said.

Army National Guard Spc. Crystal Sandor muscled a 5-ton truck through the ragtag roads of Iraq and likely would be dead from an exploding fireball had the 4-foot-10 soldier been just centimeters taller.

She was awarded a Purple Heart, but had to prove to the Army that she deserved it. Even back home in Ohio, she doesn't feel much like a soldier. “What did you do over there?” some gray-haired male veterans in Akron, Ohio, at the Department of Veterans Affairs asked as they sized up her petite frame. “Did you sell Girl Scout cookies?” one asked.

When Sandor's husband goes to the VA, he gets handshakes and “Thank you for your service” accolades in the waiting room. Not Crystal. Sandor has struggled to get the care she expected from the military since the night she nearly died – June 18, 2004. She was a driver in a 20-truck convoy during a night mission in Iraq.

She laughs just a little, remembering a conversation with a fellow soldier. She was razzing him for spilling sunflower seeds, a staple during their missions together. Then, a fireball from a roadside bomb came head-on toward their truck.

Sandor woke up pounding on her chest to make sure she was alive. She couldn't see, couldn't hear. The voice of a soldier broke the chaos. “Just keep driving! Just keep driving!” “If I was that much taller,” Sandor says, putting mere centimeters between her thumb and forefinger, “I wouldn't be alive.” After the accident and while still in Iraq, Sandor discovered her superiors lost the paperwork documenting the attack, meaning there was no official record that it ever happened.

“The only reason I have the disability (rating) I have is because I was smart enough to have a video camera on me and we recorded the damage to the truck and we took pictures of everything,” she said. “That is the only reason I have a Purple Heart or disability.” Since Sandor's return home in March 2005, she's been at odds with the Ohio VA system over her treatment.

During her first appointment later that year, she said the VA doctor seemed skeptical of her injuries, treating her as if she never left the base. When she was asked about treatment options, Sandor requested therapy to talk about the attack that injured her. Instead, she left with three prescriptions for anxiety and sleeping. She said she stopped taking the medications because she felt like a “zombie.”

“I don't think I've talked to one female veteran who goes to the VA who has had a good experience, that has been treated and received the care that they deserve,” Sandor said. “I think because the VA has dealt with men for so long, through all the previous wars, they're not set up to handle females. But we've been at this war for 10 years, it's about time they figure it out.”

She tried group therapy at the VA, but was placed in an all-male group. She left each session feeling guilty, not better, about herself because of the horror stories the men told.

For the last eight years, Sandor has bounced between her civilian doctor and the VA to prove the extent of her injuries — such as the post-traumatic stress disorder the VA denied, but her civilian doctor insists she has, along with ringing in her ears, severe arthritis in her knees, hearing and vision loss, herniated disks, a deviated septum and a brain lesion. She has a 40 percent disability rating.

She tries to dismiss her concerns with the VA, keeping her focus on her 17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes.

It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed her, but her PTSD continues to creep into her civilian life both physically and emotionally. “A lot of people are still like, ‘Why does it bother you? It's been eight years, get over it,' ” Sandor said. “It doesn't go away, it's with you the rest of your life. I mean, the severity of it might – how much you remember of it might — but that feeling, it's always there.”

Hannah Siska, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, sits in her dining room on June 9, 2013 in Ravenna, Ohio. Siska, 29, deployed twice to Iraq from February to September 2008 and February to September 2009. After her second deployment to Iraq, Siska had a “quarter-life crisis” and realized she wanted kids; she also has a 3-year-old son, Ethan. Caitlin Cruz/News21

When Hannah Siska left the Marines in 2011, she expected to find a job with the skills she acquired during her five years of service. She was a Marine in good standing. She had strong leadership skills. She had high security clearance.

But she couldn't get a job, even with her training as a special communications signals collection operator and analyst. Siska applied for more than 150 jobs posted on Department of Defense websites geared toward applicants with security clearances. The result always was the same.

“They want to hire vets that are males, not females, and that was very apparent,” said Siska, who was deployed to Iraq in 2008 and 2009. “I had everything and my resume looked just like all the other guys that got jobs and I didn't.”

In September 2012, the unemployment rate for post-9/11 female veterans hit a high of 19.9 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The average unemployment rate for female veterans for all of 2012 was 12.5 percent, but that was still 3 percentage points higher than the average for male veterans that year.

“Unfortunately when female veterans come home they aren't perceived as women warriors,” said John Pickens III, a Vietnam veteran and the executive director of VeteransPlus, a nonprofit offering financial counseling to service members.

A woman's military experience isn't seen as suitable for civilian life, despite the fact that they learned the same skills as their male counterparts, he said. “They can't enjoy the life they've fought to defend and there's a lot of pride there,” he said.

Siska calls it “the boys' club” mentality, a perception she worked against during her time as a Marine. When she joined in 2006, Siska said her superiors and fellow Marines gave her extra responsibilities because they trusted her judgment and work ethic. She sought a higher rank, but was not promoted. So she left the Marines.

“I loved it, and I loved the people, I loved what I did, I just didn't like the political aspect behind being able to move up,” she said. She described the Marines as “old fashioned,” and based on a ranking system emphasizing running and shooting scores. This mindset hinders the Marines, she said, because it discourages women from joining.

In 2009, women made up 19.5 percent of officers and enlisted members in the Air Force, but only 6.4 percent of all Marines, according to the Pew Research Center.

Now, Siska's working on a biochemistry degree at Kent State University while caring for two young children. Her goal is to go to medical school and serve in the Navy. “I want to be a career person and I want to accomplish things and feel like I'm contributing to society or a community or just my family,” she said.

U.S. Army veteran Aribella Shapiro, 32, applies eyeliner to prepare for Sunday morning worship, June 9, 2013, in Kent, Ohio. Shapiro joined the Army in August 2003 and was deployed to Camp Arifjan in Kuwait in June 2004, where she was sexually assaulted by a fellow service member. Religion has become her solace since she left the military. Prescription drugs used to treat depression sit on Shapiro's dresser in her two-bedroom apartment near Kent State University.

