Report Overview:
Total Clips (16)
Alumni (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Board of Trustees; Institutional Advancement (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (2)
Board of Trustees; Finance and Administration; Institutional Advancement (2)
College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
Internships (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU Museum (1)
May 4 (1)
Psychology (2)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Dan Veloski named Cleveland Metroparks' chief ranger 09/19/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

By James Ewinger, The Plain Dealer Follow on Twitter CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Dan Veloski is the Cleveland Metroparks new chief ranger. Veloski had been...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Board of Trustees; Institutional Advancement (1)
Property swap with Kent State frat paves way for new architecture college (Floyd, Finn) 09/18/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A property swap between Kent State University and the local Delta Upsilon fraternity chapter means growth for each. The university will exchange property at 1061 Fraternity...


Art, School of (1)
The List 09/19/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Area events and upcoming concerts ART The Kent State University School of Art's Downtown Gallery presents “Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger,...


Athletics (2)
Kent State football: Many people are behind early success of KSU quarterback Colin Reardon 09/19/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

By Stephanie Storm Beacon Journal sports writer Add This Published: September 18, 2013 - 07:40 PM | Updated: September 19, 2013 - 05:52 AM KENT:...

KENT STATE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR JOEL NIELSEN RECEIVES TWO-YEAR CONTRACT EXTENSION (Nielsen) 09/19/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Record-Courier staff report Published: September 19, 2013 4:00AM Kent State University Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen has been awarded a two-year...


Board of Trustees; Finance and Administration; Institutional Advancement (2)
KSU approves property exchange for new construction (Floyd, Finn) 09/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State trustees agreed Wednesday to trade buildings with a fraternity — a move that eventually will lead to a new home for the KSU Division of...

Kent State to Acquire Vacant Former Frat House for Esplanade Expansion (Floyd, Finn) 09/18/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Land moves involving Kent State University's Esplanade continue despite the fact the pathway linking campus to downtown itself is largely finished. Today the university's...


College of Education, Health and Human Services (2)
FOX 59 News at 10 09/18/2013 Fox 59 News at 10 PM - WXIN-TV Text Attachment Email

...text from somebody and facebook this, facebook that or instatram and then your plans go the other way. >> Want more proof? Listen to this: researchers at kent state university surveyed 300 students about their smartphone use and the ones who talked, tweeted, texed, facebooked and surfed the internet...

Gaining Weight? Maybe it isn?t Your Fault: Smartphone Use 09/18/2013 Nightcap Text Attachment Email

...from somebody and Facebook this, Facebook that or Instagram and then your plans go the other way.” Want more proof? Listen to this; researchers at Kent State University surveyed 300 students about their smartphone use and the ones who talked, tweeted, texted, facebooked and surfed the internet...


Internships (1)
thriving startup community means jobs aplenty... for the right candidates 09/19/2013 Fresh Water Text Attachment Email

...in.” One approach Explorys takes is to mold interns for future careers with the company. Explorys has relationships with CWRU, Carnegie-Mellon and Kent State University. “Our goal is to groom the kids throughout college so essentially we have mid-level software developers,” says Kirsch. “This...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Riley Museum set for opening of visitor center, week of celebration 09/19/2013 Tallahassee Democrat -- Online Text Attachment Email

...Tallahassee natives who integrated Leon County schools in the 1960s. The display was created by Tallahassee native Ann Schierhorn, now a journalism professor at Kent State University, who has also written profiles of the students that will be published in a Riley Museum magazine. The event is expected to...


KSU Museum (1)
Hepburn dresses exhibited at Appleton museum 09/19/2013 Marshfield News-Herald - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...exhibit will feature some of her rarely exhibited costumes from stage, screen and television, along with items from her personal collection on loan from the Kent State University Museum. The exhibit is called Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen. It started Sept. 13 and will continue through...


May 4 (1)
LSU fraternity apologizes for 'inappropriate' sign referencing 1970 Kent State shooting (Mansfield) 09/19/2013 UPI.com Text Attachment Email

By KATE STANTON, UPI.com In preparation for the weekend's football game against Kent State, Louisiana State University's Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity...


Psychology (2)
Don't waste your time: The best and worst study techniques (Dunlosky) 09/19/2013 Journal News Text Attachment Email

EVALUATING STUDY TECHNIQUES Prof. John Dunlosky, of Kent State University, along with other psychologists, reviewed scientific evidence for 10 learning...

Cognitive Science Meets Pre-Algebra (Dunlosky) 09/19/2013 Psychological Science Text Attachment Email

The New York Times: The math students at Liberty Middle School were not happy. The seventh graders' homework was harder and more time-consuming at first,...


WKSU (1)
Kent State Folk Festival now going 'Round Town 09/19/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Published: September 19, 2013 4:00AM Annual event expands, changes name to reflect more diverse music lineup By Kelly Maile | Staff Writer As...


News Headline: Dan Veloski named Cleveland Metroparks' chief ranger | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By James Ewinger, The Plain Dealer
Follow on Twitter

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Dan Veloski is the Cleveland Metroparks new chief ranger.

Veloski had been the interim chief since January, following the retirement of Chief Greg Loftus. The park system's three commissioners approved the appointment in executive session Wednesday morning.

"The safety and security of our park visitors is our number one priority," Park Commissioner Debra Berry said in a press release. "Chief Veloski shares this belief and his leadership, not only over the past year, but during his entire career with Cleveland Metroparks, reflects this."

Before becoming the interim chief, he had been a captain in charge of the ranger department's field operations. The department is one of Cuyahoga County's largest law-enforcement agencies with around 100 rangers and support staff. They have full arrest powers and patrol the park system's 18 reservations, eight golf courses and the zoo.

Metroparks CEO Brian Zimmerman said in a press release that "even with the challenge of adding the new lakefront properties, the division has thrived under (Veloski's) leadership and they have held the new parks to the same standards of safety and excellence we expect at all of our existing reservations."

A visible ranger presence was one of the first manifestations of the Cleveland Metroparks' takeover of the lakefront parks formerly run by the state.

Veloski joined the Metroparks as a seasonal worker at the zoo and became a ranger in 1991. According to the Metroparks, he has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice/police science from Kent State and a master's degree in psychology-diversity management from Cleveland State.

"It has been an honor to serve the people of Northeast Ohio as they visit our parks for exercise, recreation or just to spend time with one another," Veloski said in a release.

