Report Overview:
Total Clips (19)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Anthropology; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Board of Trustees; Institutional Advancement (2)
Homecoming (1)
Human Resources; KSU Esplanade; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Insurance Studies; KSU at Salem (1)
KSU Airport; Sustainability (6)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Stark; Office of the President (1)
May 4 (1)
WKSU (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for (1)
Coming Home PA : Women vets fight for jobs, services, acceptance (Anderson) 09/19/2013 New Pittsburgh Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes. It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed...


Anthropology; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Tailgate tales: Kent State is a fashion design leader 09/20/2013 Daily Record, The Text Attachment Email

York, PA - It doesn't sound like a fit, partly because most of the talk is about the football team, partly because it's in northeast Ohio. But, yeah,...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Board of Trustees; Institutional Advancement (2)
KSU approves property exchange for new construction (Finn) 09/19/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Sept. 19--Kent State trustees agreed Wednesday to trade buildings with a fraternity -- a move that eventually will lead to a new home for the KSU Division of...

PROPERTY SWAP WITH KENT STATE FRAT PAVES WAY FOR NEW ARCHITECTURE COLLEGE (Finn) 09/19/2013 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

A property swap between Kent State University and the local Delta Upsilon fraternity chapter means growth for each. The university will exchange property at 1061 Fraternity...


Homecoming (1)
Around Kent 09/20/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Homecoming is quickly approaching! Both Kent State University and Theodore Roosevelt High School in Kent will celebrate Homecoming weekend beginning...


Human Resources; KSU Esplanade; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Kent State University faculty, staff celebrate Esplanade (Decker) 09/19/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Faculty and staff at Kent State University gathered in Risman Plaza on Thursday to walk along the now complete Esplanade connection to downtown Kent for a lunchtime break....


Insurance Studies; KSU at Salem (1)
Insurance jobs will be plentiful -- and colleges will try to meet the need (Blaine) 09/20/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- “Does this mean I have to sell insurance?” was Katelyn Moore's reaction when told about Kent State University's new bachelor's degree...


KSU Airport; Sustainability (6)
STATE NEWS 09/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Airports win grants WASHINGTON: The Federal Aviation Administration has granted three Ohio airports more than half a million dollars to be used for...

FAA provides grant fund to KSU Airport for sustainability efforts 09/19/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The U.S. Department of Transportations Federal Aviation Administration has awarded $102,600 to the Kent State University Airport in Stow and $234,000 to the Akron-Canton Regional Airport Authority for the creation of sustainability master plans....

Three Ohio airports get federal grants 09/19/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...to be used for environment-friendly initiatives. The federal agency on Thursday announced that the Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants. The airports can use the money in...

FAA awards $180,000 for airport 09/19/2013 Dayton Daily News - Online Text Attachment Email

...FAA Thursday said it granted three Ohio airports more than $500,000 to be used for the initiatives — Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports. The airports are expected to use the money for projects that can promote recycling and help reduce noise and water...

3 Ohio airports get federal sustainability grants 09/19/2013 San Francisco Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

...to be used for environment-friendly initiatives. The federal agency on Thursday announced that the Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants. The airports can use the money in...

3 Ohio airports get federal sustainability grants 09/19/2013 Seattle Post-Intelligencer Text Attachment Email

...to be used for environment-friendly initiatives. The federal agency on Thursday announced that the Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants. The airports can use the money in...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Ashtabula County middle school students learn about local opportunities 09/19/2013 Star-Beacon Text Email

...Perfection Corporation; Fargo Machine; Gabriel Performance Products; Grand River Rubber and Plastics; HDT Global; Infinity Resources; Iten Industries; Kent State University Ashtabula; Kraftmaid/Masco Cabinetry; Molded Fiber Glass; Northeast Ohio Regional Airport; Praxair; Presrite; Snodgrass; Third...


KSU at Stark (1)
Time to check out exhibits in the many museums in the area 09/19/2013 TriCities.com Text Attachment Email

... E&H LITERARY FESTIVAL: E&H Board of Visitors Lounge of the Van Dyke Center. Oct. 3, 2:30 p.m. with a live interview conducted by Robert Miltner of Kent State University to follow at 3:30 p.m.; 7:30 p.m. Hague will read from his work. Oct. 4, scholarly sessions will continue with presentations...


KSU at Stark; Office of the President (1)
MyCommunuities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend – Sept. 20 09/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

JACKSON TOWNSHIP Picture This — Opening reception 5:30-7:30 Thursday. Exhibit will run through Nov. 8 in Kent State University Stark Campus Main Hall Art Gallery, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Also, Home: Installation and Body Art through today....


May 4 (1)
Louisiana State frat offends by mocking Kent State massacre in football rivalry 09/20/2013 Daily News Text Attachment Email

Delta Kappa Epsilon's frat house hung a banner that read, ‘Getting massacred is nothing new to Kent State' ahead of a Saturday football game between the...


WKSU (2)
KENT MUSIC FESTIVAL IS BOASTING NEW NAME AND BROADER FOCUS: ACTS IN VARIETY OF GENRES WILL FILL DIFFERENT VENUES IN KENT STARTING TODAY (Skinner) 09/19/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

The Kent State Folk Festival, an annual event since the 1960s is dead. Long live the Kent Stage 'Round Town Music Festival. Yes, the venerated Kent...

Around Kent 09/20/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Music! Music! Music! This is one of my favorite weekends of the entire year in Kent. This is the weekend for the newly renamed Kent State ‘Round Town...