Other than when she is in a Kent State classroom, Aribella Shapiro is always by herself. She walks everywhere because she doesn't have a car — to school, to Walmart, to the Kent Church of Christ. On one Sunday, she leaves at least 45 minutes before the 10:45 a.m. service. The dewy grass sticks to her brown suede and rubber boots with fur around the top. She says the boots remind her of being in the Army.

She cuts across the lawn of another church, passes campus, stops to get a Frappuccino at Starbucks and zigzags past Main Street and over to the church. They're finishing a Bible study and moving on to the main worship service when she comes in and sits at the back of the 14-pew church. There are fewer than 20 people in the church; Shapiro is one of about three under the age of 35. She said she likes to try out different churches, but wants to connect somewhere so God knows she's thankful.

“I'm proud because I'm alive and I'm all in one piece,” said the 32-year-old. “I have a lot of friends who have died due to the war and I wasn't one of them. I'm proud that I fought for America.”

But she's not proud of everything about the military, namely her rape by a superior officer. “I didn't tell anyone because I felt embarrassed,” she said, explaining that her rapist threatened to kill her if she said anything. “I cried for months.”

The crying stopped, she explains, because she talked with other women who experienced similar scenarios, and she realized her story was not unique. The Department of Defense's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office estimates that 26,000 cases of sexual assault or unwanted sexual contact occurred in fiscal 2012. Of that estimate, 3,374 cases were reported, according to that office.

Shapiro joined the Army, knowing her decision to serve would pay her way through college. The Post-9/11 GI Bill brought her to Kent and it's where she feels the most confident — sitting in class, studying for an exam or helping other students with their homework.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill offers an education to those who served after Sept. 10, 2001, and has paid for nearly 1 million veterans to go to school. Post-9/11 female veterans who have a high school equivalent degree outperform non-veterans when it comes to post-secondary degree attainment, according to a News21 analysis.

But many women veterans returning home to student life juggle other challenges. Only 15 percent of student veterans are “traditionally” college-aged students. Another 47 percent have children and nearly that same percentage are married.

“We think that women veterans don't necessarily want to be identified solely as veterans, as a special group, they want to be identified as women students and adult learners,” said Rachel Anderson, director of the Center for Adult and Veteran Services at Kent State University.

The Independent Budget — an annual VA budget and policy analysis prepared by independent veterans service organizations — reported that researchers found women veterans have a difficult time finding support systems upon returning home. Some women reported feeling isolated, and for others this feeling is made worse by the college atmosphere.

But Aribella Shapiro's life is lonelier than she would like. She dreams of getting her bachelor's and master's degrees to teach English overseas, maybe even in Kuwait where she was stationed in 2004. Only this time she wants to go as “friend, not foe.”

Alone in her apartment, Shapiro misses the men and women she served with in the Army. She's trying to make connections with students in her classes, through the roommate she hopes to get by putting up signs around campus and even with the barista at Starbucks.

But going from being in the Army to being by herself is difficult especially, as a single person, she said. And when asked if she felt welcomed home, Shapiro answered immediately: “No.”

She described the TV shows that show soldiers coming home to their families and the emotional reunions that cue tears and hugs. “What about us soldiers that were single and we don't have a family to come home to? Why can't you appreciate us for what we do too?” she said.

U.S. Army veteran Briana Hawkes, 25, picks up her daughter Aubrey, 3, from Champion Day School June 10, 2013, in Warren, Ohio. Hawkes was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan in April 2012, months before Aubrey's second birthday.

Briana Hawkes' dress blues, or formal military, jacket hangs at the end of her closet in the basement of her parents' home in Bristolville, Ohio. Sgt. Hawkes is a reservist and she attends Kent State University. Briana Hawkes' Army dress blues hang pressed and ready in her parents' basement in Bristolville, Ohio.

The basement is where Hawkes is living for the next two-and-a-half years. She converted it into her own studio apartment while she's home and is willing to hang her clothes on a metal rod suspended from the ceiling because she knows it's only temporary.

The 25-year-old single mother served as an E-5 supply sergeant in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2012 and is home to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill to get her degree and join the ROTC program at Kent State University. After she graduates and becomes a commissioned officer, Hawkes plans to re-enter the Army and continue her military career.

According to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), many women carry the burden of caring for children while they are deployed. More than 40 percent of women on active duty have children and more than 30,000 single mothers have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan since 2009.

“Especially as more women are involved and we see continued deployments we need to be cognizant how deployments are impacting families,” said Kate O'Gorman, political director at IAVA. “We have to make sure that service members that deploy can't be worried about their kids constantly. There needs to be a strong system at home so they can execute their job overseas.” But parents still will worry — both during and after deployment.

Hawkes is young to hold the rank of E-5 supply sergeant. She's typically in charge of soldiers with at least six years on her, she said, and it hasn't been easy to achieve this level of leadership. “It's really cut-throat out there,” Hawkes said, describing the way some sergeants stop soldiers from moving up in rank because they don't want to be passed up. “I've seen it and I've been through it and I've conquered it.”

Coming home to get a degree and care for her daughter is a major contrast to the rigor of her military lifestyle. She is used to straight lines, strict rules and order. But on campus, students walk around wearing whatever they want, smoking and talking on their cell phones. You're not allowed to do that in the Army.

Thinking about going back to the Army in two-and-a-half years is hard, especially after spending concentrated time with her 3-year-old daughter, but Hawkes knows it's a decision she's going to stand by.

“I plan on going until there's no more go in me,” she said. “If that is one star, two star, I'm not stopping ... I have a daughter to take care of and I know she's going to have needs and college so I'm going to provide.”