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News Headline: Property swap with Kent State frat paves way for new architecture college (Floyd, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Jeremy Nobile
News OCR Text: A property swap between Kent State University and the local Delta Upsilon fraternity chapter means growth for each.

The university will exchange property at 1061 Fraternity Circle for the fraternity's vacant house at 202 S. Lincoln St. to enable expansion of the University Esplanade and clear the way for the new $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Delta Upsilon KSU Alumni Chapter, Inc. will pay KSU $110,000, according to the agreement, which is the difference in appraised values between the properties. The university property was independently appraised at $550,000. The DU property, characterized by its blue sidewalk, was appraised at $440,000.

The agreement was approved Wednesday by the KSU Board of Trustees.

Gregg Floyd, KSU senior vice president of administration and finance, said the fraternity property is a necessary component for the new architecture college originally slated to be finished in December 2015. Doug Steidl, dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design, said Wednesday that building will likely open closer to June 2016.

According to the agreement, the fraternity will get the 9,600-square-foot, three-floor building that currently houses staff for the Institutional Advancement and KSU Foundation offices, so the group can refurbish it for its members.

A timeline for when that transaction would close or when KSU intends to break ground for the college has not been finalized, Floyd noted.

Eugene Finn, KSU vice president for institutional advancement, said no moves would occur until the employees of his office -- which he said total about 100 scattered among three locations -- have a new building.

Floyd said the property at 332 S. Lincoln St., the site of the former DuBois Book Store that closed in 2011, is a top location being considered for that new combined office. That property is owned by the Portage County Port Authority and leased by KSU for storage.

Floyd said that new building is roughly estimated to be about 30,000 square feet and cost between $10 million and $15 million, but noted no details are finalized.

Finn said the new office will improve operations and provide size for expansion.

"Its going to be tremendous because as we continue to grow, it's difficult for staff to communicate. And in addition to that, the three functions in those different buildings are at max capacity," Finn said. "That (new building) should accommodate not just existing staff, but also growth for future staff."

Delta Upsilon members did immediately respond to requests for comment.

In other business Wednesday:

- The Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and the Department of Health Sciences were merged, creating the Department of Biostatistics Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology within the College of Public Health.

- The pay structure for unrepresented classified civil service staff and unclassified hourly staff was amended.

- The Kent State University Library children's study room was named The Pris and J Dub's Historical Book Nook after donors Priscilla Drach and JW Coffman.

- The Enrollment Management and Student Services Office main conference room at KSU's Astabula campus (Room A110A) was named the Judith Inman Fielder Enrollment Management and Student Services Conference Room.

- The Main Hall at KSU's East Liverpool campus was named the John J. Purinton Hall.

- A new policy was drafted establishing relationships between KSU and other educational institutions abroad.

- Redmediation-free status standards for students entering postsecondary education were adopted.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or jnobile@recordpub.com

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News Headline: The List | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Area events and upcoming concerts

ART
The Kent State University School
of Art's Downtown Gallery presents
“Recent Landscapes: Works
by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and
Charles Basham” through Oct. 5.
Location: 141 E. Main St., Kent.
nnThe Kent State University School
of Art Gallery presents “Room of
Relief — An Installation Designed
By Three Master Printmakers —
Curlee Raven Holton, Veronica Ceci
& Francine K. Affourti” through Oct.
11. The closing reception from 5 to
7 p.m. Oct. 10 will give the public
a chance to hear from the artists.
The gallery is on the second floor
of the School of Art Building. Location:
325 Terrace Drive, Kent.

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News Headline: Kent State football: Many people are behind early success of KSU quarterback Colin Reardon | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Stephanie Storm
Beacon Journal sports writer

Add This Published: September 18, 2013 - 07:40 PM | Updated: September 19, 2013 - 05:52 AM

KENT: Playing in front of 89,113 mostly crazed SEC fans packed into the lair of LSU's Death Valley on Saturday night, Kent State quarterback Colin Reardon didn't look one bit the part of a shaky freshman in a stressful environment that has caused many others to crumble.
Quite the opposite, as a national television audience was able to see on ESPNU.
Reardon completed 20-of-29 passes to a season-high 10 different receivers for 190 yards in the Golden Flashes' 45-13 loss to the No. 8 Tigers, his performance belying his inexperience.
Then again, Reardon's play hasn't resembled that of a typical freshman so far this season, anyway.
“Each week Colin is continuing to get better,” Flashes coach Paul Haynes said. “Our offensive line is also starting to get better. They are starting to gel as a group up front, protecting Colin a lot better.”
Saturday, Reardon led the Golden Flashes on a nine-play, 75-yard march that was capped by his 2-yard touchdown run (the first rushing score of his career) with 12:59 left in the second quarter. It was part of an impressive first-half stretch in which he connected on 8-of-10 pass attempts for 84 yards.
In the first three games of his college career, Reardon, a 6-foot, 202-pound former Poland Seminary standout, has completed 66 percent of his pass attempts. Perhaps more impressively, he hasn't thrown an interception.
Haynes credited offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Brian Rock for his part in Reardon's early success.
“Coach Rock and the offensive staff have done a good job of putting together a game plan that [Reardon] can handle,” Haynes said. “They've found out what he does well early and we keep him in that position. They're not [making] it something that he can't do, and we will continue to [keep Reardon comfortable]. And that helps the receivers play better, too. They're catching the ball and don't have a lot of drops. You see how much he's spreading the ball around. A lot of times, a young guy will just sit there and find one guy that he's comfortable throwing to. But Colin is able to spread it around so well because he has confidence in the entire receiving corps.”
It also helps that Reardon has some say in the offensive game plan.
“We always sit there and say, ‘Tell us what you feel good about,' ” Haynes said. “And if there's something he doesn't like, it's out.”
The Flashes also have another young secret weapon that quietly has been crucial to Reardon's early success. Sophomore punter Anthony Melchiori matched a career-best with a 62-yard punt at Louisiana State University.
“We talk about the punt being the most important play in football,” Haynes said. “With how well [Melchiori] can kick, he can change the field. So that also goes into our whole mentality of not taking more chances, especially with a young quarterback. When you get in third-and-long situations of turning the ball over — and that's a lot of the times when [interceptions] happen, when you're trying to push to get a first down on third-and-long. Instead, we have more of a safety valve in letting Anthony do his thing and change the field. The better he punts, the better we are in not taking chances on trying to get third downs in bad situations.”
So far, Reardon has easily passed the statistical and eye tests in terms of being the real deal, a leader who can continue to grow and learn while leading the Flashes for years to come.
“Colin is playing very good football for us, along with four other redshirt freshmen [who've received a fair amount of playing time],” Haynes said. “It's tough for them, because their class schedule is pretty stacked as freshmen. It's hard for them to find time to come in and watch film on their own to get better.
“But [Reardon], especially, will continue to get better with every rep he takes and every game he plays in. There's a lot of young guys who are getting experience for us now that will really help us down the road.”
Stephanie Storm can be reached at sstorm@thebeaconjournal.com. Read the Kent State blog at http://www.ohio.com/flashes. Follow her on Twitter at www.twitter.com/SStormABJ and on Facebook www.facebook.com/sports.abj.