News Headline: Coming Home PA : Women vets fight for jobs, services, acceptance (Anderson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: New Pittsburgh Courier - Online
Contact Name: cn@newpittsburghcourier.com
News OCR Text: The fight to feel like a veteran weighs substantially on female soldiers returning from war, though their numbers have been historic, with more than 280,000 returning from deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade.

A News21 demographic analysis shows that 17.4 percent of post-9/11 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are women. More than a quarter of those women are Black, almost twice the proportion found in the entire U.S. population.

Yet, these same women are less likely to find a job than male veterans and more likely to be a single parent with children to support, interviews and records show.

They return to a nation that historically defines “veteran” as male, which in the post-9/11 era has meant a lack of female-specific resources at VA facilities across the country.

Ohio Army National Guard veteran Crystal Sandor, 28, plays with her young daughter Makenna, in their living room. (Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21)

A 2013 Institute of Medicine report found that women in combat-support roles, like men, experience intense warfare and constant threats on their lives, but the implications of this trauma for women has been overlooked.

“Historically, research on the health of veterans has focused on the health consequences of combat service in men, and there has been little scientific research . . . of the health consequences of military service in women who served,” according to the report.

Currently, 360,000 women use VA medical services. But the number is expected to double as more women come home and seek care, many of them relatively new to its services, said Dr. Patricia Hayes, chief consultant of Women's Health Services at the VA in Washington, D.C.

As of 2008, only 33 percent of the 152 VA medical centers had specified "women's clinics," records show. Now, about 75 percent offer at least some type of female-specific care, Hayes said.

Skeptical doctors

Crystal Sandor sits in her living room in Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21)

Army National Guard Spc. Crystal Sandor muscled a 5-ton truck through the ragtag roads of Iraq and likely would be dead from an exploding fireball had the 4-foot-10 soldier been just centimeters taller.

She was awarded a Purple Heart, but had to prove to the Army that she deserved it.

Even back home in Ohio, she doesn't feel much like a soldier.

“What did you do over there?” some gray-haired male veterans in Akron, Ohio, at the Department of Veterans Affairs asked as they sized up her petite frame. “Did you sell Girl Scout cookies?” one asked.

When Sandor's husband goes to the VA, he gets handshakes and “Thank you for your service” accolades in the waiting room.

Not Crystal.

Sandor has struggled to get the care she expected from the military since the night she nearly died – June 18, 2004.

She was a driver in a 20-truck convoy during a night mission in Iraq.

She laughs just a little, remembering a conversation with a fellow soldier. She was razzing him for spilling sunflower seeds, a staple during their missions together. Then, a fireball from a roadside bomb came head-on toward their truck.

Sandor woke up pounding on her chest to make sure she was alive. She couldn't see, couldn't hear. The voice of a soldier broke the chaos.

“Just keep driving! Just keep driving!”

“If I was that much taller,” Sandor says, putting mere centimeters between her thumb and forefinger, “I wouldn't be alive."

After the accident and while still in Iraq, Sandor discovered her superiors lost the paperwork documenting the attack, meaning there was no official record that it ever happened.

“The only reason I have the disability (rating) I have is because I was smart enough to have a video camera on me and we recorded the damage to the truck and we took pictures of everything,” she said. “That is the only reason I have a Purple Heart or disability.”

Since Sandor's return home in March 2005, she's been at odds with the Ohio VA system over her treatment.

During her first appointment later that year, she said the VA doctor seemed skeptical of her injuries, treating her as if she never left the base. When she was asked about treatment options, Sandor requested therapy to talk about the attack that injured her. Instead, she left with three prescriptions for anxiety and sleeping. She said she stopped taking the medications because she felt like a “zombie.”

Four Women, Four Stories from News21 on Vimeo. “I don't think I've talked to one female veteran who goes to the VA who has had a good experience, that has been treated and received the care that they deserve,” Sandor said. “I think because the VA has dealt with men for so long, through all the previous wars, they're not set up to handle females. But we've been at this war for 10 years, it's about time they figure it out.”

She tried group therapy at the VA, but was placed in an all-male group. She left each session feeling guilty, not better, about herself because of the horror stories the men told.

For the last eight years, Sandor has bounced between her civilian doctor and the VA to prove the extent of her injuries – such as the post-traumatic stress disorder the VA denied, but her civilian doctor insists she has, along with ringing in her ears, severe arthritis in her knees, hearing and vision loss, herniated disks, a deviated septum and a brain lesion. She has a 40 percent disability rating.

She tries to dismiss her concerns with the VA, keeping her focus on her 17-month-old daughter and her husband's National Guard unit, where she volunteers to help other families. She also is pursuing a degree in public health from Kent State University, where she used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to pay for online classes.

It's been nine years since a roadside bomb nearly killed her, but her PTSD continues to creep into her civilian life both physically and emotionally.

“A lot of people are still like, ‘Why does it bother you? It's been eight years, get over it,' ” Sandor said. “It doesn't go away, it's with you the rest of your life. I mean, the severity of it might – how much you remember of it might – but that feeling, it's always there.”

High unemployment

Hannah Siska, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, sits in her dining room on June 9, 2013 in Ravenna, Ohio. (Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21)

When Hannah Siska left the Marines in 2011, she expected to find a job with the skills she acquired during her five years of service. She was a Marine in good standing. She had strong leadership skills. She had high security clearance.

But she couldn't get a job, even with her training as a special communications signals collection operator and analyst.

Siska applied for more than 150 jobs posted on Department of Defense websites geared toward applicants with security clearances. The result always was the same.

“They want to hire vets that are males, not females, and that was very apparent,” said Siska, who was deployed to Iraq in 2008 and 2009. “I had everything and my resume looked just like all the other guys that got jobs and I didn't.”