Asha Anchan was a Peter Kiewit Foundation Fellow, Kelsey Hightower an Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Fellow and Caitlin Cruz a Women & Philanthropy Fellow for News21 this summer. This article is reprinted from the Center for Public Integrity.

Return to Top



News Headline: Arsenio Hall picks up right where he left off | Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Star-Ledger
Contact Name: Gay, Verne
News OCR Text: TELEVISION

The Arsenio Hall Show

Premiere tonight at 11 on Channel 11

A flashback.

Make that a very distant flashback -- to May 27, 1994.

"I'd like to thank America," said the gifted, black late-night host in a sharply bespoke suit -- mauve, if memory serves, however dimly -- on the last night of his celebrated show, where he liked to say "Hollywood meets the 'hood."

"But most of all, I'd like to thank God: This has been the greatest 5½ years anyone could ever hope for." Then, turning his eyes to the camera, this:

"I won't see you in 23 hours, but I will see you again."

Promise kept.

Arsenio Hall returns with a new late-night show tonight. In a recent phone interview about his hopes (and dreams) for this return, Hall almost reflexively said, "I don't need to be on the cover of Time magazine, but I'd love to just be in the game."

About that magazine: On Nov. 13, 1989, when such coronations really mattered, Time crowned Hall with a cover declaiming him the coolest kid on the late-night TV block. "The Arsenio Hall Show," which launched Jan. 3, 1989, had brought an urban beat and party-every-night vibe to a moment of the TV day that been dominated by Johnny Carson and his sensibilities for nearly three decades. About 4 million tuned in every night, denting Carson's "Tonight" ratings and even -- if you believed some of the hype at the time -- accelerating his retirement plans. Hall's show didn't feel like an alternative as much as a movement, to bring black culture into an all-white club. Studio audiences loved it. So -- for a time -- did audiences at home.

Then, on May 27, 1994, the party ended. Hall had it all, then lost it all -- unless you count a few episodes of "Martial Law," assorted cameos and a "Celebrity Apprentice" victory over the intervening years as "found."

Why did he leave Stage 29 on the Paramount lot in the first place, and why is he back on another stage? (The new show will be taped at the Sunset Bronson Studios in Hollywood.) The saga is complicated, but it's also clear that the answers to both are related. Hall thrived, then left as the tectonic plates of late-night TV shifted. They are about to shift once again. Jay Leno will leave "Tonight" in February, while the future of "Late Show With David Letterman" -- though certainly secure for now -- is a question. Audiences tend to check around when hosts change; that was true in the early '90s, and it still holds true.

As Hall said recently, "Obviously, back in the day, I was trying to take anything that was left over on Carson's plate. It's a huge challenge this time to bring people to the television. But I know that everybody doesn't have a late-night host."

Born in Cleveland 57 years ago, Hall early found an aptitude for magic, debate -- and comedy. After graduating from Kent State, he headed west -- first to Chicago, then Los Angeles, in search of a stand-up career, and landed at West Hollywood's Comedy Store, one of the premiere venues for budding and established comics, and where former club MC and future "Hall" writer Steven Alan Green recalled Hall as someone with "incredible positive energy."

That energy landed him gigs on TV -- including a voice on the animated kid hit "The Real Ghostbusters" -- and ultimately Fox's "The Late Show," where he was the show's last host before it was canceled in 1988. While there, he established some of the late-night trademarks, notably the audience's "woof woof" arm pump, that were to become signatures of his next late-night show. (The "dog pound" -- comprising particularly enthusiastic woofers on the stage near the house band, the Posse -- came later.)

Fox wanted him to stick around, but after "Late Show," Hall signed a deal with Paramount to star in Eddie Murphy's "Coming to America." After that, Paramount created his late-night syndicated vehicle It was an instant success: He embraced black culture, especially rap, which secured its most important TV venue, after "Soul Train" and "American Bandstand," to date. Salt-N-Pepa, Arrested Development, Queen Latifah as well as Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre, Cypress Hill, Tupac Shakur and Ice T were all frequent guests. For a brief moment, the show was believed to be Paramount's most financially successful TV venture, a $40-million-a-year machine.

Then, those tectonic plates shifted. CBS, which launched Letterman's show in '93, pulled "Arsenio" off some of its own big stations for the new venture. "Arsenio" ratings, which already had been dropping, plummeted. Relations with Paramount went from bad to worse, with the nadir when Hall booked Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan for a full hour in February 1994. Hugely controversial for perceived anti-Semitic views dating from the mid-'80s, Farrakhan was pressed on nothing by Hall. Paramount execs were incensed, and Hall, as the relationship fell apart, was embittered.

Hall now insists there was "never anything negative" in the split.

There is the slightest irony to the new show: It will be produced by CBS, which catalyzed his doom all those years ago. And when asked about bookings, the new show's executive producer, Neal Kendall, will say only: "We have a few things up our sleeves."

Don't expect Farrakhan, though Hall has joked (or maybe not) that he'd like Beyoncé and Jay Z's baby, Blue Ivy Carter, as a guest.

What else to expect with his new show, beyond the standard late-night talk elements? Maybe -- just maybe -- some of that old Hall magic. He's got a band headed by Robin DiMaggio, a top session drummer who has recorded with Diana Ross and Paul Simon. He's also got a studio audience that will doubtless woof -- but no "dog pound."

"Being in late night is very much like running for an office," says Hall. "Basically, what I do is just assert my personality, and you hope people will hang with you a couple nights a week."

Return to Top



News Headline: Former Kent State golfer Mackenzie Hughes now ranked No. 1 in PGA Tour Canada's rankings | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Kent State men's golf star Mackenzie Hughes, of Ontario, captured his first PGA Tour Canada victory on Sunday, shooting a 66 to win the inaugural Cape Breton Celtic Classic after trailing by six shots heading into the final round.