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News Headline: KENT STATE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR JOEL NIELSEN RECEIVES TWO-YEAR CONTRACT EXTENSION (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Record-Courier staff report Published: September 19, 2013 4:00AM

Kent State University Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen has been awarded a two-year contract extension through June 2017, as approved by the Kent State University Board of Trustees on Wednesday.

Nielsen completed the third year of his original five-year contract this past spring after being hired in March of 2010.

"I would like to thank President Lefton and the Board of Trustees for their continued confidence and support of our efforts in Kent State Athletics," Nielsen said.

"Sharon, my daughters and I are extremely grateful for the extension and are happy to remain part of the Kent community.

"I am very proud of what the coaches and student-athletes have accomplished over the last three and a half years, and I look forward to continuing the Kent State tradition of academic and athletic excellence throughout our program."

Under Nielsen's leadership, the Golden Flashes have reached remarkable heights. Academically, the department's 3.11 grade-point average in spring 2013 marked the best semester in recorded history with 61 percent of student-athletes reaching a GPA of 3.0 or higher, including 24 individuals who posted a perfect 4.0.

In the competitive arena, Nielsen has witnessed football's first bowl appearance in 40 years (2013), baseball's first appearance in the College World Series (2012), wrestling's first NCAA champion (Dustin Kilgore, 2011) and the first ever NCAA championship appearance for the women's gymnastics team (2011).

Overall, Kent State remains the premier program in the Mid-American Conference. In the last three years, the Golden Flashes have been a frontrunner in the Excellence in Management Cup, the top MAC school in the Learfield Sports Directors' Cup, won the Reese Trophy every year for men's all-sports excellence and won the Cartwright Award for program excellence for the 2012-13 school year.

During Nielsen's tenure, Kent State's athletic programs have captured an unprecedented 20 conference titles, and 12 teams have made NCAA appearances.

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News Headline: KSU approves property exchange for new construction (Floyd, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Kent State trustees agreed Wednesday to trade buildings with a fraternity — a move that eventually will lead to a new home for the KSU Division of Institutional Advancement.

Gene Finn, vice president of Institutional Advancement, said the exchange is the first step in creating a new home for staffers in alumni relations, development and the KSU Foundation.

“I would like to see it happen as soon as possible,” Finn said. “A domino effect is taking place now.”

The new home for Institutional Advancement is part of $800 million in improvements now underway at Kent State's campuses and in the city of Kent.

The university has bought up blocks of property west of campus to extend its footprint to the edge of the downtown business district.

It also is improving buildings on campus and constructing new ones for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology and renovations and additions for the School of Art.

The newest project would be a $10 million to $15 million home for the 100 or so staffers in Institutional Advancement. The building could have about 30,000 square feet and would bring all staffers reporting to Finn under one roof for the first time.

Trustees agreed to trade the current Foundation and Development Building at 1061 Fraternity Circle to the KSU chapter of Delta Upsilon in exchange for the frat chapter house at 202 S. Lincoln St.

The Fraternity Circle site is valued at $550,000 and the frat house at $440,000, so the fraternity also will give KSU $110,000 to even the exchange.

KSU will knock down the frat house to make way for its $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design on the edge of the newly completed pedestrian walkway between downtown and campus.

Meanwhile, KSU staffers will stay at the Fraternity Circle building while the university finds a new home for them. The fraternity has located quarters elsewhere in the interim, the university said.

One promising possibility for the new Institutional Advancement building is the site of the former DuBois Book Store on Willow Street. It was purchased in January by the Portage County Port Authority and has been leased to Kent State.

Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration, said details of the new building could be presented to trustees in December. That would pave the way for the start of construction for both the architecture and institutional advancement buildings.

Institutional Advancement is made up of the KSU Foundation, now at Fraternity Circle; Institutional Advancement, now at Fraternity Circle and the Administrative Services Building; and alumni relations, now at Williamson Alumni Center.

In other business, trustees:

• Approved a retire-and-rehire agreement plus a promotion for Charlene Reed, from secretary to the trustees and chief of staff for President Lester Lefton to vice president and university secretary. She will continue to be paid $180,561.

• Approved a contract extension through June 2017 and an 18 percent hike in base salary to $308,000 for athletic director Joel Nielsen. He was hired in March 2010 and just completed the third year of his original five-year contract.

Carol Biliczky can be contacted at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: Kent State to Acquire Vacant Former Frat House for Esplanade Expansion (Floyd, Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Land moves involving Kent State University's Esplanade continue despite the fact the pathway linking campus to downtown itself is largely finished.

Today the university's board of trustees agreed to a deal with the Delta Upsilon KSU alumni chapter that will eventually see the Kent State Foundation and its roughly 100 staff members relocated into a new facility somewhere in the vicinity of campus.

The agreement between the university and fraternity group will see the vacant former frat house at 202 S. Lincoln St., which is owned by the Delta Upsilon alumni chapter, exchanged for land owned by the university at 1061 Fraternity Circle, a building that currently houses about one third of the foundation staff.

Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for administration and finance at Kent State, said the exchange is critical for the university because it needs the frat house property in order to build the just south of where the Esplanade intersects with South Lincoln Street.

Floyd said the fraternity alumni group will pay the university $110,000 for the exchange.

That amount is the difference in the appraised values between the two properties. The frat house property was appraised at $440,000 and the foundation building property is appraised at $550,000, according to Kent State.

No timeline for the exchange of properties was available.

The eventual move of the fraternity to the foundation offices means the university must find a new home for the Kent State Foundation operations.

Gene Finn, executive director of the Kent State Foundation and vice president for institutional advancement, said they would like to build a new, 30,000 square-foot building to house all the foundation's operations and the university's alumni offices.

Like the fraternity move, Finn said there is no definitive timeline for building a new home for the foundation and alumni offices. But the university foundation will not relocate until a new building has been built.

Floyd said one possible location under consideration for the foundation building is the former DuBois book store building at the corner of South Lincoln and Summit streets.The university is to use as a staging area for construction of the new architecture college, which is expected to be open and occupied by 2

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News Headline: FOX 59 News at 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 59 News at 10 PM - WXIN-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >> All of you self proclaimed smartphone addicts... Listen up. A new study finds that the more you use your phone... The less fit you're going to be. Barry carpenter shows us the eye opening connection. >> 56% of americans have a smartphone-- which are so handy because they do just about everything. Dustin barrett used to spend about 100 hours a month on his phone. >> Pretty much everything. Games, texting. You know, you get on the phone I use my phone a lot for business so I'm on the phone constantly. >> At one point he weighed 254 pounds-- his smartphone was getting in the way of working out and eating a healthy diet. >> It kind of takes you off your path. You'll get an email and then you'll get a text from somebody and facebook this, facebook that or instatram and then your plans go the other way. >> Want more proof? Listen to this: researchers at kent state university surveyed 300 students about their smartphone use and the ones who talked, tweeted, texed, facebooked and surfed the internet the most were less fit than the light or moderate smartphone users. Some spent nearly five hours on their smarthones and that didn't include listing to music. Dr. Mark anderson of healthcare associate of irving says technology has left us in the dust. >> You just look at the environment has changed just over the past 20 years out of our day t today interactions and such and we haven't had time, I say to evolve, to catch up to our environment. If you described what our day is today to someone 30 years ago you may as well be talking about the moon, and astronaut shot right? >> Dr. Andreson says spending all that time on the smartphone doesn't just make us inactive--it also releases the stress hormone cortizol which can cause weight gain. Dustin says he realized he was using his smartphone way too much and decided to cut back. >> For me it was not being on social media sites all the time and not texting, trying to put it down and focus on what I needed to do. >> Dustin needed to lose weight so he cut his smartphone use in half and now when he's talking he's also walking. He's lost 70 pounds. Instead of surfing-- he'd exercising. >> If you put it down for a few hours a day you can get a lot done and transform yourself. >> That being said... There are dozens of apps you can download on your smartphone to help track your weight loss... And to help keep you motivated. [lol] >> A church marquee is turning a lot of heads. The sign says... Jesus had two dads and he turned out just fine. Of course... A lot of people driving by this busy tennessee intersection believe this sign is the church taking a stance on gay marriage. But the pastor says that's not really what they're trying to say. >> It's about children and people who grew up in homes, extended families, parents that are separated and having stepdads >> Theologically, jesus is the son of god, but also the son of joseph >> Pastor campbell says jesus is the perfect example of a blended family.... And the sign is all about stressing the importance of family for our kids. >> Ok, imagine finding a stranger living your basement! That's exactly what happened to a couple of guys at the ohio state university! They had joked about having a ghost in the house, after finding the doors to their cupboards, ovens and microwaves open. But then.. They stumbled across a locked door they thought was a mantenance closet. That's when they found another bedroom... And some guy named jeremy living inside! >> I mean he was a really nice guy I mean I feel bad for him but ya know he just wasn't supposed to be living there. >> The stranger is also a student at ohio state... But he was promptly evicted, and the house mates have since changed their locks. >> The risque music video for miley cyrus' song "wrecking ball" is causing some controversy at grand valley state university in michigan. The school also has a wrecking ball sculpture on campus. But after so many students tried to reenact the video on it... In the nude... The school had to remove the wrecking ball... And put it in storage.

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News Headline: Gaining Weight? Maybe it isn?t Your Fault: Smartphone Use | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Nightcap
Contact Name: Barry Carpenter
News OCR Text: 56% of Americans have a smartphone–which are so handy because they do just about everything.

Dustin Barrett used to spend about 100 hours a month on his phone.

“Pretty much everything,” Dustin recalled. “Games, texting. You know, you get on the phone I use my phone a lot for business so I'm on the phone constantly.”

At one point he weighed 254 pounds–his smartphone was getting in the way of working out and eating a healthy diet.

“It kind of takes you off your path,” Dustin said. “You'll get an email and then you'll get a text from somebody and Facebook this, Facebook that or Instagram and then your plans go the other way.”

Want more proof? Listen to this; researchers at Kent State University surveyed 300 students about their smartphone use and the ones who talked, tweeted, texted, facebooked and surfed the internet the most were less fit than the light or moderate smartphone users.

Some spent nearly five hours on their smartphones and that didn't include listing to music.

Dr. Mark Anderson of Healthcare Associates in Irving said technology has left us in the dust.

“You just look at the environment has changed just over the past 20 years out of our day today interactions and such and we haven't had time, I say to evolve, to catch up to our environment,” Dr. Anderson said. “If you described what our day is today to someone 30 years ago you may as well be talking about the moon, and astronaut shot right?”

Dr. Andreson said spending all that time on the smartphone doesn't just make us inactive–it also releases the stress hormone cortisol which can cause weight gain.

Dustin said he realized he was using his smartphone way too much and decided to cut back.

“For me it was not being on social media sites all the time and not texting, trying to put it down and focus on what I needed to do.”

Dustin needed to lose weight so he cut his smartphone use in half and now when he's talking he's also walking.

He's lost 70 pounds. Instead of surfing–he's exercising.

“If you put it down for a few hours a day you can get a lot done and transform yourself,” Dustin said.

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News Headline: thriving startup community means jobs aplenty... for the right candidates | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fresh Water
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artist Veronica Zak mural at Art City Commencement Celebration - Photo Bob Perkoski | Show Photo

Decision Desk Employees - Bob Perkoski

The startup community is thriving in Northeast Ohio. Explorys, a big data company in the health care industry, has ballooned to 117 employees since its inception just four years ago. OnShift, a producer of staff scheduling software, has grown to 60 employees in the same short timeframe. Younger startups like online gifting service Sociagram are following in their footsteps, growing at a pace that far exceeds expectations.

Kara Hornikel, a recruiter with JumpStart, reports that at any given time her organization has 60 to 80 job openings listed for young startups. The large number of jobs open indicates these startups are doing well and growing. And these unfilled positions aren't just for programmers; the companies also are looking for salespeople -- usually the first position they hire -- and marketing staff.

“It's really encouraging, actually,” says Hornikel. “Generally in startups, if they have jobs available it is because they are growing since their staff is so small. The amount of jobs speaks to a larger trend of new job creation. So it's great for Cleveland's economy and it shows that the startup community here is thriving."

JumpStart is just one resource local companies turn to for help filling jobs. Global Cleveland and BioEnterprise team up to host regular online job fairs. During the two fairs held in 2012, 2,611 job seekers registered and 4,668 applications were submitted for 439 positions posted by 52 employers.

But working for -- and hiring by -- a young startup has unique challenges. Recruiters and employers discuss some of the critical qualities for working at a startup.

Be Willing to Do Windows

Generally, working for a startup of any kind requires a willingness to do more than just what's in the job description -- happily. “It's surprising that when you get talent that is fresh out of school, they're not aware of the challenges of a startup,” says Shubs Sheth, director of operations for DecisionDesk, an online processor of university applications. “It's always super clear from the get-go. You're going to wear many hats, work lots of hours, but then it's going to pay off.”

Sheth describes working for a startup as being more of a generalist than a specialist. “One day, you're buying water, the next you're buying a garbage can, and then you're mounting an LCD TV,” she says. “Candidates have to have a can-do attitude.”

Ryan O'Donnell, founder of Sociagram, focuses on candidates who have the right personality for the company. “For us, we tend to spend more time on finding the right person for a role -- finding the right character who fits our culture,” O'Donnell says. “When you're running a startup you're not looking for a person who just wants a paycheck.”

Inform Candidates of the Risks

Working for a startup can have substantial rewards -- but it can also have considerable risks: the company could fail, money is usually tight, at least in the beginning, or the concept might never take off. “You want the right risk profile for these jobs because it shows people who are adaptable and able to function outside of their job descriptions,” says Hornikel. “It's just less structured.”

Hornikel says that it takes, on average, 60 to 90 days to fill a startup position, which is a bit longer than at an established company. That's largely because of the risk assessment that must be done to find employees who can handle the long hours, flexible job descriptions and volatile nature of a startup in terms of steady income and clients.

Sarah Kirsch, recruiting manager for Explorys, says, “We do our hiring for specific skill sets, making sure to hire only those whose core values are in line with our values. We're looking for mini-entrepreneurs, so if there's a problem, they can jump in.”

One approach Explorys takes is to mold interns for future careers with the company. Explorys has relationships with CWRU, Carnegie-Mellon and Kent State University. “Our goal is to groom the kids throughout college so essentially we have mid-level software developers,” says Kirsch. “This past summer we had 11 interns.”

Teri Hembree, executive vice president of operations and human resources for OnShift, has an extensive screening plan in place when recruiting new talent. “You have to really get good at assessing people's risk tolerance,” she says. “If they say, ‘I've been laid off three times' or ‘I'm looking for a stable home,' I talk to them about risk tolerance.”

When they're made for a startup, the potential hire usually knows it. After working for startups in both Boston and Detroit, Tim Downs thought perhaps he'd get a corporate job when he and his wife moved to Cleveland. “In Cleveland, I thought I'd do something more corporate, but it wasn't for me anymore,” he says. JumpStart's job board brought Downs and O'Donnell together, and now he's Lead Developer at Sociagram. “I just like the lifestyle. I work with different stuff every day and there's no bureaucracy.”

Use a Variety of Resources

While JumpStart, NEOSA and Global Cleveland all post jobs, most startups use a variety of resources. College career fairs are a popular place to recruit new talent, while national online job boards also have proven to be a good resource. Some of the online career boards are geared specifically to jobs at startup companies, like StartUpHire, or tech company jobs, like Dice. LinkedIn also can be a great networking resource.

O'Donnell is happy to see so many startup businesses taking off in Cleveland. “People have been doing high-tech startups on the coasts since the '60s and '70s,” he says. “They're on the third generation. The VC industry is very much ingrained in the coastal cities. What we're seeing here in Cleveland with organizations like LaunchHouse, FlashStarts and Bizdom is getting ahead of the younger generations."

And O'Donnell believes that the talent is here to support a thriving entrepreneurial economy. “I think there's a strong enough pool here to pull talent from,” he says. “The more companies we have succeeding in Northeast Ohio, the more we are going to succeed as a burgeoning economic ecosystem.”

OnShift's Hembree also sees the changes in the air. “In the '90s people would say, 'What technology?'" she says. “There's no secret to attracting good people. I wish there was. And there's no crystal ball, either. But we love Cleveland.”

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News Headline: Riley Museum set for opening of visitor center, week of celebration | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tallahassee Democrat -- Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New visitor center to officially open Tuesday

The new Riley House visitors center is behind the historic Riley House at 419 E. Jefferson. Officials will celebrate the opening of the visitors center with several events next week. / Gerald Ensley/Democrat

Written by Gerald Ensley Democrat senior writer

John G. Riley Museum Visitor Center Grand Opening

• 9 a.m. Ribbon cutting of new visitor center

• 10 a.m. Tours of visitor center and Riley Museum’s Florida Highwaymen exhibit (paintings donated by Grace Dansby).

• 11 a.m. Smokey Hollow reunion, unveiling of commemorative book and tours of Cascades Park.

• 3 p.m. Premiere of documentary, “Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle.” Free.

• 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 4th annual Regional L3X Legacy Tour. Historical talks and closing luncheon. $20 per person.

• 5:30 p.m. Opening of, “They Led The Way,” an exhibit about the first black students to integrate Leon County schools. Eight students profiled are expected to be present. Free.

• 9 a.m. to noon. Let’s Move Family Health and Fitness Day. Free.

• 2 p.m. Private showing of film, “The Butler.” $15 per person.

It may not have reached MLK status yet, but the birthday of John G. Riley is climbing in stature on the calendar.

Tallahassee’s Riley Museum for black history will celebrate the 156th birthday of its namesake — plus the opening of its new visitor center — with a week-long slate of activities.

The week starts with Tuesday’s official grand opening of the visitor center, followed by a nearby Smokey Hollow reunion. Events continue through Saturday, punctuated by Friday’s “They Led The Way,” a reception and exhibit featuring eight black students who were the first to integrate Leon County schools.

The celebration includes a pair of movies, a Lifelong Learning event in conjunction with the Tallahassee Senior Center, unveiling of a new book, plus tours of the Riley House and nearby Cascades Park.

“I’ve always felt a museum should not be static,” Althemese Barnes, executive director of the Riley Museum. “It should be moving, contributing and providing resources for people.”

John Gilmore Riley (1857-1954) was born into slavery but became one of Tallahassee’s leading educators and property owners. He served 34 years (1892-1926) as principal of Tallahassee’s then all-black Lincoln High. After his death, relatives lived in his home at 419 E. Jefferson until the early 1970s. The home was opened as a museum in 1984.

The facility’s new visitor center was completed earlier this summer and is located behind the Riley Museum. The two-story, 1,800-square-foot building in the style of an old Florida house will host exhibits and be available to rent for meetings and receptions.

After the grand opening, there will be a reunion of Smokey Hollow residents, family and friends. Smokey Hollow was the name of the black community founded in the 1890s in the area between Gaines Street and Apalachee Parkway, below the capitol. It was home to working-class blacks until the early 1960s, when it was cleared for urban renewal.

Much of Smokey Hollow is now encompassed by the under-construction Cascades Park, with officials planning to create a commemorative village in a block near Apalachee Parkway, near the Riley Museum. At Monday’s reunion, copies of a recently published history of Smokey Hollow will be sold ($25). The book includes stories from 18 still-living residents, photos and a directory of the neighborhood’s residents in its final years.

A story about Smokey Hollow is currently included on the website of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

“The new building is a companion to the Riley House; we have ample materials and artifacts to keep programs and exhibits going in both buildings,” Barnes said. “Then when the Smokey Hollow (commemoration) is finished, it will provide a continuous connection of a Heritage Trail.”

Friday’s event figures to be rather compelling, as the Riley House will unveil a display celebrating eight Tallahassee natives who integrated Leon County schools in the 1960s. The display was created by Tallahassee native Ann Schierhorn, now a journalism professor at Kent State University, who has also written profiles of the students that will be published in a Riley Museum magazine.

The event is expected to draw many of the eight students: Elaine Thorpe Cox (Blessed Sacrament, 1962), Melodee Thompson (Kate Sullivan Elementary, 1963), Phillip Hadley (Leon High, 1963), Marilyn Holifield (Leon High, 1963), Harold Knowles (Leon High, 1963), Keith Neyland (Florida High, 1964), Mahlon Rhaney (Florida High, 1964), and Rick Williams (Rickards High, 1965).

“I told (Schierhorn), this is really the story of the nation; it’s a history that can go on and on,” Barnes said. “(The exhibit illustrates) Riley Museum is an example how museums can be more than just buildings; they can serve as anchors to bring people together.”

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News Headline: Hepburn dresses exhibited at Appleton museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Marshfield News-Herald - Online, The
Contact Name: The Associated Press
News OCR Text: APPLETON — Clothes worn by late actress Katharine Hepburn are on display at an Appleton museum.

The exhibit will feature some of her rarely exhibited costumes from stage, screen and television, along with items from her personal collection on loan from the Kent State University Museum.

The exhibit is called Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen. It started Sept. 13 and will continue through Dec. 15 at The Trout Museum of Art in Appleton.

The exhibition is curated by Jean Druesedow, director of The Kent State University Museum and author of “Rebel Chic,” which is about Hepburn’s style.

The museum acquired Hepburn’s performance clothes from her estate. Before her 2003 death, she said she wanted her collection of performance clothes to be given to an educational institution.

The Trout Museum of Art is located at 111 W. College Ave. Museum hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday.

Admission costs $9 for adults, $7 for seniors and $6 for students and military personnel. Children 10 and younger get in free with an adult.

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News Headline: LSU fraternity apologizes for 'inappropriate' sign referencing 1970 Kent State shooting (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: UPI.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By KATE STANTON, UPI.com
In preparation for the weekend's football game against Kent State, Louisiana State University's Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity hung a sign from their front door that read: "Getting massacred is nothing new to Kent State."

Not surprisingly, the sign upset some viewers, even LSU fans, who felt that its message was offensive.

“I love my Tigers, but this is inappropriate,” one LSU fan wrote NBC 33.

Four Kent State students were shot and killed by the Ohio National Guard during a Cambodia protest in May 1970, an incident that had a profound effect on public opinion about the presidency and American action in southeast Asia.

When photos of the sign hit social media, Kent State spokesman Eric Mansfield released this statement:

May 4, 1970 was a watershed moment for the country and especially the Kent State family. We lost four students that day while nine others were wounded and countless others were changed forever. We take offense to the actions of a few people last night who created an inappropriate sign and distracted from the athletic contest on the field.
Our new May 4 Visitor Center, which opened less than a year ago, is another way in which Kent State is inviting the country to gain perspective on what happened 43 years ago and apply its meaning to the future.

We would invite those who created the sign to visit our campus to visit the May 4 Visitor Center and learn more about the event which forever changed Kent State and America.

According to WTVM, LSU said that DKE's Zeta Zeta chapter could face disciplinary action.

The fraternity's chapter issued an apology Sunday for what it called "a poor attempt at humor":

We, the men of Zeta Zeta, formally apologize to your entire community for the banner that was hung from our house this past weekend. The sign was inappropriate and should never have been hung in the first place. We hope that the Kent State community can forgive our action and accept our sincere apologies. We apologize not only to the community of Kent State, but also to those who were personally affected by this tragedy in American history. Hanging the banner was a poor attempt at humor. We, as young college students, did not grasp the full scoop of the tragedy and it's long lasting effects. This is not how we would like to represent our fraternity as well as our school, and we certainly hope we did not put a negative spin on your school's visit to Louisiana State University.

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News Headline: Don't waste your time: The best and worst study techniques (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Journal News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EVALUATING STUDY TECHNIQUES
Prof. John Dunlosky, of Kent State University, along with other psychologists, reviewed scientific evidence for 10 learning techniques commonly used by students. While the 10 learning techniques vary widely in effectiveness, two strategies received the highest overall utility ratings. Find out what they are. (SLIDESHOW)

By Swapna Venugopal Ramaswamy
Are you highlighter happy? If so, you can blame that B- on the bright fluorescent pink, yellow and greens lines running through your textbooks.

When it comes to study techniques, highlighters, mnemonics and re-reading just don't make the grade, according to a report released by the Association for Psychological Science. In the report, Professor John Dunlosky of Kent State University and a team of psychological scientists reviewed the scientific evidence for 10 learning techniques commonly used by students.

So what gets an A+, or as the report puts it, “high utility”?

Two strategies: taking practice tests and spreading out a study session, the so-called distributed practice.

Quizzing yourself and spreading out your studying over time (sorry, it's the opposite of procrastination and cramming) can improve performance across many different kinds of tests, and their effectiveness has been repeatedly demonstrated for students of all ages, report Dunlosky et al.

After admitting to the good professor that I had taken a yellow highlighter to his 55-page report published in the Psychological Science in the Public Interest, I asked him to explain his findings.

He had his own admission: He has a favorite highlighter, and it sits on his study table.

So what gives?

“Highlighting or underlining can be a very passive activity. You could be mindlessly underlining or highlighting while you dream of what you want to do after the test,” said Dunlosky. “It is a security blanket for many. But it could help if you go back to pages to restudy.”

When the students go back to re-study, simply re-reading the highlighted portion passively will not help.

“They should instead use a strategy that is more actively engaging,” he said.

For instance, make flashcards using the material that has been highlighted can be highly effective.

Schools and parents spend a lot of money on technology and programs to improve student achievement often without enough evidence showing they work, said Dunlosky.

“A lot of educational techniques used are not evidence-based,” he said.

The researchers evaluated more than 700 studies covering students of all ages. While five of the techniques consistently demonstrated unimpressive results when judged by test performance, others such as elaborative interrogation, self-explanation and interleaved practice (especially for math) appear promising but require more research, the study reports.

Dunlosky said he was surprised by the low score of one of the most commonly used strategies: Summarization.

“It turns out it doesn't have a great influence on learning,” said Dunlosky. “It can be effective for learners who are already skilled at summarizing. But for children, high school students and even some undergraduates, it is less feasible. Based on the research it is not a good use of time.”

Using mnemonics, another popular strategy, was found not to produce durable retention.

The next time you are trying to remember math operations with the mnemonic Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally (Parentheses, Exponents, Multiply, Divide, Add and Subtract), remember practice testing is key.

The good news: The two winning strategies are inexpensive and effective for students of all ages.

“Any student with a pencil, paper and a calendar can manage their own learning effectively,” said Dunlosky. “All you need is motivation.”

The full report is available free online at www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/journals/pspi/learning-techniques.html.

Follow me on twitter @SwapnaVenugopal

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News Headline: Cognitive Science Meets Pre-Algebra (Dunlosky) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Psychological Science
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The New York Times:
The math students at Liberty Middle School were not happy. The seventh graders' homework was harder and more time-consuming at first, and many of the problems seemed stale. They were old, from weeks or months ago — proportions, again? — and solving them interrupted the flow of the students' current work.

“The result is that you feel you've learned the material really well; people prefer blocked practice, when you ask them,” said Robert A. Bjork, a psychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles. “But they do much better on later tests when they practiced interleaved, or mixed, sets of problems or skills. It's completely counterintuitive.”

The researchers started small: eight seventh-grade pre-algebra classes, 140 students in all. “We didn't introduce anything new, or ask teachers to do any additional work,” said the lead investigator, Doug Rohrer, a psychologist at the University of South Florida and a former math teacher himself; his co-authors were Robert F. Dedrick and Kaleena Burgess. “We simply rearranged the material they already use.”

“But I'm much more concerned with how these lab-based techniques interact with everything else in the classroom: the different dynamics, different kids, different teaching styles. For example, some percentage of teachers are going to say, ‘This doesn't fit with how I teach math.' Period. A lot of other people are simply not going to grasp what's required to make it work. The question is: Is it adaptable?”
Most psychologists who study learning think so. “Remember, learning is slower when you begin interleaving,” said John Dunlosky, a psychologist at Kent State University. “If you have both groups learn the material to the same level — that is, if you give the people doing interleaving a little extra time at the beginning — then the benefits of mixed practice will be even larger, I expect.”
Read the whole story: The New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/03/science/cognitive-science-meets-pre-algebra.html?pagewanted=all

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News Headline: Kent State Folk Festival now going 'Round Town | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: September 19, 2013 4:00AM

Annual event expands,
changes name to reflect
more diverse music lineup

By Kelly Maile | Staff Writer

As both downtown Kent and the
campus expand with new businesses
and a connecting esplanade,
the former Kent State Folk
Festival adopts a new name, a
fresh attitude and is expanding by
welcoming even more artists and
music fans to the party.
WKSU and Kent State University
presents the Kent State
‘Round Town Music Festival tonight
through Sunday.
“It's going to be a great festival
lineup,” said Ann VerWiebe, WKSU
marketing and public relations
associate.“We have expanded the
festival thematically. That's why we
changed the name. We didn't just
want to limit it to folk. We wanted
the festival to be more inclusive of
other roots-based genres.”'
VerWiebe said it was the perfect
time to bring changes to a regional
tradition.
“The city and its aspirations are
expanding and the university's
outlook is expanding,” VerWiebe
said. “The university has this great
new performance space and they
have the Esplanade to encourage
students to go downtown and
people from the city to walk up
to campus. There's all these new
bars and restaurants for people to
perform in. It just seemed like the
right time to do it.”
The new Kent State ‘Round
Town Music Festival takes on the
flavors of the annual free ‘Round
Town concerts throughout Kent.
“It's an exciting vibe downtown,”
VerWiebe said. “If you've
ever been downtown during the
free Friday events, there's people
coming out of all these unexpected
places. People come out downtown
to see a specific concert and
discover what the festival has to
offer and have the opportunity to
see something they haven't seen
before.”
The festival will launch with rock
band Dawes and rising folk band
Good Old War at 8 tonight on the
new Student Green at KSU.
“It's going to be crazy,” VerWiebe
said. “They've put the word out to
all the student groups and there's
been a lot of excitement about it,
especially because it's a free show.”
On Friday, more than three dozen
locations in downtown Kent
will radiate with live music during
‘Round Town Free Friday.
“Performances will start at 11
a.m. and go through midnight,”
VerWiebe said. “There will everything
from folk to reggae and
blues.”
Country rock pioneers Pure
Prairie League and Poco will turn
up the volume at 8 p.m. Friday at
the Kent Stage, 175 E. Main St.
For 45 years, Poco has been making
music in the realm of the classic
country rock sound that they
helped form in the late 60s, one
that inspired other acts like The
Eagles and The Little River Band
to follow suit.
Still led by singer and songwriter
Rusty Young, the addition of
two more excellent songwriters
in bassist Jack Sundrud and keyboardist
Michael Webb, as well
as drummer George Lawrence
over the past decade helped to reshape
Poco for another generation.
“We're having so much fun,”
Young said. “We have a new album
out called, ‘All Fired Up.' We
do a lot of songs from that and of
course everyone wants to hear the
great songs we recorded over the
years like ‘Pickin' Up The Pieces'
and ‘Kind Woman,' a song I recorded
with Buffalo Springfield before
the band started.”
Featuring founding member
John David Call, veteran bassist
Mike Reilly, drummer Scott
Thompson and guitar ace Donnie
Clark, Ohio-native sons Pure
Prairie League will embellish their
rich 42-year history Friday at the
Kent Stage.
“It reminds me of the days when
we first played Kent Stage back in
the early 60s and late 70s because
those were the days of the folk festivals,”
Reilly said. “It's going to be
fun. Basically, the fans are going
to get treated to about 90 years of
country rock history between the
two bands.”
Pure Prairie League will play all
the hits like “Amie,” “Let Me Love
You Tonight” and “Falling In and
Out of Love with You.”
The festival continues with free
workshop Saturday on Sept. 21.
from noon to 5 p.m. Visitors can
stick around after the workshops
to enjoy indie folk from Black Prairie
at 8 p.m. at the Kent Stage.
Check out the return of the free
Talent Contest at 5 p.m. on Sunday
held in the tent behind Black
Squirrel Gallery & Gifts in downtown.
The winner will be featured
Open Mic artist on FolkAlley.com.
The ‘Round Town Music Festival
wraps up with a Legends Night
at 8 p.m. at the Kent Stage featuring
the one-and-only Leon Redbone
with Brewer & Shipley and
special guest emcee and local fan
favorite Alex Bevan.
Tickets for all Kent State ‘Round
Town Music Festival concerts are
available at the Kent Stage, by
phone at 1-877-987-6487 or online
at www.thekentstage.com.
For an updated list of performances
at the Kent State ‘Round
Town Music Festival, visit www.
kentstateroundtown.org.

FRIDAY PERFORMANCES

Muh Fugga: 6:30-8:30 p.m., Mugs Brew Pub, 211 Franklin Ave.

Honeytown: 9-11 p.m., Mugs Brew Pub, 211 Franklin Ave.

Zach: 5:30-8:30p.m., Pufferbelly, 152 Franklin Ave.

15 60 75 The Numbers Band: 8-11 p.m., Venice Cafe, 163 Franklin Ave., Kent, Ohio, 44240

Aric Frank, Renee Kintz and friends: 8-11 p.m., Dominick's, 147 Franklin Ave.

Boy = Girl: 7-9 p.m., Ray's Place, 153 Franklin Ave.

Long Tall Deb & The Werewolves of Alabama featuring Colin John: 9:30-12:30 p.m., Ray's Place, 153 Franklin Ave.

Shade Flex: 10 p.m.-1 a.m., The Loft, 112 W. Main St.

Diana Chittester: 5:30-7 p.m., Zephyr Pub, 106 W. Main St.

Ian Pentar: 7:30-9 p.m., Zephyr Pub, 106 W. Main St.

Real True Stories: 9:30-11:30 p.m., Zephyr Pub, 106 W. Main St.

Jon Mosey: 11:30 a.m.-1p.m., Franklin Square Deli, 108 S. Water St.

Brady's Run: 7-9 p.m., Woody's Music, 135 S. Water St.

Up 'Til 4: 5:30 p.m., Water St. Tavern, 135 S. Water St.

Roger Hoover: 7 p.m, Water St. Tavern, 132 S. Water St.

The Twistoffs: 9 p.m., Water St. Tavern, 132 S. Water St.

Ryan Humbert: 7-9 p.m., 157 Lounge, 157 S. Water St.

Folk n Thieves: 3 p.m. Ohio Music, 118 E. Main St.

Steelheaders: 8 p.m., Ohio Music, 118 E. Main St.

Hey Mavis,: 6 p.m., Ohio Music, 118 E. Main St.

Randy Horvath: 5 p.m., Ohio Music, 118 E. Main St.

Dale Galgozy: 8 p.m. Last Exit Books, 124 E. Main St.

Acorn Alley Plaza Musicians: 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Acorn Alley Plaza, near 164 E. Main St.,

Acorn Alley Earl's Nest Musicians: 12:30-8 p.m., Acorn Alley Earl's Nest, near 164 E. Main St.

Speedbumps: 8:30-10 p.m., Bar 145, 100 E. Erie St.

The Hive Robbers: 6-9 p.m., Tree City Coffee, 135 E. Erie St.

The Thor Platter Band: 6-9 p.m., Panini's, 295 S Water St.

Kent Shindig: 5-8 p.m., Euro Gyro, 107 S. Depeyster St.

Nate Clark: 4-8 p.m., Kent Natural Foods Co-op, 151 E Main St.

Phat Man Dee & The Cultural District: 8 p.m., Empire, 135 E. Main St.

Summit County Songwriters Circle: noon-5 p.m., McKay Bricker, 141 E. Main St.

The Shaw Brothers: 7:30 p.m., Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St.

Taylor Lamborn: 8-10 p.m., Black Squirrel Gallery and Gifts, 141 E. Main St.

Joe Porter: noon-2 p.m., Baked in the Village Cafe, 123 N. Water St.

The Traveling Cats: 8 p.m., Scribbles Coffee, 237 N. Water St.

The Kates: 8 p.m., Standing Rock Cultural Center, 257 N. Water St.

Ty Kellogg and The Knots: 8-11 p.m., The Brewhouse Pub, 244 N. Water St.

Celtic Clan of Kent: 6-7:30 p.m., United Universalist Church, 228 Gougler Ave.

Student Showcase: 3:30-5:30 p.m., Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St.

Cuyahoga Kirtan with Joe Culley and Friends: 5:30-7 p.m., Kent Yoga at the Silk Mill, 145 S. River St.

Joe Bova: 5-7 p.m., The Pub, 401 Franklin Ave.

Jim Casto: 10 p.m.-midnight, The Pub, 401 Franklin Ave.

American Steal: 8:30-11 p.m., Mike's Place, 1700 S. Water St.

Red Michel: 7-9 p.m., Kent Presbyterian, 1456 E. Summit St.,

Bee String Band: 8-11 p.m., Little City Grill, 802 N Mantua St.

BlueStones: 8-11 p.m., Riverside Wine, 911 N. Mantua St.

Radcliff Calabrese: 6 p.m., The Rusty Nail, 7291 S.R. 43

Ashley Brooke Toussant: 8-10 p.m., Bistro on Main, 1313 W. Main St.

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