In September 2012, the unemployment rate for post-9/11 female veterans hit a high of 19.9 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The average unemployment rate for female veterans for all of 2012 was 12.5 percent, but that was still 3 percentage points higher than the average for male veterans that year.

“Unfortunately when female veterans come home they aren't perceived as women warriors,” said John Pickens III, a Vietnam veteran and the executive director of VeteransPlus, a nonprofit offering financial counseling to service members.

A woman's military experience isn't seen as suitable for civilian life, despite the fact that they learned the same skills as their male counterparts, he said.

“They can't enjoy the life they've fought to defend and there's a lot of pride there,” he said.

Siska calls it “the boys' club” mentality, a perception she worked against during her time as a Marine. When she joined in 2006, Siska said her superiors and fellow Marines gave her extra responsibilities because they trusted her judgment and work ethic. She sought a higher rank, but was not promoted. So she left the Marines.

“I loved it, and I loved the people, I loved what I did, I just didn't like the political aspect behind being able to move up,” she said.

She described the Marines as “old fashioned,” and based on a ranking system emphasizing running and shooting scores. This mindset hinders the Marines, she said, because it discourages women from joining.

In 2009, women made up 19.5 percent of officers and enlisted members in the Air Force, but only 6.4 percent of all Marines, according to the Pew Research Center.

Now, Siska's working on a biochemistry degree at Kent State University while caring for two young children. Her goal is to go to medical school and serve in the Navy.

“I want to be a career person and I want to accomplish things and feel like I'm contributing to society or a community or just my family,” she said.

Unwelcome at home

U.S. Army veteran Aribella Shapiro, 32, walks through a park behind her apartment on her way to church service. (Photo by Caitlin Cruz/News21)

Other than when she is in a Kent State classroom, Aribella Shapiro is always by herself. She walks everywhere because she doesn't have a car – to school, to Walmart, to the Kent Church of Christ.

On one Sunday, she leaves at least 45 minutes before the 10:45 a.m. service. The dewy grass sticks to her brown suede and rubber boots with fur around the top. She says the boots remind her of being in the Army.

She cuts across the lawn of another church, passes campus, stops to get a Frappuccino at Starbucks and zigzags past Main Street and over to the church. She said she likes to try out different churches, but wants to connect somewhere so God knows she's thankful.

“I'm proud because I'm alive and I'm all in one piece,” said the 32-year-old. “I have a lot of friends who have died due to the war and I wasn't one of them. I'm proud that I fought for America.”

But she's not proud of everything about the military, namely her rape by a superior officer.

“I didn't tell anyone because I felt embarrassed,” she said, explaining that her rapist threatened to kill her if she said anything. “I cried for months.”

The crying stopped, she explains, because she talked with other women who experienced similar scenarios, and she realized her story was not unique.

The Department of Defense's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office estimates that 26,000 cases of sexual assault or unwanted sexual contact occurred in fiscal 2012. Of that estimate, 3,374 cases were reported, according to that office.

Shapiro joined the Army, knowing her decision to serve would pay her way through college. The Post-9/11 GI Bill brought her to Kent and it's where she feels the most confident – sitting in class, studying for an exam or helping other students with their homework. The Post-9/11 GI Bill offers an education to those who served after Sept. 10, 2001, and has paid for nearly 1 million veterans to go to school.

Post-9/11 female veterans who have a high school equivalent degree outperform non-veterans when it comes to post-secondary degree attainment, according to a News21 analysis.

But many women veterans returning home to student life juggle other challenges. Only 15 percent of student veterans are “traditionally” college-aged students. Another 47 percent have children and nearly that same percentage are married.

“We think that women veterans don't necessarily want to be identified solely as veterans, as a special group, they want to be identified as women students and adult learners,” said Rachel Anderson, director of the Center for Adult and Veteran Services at Kent State University.

Shapiro dreams of getting her bachelor's and master's degrees to teach English overseas, maybe even in Kuwait where she was stationed in 2004. Only this time she wants to go as “friend, not foe.”

Alone in her apartment, Shapiro misses the men and women she served with in the Army. She's trying to make connections with students in her classes, through the roommate she hopes to get by putting up signs around campus and even with the barista at Starbucks.

But going from being in the Army to being by herself is difficult especially, as a single person, she said. And when asked if she felt welcomed home, Shapiro answered immediately: “No.”

‘Going until there's no more go'

Briana Hawkes' Army dress blues hang pressed and ready in her parents' basement in Bristolville, Ohio.

The basement is where Hawkes is living for the next two-and-a-half years. She converted it into her own studio apartment while she's home and is willing to hang her clothes on a metal rod suspended from the ceiling because she knows it's only temporary.

The 25-year-old single mother served as an E-5 supply sergeant in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2012 and is home to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill to get her degree and join the ROTC program at Kent State University. After she graduates and becomes a commissioned officer, Hawkes plans to re-enter the Army and continue her military career.

According to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), many women carry the burden of caring for children while they are deployed. More than 40 percent of women on active duty have children and more than 30,000 single mothers have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan since 2009.

“Especially as more women are involved and we see continued deployments we need to be cognizant how deployments are impacting families,” said Kate O'Gorman, political director at IAVA. “We have to make sure that service members that deploy can't be worried about their kids constantly. There needs to be a strong system at home so they can execute their job overseas.”

But parents still will worry – both during and after deployment.

Hawkes is young to hold the rank of E-5 supply sergeant. She's typically in charge of soldiers with at least six years on her, she said, and it hasn't been easy to achieve this level of leadership. “It's really cut-throat out there,” Hawkes said, describing the way some sergeants stop soldiers from moving up in rank because they don't want to be passed up. “I've seen it and I've been through it and I've conquered it.”