Hughes, the 2011 and 2012 Canadian amateur champion, birdied five of his first six holes and four of his last five holes to card a 6-under 66, the best round of the day, and claim a one-shot victory over Vancouver's Ryan Williams.

The win, along with a second-place finish at last week's Wildfire International, vaulted Hughes to the top of the PGA Tour Canada's Order of Merit with one event to go, virtually guaranteeing him Web.com Tour status for 2014.

"To win here on PGA Tour Canada means so much. It's been a crazy year," said Hughes. "If you told me at the start of the year, after I missed those first few cuts, that I'd be No. 1 on the Order of Merit heading to the Tour Championship, I'd say, 'Stop messing with me'."

Despite not being a member of PGA TOUR Canada, Hughes has played every event this season through solid play and a series of sponsor's exemptions. He's earned over $52,000 on the PGA Tour Canada in 2013.

WOMEN'S SOCCER

Junior Stephanie Haugh scored in the 21st minute to lead Kent State (4-2) to a 1-0 win over the College of Charleston (2-4) at Patriots Point in South Carolina on Sunday afternoon, giving the Golden Flashes a split at the College of Charleston Cup.

Kent State senior Jaclyn Dutton earned her first point of the season when she assisted on the game-winning goal. Dutton played the ball over the middle to Haugh, who scored her first goal of the season on the volley.

Stephanie Senn had a season-high eight saves to earn the shutout for Kent State, which outshot the Cougars 12-11 and had a 4-0 advantage in corner kicks.

The Flashes fell 1-0 to Coastal Carolina (3-1-1) on Friday. Senn made seven saves, as Kent State was outshot 15-6.

Haugh and seniors Katherine Lawrence and Morgan Mah earned spots on the All-Tournament team.

FIELD HOCKEY

Rebecca Lee scored goals at the five- and seven-minute marks to catapult Kent State (2-2) to a 5-1 victory over Monmouth (0-2) on Friday.

Lee got the scoring started off a corner with an assist by Madi Thompson, then her second goal of the match came off the left side unassisted.

In the second half, Julia Hofmann found the back of the net twice, while Shannon Martin added a tally for KSU.

The Flashes produced a strong defensive effort, as goalkeeper Jahna Jordan only faced four shots on goal.

Kent State then kept things close in the first, but No. 5 Syracuse (4-0) pulled away down the stretch to earn a 6-2 victory on Sunday at Michigan State.

The Flashes grabbed an early lead when Karleigh Carlin scored four minutes into the game. The match was tied after 35 minutes, but Syracuse scored three goals in a nine-minute span in the second half to put it away.

Sabrina Binder added a goal for KSU.

VOLLEYBALL

The Flashes (1-5) went 0-3 at the Fullerton Classic, falling 3-0 to host Cal State Fullerton, 3-1 to Gardner-Webb and 3-2 to William & Mary over the weekend.

Freshman Bianca Cifaldi was named to the All-Tournament team after piling up 35 kills, 15 digs and three blocks.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State's Corey Conners wins Gopher Invitational for second straight year | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Flashes' Conners wins Gopher Invitational for 2nd straight year

Kent State senior Corey Conners became the first back-to-back individual champion in the nine-year history of the Gopher Invitational with a one-shot victory on Monday. The Flashes finished third as a team at Windsong Farm Golf Club in Independence, Minn.

Conners closed with a 2-under 69 in the final round to cap a 7-under tournament to best California's Brandon Hagy.

After back-to-back bogeys at the 202-yard 16th and 446-yard 17th hole, Conners needed a closing birdie at the long 571-yard final hole to claim the title.

The Golden Flashes began the day at even-par, trailing overnight leader New Mexico by just two shots when they teed off on Monday. KSU took the lead briefly on the back nine before experiencing some difficulties with the closing holes on the 7,152-yard, par-71 course.

New Mexico's 4-under team total was good for a six-shot victory over Baylor and nine shots better than the Flashes, who shot a 5-over (289) to finish at 5-over for the tournament.

After Conners, Kent State was led by freshman Josh Whalen, who tied for 19th overall in his first college tournament. He closed with a 74 to finish his three rounds at 5-over. Senior Taylor Pendrith was one shot behind Whalen and in a tie for 24th after a final-round 71 put him at 6-over for the week. Nick Scott shot 77 and finished tied for 35th at 9-over, and Ryan Troyer shot 75 to place tied for 39th at 10-over.

Return to Top



News Headline: Constitution Day Events at Colleges | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Neighbor News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: National Constitution Day, Sept. 17, recognizes the day in 1787 when the U.S. Constitution was signed and honors all U.S. citizens, whether by birth or naturalization. Created in 2004, this federal observance day mandates that all publicly funded educational institutions provide educational programming on the history of the Constitution on that day.

WALSH HOSTS LECTURE

Walsh University's Phi Alpha Theta, the Honor Society of History, will host Dr. Leonne M. Hudson, associate professor of history at Kent State University. He will present "The Constitution and the Emancipation Proclamation" at 7 p.m. in the David Center Auditorium. The presentation is free and open to the public.

For more information contact Assistant Professor of History Kelly D. Selby, Ph. D., at 330-244-4772 or email kselby@walsh.edu.

KENT STATE STARK INFORMATION SESSIONS

Kent State University at Stark will begin the day at 9 a.m. with a flag ceremony at the Kent State Stark Flagpole Circle, near the Frank Avenue entrance.

From 12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m., “Anthony Kenny and Gay Rights Jurisprudence” will be presented by Professor Andrew Povtak in the library conference room.

From 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m., “The Evolving Presidency and the Constitution” will be presented by Professor Timothy Gray in the library conference room. For both sessions, refreshments and pocket Constitutions will be provided.

These events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Joel Carbonell at 330-244-3429 or jcarbon2@kent.edu.

Return to Top



News Headline: Local news briefs -- Sept. 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Esplanade event

KENT: Kent State University will host a Let's Take a Ride/Walk event at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 19.

Students, faculty and staff are invited to walk or ride a bike on the newly completed Esplanade to Bar 145 restaurant for a free lunch and refreshments in downtown Kent.

Participants will receive a bag with promotional items and coupons to downtown Kent stores and restaurants and 500 FLASHperks reward points.

Information about the Hike and Bike Trails in the area will be presented by the executive director of the Portage Park District.

The check-in table will be located outside near the Student Center on the K in Risman Plaza.

Registration is required by Sept. 17 and is limited to 120 participants.

To register, visit http://bit.ly/14WbtjY.

For more information, call Alex at 330-673-6115 or Marty at 330-672-9618.

Return to Top



News Headline: High school newspaper ink drying up | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Las Vegas Sun - Online
Contact Name: Clarence Page
News OCR Text: I was thumbing through my old “Class of 1965” high school yearbook one day when I was stopped dead cold by an autograph left by one of my teachers: “Dear Clarence: All I ask is that you mention my name when you win your first Pulitzer Prize. Don't forget. Mary Kindell.”

I was stunned because it was 1989 and I had just won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary. While I was getting over the shock, reporters were calling with the usual reporter questions: “How'd you get started?” “Who was your inspiration?” etc., etc.

That's why I was looking at my old yearbook to refresh my memory. It's embarrassing to blow facts, especially the facts of your own life.

My life in journalism began at our high school student newspaper under Mrs. Kindell's supervision at Middletown High School in Ohio, where she also taught a one-credit-hour journalism class.

My initial media goals were modest. I didn't have much of a social life. Journalism, a field that compensates articulate nosiness, was a good way for me to meet people. Mrs. Kindell encouraged me to pursue my media interests and, just as important, helped to pacify my alarmed parents, who wanted me to be a doctor.

I put down my yearbook and called Mrs. K. She didn't sound surprised to hear what she had written. “I always knew you could do it,” she said.

I thought she probably issued that challenge to all of her young aspiring journalists, I said. Maybe, she responded, “but you're the only one who has taken me up on it.”

I apologize to Mrs. K for tooting my own horn with this anecdote. She encouraged modesty and humility in her aspiring journos. Put the story first, she instructed us, not your egos.

But I have a couple of good reasons for this deep dive into my anecdotage. For one, Mrs. Kindell turned 99 in August and deserves this shout-out: Happy birthday, Mrs. K!

At a reception with four birthday cakes in her honor at Middletown's First Presbyterian Church, she told me she feels fine. Her only complaint was a persistent numbness in her hands that makes it hard to type or use the telephone, a poignantly cruel twist, in my view, for someone who helped to improve my skills on typewriters and telephones.

My other justification for these memories is to sound an alarm for the endangered state of high school journalism. Opportunities for today's aspiring or potential high school journalists to receive on-the-job learning like Mrs. Kindell offered are slim and getting slimmer.

Even in New York, the media capital, only 1 in 8 public high schools has a student newspaper, The New York Times reported in May, and many publish only a few times a year.

Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students — like I was.

That's sad because, as Robert Fulghum titled his best-seller, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” I often feel as though I learned all I really needed to know about journalism in high school.

Newspapers have been battered for decades by television and widespread illiteracy. At least the popularity of online news encourages kids to read, in between their views of Miley Cyrus videos.

But as they add to today's explosion of Internet traffic, too few youngsters are learning good news literacy. As Mrs. Kindell taught, you need to be a good reporter before you start giving your opinion. Today's world of blogging and tweeting encourages the opposite.

Too bad we don't have more Mrs. Kindells to go around.

Return to Top



News Headline: Students miss out on high school newspaper experience | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daytona Beach News-Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: I was thumbing through my old “Class of 1965” high school yearbook one day when I was stopped dead cold by an autograph left by one of my teachers: “Dear Clarence: All I ask is that you mention my name when you win your first Pulitzer Prize. Don't forget. Mary Kindell.”

I was stunned because it was 1989 and I had just won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary. While I was getting over the shock, reporters were calling with the usual reporter questions: “How'd you get started?” “Who was your inspiration?” etc., etc.

That's why I was looking at my old yearbook to refresh my memory. It's embarrassing to blow facts, especially the facts of your own life.

My life in journalism began at our high school student newspaper under Mrs. Kindell's supervision at Middletown High School in Ohio, where she also taught a one-credit-hour journalism class.

My initial media goals were modest. I didn't have much of a social life. Journalism, a field that compensates articulate nosiness, was a good way for me to meet people. Mrs. Kindell encouraged me to pursue my media interests and, just as important, helped to pacify my alarmed parents who wanted me to be a doctor.

I put down my yearbook and called Mrs. K. She didn't sound surprised to hear what she had written. “I always knew you could do it,” she said.

I thought she probably issued that challenge to all of her young aspiring journalists, I said. Maybe, she responded, “but you're the only one who has taken me up on it.”

I apologize to Mrs. K for tooting my own horn with this anecdote. She encouraged modesty and humility in her aspiring journos. Put the story first, she instructed us, not your egos.

But I have a couple of good reasons for this deep dive into my anecdotage. For one, Mrs. Kindell turned 99 in August and deserves this shout-out: Happy birthday, Mrs. K!

At a reception with four birthday cakes in her honor at Middletown's First Presbyterian Church, she told me she feels fine. Her only complaint was a persistent numbness in her hands that makes it hard to type or use the telephone, a poignantly cruel twist, in my view, for someone who helped to improve my skills on typewriters and telephones.

My other justification for these memories is to sound an alarm for the endangered state of high school journalism. Opportunities for today's aspiring or potential high school journalists to receive on-the-job learning like Mrs. Kindell offered are slim and getting slimmer.

Even in New York, the media capital, only one in eight public high schools has a student newspaper, The New York Times reported in May, and many publish only a few times a year.