Coming home to get a degree and care for her daughter is a major contrast to the rigor of her military lifestyle. She is used to straight lines, strict rules and order. But on campus, students walk around wearing whatever they want, smoking and talking on their cell phones.

You're not allowed to do that in the Army.

Thinking about going back to the Army in two-and-a-half years is hard, especially after spending concentrated time with her 3-year-old daughter, but Hawkes knows it's a decision she's going to stand by.

“I plan on going until there's no more go in me,” she said. “If that is one star, two star, I'm not stopping . . . I have a daughter to take care of and I know she's going to have needs and college so I'm going to provide.”

Asha Anchan was a Peter Kiewit Foundation Fellow, Kelsey Hightower an Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Fellow and Caitlin Cruz a Women & Philanthropy Fellow for News21 this summer.*

For the complete project "Back Home: The Challenges Facing Post-9/11 Veterans Returning from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan," click here.

http://publicsource.org/investigations/women-veterans-fight-for-jobs-services-acceptance

PublicSource coverage

Coming Home PA is a project about veterans' return to civilian life spearheaded by PublicSource and reported in cooperation with its local media partners, who include WESA (90.5), The Allegheny Front, The New Pittsburgh Courier, The Pittsburgh City Paper, Pop City and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

"Back Home: The Challenges Facing Post-9/11 Veterans Returning from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan" was produced by News21, a national investigative reporting project involving top college journalism students across the country and headquartered at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. News21 is funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation. The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, the Hearst Foundations, the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, Women & Philanthropy at ASU and the Peter Kiewit Foundation funded the work of individual fellows.

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News Headline: Tailgate tales: Kent State is a fashion design leader | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: York, PA -

It doesn't sound like a fit, partly because most of the talk is about the football team, partly because it's in northeast Ohio.

But, yeah, Kent State is one of the top fashion design learning centers in the world.

Actually, it was No. 13 by fashionista.com overall and is the top major American university on the list. It boasts study abroad programs in Paris and Milan and an MBA program in fashion-focused business.

The Project Runway Season 5 winner went to Kent. So did Elle Magazine deputy editor Maggie Bullock.

Then there's professor Vince Quevedo, who has created innovative designs for firefighter clothing.

And the Kent State University Museum features "one of the world's finest collections of high fashion garments."

Which, in a way, is a fine segue to university anthropologist, C. Owen Lovejoy.

All he did was help introduce the world to "Ardi," a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago that has changed the perception of human evolution. It was named 2009 Science Breakthrough of the Year.

Much of Lovejoy's work has traced the development of humans walking upright. In particular, he theorizes that this most progressive change was driven by the desire to find a more attractive mate.

It is a fitting connection, of course, at Kent State.

Where else could an anthropology prof be talking about forays into fashion and style millions of years ago?

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News Headline: KSU approves property exchange for new construction (Finn) | Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sept. 19--Kent State trustees agreed Wednesday to trade buildings with a fraternity -- a move that eventually will lead to a new home for the KSU Division of Institutional Advancement.

Gene Finn, vice president of Institutional Advancement, said the exchange is the first step in creating a new home for staffers in alumni relations, development and the KSU Foundation.

"I would like to see it happen as soon as possible," Finn said. "A domino effect is taking place now."

The new home for Institutional Advancement is part of $800 million in improvements now underway at Kent State's campuses and in the city of Kent.

The university has bought up blocks of property west of campus to extend its footprint to the edge of the downtown business district.

It also is improving buildings on campus and constructing new ones for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology and renovations and additions for the School of Art.

The newest project would be a $10 million to $15 million home for the 100 or so staffers in Institutional Advancement. The building could have about 30,000 square feet and would bring all staffers reporting to Finn under one roof for the first time.

Trustees agreed to trade the current Foundation and Development Building at 1061 Fraternity Circle to the KSU chapter of Delta Upsilon in exchange for the frat chapter house at 202 S. Lincoln St.

The Fraternity Circle site is valued at $550,000 and the frat house at $440,000, so the fraternity also will give KSU $110,000 to even the exchange.

KSU will knock down the frat house to make way for its $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design on the edge of the newly completed pedestrian walkway between downtown and campus.

Meanwhile, KSU staffers will stay at the Fraternity Circle building while the university finds a new home for them. The fraternity has located quarters elsewhere in the interim, the university said.

One promising possibility for the new Institutional Advancement building is the site of the former DuBois Book Store on Willow Street. It was purchased in January by the Portage County Port Authority and has been leased to Kent State.

Gregg Floyd, senior vice president for finance and administration, said details of the new building could be presented to trustees in December. That would pave the way for the start of construction for both the architecture and institutional advancement buildings.

Institutional Advancement is made up of the KSU Foundation, now at Fraternity Circle; Institutional Advancement, now at Fraternity Circle and the Administrative Services Building; and alumni relations, now at Williamson Alumni Center.

In other business, trustees:

--Approved a retire-and-rehire agreement plus a promotion for Charlene Reed, from secretary to the trustees and chief of staff for President Lester Lefton to vice president and university secretary. She will continue to be paid $180,561.

--Approved a contract extension through June 2017 and an 18 percent hike in base salary to $308,000 for athletic director Joel Nielsen. He was hired in March 2010 and just completed the third year of his original five-year contract.

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News Headline: PROPERTY SWAP WITH KENT STATE FRAT PAVES WAY FOR NEW ARCHITECTURE COLLEGE (Finn) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A property swap between Kent State University and the local Delta Upsilon fraternity chapter means growth for each.

The university will exchange property at 1061 Fraternity Circle for the fraternity's vacant house at 202 S. Lincoln St. to enable expansion of the University Esplanade and clear the way for the new $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Delta Upsilon KSU Alumni Chapter, Inc. will pay KSU $110,000, according to the agreement, which is the difference in appraised values between the properties. The university property was independently appraised at $550,000. The DU property, characterized by its blue sidewalk, was appraised at $440,000.

The agreement was approved Wednesday by the KSU Board of Trustees.

Gregg Floyd, KSU senior vice president of administration and finance, said the fraternity property is a necessary component for the new architecture college originally slated to be finished in December 2015. Doug Steidl, dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design, said Wednesday that building will likely open closer to June 2016.

According to the agreement, the fraternity will get the 9,600-square-foot, three-floor building that currently houses staff for the Institutional Advancement and KSU Foundation offices, so the group can refurbish it for its members.

A timeline for when that transaction would close or when KSU intends to break ground for the college has not been finalized, Floyd noted.

Eugene Finn, KSU vice president for institutional advancement, said no moves would occur until the employees of his office -- which he said total about 100 scattered among three locations -- have a new building.

Floyd said the property at 332 S. Lincoln St., the site of the former DuBois Book Store that closed in 2011, is a top location being considered for that new combined office. That property is owned by the Portage County Port Authority and leased by KSU for storage.

Floyd said that new building is roughly estimated to be about 30,000 square feet and cost between $10 million and $15 million, but noted no details are finalized.

Finn said the new office will improve operations and provide size for expansion.

"Its going to be tremendous because as we continue to grow, it's difficult for staff to communicate. And in addition to that, the three functions in those different buildings are at max capacity," Finn said. "That (new building) should accommodate not just existing staff, but also growth for future staff."

Delta Upsilon members did immediately respond to requests for comment.

In other business Wednesday:

• The Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and the Department of Health Sciences were merged, creating the Department of Biostatistics Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology within the College of Public Health.

• The pay structure for unrepresented classified civil service staff and unclassified hourly staff was amended.

• The Kent State University Library children's study room was named The Pris and J Dub's Historical Book Nook after donors Priscilla Drach and JW Coffman.

• The Enrollment Management and Student Services Office main conference room at KSU's Astabula campus (Room A110A) was named the Judith Inman Fielder Enrollment Management and Student Services Conference Room.

• The Main Hall at KSU's East Liverpool campus was named the John J. Purinton Hall.

• A new policy was drafted establishing relationships between KSU and other educational institutions abroad.

• Redmediation-free status standards for students entering postsecondary education were adopted.

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News Headline: Around Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Homecoming is quickly approaching! Both Kent
State University and Theodore Roosevelt High
School in Kent will celebrate Homecoming weekend
beginning on Oct. 4.

Included in a long list of events that are planned,
KSU will host a Spirit Walk and Pep Rally in the
Risman Plaza at noon Oct. 3. On Oct. 4, departments,
colleges, sports, and on-campus groups
will host various reunion events. On Oct. 5, the
KSU Homecoming Parade steps off at 11 a.m. and
marches down Main Street.

This year's grand marshal is Charlie Thomas,
owner of Ray's Place. He will be signing copies of
the new book by Patrick O'Connor, “Meet Me at
Ray's: A Celebration of Ray's Place,” before the
parade at the Williamson Alumni Center, from
10 to 10:45 a.m. Books will be for sale for $18. A
portion of the proceeds from the sale of the book
supports the Ray's Place Entrepreneurial Scholarship
at KSU.

At 3:30 p.m., the Kent State Golden Flashes
take on the Northern Illinois Huskies for the
KSU Homecoming game. Be sure to get there early,
though. Gates will open at 2 p.m. for pregame
celebration time.

The south end of Dix Stadium will feature a
Family Fun Zone with caricature artists, inflatables,
and more for kids. For adults, enjoy Happy
Hour for the first 60 minutes, with select concessions
for only $1 each. Tickets for the event and
game are $20 each. Contact Kent State's ticket
office at 330-672-2244.

Roosevelt High School will play its Homecoming
game on Oct. 4. The Rough Riders will play
Springfield at 7 p.m. Pregame activities include
the Roosevelt marching band and Alumni Band
show. This year the Alumni Band remembers
founding member, and my dear friend, W. Roak
Zeller. I could spend an entire column talking
about Roak. He was a good man, who was taken
too soon on Sept. 6. He will be remembered well
and missed greatly.

The high school will celebrate the Homecoming
dance on Saturday night. The town will be abuzz
with activity that weekend. Look for teens dressed
in their best and out and about that night. Drive
safely everyone.

The Theodore Roosevelt High School class of
1988 will be celebrating its 25-year reunion that
weekend, also. Welcome home, kids! You may not
recognize the place … but I think that you're going
to really like it!

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News Headline: Kent State University faculty, staff celebrate Esplanade (Decker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Kyle McDonald
News OCR Text: Faculty and staff at Kent State University gathered in Risman Plaza on Thursday to walk along the now complete Esplanade connection to downtown Kent for a lunchtime break.

About 140 people took part in, "Let's Take a Ride/Walk," on the Esplanade, which included free lunch at Bar 145, co-sponsored by Miracle on Main Street.

"We're really working hard to try and connect campus to Kent," said Alex Piteo of Miracle on Main Street and a member of the KSU sustainability task force. "What a beautiful job has already been done."

Piteo said the event has grown exponentially since it started in 2011.

Vanessa Decker, a secretary in the KSU Department of Sociology, said the event was a great reason for her to get outdoors, walk through campus and get a bite to eat downtown.

"I think it's a good event for the university and I think they should do things like this more often," she said. "Exercising is more fun with other people."

A lifelong resident of Ravenna and no stranger to Kent, Decker said the walk was her first time taking the Esplanade into downtown.

Decker recalled doing school shopping in downtown Kent as a child and said she's glad to see it thriving once again.

"I think there's just something for everybody. It's great to see families and little kids having fun in Kent," she said.

Upon their arrival to downtown, the Kent Police Department provided assistance in helping the large crowd cross Haymaker Parkway.

Goodie bags with downtown deals from Main Street Kent were given to participants.

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News Headline: Insurance jobs will be plentiful -- and colleges will try to meet the need (Blaine) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- “Does this mean I have to sell insurance?” was Katelyn Moore's reaction when told about Kent State University's new bachelor's degree in insurance studies.

That's nearly everyone's first impression of the insurance industry, but officials say it offers dozens of career opportunities and an almost guaranteed job with a good salary.

Insurance companies, Gov. John Kasich, the Ohio Department of Insurance, the Ohio Board of Regents and colleges have joined forces to establish programs to help fill more than 17,000 expected job openings in the next five years as workers retire. The public/private partnership resulted in Insuring Ohio Futures, which it says is the first effort in the nation to attract skilled workers to the insurance sector.

Kent State introduced the state's only bachelor's degree in insurance studies in fall 2012. Moore was its only student but 34 are now enrolled, said Carol Blaine, who oversees Kent's two-year online program, offered through its Salem campus. Other colleges with programs include Ohio Northern University, Franklin University and Clark State Community College. Ohio State University has a specialization in insurance and risk management in its college of business. The University of Cincinnati is developing a program.

Moore, 21, of East Liverpool, said she was attracted to Kent's program because she likes to help people and wants a job when she graduates. She switched her major from accounting.

“The draw of the programs is absolutely the fact that there are real jobs,” said Blaine, who had a 36-year insurance career. “There are 45 occupations in the insurance industry including marketing, informational technology and human resources.”

Blaine said the industry has changed greatly from when she was hired with a high school degree. At that time most companies had extensive internal training programs. Companies today are looking for skilled workers, preferably with a college degree.

Ohio has more than 260 insurance companies and it ranks seventh in the nation, with more than 100,000 employees, according to the Ohio Insurance Institute, which represents property/casualty insurance companies. The industry, which includes life, health/medical and property/casualty, has an annual economic impact of nearly $6 billion. The average annual salary is about $60,000.

Some might say insurance is the new plastics (for those who remember the career advice given to Dustin Hoffman's character in “The Graduate.”)

Several separate efforts in recent years to promote insurance industry jobs and find qualified workers resulted in the joint statewide effort. Shortly after Kasich took office in 2011, he met with CEOs in the insurance industry and challenged them to find a strategy to fill jobs, Blaine said. Thirteen companies collaborated to form the Insurance Industry Resource Council in 2012. It hired a public relations firm and identified three target audiences – college students, people seeking to change careers and military veterans.

In early 2012, Kent State received approval from the Ohio Board of Regents to offer a degree program in insurance studies.

The university developed the program after a request in 2009 from David Hazen, then the president of the Independent Insurance Agents of Ohio, Blaine said. Since Hazen lived and worked in Salem, the program was based at that campus, she said.

The Ohio Insurance Institute formed a web site to promote careers three years ago, said Mitch Wilson, vice president of public information and education.

“A lot of baby boomers are going to be retiring and no one understands what insurance is,” he said. “They think it's sales and say ‘ugh' because most don't want to do that, but there are hundreds of jobs and career opportunities.”

It merged its site into the Insurance Industry Resources Council's Insuring Ohio Futures site, InsuringOhioFutures.com, which launched in March. The site includes a survey, information on careers, resources and videos for students, veterans and those seeking to change careers.

“It has been a very eye-opening and interesting process,” Wilson said. “Everyone has worked well. It's funny because insurance companies are competing for business every day. But on this issue they said ‘We have to work together and get this message out because it will benefit our industry.'”

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News Headline: STATE NEWS | Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Airports win grants

WASHINGTON: The Federal Aviation Administration has granted three Ohio airports more than half a million dollars to be used for environment-friendly initiatives.

The federal agency said Thursday that Akron-Canton, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants.

The airports can use the money in projects to help reduce noise and water usage, improve air quality and bring down emissions from ground-based vehicles.

Akron-Canton Airport received $234,000; Kent State received more than $102,000.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said the grants will help protect the health of the local communities that the airports serve.

— Associated Press

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News Headline: FAA provides grant fund to KSU Airport for sustainability efforts | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The U.S. Department of Transportations Federal Aviation Administration has awarded $102,600 to the Kent State University Airport in Stow and $234,000 to the Akron-Canton Regional Airport Authority for the creation of sustainability master plans.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown announced the release of the funds on Thursday.

"These improvements will reduce the environmental impact and help improve the economic benefits of the Kent State University Airport and the Akron-Canton Regional Airport," Brown said. "These federal dollars will go a long way in sustaining safe travel in and out of the airports for area residents and businesses."

The KSU Airport is working on a new master plan and is holding public meetings on the topic.

The competitive federal grants will be used to create airport sustainability plans, establishing sustainability goals and tracking strategies, according to Brown's office.

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News Headline: Three Ohio airports get federal grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration has granted three Ohio airports more than half a million dollars to be used for environment-friendly initiatives.

The federal agency on Thursday announced that the Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants.

The airports can use the money in projects that can help reduce noise and water usage, improve air quality and bring down emissions from ground-based vehicles.

The airport in North Canton received $234,000, the one in Miamisburg south of Dayton got $180,000, and Kent State's facility was awarded more than $102,000.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement said the grants will help protect the health of the local communities that the airports serve.

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News Headline: FAA awards $180,000 for airport | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Dayton Daily News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport will use a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration to create a plan for a more environmentally-friendly facility.

The FAA Thursday said it granted three Ohio airports more than $500,000 to be used for the initiatives — Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports.

The airports are expected to use the money for projects that can promote recycling and help reduce noise and water usage, improve air quality and reduce emissions from ground-based vehicles.

Dayton will get $180,000 and use it to create a master plan for the green initiatives, Director of Aviation Terry Slaybaugh said.

Consultant VHB Inc. of Orlando, Fla., will complete the study, Slaybaugh said.

It should be completed within 18 months. A environmental study is already underway for Dayton International Airport that will be completed in spring 2014. Among the ideas that have been discussed include planting prairie grass on some airport properties.

Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport, 10550 N, Springboro Pike, is for general aviation and is the reliever airport for Dayton International. Both are owned by the city of Dayton.

The airport in North Canton received $234,000, and Kent State's facility was awarded more than $102,000.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement said the grants will help protect the health of the local communities that the airports serve.

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News Headline: 3 Ohio airports get federal sustainability grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: San Francisco Chronicle - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Federal Aviation Administration has granted three Ohio airports more than half a million dollars to be used for environment-friendly initiatives.

The federal agency on Thursday announced that the Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants.

The airports can use the money in projects that can help reduce noise and water usage, improve air quality and bring down emissions from ground-based vehicles.

The airport in North Canton received $234,000, the one in Miamisburg south of Dayton got $180,000, and Kent State's facility was awarded more than $102,000.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement said the grants will help protect the health of the local communities that the airports serve.

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News Headline: 3 Ohio airports get federal sustainability grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Federal Aviation Administration has granted three Ohio airports more than half a million dollars to be used for environment-friendly initiatives.

The federal agency on Thursday announced that the Akron-Canton Regional, Dayton-Wright Brothers and Kent State University airports are among the 20 facilities nationwide that will receive sustainability grants.

The airports can use the money in projects that can help reduce noise and water usage, improve air quality and bring down emissions from ground-based vehicles.

The airport in North Canton received $234,000, the one in Miamisburg south of Dayton got $180,000, and Kent State's facility was awarded more than $102,000.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement said the grants will help protect the health of the local communities that the airports serve.

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News Headline: Ashtabula County middle school students learn about local opportunities | Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sept. 19--HARPERSFIELD TOWNSHIP -- Approximately 900 middle school students from area school districts got a crash course on potential future career opportunities in the county Wednesday.

Growth Partnership for Ashtabula County hosted the Middle School Career Awareness Day at the Spire Institute to give local 7th grade students an introduction to various companies and opportunities available in Ashtabula County, said Executive Director Brian Anderson.

Anderson said the idea was to hopefully get students thinking about 10 to 15 years into the future and where they would like to be in terms of their career.

"At this age we don't expect them to know what they want to do, but we are trying to make them aware," he said. "We want them to be 7th graders and enjoy being 7th graders, but to start thinking about the future."

Students from six local school districts as well as students from St. John School attended the event.

A number of local companies participated in the event including Ashtabula County Medical Center; Aqua Ohio; ASHTA Chemicals; A-Tech; CenturyLink; Chromaflo; Cristal; Elite Employment; Elster Perfection Corporation; Fargo Machine; Gabriel Performance Products; Grand River Rubber and Plastics; HDT Global; Infinity Resources; Iten Industries; Kent State University Ashtabula; Kraftmaid/Masco Cabinetry; Molded Fiber Glass; Northeast Ohio Regional Airport; Praxair; Presrite; Snodgrass; Third Dimension; and University Hospitals.

Companies handed out information sheets to students and talked with them about various opportunities available to them.

Larry Fargo, president of Fargo Machine, said the event was a fabulous idea.

"It's great to see so many students," he said. "Our industry needs skilled workers and this is our future here today. We need to get kids interested in this trade so we have a skilled workforce."

Fargo said the event was a little overwhelming for students, but a few of them were interacting and asking questions.

"This is really fun," he said. "I've been to a lot of trade shows and they can be boring, but this is fun."

Fargo said one thing that really impressed him was the number of students that said "thank you" when he gave them a flier.

Anderson said this is the first time Growth Partnership has hosted such an event, but hopes to do more in the future.

"We will learn as we go," he said. "Hopefully we can get more companies involved in the future."

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News Headline: Time to check out exhibits in the many museums in the area | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: TriCities.com
Contact Name: Time to check out exhibits
News OCR Text: FESTIVALS

E&H LITERARY FESTIVAL: E&H Board of Visitors Lounge of the Van Dyke Center. Oct. 3, 2:30 p.m. with a live interview conducted by Robert Miltner of Kent State University to follow at 3:30 p.m.; 7:30 p.m. Hague will read from his work. Oct. 4, scholarly sessions will continue with presentations by poet and novelist Michael Henson and Chris Green, current president of the Appalachian Studies Association.

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News Headline: MyCommunuities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend – Sept. 20 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: JACKSON TOWNSHIP

Picture This — Opening reception 5:30-7:30 Thursday. Exhibit will run through Nov. 8 in Kent State University Stark Campus Main Hall Art Gallery, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. Also, Home: Installation and Body Art through today. 330-499-9600 or www.stark.kent.edu/art.

KENT

Kent State University Presidential Speaker Series — 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Kent State Student Ballroom. Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and the Frederick P. Rose director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, will speak. Free. For tickets, go to http://kentstate.universitytickets.com.

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News Headline: Louisiana State frat offends by mocking Kent State massacre in football rivalry | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Delta Kappa Epsilon's frat house hung a banner that read, ‘Getting massacred is nothing new to Kent State' ahead of a Saturday football game between the schools.

Many other students were outraged with the sign that made light of the notorious Kent State massacre.

A fraternity at Louisiana State University is drawing heat for hanging a sign that mocks the shooting that occurred at Kent State University in 1970 in preparation for a football game between the schools.

"Getting massacred is nothing new to Kent State," the sign read outside Delta Kappa Epsilon's frat house.

The controversial banner offended officials at both schools, prompting the house to unveil another banner.

"We would like to apologize to Kent State for our inappropriate sign," it read.

The Delta Kappa Epsilon frat house created another sign to apologize.

RELATED: CHICAGO FRAT TARGET OF RACIST, HOMOPHOBIC PRANK

Saturday, the LSU Tigers beat the Kent State Golden Flashes, 45-13.

Earlier this month, the same fraternity made headlines for a similar sign about the atrocities in Syria.

"LSU vs. UAB It's gonna be a gas. Syriasly."

The fraternity may face disciplinary action for the signs, according to local news site AL.com.

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News Headline: KENT MUSIC FESTIVAL IS BOASTING NEW NAME AND BROADER FOCUS: ACTS IN VARIETY OF GENRES WILL FILL DIFFERENT VENUES IN KENT STARTING TODAY (Skinner) | Email

News Date: 09/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Abram, Malcolm
News OCR Text: The Kent State Folk Festival, an annual event since the 1960s is dead.

Long live the Kent Stage 'Round Town Music Festival.

Yes, the venerated Kent State Folk Festival has rebranded, giving itself a new name and a broader musical focus as acts in a variety of genres from reggae to blues to jazz to rock and of course folk will fill various venues around Kent tonight-Sunday with the sounds of music.

The festival, presented by WKSU (89.7-FM) and Kent State University has essentially adapted the format traditionally used on the final Friday of the four-day festival where several concerts are spread throughout Kent venues and on Kent State's campus.

"For many years, 'Round Town Fridays have set the tone for the rest of the folk festival," said WKSU Executive Director Dan Skinner in a news release. "These performances broadened the region's definition of folk to embrace other genres - like jazz, Americana and blues - that have roots music at their core. [The festival] is a celebration of sounds and we want everyone to join in the fun."

The event will kick off with a free concert on the new Student Green at the heart of Kent State featuring popular L.A.-based indie-folk rock band Dawes and special guests Good Old War and Liz Frame and the Kickers.

On "Free Friday," more than three-dozen venues will be home to live music featuring area bands such as the Smokin' Fez Monkeys at Bar 145, local legends 15 60 75 The Numbers Band at the Venice Cafe, singer/songwriter Ashley Brooke Toussant at the Bistro on Main, and "cosmic jazz chanteuse" Phat Man Dee & the Cultural District at the Empire. Go to kentstateroundtown.org for the full schedule of acts and venues.

The lineup for the festival is:

5 tonight - Dawes and Good Old War with Liz Frame and the Kickers and others on the Student Green. Free.

Various times Friday - Free concerts at 36 venues throughout Kent.

8 p.m. Friday - Pure Prairie League and Poco at the Kent Stage, 175 E. Main St. $35.

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday - Free workshops at various venues.

8 p.m. Saturday - Black Prairie with Ashleigh Flynn at the Kent Stage. $24.

7 p.m. Sunday - Legends Night at the Kent Stage featuring Leon Redbone with Brewer & Shipley and guest emcee Alex Bevan. $35.

Tickets are available at www.the kentstage.com. Call 330-677-5005 for information.

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News Headline: Around Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Music! Music! Music! This is one
of my favorite weekends of the entire
year in Kent. This is the weekend
for the newly renamed Kent
State ‘Round Town Music Festival
(formerly “Kent State Folk Fest”).
Today, more than 30 venues in the
Downtown Kent areas will be hosting
live, free music.

The range of music genres will include folk,
reggae, blues, indie, and more. Bands performing
around Kent will include: The Speedbumps,
Smokin' Fez Monkeys, Johnny & the Apple Stompers,
The Twistoffs, Boy=Girl, and Bethesda. Red
Michel (of Reo Neon) will perform a show for youth
at Presbyterian Church of Kent.

Tickets for the Pure Prairie League and Poco
show at the Kent Stage on Friday night are still
available. Visit the Festival's website for a complete
schedule at www.kentstateroundtown.org.

On Saturday, venues around Kent will host hourlong
workshops. Both musicians and music fans
are invited to participate in these free workshops.
Learn about music arranging for group sings, jug
bands, Russian folk music, and clogging. Concerts
at the Kent Stage will continue that evening
and Sunday.

Also on Sunday, be sure to check out or participate
in the Talent Contest. The contest will be held
in the tent in the parking lot behind McKay Bricker
and Black Squirrel Gallery & Gifts at 141 E.
Main St. Submit your act through the Kent State
‘Round Town Music Festival's Facebook page. The
top 10 acts will be competing for a chance to be
FolkAlley.com's featured Open Mic artist.

Tickets for Festival concerts are available
through The Kent Stage. Contact by phone by
calling toll-free 877-987-6467 or online at www.thekentstage.
com. The Kent Stage is located at 175 E.
Main St. in Kent. The box office is open from 1 to
6 p.m. weekdays.

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