Nationally, about two-thirds of public high schools have newspapers, according to a 2011 media study by the Center for Scholastic Journalism at Kent State University. But whether on paper or online, they tend to be absent from lower-income schools and lower-income students — like I was.

That's sad because, as Robert Fulghum titled his best seller, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” I often feel as though I learned all I really needed to know about journalism in high school.

Newspapers of all sorts have been battered for decades by television and widespread illiteracy. At least the popularity of online news encourages kids to read.

But as they add to today's explosion of Internet traffic, too few youngsters are learning good news literacy.

As Mrs. Kindell taught, you need to be a good reporter before you start giving your opinion. Today's world of blogging and tweeting encourages the opposite. Too bad we don't have more Mrs. Kindells to go around.

Return to Top



News Headline: College students are looking to rent textbooks (Leitner) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Saimi Bergmann
News OCR Text: Old school: Buy a textbook. Try to sell it when the semester ends.

New school: Rent and return.

Local university bookstores are seeing a dramatic increase in the number of students who are renting textbooks rather than buying. In response, stores are offering more and more titles for rent. "We've gone full-steam ahead with rentals," said Kevin Leitner, bookstore manager at Kent State University's Stark campus. "We quadrupled the number of rental offerings from last semester to this semester. We've made it a priority." Kyle Ori, a senior at Walsh University, says renting takes away some of the sting of paying big bucks for books. "Tuition is very expensive. You're pinching pennies to go to school, then on top of that, books are a couple hundred (per semester) if not more. It's not fair," Ori said. "Textbooks in general are way overpriced. I rent as much as possible. I save about 40 percent." RENTAL GROWTH

Patrick Eckhardt of Tree of Life Book Stores said his company was one of the first to offer rentals when it launched the service in 2008. Tree of Life runs 25 campus bookstores, including the one at Malone University in Canton. "The old model was students buy a book, and at the end of the semester the bookstore buys it back. Students hate it," Eckhardt said. "They never think they get what they should for the book." There's also a risk the book will no longer be required for a course or a newer edition will come out and the student would not be able to sell it at the end of the semester. We said, "There has to be a better system. What if we offered a guaranteed buy-back?" Eckhardt said. "And someone said, "Isn't that just a rental?" Once introduced, the rental trend took off quickly. During the 2009-10 school year, only 9 percent of college bookstores offered rental books. That jumped to nearly 80 percent in 2011-12, according to the most recent figures available from the National Association of College Stores.

POTENTIAL SAVINGS

Textbooks cost college students between $250 and $600 a semester, studies show. How much can a student save by renting?

As much as 60 percent, says Kathy Feichter, manager of the Stark State College Store. "Say the new book is $100. Used would be $75 and renting would be $40," Feichter said. "We try to give students as many choices as we can- buy new, buy used, rent, digital books."

Return to Top



News Headline: Enrollment virtually unchanged at Kent State Trumbull campus (Palmer, Ritter) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WFMJ-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WARREN, Ohio - Fall enrollment at Kent State University's Trumbull campus fell less than one-half of one percent compared to one year ago.

A news release from the university says enrollment stands at 3,093 students, a decrease of just 14 students from the 3,107 students attending one year ago according to the official 15-day count.

According to the news release from Kent State, Daniel Palmer, Ph.D., assistant dean for Kent State Trumbull said, "The fact that our enrollment numbers remain close to our historic high, reflects the value and affordability that students continue to find in our degree programs."

James Ritter, Ph.D., director of enrollment management and student services for Kent State Trumbull, added, "Students want to have numerous options when it comes to choosing a major, because many realize they will probably change their major at some point during their educational career.

Youngstown State University saw a 3.1% decline in student enrollment this fall.

Return to Top



News Headline: Memorial page set up for Kent State prof Erik Heidemann | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A memorial page for Erik Heidemann, a 35-year-old Kent State University assistant professor in the political science department who died unexpectedly last Tuesday, has been set up online.

The page includes links to stories about Heidemann and a moderated comments section, said Andrew Barnes, chair of Kent State's political science department.

Barnes added that further information about a memorial service on campus for Heidemann is on the page as well.

Return to Top



News Headline: Scientific Learning Announces New White Paper and Webinar on Reading Fluency and Comprehension by Dr. Timothy Rasinski (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: iStockAnalyst
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Free Research Paper and Online Seminar Discuss How Teaching Reading Fluency Helps Students Build Better Comprehension

OAKLAND, Calif., Sept. 9, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- As part of the Common Core State Standards initiative, students are required to read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. To help educators gain a better understanding of how to teach fluency so their students can gain more from their reading, (OTCQB:SCIL) will release a new white paper and present a free webinar by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic.

"Fluency is an important predictor of reading comprehension and a key element of any successful reading program," said Dr. Rasinski. "Yet, it has been relatively ignored or misinterpreted for years. It's time we consider new ways of approaching reading instruction — and reading fluency is an approach that offers great potential for many students, particularly those who struggle and find reading difficult or uninteresting."

In the white paper, titled "Supportive Fluency Instruction: The Key to Reading Success (Especially for Students who Struggle)," Rasinski describes the importance of reading fluency as well as why fluency instruction is often severely limited in many classrooms. He explores how instructional methods, such as the modeling of fluent reading and assisted reading, can be used to develop fluency in students, including those who have not achieved grade level proficiency in reading. He also discusses how to synthesize the building blocks of fluency instruction into a daily lesson. To download a free copy of the white paper, visit http://bit.ly/1ecbeZd

In the live webinar, scheduled Sept. 11 at 1 p.m. Pacific (4 p.m. Eastern), Rasinski will discuss research on reading fluency and how fluency is the often-neglected bridge to comprehension. During the webinar, titled "Reading Fluency: The Neglected (but Necessary) Goal of Your Reading Program," he will share approaches to teaching this all-important skill that will move students toward better comprehension, including the use of guided oral reading and voice recognition technologies such as Reading Assistant™. The webinar is free, but registration is required. To register, or for more information, visit http://www.scilearn.com/webinars.

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is author of the best selling books on reading fluency, The Fluent Reader and The Fluent Reader in Action. His research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, and the Journal of Educational Research.

About Reading Assistant

The Reading Assistant program combines advanced speech recognition technology with research-based reading instruction to help students strengthen their reading fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. As students practice reading out loud, the program "listens" and provides immediate, personalized feedback and guidance. Clickable glossary words with definitions available in English or Spanish help build vocabulary, and "Think About It" questions and quizzes at the end of each selection help build comprehension. With Reading Assistant, students can improve their reading grade level up to 50 percent more than students receiving classroom instruction alone. We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270 research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call toll-free 888-810-0250.

CONTACT: Media Contact: Hallie Smith Director of Marketing Scientific Learning Corporation (619) 795-6509 HSmith@scilearn.com Investor Contact: Jane Freeman Chief Financial Officer Scientific Learning Corporation (510) 625-6710 JFreeman@scilearn.com (Source: PrimeZone )

(Source: Quotemedia)

Return to Top



News Headline: Scientific Learning Announces New White Paper and Webinar on Reading Fluency and Comprehension (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stockhouse Publishing Ltd.
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Free Research Paper and Online Seminar Discuss How Teaching Reading Fluency Helps Students Build Better Comprehension

OAKLAND, Calif., Sept. 9, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- As part of the Common Core State Standards initiative, students are required to read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. To help educators gain a better understanding of how to teach fluency so their students can gain more from their reading, Scientific Learning Corp. (OTCQB:SCIL) will release a new white paper and present a free webinar by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic.

"Fluency is an important predictor of reading comprehension and a key element of any successful reading program," said Dr. Rasinski. "Yet, it has been relatively ignored or misinterpreted for years. It's time we consider new ways of approaching reading instruction — and reading fluency is an approach that offers great potential for many students, particularly those who struggle and find reading difficult or uninteresting."

In the white paper, titled "Supportive Fluency Instruction: The Key to Reading Success (Especially for Students who Struggle)," Rasinski describes the importance of reading fluency as well as why fluency instruction is often severely limited in many classrooms. He explores how instructional methods, such as the modeling of fluent reading and assisted reading, can be used to develop fluency in students, including those who have not achieved grade level proficiency in reading. He also discusses how to synthesize the building blocks of fluency instruction into a daily lesson. To download a free copy of the white paper, visit http://bit.ly/1ecbeZd

In the live webinar, scheduled Sept. 11 at 1 p.m. Pacific (4 p.m. Eastern), Rasinski will discuss research on reading fluency and how fluency is the often-neglected bridge to comprehension. During the webinar, titled "Reading Fluency: The Neglected (but Necessary) Goal of Your Reading Program," he will share approaches to teaching this all-important skill that will move students toward better comprehension, including the use of guided oral reading and voice recognition technologies such as Reading Assistant™. The webinar is free, but registration is required. To register, or for more information, visit http://www.scilearn.com/webinars.

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is author of the best selling books on reading fluency, The Fluent Reader and The Fluent Reader in Action. His research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, and the Journal of Educational Research.

About Reading Assistant

The Reading Assistant program combines advanced speech recognition technology with research-based reading instruction to help students strengthen their reading fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. As students practice reading out loud, the program "listens" and provides immediate, personalized feedback and guidance. Clickable glossary words with definitions available in English or Spanish help build vocabulary, and "Think About It" questions and quizzes at the end of each selection help build comprehension. With Reading Assistant, students can improve their reading grade level up to 50 percent more than students receiving classroom instruction alone.

Scientific Learning Corp.

We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270 research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call toll-free 888-810-0250.

CONTACT: Media Contact:
Hallie Smith
Director of Marketing
Scientific Learning Corporation
(619) 795-6509
HSmith@scilearn.com

Investor Contact:
Jane Freeman
Chief Financial Officer
Scientific Learning Corporation
(510) 625-6710
JFreeman@scilearn.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Scientific Learning Announces New White Paper and Webinar on Reading Fluency and Comprehension by Dr. Timothy Rasinski (Rasinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Finance
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OAKLAND, Calif., Sept. 9, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- As part of the Common Core State Standards initiative, students are required to read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. To help educators gain a better understanding of how to teach fluency so their students can gain more from their reading, Scientific Learning Corp. (SCIL) will release a new white paper and present a free webinar by Timothy Rasinski, Ph.D., a professor of literacy education at Kent State University and director of its award-winning reading clinic.

"Fluency is an important predictor of reading comprehension and a key element of any successful reading program," said Dr. Rasinski. "Yet, it has been relatively ignored or misinterpreted for years. It's time we consider new ways of approaching reading instruction — and reading fluency is an approach that offers great potential for many students, particularly those who struggle and find reading difficult or uninteresting."

In the white paper, titled "Supportive Fluency Instruction: The Key to Reading Success (Especially for Students who Struggle)," Rasinski describes the importance of reading fluency as well as why fluency instruction is often severely limited in many classrooms. He explores how instructional methods, such as the modeling of fluent reading and assisted reading, can be used to develop fluency in students, including those who have not achieved grade level proficiency in reading. He also discusses how to synthesize the building blocks of fluency instruction into a daily lesson. To download a free copy of the white paper, visit http://bit.ly/1ecbeZd

In the live webinar, scheduled Sept. 11 at 1 p.m. Pacific (4 p.m. Eastern), Rasinski will discuss research on reading fluency and how fluency is the often-neglected bridge to comprehension. During the webinar, titled "Reading Fluency: The Neglected (but Necessary) Goal of Your Reading Program," he will share approaches to teaching this all-important skill that will move students toward better comprehension, including the use of guided oral reading and voice recognition technologies such as Reading Assistant(TM). The webinar is free, but registration is required. To register, or for more information, visit http://www.scilearn.com/webinars.

Rasinski has written over 200 articles and has authored, co-authored or edited over 50 books or curriculum programs on reading education. He is author of the best selling books on reading fluency, The Fluent Reader and The Fluent Reader in Action. His research on reading has been cited by the National Reading Panel and has been published in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, and the Journal of Educational Research.

About Reading Assistant

The Reading Assistant program combines advanced speech recognition technology with research-based reading instruction to help students strengthen their reading fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. As students practice reading out loud, the program "listens" and provides immediate, personalized feedback and guidance. Clickable glossary words with definitions available in English or Spanish help build vocabulary, and "Think About It" questions and quizzes at the end of each selection help build comprehension. With Reading Assistant, students can improve their reading grade level up to 50 percent more than students receiving classroom instruction alone.

Scientific Learning Corp.

We accelerate learning by applying proven research on how the brain learns. Scientific Learning's results are demonstrated in over 270 research studies and protected by over 55 patents. Learners can realize achievement gains of up to two years in as little as three months and maintain an accelerated rate of learning even after the programs end. For more information, visit www.scientificlearning.com or call toll-free 888-810-0250.

Return to Top



News Headline: Organic Valley tour, cask tastings, cows with names: Cleveland Local Food Calendar, Sept. 11-18 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Debbi Snook, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Tossing a bit of each year's wine harvest into the same cask sounds like a shake of the dice. But when I stopped at St. Joseph Vineyard in Lake County a few weeks ago and tried their cask vintage, it lived up to the reputation of this specialist in dry red Ohio wines. Sure, maybe a few too many flavors to be identifiable, but still remarkable.

Cask tastings can be like that ? as good as what they're fed.

St. Joseph is where Doreen and Art Pietrzyk (pee-trik) painstakingly make their noted Pinot Noir with the help of a small army of volunteers. They've attracted compliments from across the country, including specialists in the Pacific Northwest, where the grape has prominence.

Ohio is better known for sweet wine than dry, because many reds need a longer season than we can supply. But the Pietrzyks have a magic formula ? and the matching effort ? to snip back a portion of their budding bunches. That puts more nutrients into the bunches that remain. The result: potent flavor.

On Saturday, St. Joseph will feature its rolling cask vintage, and so will other noted winemakers in the Grand River Valley. It's a progressive tasting that will introduce you to a range of wines, and give you something to nibble on at each stop.

Here are the participants and their noshes: Debonne Vineyards (chocolate cherry brownie), Ferrante Winery (prosciutto and goat cheese souffl�, Grand River Cellars (penne pasta topped with spicy puttanesca sauce), Laurello Vineyards ? (gorgonzola, fig and walnut tartlets), St. Joseph Vineyards (pork au vin with Deidra and Alex Bevan's bread from their Stone Dragon Bakery).

Each of the five vineyards cooperatively purchased an oak cask for this purpose in 2010, adding some of the best of each year's harvest.

"This is truly the elite tasting event of the year," Nicholas Ferrante, owner and winemaker of Ferrante Winery and Ristorante, said in a news release. "The cask wines from the five area wineries are all about bottling the best that we have. The blends are amazing and the consumer can really taste the difference an oak barrel can make."

The drive-it-yourself event runs noon-5 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 14, with a $6 fee at each stop. Each winery is about 10 minutes from the others. For more information, call 440-466-3485 or go online and click on events listing.

If you go, keep the car windows open. It's harvest time and the air might smell sweet.

Neighbors Feeding Neighbors

If you enjoyed reading about Maggie's Farm in last week's Taste section, you could get busy for the cause. Diane Morgan and her collective of volunteers are pulling the plastic over a new hoop house on the West Side of Cleveland, a task that takes many workers. If you want to do an Amish-in-Cleveland thing and learn more about this group, stop by the farm on Saturday, Sept. 14. They're also looking for spare lumber. Email Morgan or call 216-324-5036.

Name that cow

Randy James, author of the new book, "Why Cows Need Names and More Secrets of Amish Farms," (Kent State University Press) will speak 6:30-8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 at West Woods Nature Center, 9465 Kinsman Road (Ohio 87), Russell Township.

James is a professor emeritus with The Ohio State University's College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, and a former OSU Extension agent in Geauga County. His experiences there gave him his subject matter -- a first-hand view of a local Amish family attempting to start a small farm and become part of the wave of 100,000 new farms established over the past few years.

His story gives readers a glimpse of what it's like to work in the fields with draft horses; to spend time in the barn with cows, calves, children and Chip the family dog; and to sit at the table talking with family and friends over a noontime meal.

"Thus," the publisher states, "a quiet picture emerges about how a shared goal and 'doing without' can strengthen family and provide an appreciation for what's truly important in life."

James now lives in South Carolina but keeps in touch with his subjects.

The talk is free and open to the public. For additional information, call 440-286-9516.

Or go to a farm

Ever wonder who are the cooperative farmers behind the Organic Valley label? You can meet some of them at the 200-acre Rolling Ridge Meadows Organic Dairy Farm Tour, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursday, September 12 in Millersburg.

Owner Jerry Miller will lead the tour and panel discussion including other organic dairy farmers, David Kline, Mark Martin, and Jim Gasser. They are among the 170 working in Ohio to serve the national cooperative.

Sponsored by the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association and Organic Valley, the day will start with a panel discussion followed by a free lunch at 11:30 a.m. and a tour at 12:30 p.m.

For more information, email Mike Kline or call 330-231-1741.

Find Rolling Ridge Meadows at 5950 Township Road 409, Millersburg.

Food futures

PawPaw Festival, Friday through Sunday, Sept. 13-15 (740-698-6060). . . Ripe Festival at Cleveland Botanical Garden, Sept. 21 and 22 (216-721-1600). . . Cleveland Sustainability Conference, Oct. 3-4. (216-664-2455).

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus