Report Overview:
Total Clips (41)
Alumni (1)
Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Students (2)
Art, School of (2)
Athletics (6)
Bowman Breakfast; Global Education (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Arts and Sciences (AS); College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Enrollment; KSU Esplanade; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Enrollment; Town-Gown (2)
Fashion Design; KSU Museum (1)
Financial Aid; Higher Education; Tuition (1)
Interior Design (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (4)
KSU Airport (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (2)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
Office of the President (1)
Renovation at KSU; University Facilities Management (1)
Students (5)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
Life in the Middle Ages: The Thrills and Chills of Menopause 09/20/2013 Parade Text Attachment Email

...hairless, single chin? I narrowed my eyes and stared at the dog-eared sheet of paper for clues. The notepad was an assignment in my graphics class at Kent State. We had to come up with a design, print it on a stack of paper, and then glue the top to hold it all together. I decided to sketch a self-portrait....


Alumni; College of Education, Health and Human Services (1)
Zurava earns Distinguished Service award at Kent State University 09/20/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

...English at Claymont City Schools and Akron Public Schools. She has a bachelor's degree from Ohio State University and a master's degree and doctorate from Kent State University. The award is part of Kent State University's College of Education, Health, and Human Services Fourth Annual Hall of...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Students (2)
Wright homes within walking distance 09/22/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...that the Feimans commissioned was patterned after a display home built in New York City for an exhibition there, said Lewis, an architecture student at Kent State.

Wright homes within walking distance 09/22/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...that the Feimans commissioned was patterned after a display home built in New York City for an exhibition there, said Lewis, an architecture student at Kent State.


Art, School of (2)
Art review: Nostalgia seeps into KSU landscapes exhibit 09/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...approach the landscape without falling into a nostalgic funk. Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham, on view at the Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery, is an effort to do just that, and the fact that it only partially succeeds can be instructive....

Unger, Bassham and Basham details 09/20/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

What: Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham When: Through Oct. 5 Where: Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. Information: 330-672-1369, 330-672-3450 or www.kent.edu/arts/galleries/downtown/index.cfm


Athletics (6)
Kent State athletic director gets 18 percent raise, making him highest paid in MAC (Nielsen) 09/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Kent State University's Joel Nielsen's 18 percent raise makes him the highest paid athletic director in the Mid-American Conference. The university...

Golden Flashes' women's cross country finishes fifth at Iona Meet of Champions 09/22/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...retransmission of any of the contents of this service without the express written consent of the Akron Beacon Journal is expressly prohibited. KENT: Kent State University competed in the 19th annual Iona Meet of Champions on Saturday afternoon. The women's team finished fifth overall and the men...

Kent State volleyball looks to turn corner 09/23/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Volleyball is one of the only sports Kent State has struggled in over the past several seasons. Those struggles may be coming to an end. The Golden...

Athletic Director gets $40,000 Yearly Raise in New Contract (Nielsen) 09/23/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Kent State, Joel Nielsen agree to contract extension through 2017 Recent successes on the athletic field for Kent State University translated into a...

Nittany Lions take pride in shutout 09/21/2013 ESPN.com Text Attachment Email

...he waxed poetic on the Lions' improved rushing attack. "You guys need to ask me some defensive questions. They're all offensive questions right now," Penn State's head coach said following a 34-0 victory over Kent State. "The defense just pitched a shutout, and you guys were all over them...

Post-Game Link Recap: Kent State 09/22/2013 SB Nation Text Attachment Email

...Central Florida. Keiser had an interception and sack to go along with four tackles and three pass breakups in undoubtedly the best performance of his Penn State career. Because of that, ESPN's Nittany Nation blog, StateCollege.com and Victory Bell Rings all honored him with sort of of Player of...


Bowman Breakfast; Global Education (1)
Bowman Breakfast set for Oct. 2 at KSU 09/22/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The fall 2013 Bowman Breakfast will take place at Kent State University in the Kent Student Center Ballroom on Oct. 2. Doors open at 7 a.m., breakfast begins at 7, and the program will follow...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Master plans act as 'road map' for communities (Schwarz) 09/22/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...government officials said they have no set procedure in place for making sure new leaders familiarize themselves with the plans. Terry Schwarz, director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, the organization that developed North Canton?s plan, said communities are more likely...


College of Arts and Sciences (AS); College of Business (COB) (1)
'POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE ARAB UPRISINGS' TO BE TOPIC OF CO-LECTURE AT KENT STATE ON SEPT. 27 09/20/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Sept.20 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Business...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Data on Cancer Research Discussed by Researchers at Kent State University (Vangeest) 09/21/2013 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week Text Email

...declining response rates, with incentives often employed to encourage participation." Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "While successful, magnitude of effect is partially dependent upon situational characteristics of respondents, including health...


Enrollment; KSU Esplanade; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Kent, Kent State in a city-university partnership 09/21/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT -- There are a lot of good things happening at Kent State University. Enrollment is up -- and the school is expanding its campus into the downtown area. It's a multi-year project that benefits...


Enrollment; Town-Gown (2)
Good things happening at kent state university 09/20/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

There are a lot of good things happening at kent state university. Enrollment is up. The school is expanding its campus into the downtown area. It's a multiyear project that benefits many. Let's...

Win-win for the university and local economy 09/20/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

...university and local economy. >> Reporter: it sure is, chris. I will tell you what, this is the best of times as you say for not only the city of kent but kent state university. Enrollment is at an all time high. And they have a partnership that has transformed both locations. Take a look at the pictures...


Fashion Design; KSU Museum (1)
Charity events -- week of Sept. 23 09/23/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Bob Mackie Razzle Dazzle Collection Dinner and Exhibition — 6 p.m. in the Atrium, Rockwell Hall, Kent State University. $125. Benefits Friends of Fashion...


Financial Aid; Higher Education; Tuition (1)
Student loan debt 09/22/2013 Al Jazeera America Text Attachment Email

...debt. >> A dramatic confession, he is hopes will act as an entry point for a broader discussion on student loan. >> Enrolled. >> When the curtain drops at kent state university, students are questioning the status yeah. >> Duh? Why do we have so much debt. >> It made me think, you know, I wish that the...


Interior Design (1)
'Crow's nest' a big plus: College of Wooster shows mock-up of rooms in former Gault Family Learning Center (Uber) 09/21/2013 Daily Record - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...intrigued Terrence Uber, a Wooster resident who is a professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design in the interior design program at Kent State University. "Research shows people like individual space," Uber said, pointing out the plan for the former Gault Learning Center provides...


Journalism and Mass Communications (4)
Smartphones, point-and-shoot cameras make photography hobby easy, affordable 09/22/2013 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...photography has exploded in recent years as an easy and affordable alternative to traditional photography, said David LaBelle, photojournalism director at Kent State University. Rather than invest in expensive camera equipment, people are choosing to simply use the device they already own for their photo...

Smartphones, point-and-shoot cameras make photography hobby easy, affordable (LaBelle) 09/21/2013 Zanesville Times Recorder - Online Text Attachment Email

...photography has exploded in recent years as an easy and affordable alternative to traditional photography, said David LaBelle, photojournalism director at Kent State University. Rather than invest in expensive camera equipment, people are choosing to simply use the device they already own for their photo...

Smartphones, point-and-shoot cameras make photography hobby easy, affordable 09/22/2013 Chillicothe Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...photography has exploded in recent years as an easy and affordable alternative to traditional photography, said David LaBelle, photojournalism director at Kent State University. Rather than invest in expensive camera equipment, people are choosing to simply use the device they already own for their photo...

Media Oxpecker: The End of the River 09/20/2013 AAN News Text Attachment Email

...solution, but every solution." "Journalism has to stop mimicking what's happening on the Internet." Highlights from yesterday's Media Ethics Workshop at Kent State University. Why the media has been wrong about YouTube networks. How Telegraph Media Group uses responsive design to drive digital...


KSU Airport (1)
A day for airplanes and automobiles 09/22/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University hosted its annual Aviation Heritage Fair on Sept. 14 at its airport from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to aircraft on display,...


KSU at Ashtabula (2)
Still time to register for Profiles of Ashtabula County breakfast 09/22/2013 Gazette News - Online Text Attachment Email

...and experiences on trying to make the county a better place to live, work and play. The series is held at 8 a.m. on the first Wednesday of the month at Kent State University at Ashtabula. The mission of the series is to help raise awareness of projects that affect everyone and share strengths of...

LEADERship Ashtabula County nears Legacy Scholarship goal 09/21/2013 Columbus C.E.O. - Online Text Attachment Email

...County. The group proposed the creation of a “Legacy” Scholarship to benefit future generations of local citizens that choose to pursue higher education at Kent State University at Ashtabula. With the guidance of development staff at Kent State Ashtabula, the class originally raised $12,000 with...


KSU at Stark (1)
Area educators, libraries observe Banned Books Week (Sturr) 09/20/2013 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...popular week for libraries and bookstores to host events to draw attention to the problem of censorship. Robert Sturr Associate professor of English at Kent State University Stark said Banned Book Week is a way to encourage sharing of thoughts and ideas – even those that may be unpopular. "Our...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Rosenberry Foundation awards $212K in local grants 09/22/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

...turf installation at Crater Stadium Dover Tornado Club Project; United Way of Tuscarawas County, $25,657.80 toward replacing heating and cooling units; Kent State University at Tuscarawas, $19,748, purchase a solar/wind/fuel cell energy training system; Claymont City Schools, $10,000, Project Lead...


Liquid Crystal Institute (2)
U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (Sept. 21) 09/21/2013 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in Ohio. Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Sept. 21 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,537,326)...

LCDs enter the fast lane 09/20/2013 Physicsworld.com Text Attachment Email

...properties of the liquid crystal, such as its elasticity, rather than the size of the electric field. Quick switch Oleg Lavrentovich and colleagues at Kent State University in Ohio have now demonstrated a smaller but quicker effect. The molecules in a nematic liquid crystal do not line up perfectly...


Office of the President (1)
Eyes on the skies 09/22/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...Tyson — author of “The Pluto Files: The Rise and Fall of America's Favorite Planet” — is known for making science accessible and fun. Tyson speaks at the Kent State University Presidential Speaker Series at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Kent Student Center Ballroom, 1075 Risman Drive. Tickets are sold out....


Renovation at KSU; University Facilities Management (1)
Gazebo latest addition to Kent State front campus (Euclide) 09/23/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

This gazebo under construction on front campus at Kent State University reflects the university's goal of creating a living, learning community,...


Students (5)
Downtown Jobs: 5 Things with Popped! Manager Becca Resnick 09/21/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...position? Becca Resnick: Assistant manager, part-time.Patch: What's your hometown, and what brought you to Kent?Resnick: Ravenna. I'm a student at Kent State University studying early childhood education. Patch: What do you like most about working downtown? Resnick: I love the involvement,...

Hudson HeART walk returns for second year 09/22/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...the event, said Brenda Schneider, grant operations manager of the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation. The gallery exhibit will feature art work from Kent State University graduate students, Schneider said. There will be visual artists in the office space and a musician in the gallery from Western...

Memorial held for Taylor Robinson 09/21/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...May 2013, her bones were located last week in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, just off of a popular hiking trail. Robinson, 19, was a student at Kent State University when she was reported missing. Her death is considered a homicide. So far, there have been no arrests. Services were held...

Aviation Grounded by rain, kids still learn about flight 09/22/2013 Columbus Dispatch Text Email

Be prepared. The Boy Scout motto was put to good use yesterday at Ohio State University's Don Scott Field as morning showers almost put a damper on the Youth Aviation Adventure Program's twice-a-year event. In...

Grounded by rain, kids still learn about flight 09/22/2013 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

Be prepared. The Boy Scout motto was put to good use yesterday at Ohio State University's Don Scott Field as morning showers almost put a damper on the Youth Aviation Adventure Program's twice-a-year event. In...


Town-Gown (1)
Kent Sherman House moved to new home 09/21/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...final part of the move, when the building is lowered to the new foundation walls," said Roger Thurman, vice-chair of Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. Kent State University had scheduled the former East Erie Street rooming house for demolition in 2012 to make way for the Esplande that now connects...


News Headline: Life in the Middle Ages: The Thrills and Chills of Menopause | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Parade
Contact Name: Connie Schultz Contributor
News OCR Text: Long ago, on a single piece of notepad paper of my own design, I wrote these words from Abigail McCarthy:

“I look the way I do, I'm the age I am, and I'm going to do the things I have to do.”

I was 21 at the time.

It was a quote of determined self-acceptance. What, I wondered, could I have possibly struggled to accept about oh-so-young me? My gray-free hair? My 26-inch waist? My hairless, single chin?

I narrowed my eyes and stared at the dog-eared sheet of paper for clues.

The notepad was an assignment in my graphics class at Kent State. We had to come up with a design, print it on a stack of paper, and then glue the top to hold it all together. I decided to sketch a self-portrait.

Thirty-five years later I recognize the familiar twinge of anxiety in Cartoon Connie's face. She is sitting at an electric typewriter, fingers poised over the keys. Her long hair is a wild thing winning the fight with two barrettes straining for position on either side of her brow. Large drops of sweat jump off her head as a clock ticks on the wall behind her. She is frowning, with eyes crossed.

I know her, all right. Her hair may be grayer now and her cinch-waist a distant memory, but that anxious young striver still resides in me.

Only now she has hot flashes, too.

What fun.

Two years ago, a snowstorm raged outside our windows as I stood in the kitchen and tugged on my turtleneck with both hands.

“Oh, my gosh,” I said to my husband. “It's only 62 degrees in here. Why am I so hot?”

“I don't know, honey,” he said, blowing warm air into his cupped hands. “I've never been married to anyone this old.”

We gasped in tandem, our eyes wide. The only thing missing was the carnival barker shouting, “Ladies and gentlemen, did he just say that out loud?”

“What?” I said. “What?”

Sherrod had been married exactly once before. He was a single dad for 18 years before he married me. The way he was talking you'd think he'd had eight wives before saddling up next to this cowgirl.

Of course he regretted it as soon as he said it. He pulled me into a semi-hug and started patting my back as if he were putting out a fire.

“That isn't what I meant to say,” he whispered. “I just mean we've been married a long time now and I never dated anyone – “

“Stop.”

He sighed. “That wasn't what I meant to say, either.”

“Just. Stop.”

He made the sound of screeching tires. I turned on the faucet and started splashing water on my face.

I couldn't blame my husband for not understanding what was happening to me. Despite my years of reporting on women's health issues, I didn't understand it either because, this time, it was happening to me. I mentioned that, right?

For a few blissful weeks, I was 54 and feeling at the top of my game. Then, without warning, I was a walking home heating system with chin hairs. We're not talking tiny little stubs. These things sprouted overnight like alfalfa shoots.

“Look at this,” I said one morning to my husband. He pulled on his reading glasses and stared at the long curly piece of hair caught in the claws of my tweezers. “It doesn't look gray to me.”

“It's not from my head. It's from my chin.”

He chuckled. “Good one, honey.” Clearly, his new strategy was to pretend he had no idea what this menopause mama was talking about. Smart guy, that one.

I know women who claim that menopause was no big deal. They tend to be the same women whose nails are never chipped and who refer to middle school as their golden years. The more they talk, the more we don't have in common. I prefer to admire them from afar.

Fortunately, most of my female friends around my age seem capable of making me laugh about every inconvenience aging brings to our lives. The bone density jokes alone are killers.

Besides, I can't say menopause is the worst thing that ever happened to me. Please. Divorce, my 12-album Barry Manilow collection, Earth shoes – they're all reminders of a more painful past.

My body is shifting in alarming ways. Fine. Not thrilled to be Landslide Sally, but I'm upright, in love, and full of energy. I walk at least 10,000 steps a day and lift weights to be strong, not sculpted. My smile has the crinkled eyes to match, and when I laugh I howl, no loner concerned if grumpy others think I'm too loud. Why did I ever care what they think?

The hot flashes are nearly gone, too. Now I just have what looks to be a long-term intolerance to heat, period. I lean into the oven to pull out a pizza and by the time I stand up I want to wrestle a wild woolly to the ground. Sherrod fans me with a potholder and it passes.

If ever there was a time I could accept myself for who I am, this is it. I think of Abigail McCarthy's wise words every day because that page of the notepad now hangs on my mirror.

The Connie who scribbled down that quotation had her insecurities, but even then she knew she had to get over herself. Some part of 21-year-old her still lives in 56-year-old me. Together, we're going to get through this. Together, we're going to do the things we have to do.

Join the conversation! Sign up to follow Connie's blog at parade.com/connie.

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News Headline: Zurava earns Distinguished Service award at Kent State University | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name: Allison Hogshead
News OCR Text: Rebecca Zurava, Ph.D., of Silver Lake earned the ?2013 Distinguished Service to Education, Health, and Human Services Award.? Zurava taught French and English at Claymont City Schools and Akron Public Schools. She has a bachelor's degree from Ohio State University and a master's degree and doctorate from Kent State University.

The award is part of Kent State University's College of Education, Health, and Human Services Fourth Annual Hall of Fame Awards given to alumni. The awards ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Oct. 4 at Kent State University's Student Center Ballroom.

For more information, email ehhsalumni@kent.edu.

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News Headline: Wright homes within walking distance | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Gary Brown
News OCR Text: ?My mom and dad met Frank Lloyd Wright,? recalled Robert Rubin, who lives in the home that his parents, Nathan and Jeanne Rubin, commissioned the noted architect to design early in the 1950s. ?They went to see Wright several times.? That home off 44th Street NW in Canton is a short walk around a corner from a second Wright home, on Santa Clara Street. The proximity is not a coincidence. The second was owned by Jeanne Rubin?s sister, Alice and her husband Ellis Feiman.

The tale of these two Wright houses begins with the two sisters? appreciation of art. ?Both my mom and my aunt were trained musicians,? said Rubin. ?My aunt taught piano. My mom was violin, and she taught music. But, my mom also was interested in art in general, and her interest in the art of Frank Lloyd Wright was directly related to that general interest in art.? COMMISSION IS MADE

Wright and the Rubins communicated on numerous occasions about the couple?s desires for the design of their home. Robert Rubin was 8 at the time the home was constructed in 1951. ?My brother and I were encouraged to do little things to help,? he recalled. Since Wright?s designs employed artistic elements requiring master craftsmen, a person with a passion for Wright?s architecture ? and patience ? likely was needed to usher in the first of three Wright-designed houses in Canton. ?Every aspect of a Frank Lloyd Wright house is artistic,? said Rubin. ?Everything in it is custom-built, made by craftsmen on the site. Every window, for example, was made on the site and each one has an artistic element in it. ?If it hadn?t been for my mom, I don?t think Canton would have three Wright houses. And it?s unique for Canton to have three of them within two miles of each other ? two of them within 200 yards of each other.? OTHER HOMES FOLLOWED

The second Wright home ? built on Plain Center Avenue NW by John Dobkins and now owned by Daniel and Dianne Chrzanowski ? was constructed in 1953. The third, commissioned by the Feimans, was conceived when Alice Feiman visited her sister. ?The (Rubin) house was finished, and Nate and Jeanne moved in and invited Alice over and she loved it and wanted one herself,? said Dave Lewis, who lives beside the Feiman house and knew both families.

The home that the Feimans commissioned was patterned after a display home built in New York City for an exhibition there, said Lewis, an architecture student at Kent State.

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News Headline: Wright homes within walking distance | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Gary Brown
News OCR Text: “My mom and dad met Frank Lloyd Wright,” recalled Robert Rubin, who lives in the home that his parents, Nathan and Jeanne Rubin, commissioned the noted architect to design early in the 1950s. “They went to see Wright several times.”

That home off 44th Street NW in Canton is a short walk around a corner from a second Wright home, on Santa Clara Street. The proximity is not a coincidence. The second was owned by Jeanne Rubin's sister, Alice and her husband Ellis Feiman.

The tale of these two Wright houses begins with the two sisters' appreciation of art.

“Both my mom and my aunt were trained musicians,” said Rubin. “My aunt taught piano. My mom was violin, and she taught music. But, my mom also was interested in art in general, and her interest in the art of Frank Lloyd Wright was directly related to that general interest in art.”

COMMISSION IS MADE

Wright and the Rubins communicated on numerous occasions about the couple's desires for the design of their home. Robert Rubin was 8 at the time the home was constructed in 1951.

“My brother and I were encouraged to do little things to help,” he recalled.

Since Wright's designs employed artistic elements requiring master craftsmen, a person with a passion for Wright's architecture — and patience — likely was needed to usher in the first of three Wright-designed houses in Canton.

“Every aspect of a Frank Lloyd Wright house is artistic,” said Rubin. “Everything in it is custom-built, made by craftsmen on the site. Every window, for example, was made on the site and each one has an artistic element in it.

“If it hadn't been for my mom, I don't think Canton would have three Wright houses. And it's unique for Canton to have three of them within two miles of each other — two of them within 200 yards of each other.”

OTHER HOMES FOLLOWED

The second Wright home — built on Plain Center Avenue NW by John Dobkins and now owned by Daniel and Dianne Chrzanowski — was constructed in 1953. The third, commissioned by the Feimans, was conceived  when Alice Feiman visited her sister.

“The (Rubin) house was finished, and Nate and Jeanne moved in and invited Alice over and she loved it and wanted one herself,” said Dave Lewis, who lives beside the Feiman house and knew both families.

The home that the Feimans commissioned was patterned after a display home built in New York City for an exhibition there, said Lewis, an architecture student at Kent State.

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News Headline: Art review: Nostalgia seeps into KSU landscapes exhibit | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Dorothy Shinn
News OCR Text: I'm a fan of American Impressionism. The landscapes in that style and period are some of the most romantic and evocative in our country's brief art history.

They aren't the landscapes of today, however, and it's important to keep that in mind when we look at contemporary landscape paintings.

The Plein Air painters tend to favor the American Impressionist look, as do many others who venture into the realm of landscape painting not understanding that that time has come and gone.

What is the landscape of today? How can an artist approach the genre and not lapse into an approach that ceased to be new 100 years ago?

It's a difficult question, not only because when faced with a beautiful vista, our instinct is to capture it in a beautiful manner, and nothing was more beautiful than the impressionist technique.

Many new methods have taken root since then, such as collage, abstraction, Dada, found art, assemblage, conceptualism, installation art and, increasingly, hybrids of all the above.

If an artist is dedicated to paint and canvas, however, there are still ways to approach the landscape without falling into a nostalgic funk.

Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham, on view at the Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery, is an effort to do just that, and the fact that it only partially succeeds can be instructive.

The works are essentially those of Unger and two of his students — Charles Basham, who studied under him at Kent State University during the 1970s and currently is an adjunct faculty member there; and Ben Bassham, who taught art history at KSU until his retirement in 1999 after 30 years of teaching, and who has been taking instruction under Unger since then.

Unger, like Ben Bassham, is an emeritus professor who taught at KSU for 35 years. And like Charles Basham, Unger was raised on a farm and has profound ties to the land and farming.

Because of these deep ties, Unger has found a sympathetic cord in the Amish way of life and spends much of his time exploring Ohio's Amish country, painting and photographing (with permission) the carefully cultivated lands of the Ordnung.

Almost all of Unger's pastels in this exhibit are Amish farms in and around Charm, Ohio, where he often travels in pursuit of unusual and rare woods that he uses in his other artistic pursuit, the building and carving of musical instruments.

As an artist, craftsman and traditional musician who lives and works in Peninsula, Unger finds the Amish stewardship, not only of the land, but of whatever pursuit they undertake, to be personally gratifying.

“There's a kind of serene beauty of the land that I'm after, and I find that in the Amish culture,” Unger said.

“They let me use my camera as long as I don't aim it at them. But sometimes they say no, and when that happens, I usually discover that they are Old Order. They don't like the ‘English,' ” he explained. “There are Old Order Mennonites who don't like the ‘English' either.”

Most of his pastels are done on site and on farms that are near each other, and, he says, those are usually farms of an extended family.

“The big house is lived in by the head of the family, and his children live in smaller houses on different parts of the farm. When he dies, the oldest child moves into the big house,” he explained, adding that the Amish society is notoriously patriarchal and misogynistic.

“They are a lot like Muslims in that regard,” he said.

Reflecting that rigidity, Unger's pastels and paintings have a rectilinear quality, with the gridded order of the Amish farm coming through in the combination of vertical and horizontal strokes resulting in a pointillistic effect that's almost gridlike in nature.

His palette consists of nuanced local color, and his compositions are straightforward, economical and traditional, an approach that gets no apologies from Unger.

“I grew up on a farm, so what [the Amish] do is kind of near and dear to me,” he said.

“Chuck and I were both trained in portrait painting, but we grew out of it,” Unger noted. “With landscape painting, you have to deal with everything.

Ben Bassham's work is similarly traditional, only not as ordered nor as nuanced as Unger's.

The work Bassham displays was done on his many travels to the American Southwest, New Mexico in particular, and a recent trip to Ireland.

Bassham's approach is straightforward and his palette tends toward generalized local color.

His best work continues to be the paintings done in New Mexico and the American Southwest, as the austerity of the land and the clarity of the light are the perfect antidote to foregone conclusions.

It is to Chuck Basham's landscapes, however, that we must turn for insightful and interpretive richness.

His recent paintings reflect both the foreboding and tension that one would expect to find in today's paintings, no matter the genre.

Not just a means of conveying the tranquility and serenity of agricultural life, Basham's work reveals the concerns of one for whom the life of a farmer is a neighboring everyday reality.

Having spent many years living next to his parents' farm, he learned to juxtapose studio time with days helping his dad maintain the holdings. And even if those days are now behind him, the stark realities linger in his work.

His paintings confront us with startled blackbirds at dusk, rising in thick swarms to search for nesting sites for the night; disordered underbrush clogging the woodlands; the threat of approaching summer storms — nothing, in short, that's serene or bucolic.

These paintings could serve as metaphors for contemporary life, and separated from each other, they can stand alone for the apprehension of contemporary life, the loss of/search for order in the world, the unexpected fragmentation of our tranquility.

If we were looking for a guide as to how to depict the contemporary landscape within the medium of paint on canvas, we would have to look long and hard to find a better example than the work of Charles Basham.

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News Headline: Unger, Bassham and Basham details | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: System Administrator
News OCR Text: What: Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham

When: Through Oct. 5

Where: Kent State University School of Art Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St.

Information: 330-672-1369, 330-672-3450 or www.kent.edu/arts/galleries/downtown/index.cfm

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News Headline: Kent State athletic director gets 18 percent raise, making him highest paid in MAC (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State University's Joel Nielsen's 18 percent raise makes him the highest paid athletic director in the Mid-American Conference.

The university raised Nielsen's base salary to $308,000 and doubled how much he can make in deferred compensation.

“I am very proud of what the coaches and student-athletes have accomplished,” Nielsen, 50, said in a media release after KSU trustees approved his raise Wednesday.

University officials applauded Nielsen for guiding the Golden Flashes to several successes.

Under him, student athletes' grade-point average last spring was 3.11, a record high, and 61 percent of student athletes had a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

KSU's football team went to its first bowl game in 40 years, while baseball went to the College World Series for the first time in 2012 and a KSU wrestler was the university's first NCAA champion in 2011.

During Nielsen's tenure, KSU athletic programs have won an unprecedented 20 conference titles, 12 NCAA team appearances and numerous NCAA individual qualifiers, KSU said in lauding Nielsen's performance.

Nielsen joined KSU in March 2010 at a base of $225,000 and has received raises that brought that to $261,600.

His five-year contract was extended two more years to June 2017 and he will be able to depend on steady raises for the next four years. His base salary will rise $40,000 a year until it reaches $428,000 in 2016-2017.

KSU also will continue to contribute $20,000 a year to a deferred compensation plan for Nielsen until June 2015 and will credit an added $100,000 to the plan as of March 2013. Nielsen can access the full $200,000 in June 2015.

Meanwhile, Nielsen will continue to be eligible to receive 17 bonuses for meeting marks in athletics, academics and fundraising.

He can make tens of thousands in additional income by raising paid attendance at football and basketball games, increasing the 400-plus athletes' graduation rates and raising more money for scholarships and capital projects.

Nielsen remains the third-highest paid athletic director at a tax-supported university in Ohio, behind Gene Smith at Ohio State ($857,294) and Whit Babcock at the University of Cincinnati ($364,000). The University of Akron's Tom Wistrcill earns a base of $243,477.

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News Headline: Golden Flashes' women's cross country finishes fifth at Iona Meet of Champions | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: September 22,2013 02:27 PM GMT Beacon Journal staff Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Copyright � 2013 Beacon Journal Publishing Co. Inc and Black Press. All Rights Reserved. Any copying, redistribution or retransmission of any of the contents of this service without the express written consent of the Akron Beacon Journal is expressly prohibited.

KENT: Kent State University competed in the 19th annual Iona Meet of Champions on Saturday afternoon. The women's team finished fifth overall and the men were 11th in the 20-team field.

Senior Melinda Sawnor paced the women, finishing 14th with a time of 23 minutes, 23.06 seconds in the 6,000-meter run.

Paige Foster (23:37) was 22nd, Rachel Slingluff (23:41) placed 26th and Hannah Fleck (23:56) and Taylor Wickley (24:39) rounded out the scoring for the women.

The men were led by Andrew Goodwin, who finished 37th with a time of 26:33 for the 8,000-meter run.

Julian Meyer (26:46) was 48th, Matt Kahl (27:02) 65th and Jared Fleming (27:04) 66th. Grant Onken clocked 27

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News Headline: Kent State volleyball looks to turn corner | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Volleyball is one
of the only sports
Kent State has
struggled in over
the past several
seasons.
Those struggles
may be coming to
an end.
The Golden
Flashes put the finishing
touches on
an unbeaten weekend
by defeating Illinois-
Chicago in
four sets (24-26,
25-20, 25-18, 25-17)
Saturday night at
the M.A.C. Center,
earning the team
championship at the Golden Flashes
Classic with a 3-0 record.
Senior libero Hannah Herc earned
MVP and Top Defensive Player honors
for the Flashes, and was joined
on the all-tournament team by fellow
senior Aleksandra Nowak and
junior Liz Reikow.
Kent State has now matched its
win total from last season (6-23),
and heads into the start of Mid-
American Conference play next
weekend with a 6-6 record after
starting 1-5.
“This is an exciting weekend for
our team,” said KSU second-year
head coach Don Gromala. “The past
two weeks, the way that we've been
carrying ourselves as a team and
playing volleyball, it's been great to
watch.”
Herc led a defense that limited Illinois-
Chicago to a .043 hitting percentage
by recording 10 digs in the
opening set, the final of which made
her a member of Kent State's 1,000-
dig club. She finished with a matchhigh
19 digs and is ninth on the
school's all-time list with 1,009 in her
career.
“Our goal was just to play well
on defense, and we really did that,”
Herc said. “Whenever we were down,
we got back up through our defense.
I wasn't even thinking about the
1,000 career digs. I didn't even know
that I got it until after the game. My
main goal is just to be consistent for
the team.”
Nowak and Reikow both had double-
doubles in the victory. Nowak recorded
46 assists and 12 digs, finishing
the weekend at 12 assists and
2.64 digs per set. Reikow used her
6-foot-6 frame to dominate around
the net as she totaled 10 kills and 10
block assists.
“They had a great whole weekend,”
Gromala said of the trio. “Hannah
was steady as ever. She's our
leader of our floor court, and that's
the big part of the turnaround of
this team right now. It's a testament
to her and the rest of the ‘diggers',
as we call them. This tournament
had some pretty good middles
all-around, and Liz was neck-andneck
with them, so we're really happy
about that.”
Earlier Saturday freshman Bianca
Cifaldi and sophomore Bridget
Wilhelm posted career-high totals in
kills as Kent State topped Eastern
Illinois 3-1 (20-25, 25-23, 25-19, 25-17).
Cifaldi led the way with a matchhigh
18 kills, including five or more in
each of the final three sets. Wilhelm
totaled 16 kills on just 20 attempts
and had a .700 hitting percentage.
Sophomore Kelly Hutchison added
10 kills, while junior Lauren Engleman
came off the bench to post six
kills in the final two sets.
Nowak had a seasonbest
49 assists to go with
nine digs, and Herc tallied a
match-high 22 digs.
Kent State opened play
at the Golden Flashes Classic
by sweeping Binghamton
in straight sets (25-22,
25-15, 25-19) Friday night
in its 2013 home opener.
Hutchison led the attack
with a match-high 12 kills,
and Cifaldi had 10 kills.
The Flashes begin MAC
play with a pair of road
matches at Akron on Friday
and at Buffalo on Saturday.
“When we reflect back
and look at the season,
these are the moments that
may be a turning point for
us,” said Gromala. “I hope
we can carry it over a bit
into the MAC. Our girls are
focused, they have their
goals, and they know what
they have to do to achieve
those goals.”
WOMEN 'S GOLF
Greg Robertson's coaching
career is off to a winning
start thanks to Jennifer Ha
and her teammates.
Ha took first individually,
helping the Flashes defeat
runner-up Illinois by a
stroke to capture the Minnesota
Invitational last
week in Robertson's inaugural
event as leader of
the KSU women's golf program.
The Flashes improved
round-by-round, shooting
a 306 in the opening round
followed by a 302. They
ended with a tournamentlow
round of 294 on Tuesday.
“I was happy with the
way the team played,” said
Robertson. “I challenged
them a little bit and told
them I was going to find
out a lot about them in
the final round and, sure
enough, they came out in
the final round and fought
hard.”
Ha shot 76 and 71 on day
one to find herself with the
lead going into Tuesday's
final round. She heated up
on the final 18, shooting a
tournament low 4-under
68 to claim a seven-stroke
victory with a final score of
12-under 215. Ha had two
birdies and an eagle on the
final nine and led the field
with 13 birdies in all. Her
rounds of 71 and 68 were
the lowest posted by anyone
in the event.
Has was later named
Mid-American Conference
Women's Golfer of the
Week.
“Not just winning it, but
the way she won, it's definitely
going to help her confidence,”
said Robertson. “I
think it's going to help the
team's confidence, too.”
Kent State also received
help from Josee Doyon,
who tied for fourth after
shooting an 8-over 224.
Raksha Phadke finished in
a tie for 14th place with a
230 (+14), Natalie Goodson
tied for 37th (238) and Taylor
Kim contributed rounds
of 77 and 76 to the KSU
cause.
“It's good to start off the
year with a win,” Robertson
said. “Now it's time to
get back to work and keep
making improvements.”
The Flashes hit the
course again September 27-
29 at the Nittany Lion Invitational
in State College,
Pa.
FIELD HOCKE Y
Kent State (4-4) fell to
No. 10 Iowa 6-0 on Friday,
and dropped a 6-1 decision
to Drexel (4-2) on Thursday.
The Flashes gave up two
quick goals to the Hawkeyes,
who were then able to
net four goals in a five-minute
span to begin the second
half to win going away
even though Kent State actually
outshot Iowa 13-12.
Against Drexel, reigning
MAC Offensive Player
of the Week Julia Hofmann
scored the lone goal
for KSU, which was outshot
just 25-21.
The Flashes will host
Ohio State Tuesday at 2
p.m.
WREST LING
Kent State will host seven
different wrestling
events during the 2013-14
season, including a Beauty
and the Beast wrestling/
gymnastics event on Jan.
19. The Flashes will entertain
Big Ten powerhouse
Ohio State on Dec. 19, and
will host the 2014 MAC
Championships March 8-9.
BASEBA LL
Kent State rallied to defeat
Ontario 11-4 in an exhibition
game played last
week. The Flashes, under
first-year head coach Jeff
Duncan, fell behind 4-1 after
two innings but plated
nine runs from the fourth
through sixth innings to
take control.
Eric Dorsch was the only
Kent State hurler to allow
any damage, giving up four
runs, although only two
were earned. Seven Flashes
totaled 11 strikeouts in the
contest while walking just
one and hitting a pair.
Offensively, Justin Wagler
led the way with three hits
in four at-bats, including
a double, and scored two
runs. Sawyer Polen, Alex
Miklos and Conner Simonetti
had two hits each,
and Troy Summers contributed
a triple.
WOMEN 'S SO CCER
Kent State (5-3) earned
a 3-0 victory over visiting
Youngstown State (1-7-1)
on Friday at Zoeller Field.
“I thought it was a great
result today,” said KSU
coach Rob Marinaro. “We
had high energy to start
the game and capitalized
on opportunities early, and
that made a big difference.”
Just six minutes into
the game, Kent State junior
Stephanie Haugh took
a corner kick that rookie
teammate Jenna Helstrom
one-timed past the YSU
goalkeeper to give the
Flashes an early 1-0 lead.
Kent State increased
its lead to 2-0 after
Youngstown State had a
handball in the box. Kent
State senior Jessacca Gironda
stepped up and
nailed the ball into the
high left corner of the net
in the 38th minute to give
the Flashes a two-goal lead
heading into halftime. Senior
Morgan Mah added
her first goal of the year in
the second half on a direct
kick.
Goalkeeper Stephanie
Senn made three saves to
earn the shutout, her third
of the year.
The Flashes will begin
MAC play at Zoeller Field
next weekend with matches
against Central Michigan
on Friday and Bowling
Green on Sunday.
CROSS COUNT RY
Kent State competed at
the 19th annual John “Paddy”
Doyle/Iona Meet of
Champions at Van Cortlandt
Park on Saturday afternoon.
The women finished
fifth overall, while the
men came in 11th in the 20-
team field.
The Flashes women's
squad was led by senior
Melinda Sawnor's 14th
place finish in 23:23.06, followed
by a 22nd place finish
by junior Paige Foster.
Leading the way for the
KSU men was senior Andrew
Goodwin, who finished
37th with a time of
26:33.

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News Headline: Athletic Director gets $40,000 Yearly Raise in New Contract (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State, Joel Nielsen agree to contract extension through 2017

Recent successes on the athletic field for Kent State University translated into a contract extension and boost in salary for the university's athletics director.

University officials recently announced they had agreed to a contract extension with Kent State Athletics Director Joel Nielsen that will keep him at the helm of the sports programs into 2017.

The new contract will see Nielsen's base salary increase by $40,000 three years in a row from 2013 to 2016. The yearly contract runs from July 1 to June 30.

According to the contract, the athletics director's base salary and scheduled raises are as follows:

•$308,000 in 2013-2014
•$348,000 in 2014-2015 (12.9 percent increase)
•$388,000 in 2015-2016 (11.5 percent increase)
•$428,000 in 2016-2017 (10.3 percent increase)
Nielsen said he is happy to remain a part of the Kent community thanks to the contract extension, according to a press release from the athletics department.

“I am very proud of what the coaches and student athletes have accomplished over the last three and a half years, and I look forward to continuing the Kent State tradition of academic and athletic excellence throughout our program,” he said.

Under the supervision of Nielse, who was hired in 2010, Kent State sports teams have accomplished nearly unprecedented successes.

In 2012, the men's baseball team earned the school's first-ever College World Series appearance. 2013 saw Kent's first college football bowl appearance in 40 years.

Kent women's gymnastics landed its first NCAA championship appearance in 2011. And 2011 also saw Kent's first NCAA wrestling champion.

In addition, Kent State athletes have performed well in the classroom.

In spring of this year the school's athletes set a record with an average 3.11 GPA with 60 percent of student athletes earning a 3.0 GPA or higher.

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News Headline: Nittany Lions take pride in shutout | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: ESPN.com
Contact Name: Josh Moyer
News OCR Text: STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Bill O'Brien, the offensive guru who's had to insist on more than one occasion that he's no rock star, took to the dais Saturday evening and cut himself short as he waxed poetic on the Lions' improved rushing attack. "You guys need to ask me some defensive questions. They're all offensive questions right now," Penn State's head coach said following a 34-0 victory over Kent State. "The defense just pitched a shutout, and you guys were all over them last week and they just pitched a shutout.

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News Headline: Post-Game Link Recap: Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: SB Nation
Contact Name: Dan Vecellio
News OCR Text: I wasn't able to pay as much attention to the game as I would have liked to yesterday, so let's get to the links and hope they help sort out the drenched mess that was the situation at Beaver Stadium yesterday.

Ryan Keiser is most certainly on a roll. The safety made quite an impact on a defense reeling from last week's lackluster performance against Central Florida. Keiser had an interception and sack to go along with four tackles and three pass breakups in undoubtedly the best performance of his Penn State career. Because of that, ESPN's Nittany Nation blog, StateCollege.com and Victory Bell Rings all honored him with sort of of Player of the Game honors.

TWWL's Nittany Nation blog also had a multitude of other stories about yesterday's 34-0 victory over Kent State. Defensive players were deservedly proud of their defensive performance against the Flashes although they know they'll have to continue to improve when they go up against tougher offenses... Josh Moyer also gave us five things to take from yesterday's game, including the fact that Bill O'Brien's playcalling is still leaving some scratching their heads this season.

Over at my old stomping-grounds, Zach Berger of Onward State has a lot of takeaways from the offensive side of the ball, detailing how Christian Hackenberg, while great so far, still has some freshman growing pains to go through and why Akeel Lynch didn't break one run to the house because he essentially pants-ed himself.

The Associated Press has your game recap here and some other news and notes which have news on how Penn State will deal with its first bye week and an improvement in third downs on Saturday.

Sam Ficken hit a ridiculous 54-yard field goal considering the conditions yesterday, one yard from the Penn State all-time record. Greg Pickel at PennLive tells how Ficken is motivated after his performance against Virginia last year.

A multitude of stories from PennLive: Bob Flounders's report card.... Joe Hermitt's incredible pictures... Penn State came out of Kent State unharmed.... Deion Barnes is happy to finally be back in the sack column.

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News Headline: Bowman Breakfast set for Oct. 2 at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The fall 2013 Bowman Breakfast will take place at Kent State University in the Kent Student Center Ballroom on Oct. 2.

Doors open at 7 a.m., breakfast begins at 7, and the program will follow at 8. The featured speaker is Marcello Fantoni, Ph.D., associate provost for global education at Kent State. Fantoni will speak on the topic âThe International City of Kent.â

The cost to attend is $10 per person at the door, payable by cash or check. No invoicing is available for this event, and payment at the door is required.

Reservations can be completed online or by contacting Mary Mandalari at 330-672-8664 or mmandala@kent.edu no later than Thursday. No-shows will be billed. If you find you cannot attend, please contact Mandalari at 330-672-8664 or mmandala@kent.edu to cancel your reservation by Thursday.

Fantoni received his doctorate in history and civilization in 1991 from the European University Institute. In 1994, he was a visiting scholar at Brown University, and in 1998-99 he was a fellow of the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies.

From 1995-2004, he served as director of the Georgetown University program in Florence and professor of European history at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

In 2002, he received his tenure as full professor in early modern history, and he taught at the Catholic University in Milan and at the University of Teramo, Italy. At the University of Teramo, he was chairman of the Department of Communication from 2006-10 and vice-president for international relations from 2008-10.

In 2005, he was appointed director of the Kent State program in Florence, Italy, and in 2009 was named the universityâs Europe manager, overseeing Kent Stateâs campuses in Florence and Geneva, Switzerland. He was named associate provost for global education at Kent State in 2012.

Since 2004, Fantoni has served as director of Centro studi Europa delle Corti, and he has served on the board of Centre de Recherche du Chateau de Versailles since 2007. He is president of Court Studies Forum, an organization he founded in 2007.

Fantoni was editor of the journal Italian History and Culture from 1998 to 2004. His publications include La corte del Granduca (1994); The Anglo-Americans and Florence (2000); Il potere dello spazio (2002); The Art Market in Italy (15th-17th centuries) (2004); Catholicism as Decadence (2007); Fes et Florence en quete dâabsolu (2008); The Politics of Space: European Courts (2009); I gesti del potere (2011); The Court in Europe (2012) and Late Medieval and Early Modern Ritual: Studies in Italian Urban Culture (2013).

Kent State is committed to making its programs and activities accessible to individ-uals with disabilities. If you or a family member will need an interpreter or any other accessibility accommodation to participate in this event, contact the universityâs accessibility liaison, Jacqueline Gee, by phone at 330-672-8667, by video phone at 330-931-4441 or via email at accessKSU@kent.edu.

The Bowman Breakfast, a tradition since 1963, is sponsored by Kent State and the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce.

Other stories of interestEGCC announces academic changesYSU Alumni Lecture Series to present ?Success in Urban School Districts?GED testing set

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News Headline: Master plans act as 'road map' for communities (Schwarz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Alison Matas
News OCR Text: Doug Lane, president of the North Canton Chamber of Commerce, can point to a handful of developments underway in the city.

There are projects to improve pedestrian crossings, to expand trails and to raze the Charlotte Building. And Lane says the ideas came directly from the community?s master plan. ?Having it there gives us a road map, and that?s exactly what it is,? he said. ?It?s a road map to our future.? Several local governments recently have completed or are preparing to update their comprehensive or master plans ? documents that detail how the city or township hopes to develop in the upcoming years. The plans cost tens of thousands of dollars and take months to craft, consultants said. When finished, they?re intended to provide elected officials with guidance for making decisions. But local government officials said they have no set procedure in place for making sure new leaders familiarize themselves with the plans.

Terry Schwarz, director of Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, the organization that developed North Canton?s plan, said communities are more likely to evolve the way residents want them to if there?s a master plan in place. ?The only community I think that doesn?t need a master plan is one that?s never going to change,? she said. ?ACTIONABLE? PLANS Schwarz said based on the goals of a community, plans have different purposes ? some are devised to preserve green space, others are intended promote job creation, and some are designed to maintain historical buildings.

A survey of area master and comprehensive plans shows they include information about population, infrastructure, land use, and services offered.

Costs for comprehensive plans vary, depending on how in-depth the plan is, whether a private consulting firm or a public agency creates it, and whether the plan is being created from scratch or being updated.

For the Stark County Regional Planning Commission, recent plans have required between about 320 and 400 hours of work, putting the price tag in the $20,000 range, Rachel Lewis, senior regional planner, said.

Schwarz said the average cost for plans she handles is between $40,000 and $50,000, but her office also has crafted plans that come in closer to $100,000.

The process of drafting a plan usually starts with a meeting between the consultants and local officials. After a fact-finding period, when consultants learn about the existing conditions of the community, they bring residents in to ask them what they envision. And then comes the tricky part ? turning people?s wishes into realistic steps, detailed in the document.

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News Headline: 'POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE ARAB UPRISINGS' TO BE TOPIC OF CO-LECTURE AT KENT STATE ON SEPT. 27 | Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Sept.20 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Business Administration will host a co-lecture, "The Political Economy of the Arab Uprisings," to be given by two of Northeast Ohio's experts in Middle East politics and political economy on Sept.27 at 7 p.m.in Room 483 of the College of Business Administration Building, home of Kent State's College of Business Administration.

Joshua Stacher, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of political science at Kent State and author of "Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria," published by Stanford University Press.Pete Moore, Ph.D., is an associate professor of political science at Case Western Reserve University and co-author of "Beyond the Arab Spring: Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Arab World," which examines root causes of the Arab uprisings.

This event, which is free and open to the public, is part of the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Ohio Association of Economists and Political Scientists (OAEPS) and is co-sponsored by the Northeast Ohio Consortium of Middle East Studies (NOCMES).A reception will follow the lecture.

The Business Administration Building is located at 475 Terrace Drive on the Kent Campus.Visitor parking is available in the Kent Student Center visitor lot on Summit Street.

For more information about this event and the Ohio Association of Economists and Political Scientists, please visit www.oaeps.org.

To learn more about the Northeast Ohio Consortium on Middle East Studies, visit www.nocmes.org.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Data on Cancer Research Discussed by Researchers at Kent State University (Vangeest) | Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers detail new data in Oncology. According to news reporting out of Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Surveys of cancer patients are an important means of collecting data necessary to improve cancer prevention and control. However, health surveys generally are characterized by declining response rates, with incentives often employed to encourage participation."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "While successful, magnitude of effect is partially dependent upon situational characteristics of respondents, including health status. Given the health challenges experienced by cancer patients, it is unclear to what extent incentives can improve survey participation. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of monetary and non-monetary incentives in improving response to cancer patient surveys. We reviewed the available experimental literature regarding efforts to improve response rates among cancer patients/survivors via incentives. Relevant studies were identified through searches of the MEDLINE, PubMed, and PsychINFO databases from 1975 to 2012. Seed sources (e.g., Cancer Causes & Control, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, and BMC Medical Research Methodology) were also referenced extensively in order to establish a comprehensive set of studies. Although limited, evidence does suggest that token incentives may be less effective for improving survey participation among cancer patients, relative to other population groups. These results are contrary to well-established evidence regarding the efficacy of incentives in improving survey participation generally. Potential reasons why incentives may be less effective in this population are explored."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "While more research is necessary, results suggest that survey research strategies targeting cancer patients be purposively designed in a manner that gives consideration to the distress associated with the condition, including selection of alternative strategies to improve response."

For more information on this research see: Using incentives in surveys of cancer patients: do "best practices" apply? Cancer Causes & Control, 2012;23(12):2047-52.

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.B. Vangeest, College of Public Health, Kent State University, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001, United States.

Copyright© 2013 Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Kent, Kent State in a city-university partnership | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- There are a lot of good things happening at Kent State University. Enrollment is up -- and the school is expanding its campus into the downtown area.

It's a multi-year project that benefits a lot of people and the local economy.

The motto at Kent State University is "building the future," and that's being done in a very big way.

It's part of a unique $100 million partnership with the city of Kent that seems to be working out quite well for everybody involved.

These are definitely the best of times for Kent State University. And the same goes for the city of Kent.

Who ever thought downtown Kent would become a destination location?

What had historically been a student hangout for beers and bars has been transformed into a thriving and inviting comfort zone for friends and families.

New retail, restaurants and coffee shops line Main and Erie streets, next door to the KSU hotel and conference center.

The city and university partnership connects the campus with downtown at a time when enrollment has never been greater -- 28,000 students.

The university's construction has been no less dramatic.

Newer dormitories dot the landscape, as well as the new Reissman Plaza next to the student center.

Still to come -- a new school of architecture, technology and art -- a $200 million undertaking.

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News Headline: Good things happening at kent state university | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There are a lot of good things happening at kent state university. Enrollment is up. The school is expanding its campus into the downtown area. It's a multiyear project that benefits many. Let's go to jack marshall. He is live at kent state university. Hi jack. >> Reporter: hey jimmy. We are live tonight in downtown kent at acorn alley. You probably heard about that. The band striking up playing tunes for the crowd on hand. It's all part of a downtown revitalization partnership. >> These are the best of times for kent state university. >> I like riding my bike through it. It's really beautiful. I like what they are doing with the place. The hotel is nice too. >> Reporter: and the same goes for the city of kent. >> It's just such a wonderful improvement. And to see so many people enjoying the city. It's like I've never seen anything like this. >> Reporter: whoever thought downtown kent would become a destination location. Which had been a student hangout for beers and bars has been transformed into a thriving zone for friends and family. New retails and restaurants line mane and area streets. >> People are coming down here. This has become destination. Not just a college top. It's not bars. It's a lot more to offer. >> Business. The university. Government all came together and linked arms and made the impossible happen during the worst recession in our lifetime. >> Reporter: new dormitories dot the landscape and the new plaza next to the student center. Still to come a new school of architecture. Technology, science, and art. A $200 million under taking. >> What we have done is created a real college community a la san antonio, it coo or ann harbor. >> Reporter: and as a perfect example of success. Enrollment at ksu 28,000 students. That san all-time high. And their economic impact will grow from here across the region. Who would have thought downtown kent being a destination location. I just can't believe it. Live from acorn alley in downtown kent jack marshall channel 3 news. >> Thanks. It looks great. Congratulations to kent state.

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News Headline: Win-win for the university and local economy | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students are enrolling in ken state university in record numbers. They are expanding to the downtown area. Jack marshall joins us with details. Jack, this is a win-win for the university and local economy. >> Reporter: it sure is, chris. I will tell you what, this is the best of times as you say for not only the city of kent but kent state university. Enrollment is at an all time high. And they have a partnership that has transformed both locations. Take a look at the pictures we shot earlier today. This is not the same downtown kent I remember when I attended classes a few years. Construction of the new gateway has connected to the new vibrant downtown. It was all done with public and private money. Fueling the economy for local businesses at a time when enrollment at ksu has never been greater. >> I love the campus. I love downtown. My sister goes here. She is a senior. It's close to my house. I'm 20 minutes away. I love it here. >> Year and a half ago if you looked around here all you saw is dirt roads and everything. I have never seen more loyal people in this town. They made us. They supported us so well. >> Reporter: you know what I just may have a cup of coffee before I come back to cleveland. Enrolled at ksu 28,000. And the average gpa 3.4. not bad at all. Coming up we will talk to the president of kent state and find out what this unique partnership means not only to the city and campus but the entire region. >> Enjoy the music. Thanks.

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News Headline: Charity events -- week of Sept. 23 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bob Mackie Razzle Dazzle Collection Dinner and Exhibition — 6 p.m. in the Atrium, Rockwell Hall, Kent State University. $125. Benefits Friends of Fashion of the Kent State University Museum and Fashion School. 330-688-8899

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News Headline: Student loan debt | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Al Jazeera America
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Colorado is one of several states cross-referencing college and employment data so students can decide if their dream degree is worth a cost. >> They have to pay on their locations the first year out. They want to know they are going to be able to cover those loans. >> Tuition at colorado community colleges is about $3,600 a year. Students should still study what matters to them, what excites them but they should also know going in what will -- what are the challenges they will face if they graduate with a philosophy degree. >> Red rock said it's technical degrees like ones from similar degrees around the current tree are so valuable because industry professionals help shape the SCHOOL's curriculum. >> You wanted to go into -- does he want to go into water management, too >> That would be awesome. >> Lakewood, colorado. >> We have all heard the numbers on student loan debt, roughly $1 trillion and growing, two-thirds of college seniors will graduate with an average $26,600 in student loan debt up 41% since 1989? It's a lot to digest. And easy to ignore if it's not your problem. But consider the people behind those numbers. Thanks to one actor turned activist, the potspotlight is on, we went to ohio to meet the man and see the student debt drama he created. >> I just want to pay off my student loan. Please give me a course of action in best practices almighty god. Hosanna in the highest >> One man, one act, $1 trillion problem. >> $1 trillion. The number comes off of the screen. That's a big number. >> A number actor and activistarian kalasado is trying to cut down to size with for profit, a play recounting his journey through both sides of the student debt crisis. >> Tuition is going up and up and up and the value of the degree is going down and down. >> My student debt came up all at one time. You are kind of looking at your expenses, your bills, and I am not able to pay it. >> His high student loan payments forced him to leave behind a budding acting career in new york and return home to ohio where he took a job that would inspire his one-man show. >> I took a job as an admissions advisor in in a for-profit institution. I enrolled students. I put them into debt in order to pay off my own student loan debt. >> Through one hour and a cast of characters, califato explores a system fueled by dreams debt and desperation. >> A for-profit university we don't call people "people"." we don't call students "students" we call them leads. >> I am getting pressure. Lenders are calling me and I have to put you in debt. >> A dramatic confession, he is hopes will act as an entry point for a broader discussion on student loan. >> Enrolled. >> When the curtain drops at kent state university, students are questioning the status yeah. >> Duh? Why do we have so much debt. >> It made me think, you know, I wish that the government did more to help students with debt. >> I think that when people see a human face, a human experience, they are more likely to take action. >> Califato has been the face of student debt for more than 50 perform applications across six states. Now, he was hoping to take his campaign national by encouraging others to go public with their stories. >> My name is aaron califato. I have $62,000 in student loan debt. >> Working through student debt crisis, a nonprofit he co-founded. He has launched "out with student debt" an olbermann platform that invites anyone to upload their stories. >> I see $0,148,251. >> We owe $81,000? >> I owe about 20,000. >> $144,000 in the hole. >> This tears you up. >> Cal. Ifato hopes to turn the project into a larger video that you to have reform, an issue more. >> I need to do my small part to help tell the sorry so when she grows up, she will have at least the opportunity to get a higher education but not have to go into so much debt where it's destroying her life economically. >> Thank you. [applause.] >> Califato has been petitioning congress, offering bankruptcy protection for all student loans and he wants to make all federal and private student loans eligible for loan forgiveness programs. Califato and his wife are struggling to pay off their own college education by the way, combined they owe $1,200 a month. Califato says one has gone into collection. >> Coming up, how to make a home loan to your son or daughter without risking your relationship. That story and more straight

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News Headline: 'Crow's nest' a big plus: College of Wooster shows mock-up of rooms in former Gault Family Learning Center (Uber) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New college dorms optimize space in former GFLC

WOOSTER -- The model for single-living rooms, to be built around a common room as part of a suite, has been set up at the former Gault Family Learning Center, which is being turned into student housing at The College of Wooster.

Kurt Holmes, dean of students, showed it off to staff members at 4 p.m. Wednesday. Neighbors and students were invited to later time slots, but all were welcome to visit at any time during the afternoon and evening.

"For the most part," Holmes said, the housing will feature single units, although depending on the configuration of the building, some doubles -- "mirror images" -- will be constructed.

The primary concept, Holmes said, "is raised bunks, basically everywhere (in the building)."

A "crow's nest" on the bunk level loft will offer storage, a place to put a television, or just about anything a student wants to do with the additional space.

"A couple of students said, 'We'll put our bed there,'" Holmes said, adding, there will be a safety rail installed.

"These (units) will be built on interior walls," Holmes explained, "built to the height of (the former) classrooms."

While the suites around which the units will be constructed will have no exterior windows, the glass panes and small window in the crow's nest "will look through to (the building's) outer windows."

It has been a "big debate" with students -- about 30 of them on campus over the summer -- consulted on the design as to whether both of the glass panes on the individual units should be frosted, Holmes said, which determines whether a student can see into or out of the pod, or housing unit, from the living area.

Students also suggested they may put a tension rod, from which they would hang beads or a curtain, to close off the closet and shelving area from the study space in each of the units.

Holmes demonstrated where the ladder leading to the bunk bed and crow's nest could be hooked.

Many of the units will be made off-site and then installed in the building, Holmes said.

The inspiration for the design was Little, an architectural firm which has been working in conjunction with BSHM (Balog, Steines, Hendricks, & Manchester Architects) of Columbus.

On the ground level (one of three levels being renovated) will be handicap-accessible rooms and features.

The second and third floors will be "standard," Holmes said.

The common living area of the suites will be furnished on a limited basis, he said, probably with "a couch, coffee table and chair. The jury is still out on that."

In terms of technology features, "some of (the students) have said, 'Let us handle that,'" Holmes said.

Doug Laditka, the director of facilities and physical plant operations, gave a mini-tour of the building to staff members.

"There will be 74 total beds," Laditka said, counting into the total one professional staff member.

Out of 58 units, some will be doubles and some singles, Laditka said. Each suite will have its own bathroom.

Laditka pointed out a few additional features, such as a conference room with whiteboard paint on one wall for note-taking or messages.

He also highlighted a multi-purpose room -- "a hangout place," or he said, to use a buzz word, "chill room" -- where residents can play games or watch television. A kitchenette will be attached, but each suite will have its own refrigerator, microwave and sink.

A laundry room will be adjacent to the multi-purpose room, Laditka said, so students "don't have to go to a dungeon, leave their laundry and come back two hours later."

Construction will in most cases work around the interior configuration of the building, but some partition walls will be removed.

As Laditka described it, "a suite is a big rectangle with pods (units) tucked in. As many of the (components) of this building we can re-use, we're trying to do so."

The exterior of the building will remain fundamentally unchanged, however.

On the interior, in some of the common rooms the original brick and other parts of the structure will be exposed in places, as it is in Kauke Hall.

Construction is anticipated to begin in mid-October, Laditka said.

The College is "shooting for completion by July 1," he said.

The highest ranking seniors will be sought as the buildings residents, along with juniors, Holmes said.

The first year at least there may be an application process for vetting students, he said, noting "we want this to be a success for the neighbors."

Several groups of students and several neighbors checked out the model room at the 7 p.m. session.

College of Wooster sophomore Andrew Hamel admired "the privacy of it."

Michael Andes, also a sophomore, said, "Especially what makes it is the crow's nest. It creates a second floor."

Andes thinks designers "really worked to optimize it."

The design also intrigued Terrence Uber, a Wooster resident who is a professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design in the interior design program at Kent State University.

"Research shows people like individual space," Uber said, pointing out the plan for the former Gault Learning Center provides that, but also prevents isolation because of its common space.

Uber called it "a perfect model for urban living," in which space is restricted and costs are a concern.

He compared it to the principles used in recreational vehicles, noting, "Everything is really condensed. I think it is a really innovative use of space."

Wooster resident Heidi Steiner thought the plan for the building aligns with the way it is laid out, offering a "nice, formal entrance" and a back egress where students have easy access to several academic buildings.

"I think it's going to be wonderful," she said, taking particular note of a student's ability "to close the door and hunker down" when privacy or study time is needed.

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News Headline: Smartphones, point-and-shoot cameras make photography hobby easy, affordable | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name: Emily Maddern CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Tera Allen takes a picture with her cellphone of her children, Alexxa Mowers, 5, and Dominic Shadburn, 3, on the front steps of Union Elementary School in Coshocton.

Here are 10 useful photo-editing apps for your smartphone:

• Photoshop Express (free), available for iPhone, Android and Windows

• VSCO Cam (free), available for iPhone and Android

• Camera+ ($1), available for iPhone

• Camera Zoom Fix ($3), available for Android

• Snapseed (free), available for iPhone and Android

• PicFrame ($1), available for iPhone, Android and Blackberry

• Over ($1), available for iPhone

• A Beautiful Mess ($1), available for iPhone, coming soon for Android

• Facetune ($3), available for iPhone

• Repix (free), available for iPhone and Android

List compiled by Kristin Appenbrink for Brit+Co

To learn more about the Richland Camera Club, email RCC2008@neo.rr.com.

If you ask award-winning photographer Chase Jarvis, the best camera out there is the one you probably have with you.

For most people, that means the camera on their smartphone. A study by ABI Research projects there will be 1.4 billion smartphones in use worldwide by the end of 2013.

Smartphone photography has exploded in recent years as an easy and affordable alternative to traditional photography, said David LaBelle, photojournalism director at Kent State University. Rather than invest in expensive camera equipment, people are choosing to simply use the device they already own for their photo needs.

“It’s just made everything so much easier,” LaBelle said. “Everything is instant. You can take a picture and send it off almost before the moment happens.”

LaBelle was one of the first professors to develop a smartphone photography course for university students. It has become a wildly popular elective at the school, as well as at other colleges and universities across the country.

The course focuses on photography principles, such as composition, light, timing and color, as well as an introduction into the ethics of what you photograph and how you use the photos once you have them.

It is absolutely possible to get great photos out of your smartphone if you have a good eye and a little creativity up your sleeve, LaBelle said. If you need a little help getting started, LaBelle said the three most important things to remember when taking photos with your smartphone are:

• Let the light in: There is no substitute for quality light in a photo. If you have good lighting on your side, you’re bound to get some good photos.

• Get up close and personal: Perhaps the best thing about using the camera on your smartphone is it forces you to really interact with your subject. People are always shooting things from too far away, LaBelle said. If you want to fill your frame properly, you have to get a little closer.

• Anticipate the moment: Timing is everything in photography, but with a smartphone as your camera, you’re going to have a considerable lag from the time you hit the shutter button to the moment the image is actually captured. “A half a second is the difference between a great moment and no moment,” LaBelle said, so you have to be able to anticipate what’s going to happen next or you might miss your shot.

Kevin Wooldridge, member and co-organizer of the Central Ohio Photo Group, has seen firsthand how someone can get amazing photos out of his or her smartphone. One of the members in his group gets some of the best black-and-white photos on his phone.

“If you have an eye for what makes a good image, you can get spectacular photos on your smartphone. There are some people who can’t take a good picture with a $2,000 camera even if they tried,” he said.

But for anyone looking to step up their photography game, investing in a cheap point-and-shoot digital camera or upgrading to a DSLR isn’t a bad idea, Wooldridge said. Once you’ve found the camera that suits your needs, here is Wooldridge’s top advice for what to do next:

• Learn how to operate your camera: As boring as reading the manual sounds, anyone who is just getting their start in photography needs to learn the basics. You don’t want to be that photographer who is stuck on automatic mode and merely “pressing buttons.” If you’re determined to never read the manual, there are thousands of tutorials online for nearly every make and model of camera, Wooldridge said.

• Take some practice shots: Experimenting with the controls and settings on your camera is the best way to find out how they affect your images. Go out and take a series of photos with each image set to a different ISO level or shutter speed. Then review the photos to see how increasing or decreasing the settings change the photo. You’ll soon start to figure out how to tweak the settings to get the perfect image in any setting.

• Join a camera club: One of the best ways to get out into the field and try new things is to surround yourself with fellow photographers. It’s a great way to network, share tips and tricks and get some constructive criticism on your work.

Really, all it takes to get started is to just start taking pictures.

“Bring your camera with you everywhere and start shooting. Something amazing might happen when you least expect it and you’ll wish you had your camera,” Wooldridge said. “Once you’ve been doing it for a while, you’ll find what you like to photograph and eventually you'll start to notice what works best for you.”

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News Headline: Smartphones, point-and-shoot cameras make photography hobby easy, affordable (LaBelle) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Zanesville Times Recorder - Online
Contact Name: Emily Maddern CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Tera Allen takes a picture with her cellphone of her children, Alexxa Mowers, 5, and Dominic Shadburn, 3, on the front steps of Union Elementary School in Coshocton.

Here are 10 useful photo-editing apps for your smartphone:

• Photoshop Express (free), available for iPhone, Android and Windows

• VSCO Cam (free), available for iPhone and Android

• Camera+ ($1), available for iPhone

• Camera Zoom Fix ($3), available for Android

• Snapseed (free), available for iPhone and Android

• PicFrame ($1), available for iPhone, Android and Blackberry

• Over ($1), available for iPhone

• A Beautiful Mess ($1), available for iPhone, coming soon for Android

• Facetune ($3), available for iPhone

• Repix (free), available for iPhone and Android

List compiled by Kristin Appenbrink for Brit+Co

If you ask award-winning photographer Chase Jarvis, the best camera out there is the one you probably have with you.

For most people, that means the camera on their smartphone. A study by ABI Research projects there will be 1.4 billion smartphones in use worldwide by the end of 2013.

Smartphone photography has exploded in recent years as an easy and affordable alternative to traditional photography, said David LaBelle, photojournalism director at Kent State University. Rather than invest in expensive camera equipment, people are choosing to simply use the device they already own for their photo needs.

“It’s just made everything so much easier,” LaBelle said. “Everything is instant. You can take a picture and send it off almost before the moment happens.”

LaBelle was one of the first professors to develop a smartphone photography course for university students. It has become a wildly popular elective at the school, as well as at other colleges and universities across the country.

The course focuses on photography principles, such as composition, light, timing and color, as well as an introduction into the ethics of what you photograph and how you use the photos once you have them.

It is absolutely possible to get great photos out of your smartphone if you have a good eye and a little creativity up your sleeve, LaBelle said. If you need a little help getting started, LaBelle said the three most important things to remember when taking photos with your smartphone are:

• Let the light in: There is no substitute for quality light in a photo. If you have good lighting on your side, you’re bound to get some good photos.

• Get up close and personal: Perhaps the best thing about using the camera on your smartphone is it forces you to really interact with your subject. People are always shooting things from too far away, LaBelle said. If you want to fill your frame properly, you have to get a little closer.

• Anticipate the moment: Timing is everything in photography, but with a smartphone as your camera, you’re going to have a considerable lag from the time you hit the shutter button to the moment the image is actually captured. “A half a second is the difference between a great moment and no moment,” LaBelle said, so you have to be able to anticipate what’s going to happen next or you might miss your shot.

Kevin Wooldridge, member and co-organizer of the Central Ohio Photo Group, has seen firsthand how someone can get amazing photos out of his or her smartphone. One of the members in his group gets some of the best black-and-white photos on his phone.

“If you have an eye for what makes a good image, you can get spectacular photos on your smartphone. There are some people who can’t take a good picture with a $2,000 camera even if they tried,” he said.

But for anyone looking to step up their photography game, investing in a cheap point-and-shoot digital camera or upgrading to a DSLR isn’t a bad idea, Wooldridge said. Once you’ve found the camera that suits your needs, here is Wooldridge’s top advice for what to do next:

• Learn how to operate your camera: As boring as reading the manual sounds, anyone who is just getting their start in photography needs to learn the basics. You don’t want to be that photographer who is stuck on automatic mode and merely “pressing buttons.” If you’re determined to never read the manual, there are thousands of tutorials online for nearly every make and model of camera, Wooldridge said.

• Take some practice shots: Experimenting with the controls and settings on your camera is the best way to find out how they affect your images. Go out and take a series of photos with each image set to a different ISO level or shutter speed. Then review the photos to see how increasing or decreasing the settings change the photo. You’ll soon start to figure out how to tweak the settings to get the perfect image in any setting.

• Join a camera club: One of the best ways to get out into the field and try new things is to surround yourself with fellow photographers. It’s a great way to network, share tips and tricks and get some constructive criticism on your work.

Really, all it takes to get started is to just start taking pictures.

“Bring your camera with you everywhere and start shooting. Something amazing might happen when you least expect it and you’ll wish you had your camera,” Wooldridge said. “Once you’ve been doing it for a while, you’ll find what you like to photograph and eventually you'll start to notice what works best for you.”

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News Headline: Smartphones, point-and-shoot cameras make photography hobby easy, affordable | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chillicothe Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Emily Maddern CentralOhio.com
News OCR Text: Tera Allen takes a picture with her cellphone of her children, Alexxa Mowers, 5, and Dominic Shadburn, 3, on the front steps of Union Elementary School in Coshocton.

Here are 10 useful photo-editing apps for your smartphone:

• Photoshop Express (free), available for iPhone, Android and Windows

• VSCO Cam (free), available for iPhone and Android

• Camera+ ($1), available for iPhone

• Camera Zoom Fix ($3), available for Android

• Snapseed (free), available for iPhone and Android

• PicFrame ($1), available for iPhone, Android and Blackberry

• Over ($1), available for iPhone

• A Beautiful Mess ($1), available for iPhone, coming soon for Android

• Facetune ($3), available for iPhone

• Repix (free), available for iPhone and Android

List compiled by Kristin Appenbrink for Brit+Co

If you ask award-winning photographer Chase Jarvis, the best camera out there is the one you probably have with you.

For most people, that means the camera on their smartphone. A study by ABI Research projects there will be 1.4 billion smartphones in use worldwide by the end of 2013.

Smartphone photography has exploded in recent years as an easy and affordable alternative to traditional photography, said David LaBelle, photojournalism director at Kent State University. Rather than invest in expensive camera equipment, people are choosing to simply use the device they already own for their photo needs.

“It’s just made everything so much easier,” LaBelle said. “Everything is instant. You can take a picture and send it off almost before the moment happens.”

LaBelle was one of the first professors to develop a smartphone photography course for university students. It has become a wildly popular elective at the school, as well as at other colleges and universities across the country.

The course focuses on photography principles, such as composition, light, timing and color, as well as an introduction into the ethics of what you photograph and how you use the photos once you have them.

It is absolutely possible to get great photos out of your smartphone if you have a good eye and a little creativity up your sleeve, LaBelle said. If you need a little help getting started, LaBelle said the three most important things to remember when taking photos with your smartphone are:

• Let the light in: There is no substitute for quality light in a photo. If you have good lighting on your side, you’re bound to get some good photos.

• Get up close and personal: Perhaps the best thing about using the camera on your smartphone is it forces you to really interact with your subject. People are always shooting things from too far away, LaBelle said. If you want to fill your frame properly, you have to get a little closer.

• Anticipate the moment: Timing is everything in photography, but with a smartphone as your camera, you’re going to have a considerable lag from the time you hit the shutter button to the moment the image is actually captured. “A half a second is the difference between a great moment and no moment,” LaBelle said, so you have to be able to anticipate what’s going to happen next or you might miss your shot.

Kevin Wooldridge, member and co-organizer of the Central Ohio Photo Group, has seen firsthand how someone can get amazing photos out of his or her smartphone. One of the members in his group gets some of the best black-and-white photos on his phone.

“If you have an eye for what makes a good image, you can get spectacular photos on your smartphone. There are some people who can’t take a good picture with a $2,000 camera even if they tried,” he said.

But for anyone looking to step up their photography game, investing in a cheap point-and-shoot digital camera or upgrading to a DSLR isn’t a bad idea, Wooldridge said. Once you’ve found the camera that suits your needs, here is Wooldridge’s top advice for what to do next:

• Learn how to operate your camera: As boring as reading the manual sounds, anyone who is just getting their start in photography needs to learn the basics. You don’t want to be that photographer who is stuck on automatic mode and merely “pressing buttons.” If you’re determined to never read the manual, there are thousands of tutorials online for nearly every make and model of camera, Wooldridge said.

• Take some practice shots: Experimenting with the controls and settings on your camera is the best way to find out how they affect your images. Go out and take a series of photos with each image set to a different ISO level or shutter speed. Then review the photos to see how increasing or decreasing the settings change the photo. You’ll soon start to figure out how to tweak the settings to get the perfect image in any setting.

• Join a camera club: One of the best ways to get out into the field and try new things is to surround yourself with fellow photographers. It’s a great way to network, share tips and tricks and get some constructive criticism on your work.

Really, all it takes to get started is to just start taking pictures.

“Bring your camera with you everywhere and start shooting. Something amazing might happen when you least expect it and you’ll wish you had your camera,” Wooldridge said. “Once you’ve been doing it for a while, you’ll find what you like to photograph and eventually you'll start to notice what works best for you.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Media Oxpecker: The End of the River | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: AAN News
Contact Name: Jason Zaragoza
News OCR Text: Every week we round up media news you may have missed while you were busy impressing James Fallows.

Why did Reuters pull the plug on Reuters Next, its ballyhooed digital initiative to deliver a "river of news" directly to consumers?

"The back story behind its decision to scrap two years of development work on a new version of its consumer-facing website is a classic one of corporate dysfunction, neglect and diffusion of responsibility," writes Jeff Bercovici. "It didn't help that the project had consumed 'millions and millions of dollars,' according to one source … It also didn't help that Next was far behind schedule and over budget."

Corporate dysfunction aside, Justin Ellis of the Nieman Journalism Lab says the demise of Reuters Next is emblematic of the identity crisis facing wire services as they expand from their traditional role as a B2B supplier into a news organization with a direct consumer audience: The thinking is obvious: We have all these reporters and editors (over 2,000 in Reuters' case), all around the world, and we're producing all these stories and videos and photos — can't we figure out a way to get them in front of readers and viewers without a middleman?

By abandoning Reuters Next, the company isn't necessarily shifting away from the consumer market, but at the very least it's admitting the failure of a very expensive project and as many as 20 web and design staffers are expected to lose their jobs as a result.

David Carr tracks down the guy who helped create the first web banner ad in 1994, and finds a man who is troubled by the implications of native advertising: He says he thinks native advertising can provide value to both reader and advertiser when properly executed, but he worries that much of the current crop of these ads is doing damage to the contract between consumer and media organizations … "It is a very slippery slope and could kill journalism if publishers aren't careful," he said.

How Upworthy learned to stop worrying and love the pageview: For us, the pageview rat race is actually us doing good in the world. We just made a rule in the beginning saying we're not just going to publish anything we don't think will make the world a better place if a million people see it. It's allowed us to get excited about the pageview rat race because we only publish content we're proud of to begin with, and we're totally aligned in thinking the more people who click on it, the better.

Four takeaways from the loss of the Boston Phoenix.

Leave no stone unturned: "In today's news media marketing world, success comes not from a single solution, but every solution."

"Journalism has to stop mimicking what's happening on the Internet." Highlights from yesterday's Media Ethics Workshop at Kent State University.

Why the media has been wrong about YouTube networks.

How Telegraph Media Group uses responsive design to drive digital revenue.

And finally, "I wish I had done fewer phoners and gotten sunburned on more boats." A letter to a journalism student from Pulitzer Prize-winning St. Petersburg Times features writer Lane DeGregory.

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News Headline: A day for airplanes and automobiles | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University hosted its annual Aviation Heritage Fair on Sept. 14 at its airport from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to aircraft on display, there were exhibitors, airplane rides and a pancake breakfast in cooperation with the Stow-Munroe Falls Kiwanis Club. The band FenderJet offered entertainment during the day. Exhibitors included the United States Army, United States Air Force ROTC, Air Heritage Museum, MAPS Air Museum and Corsair Modelers Club. Airplane rides were offered to the public during the Heritage Fair, utilizing Kent State University's Fleet of Cessna 172s. Plane rides were also offered by the Kent State Precision Flight Team, with the proceeds going to help run its competitive program.

Just down the street, the 13th Annual Stow Glen Charity Car Show was taking place at Stow Glen Retirement Village. The event included 50/50 Raffle Prize Giveaways, DJ, music and food. Proceeds will go to American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association.

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News Headline: Still time to register for Profiles of Ashtabula County breakfast | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gazette News - Online
Contact Name: Wessell, Stefanie
News OCR Text: ASHTABULA - There is still time to register for the next session of the Profiles of Ashtabula County Breakfast Speaker series, which involves a session on land banks on Wednesday, Oct. 2.

Profiles of Ashtabula County features speakers from various sectors of the community who share ideas and experiences on trying to make the county a better place to live, work and play. The series is held at 8 a.m. on the first Wednesday of the month at Kent State University at Ashtabula.

The mission of the series is to help raise awareness of projects that affect everyone and share strengths of the county, according to officials. The program starts with breakfast, a brief introduction of the speaker and then a 25-30 minute address by the speaker. Questions from the audience are welcome at the conclusion of the presentation.

Kent State University Ashtabula, LEADERship Ashtabula County, The Growth Partnership for Ashtabula County and Gazette Newspapers are sponsors of the 2012-2013 Profiles of Ashtabula County Breakfast Speaker series.

The next session of the 2013-2014 season will be held on the topic of "Land Banks: How communities can address blight and position properties and neighborhoods for redevelopment."

The speakers are Jim Rokakis, director of the Thriving Communities Institute, and Dawn Cragon, Ashtabula County treasurer.

The Ashtabula County Land Reutilization Corporation (ACLRC) was officially incorporated in May, according to information provided by Growth Partnership. The ACLRC, commonly referred to as a land bank, will basically hold tax-foreclosed, abandoned and vacant parcels until they can be returned to productive use.

The land bank will provide the county the ability to quickly acquire foreclosed and vacant property, officials said. It will then hold the distressed property, clean its title and prepare it for productive use. The goal of the land bank is to secure vacant properties, which would otherwise attract crime, lower neighboring home values and incur public service costs, so they can be put to better use in the future.

The county will be working with the Western Reserve Land Conservancy to get the land bank up and running. The non-profit organization works with counties to establish rules and regulations for the land bank and then is available for consulting and advise for up to one year after the land bank begins taking in properties.

There are 16 counties in the state with land banks, including Lake, Cuyahoga, Summit and Portage counties, with Ashtabula County being the most recent. Once established, the land bank will operate under a board of directors. The board will include the county treasurer and two county commissioners. The board can be expanded to up to nine people

People can RSVP by e-mailing

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

or calling Mary Collins at (440) 964-4312. Reservations will be accepted until noon on Monday, Sept. 30. The cost is $8.

Stefanie Wessell, senior editor for Gazette Newspapers, may be reached at

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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News Headline: LEADERship Ashtabula County nears Legacy Scholarship goal | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus C.E.O. - Online
Contact Name: Star Beacon
News OCR Text: In celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the LEADERship Ashtabula County program, the 2013 LEADERship class decided to put their mark on education in Ashtabula County. The group proposed the creation of a “Legacy” Scholarship to benefit future generations of local citizens that choose to pursue higher education at Kent State University at Ashtabula. With the guidance of development staff at Kent State Ashtabula, the class originally raised $12,000 with the ultimate goal of raising at least $25,000 for the creation of an endowed scholarship and to assist with upcoming capital improvements to the local campus.

The LEADERship Legacy Scholarship is focused on assisting third and fourth year students at Kent State Ashtabula who need financial assistance to make the final push towards earning a Bachelor's degree. The scholarship will be awarded annually in the amount of $1,000.

Though faced with a difficult fundraising climate, citizens of Ashtabula County have supported the project with generous donations. The 2013 Class is pleased to report that, in conjunction with support from the local community, they are within $3,000 of their initial $25,000 goal to fund the LEADERship Legacy Scholarship at Kent State Ashtabula. The effect of individual donations has been magnified by financial contributions made by corporate and business sponsors, including Chromaflo Technologies, The Composites Group, Complete Energy Services, Eddie's Grill and Wells Fargo Advisors. In addition to these corporate and business donations, Cristal Global has announced plans to further fund the Legacy Scholarship with annual contributions of $1,000.00 in the hopes of providing an even greater impact to future Ashtabula County residents seeking to complete their college degree.

To add to the excitement, a further challenge has been offered to the LEADERship Class of 2013. A local donor has offered to double any contributions made to the scholarship before the end of September, up to $10,000. To take advantage of the generous matching dollars offered by this local donor, the 2013 Class is seeking contributions from the general public to raise the final funds needed to endow the LEADERship Legacy Scholarship at Kent State Ashtabula and to make a lasting impact on education in the community.

Tax deductible donations may be made to: LEADERship Ashtabula County, c/o LEADERship Legacy Scholarship, PO Box 643, 3441 North Ridge West Ashtabula Ohio 44005. For more information, please contact: Laura Jones, Executive Director, LEADERship Ashtabula County at 440-998-3888 or Pam Palermo, Associate Director of Advancement at 440-964-4274

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News Headline: Area educators, libraries observe Banned Books Week (Sturr) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name: Carolynn Mostyn
News OCR Text: One of the most read books of 2012 and 2013 was "50 Shades of Grey," by E.L. James.

It was also anticipated that James' racy book would top the list of banned or challenged books. However, it was number four.

Topping the list at number one was a popular children's book, "Captain Underpants" by Dav Pilkey. This is not the first time the children's book has been in at the top of the list. It has been challenged many times throughout the last decade.

The week of Sept. 23 through Sept. 28 is Banned Books Week. It is the annual celebration of the freedom to read and is a popular week for libraries and bookstores to host events to draw attention to the problem of censorship.

Robert Sturr Associate professor of English at Kent State University Stark said Banned Book Week is a way to encourage sharing of thoughts and ideas – even those that may be unpopular.

"Our society is really dependent upon a free flow of ideas,” Sturr said, “and if we stop that, we are running risks to our democracy and the education of our children.”

Banned Book Week first began in 1982 when a large number of books were challenged in schools, bookstores and libraries. Since that time more than 11,300 books have been challenged.

According to the American Library Association (ALA) website, the weeklong celebration "highlights the value of free and open access to information." Booksellers, publishers, journalists, librarians, teachers and readers are brought together in support of expressing ideas.

Books are often challenged because the content is not suitable for young readers and parents are usually behind the challenges. According to the ALA between 1990 and 2010 more than 10,000 challenges were filed on books. A challenge does not necessarily result in a book being banned from circulation. The questioned book is looked at carefully to determine if it is unsuitable. A wide variety of reasons for the challenge can range from the mention of suicide, contains sexually explicit content or is not suited for a particular age group.

"Captain Underpants" books have been challenged by educators and parents because of the "toilet humor" and the "attitudes" of the main characters. On the other side, some have praised the series for the fact it gets boys to read.

"My kids read it and it helped to develop their language skills,” Sturr said. “It is the kind of book children gravitate toward."

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News Headline: Rosenberry Foundation awards $212K in local grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A $20,000 grant from the Harold C. and Marjorie Q. Rosenberry Tuscarawas County Foundation will help RTY Inc. finish a mechanical and electrical renovation of the carousel at Tuscora Park in New Philadelphia. The foundation?s selection committee recently awarded grants totaling $212,385 to charitable organizations in Tuscarawas County.

Work on replacing worn-out mechanic parts on the carousel will begin at the end of September, according to Carey Gardner, president of RTY, which is responsible for the operation of the Tuscora Park amusement rides, concessions, catering, amphitheater concerts and Park Place Teen Center.

The work will be done by the Carousel Works of Mansfield, which Gardner described as the world?s leading company in building new carousels and restoring vintage carousels.

RTY has raised about $120,000 for the renovation project, which began in the spring.

Earlier this year, the electrical system and lights were replaced on the carousel, as well as a new drive system, Gardner said. The new drive system gives patrons a smoother ride, while the lighting system is more energy efficient.

Later this month, workers will begin phase two of the project, which involves replacing 12 crankshafts on the carousel, he said. Three horses are connected to each crankshaft. Each horse is connected to a piston, and the pistons also will be replaced.

Gardner stressed that the carousel will retain its original character when the project is completed. ?The fun factor will still be there,? he said. He was grateful for the Rosenberry Foundation?s grant, describing the organization as a ?terrific community asset.? ?It?s just a wonderful organization,? Gardner said. ?Without it, the park wouldn?t be where it is.? Other organizations receiving grants include: Community Mental Healthcare, Inc., $8,295.20, furniture replacement for Crisis Stabilization Unit; Dover City Schools, $35,000 toward turf installation at Crater Stadium Dover Tornado Club Project; United Way of Tuscarawas County, $25,657.80 toward replacing heating and cooling units; Kent State University at Tuscarawas, $19,748, purchase a solar/wind/fuel cell energy training system; Claymont City Schools, $10,000, Project Lead the Way; Indian Valley Local Schools, $10,000, Project Lead the Way; Tuscarawas Valley Local Schools, $10,000, Project Lead the Way; New Philadelphia City Schools, $24,890, scoreboards for high school gymnasium Quaker Club project; Trinity Hospital Twin City, $17,710, purchase a Respironics V200 ventilator; Dennison Railroad Depot Museum, $15,954, replacement of exterior doors on the Dennison Depot; Zoar Volunteer Fire Department, Inc., $5,130, replacement of tables and chairs used for various civic and fundraising activities; The Ohio Historical Society, $10,000, rest room project at Fort Laurens Historical Site managed locally by Tuscarawas Heritage, Inc.

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in Ohio (Sept. 21) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in Ohio.

Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Sept. 21 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,537,326) developed by Deng-Ke Yang, Hudson, Ohio, Young Cheol Yang, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, and Rui Bao, Wuhan, China, for a "liquid crystal composition, device and method thereof." The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: "The invention provides a liquid crystal (LC) composition, a LC device such as a liquid crystal display and a phase modulator, and a method thereof. The liquid crystal composition comprises a liquid crystal and a polymer. The liquid crystal exhibits a macroscopic anisotropic property such as optical property in the absence of the polymer under a condition such as certain temperature. The polymer in the composition stabilizes the liquid crystal so that the liquid crystal exhibits a macroscopic isotropic property under the same condition, and the liquid crystal stabilized by the polymer exhibits the macroscopic anisotropic property when an electrical field is applied thereon. The devices exhibit technical merits such as large viewing angle, fast response time, better contrast ratio, easy manufacturability of large size display with improved dark state, easy manufacturing process with wider temperature region, and polarization-insensitivity of PSI phase modulator, among others." The patent application was filed on May 13, 2010 (12/779,293). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8537326.PN.&OS=PN/8537326&RS=PN/8537326 Written by Amal Ahmed; edited by Jaya Anand.

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News Headline: LCDs enter the fast lane | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Physicsworld.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Liquid crystals, used in many devices such as laptop computers and TV screens, are popular because they modulate light in response to switching by an electric current, but the millisecond speed at which they switch can prove to be quite sluggish. However, physicists in the US now report observing a more subtle kind of switching that takes place on nanosecond timescales, a phenomenon that might be exploited in displays of the future, they say.

Liquid crystals owe their light-manipulating abilities to the fact that they are neither wholly liquid nor wholly solid but a cross between the two. They consist of rod-shaped molecules that are free to move, as in a liquid, but oriented in particular directions, as in a solid. The kinds of liquid crystals that are exploited in displays, called nematics, consist of layers of molecules with an average orientation, or director, that changes very slightly from one layer to the next. This is done by exposing the material to an electric field that, in turn, affects the material's optical properties.

Twist and turn

A typical liquid-crystal display (LCD) consists of a slab of liquid crystal that is sandwiched between a pair of electrodes and two flat pieces of glass. Each piece of glass has a series of tiny grooves etched into its inner surface that align the molecules of the liquid crystal and a light-polarizing filter attached to its outer surface. With the two sets of grooves at right angles to one another and the electric current off, the orientation of the molecular layers twists through 90� across the thickness of the slab. And if the filters are aligned with their respective grooves, then any light entering the display will pass through unimpeded.

However, with the current switched on, the layers untwist and the polarization axis of the light reaching the lower piece of glass is perpendicular to that of the second filter. So, the light is blocked and the display now appears dark. There are different ways to then exploit this principle in displays but in the simplest devices images are built up through a suitable patterning of the electrodes, which breaks the display up into discrete units.

Unfortunately, existing LCDs are slow. The time needed for the molecules to untwist can be made very short since it is proportional to the square of the electric field. But their re-twisting is slow because it is determined by material properties of the liquid crystal, such as its elasticity, rather than the size of the electric field. Quick switch

Oleg Lavrentovich and colleagues at Kent State University in Ohio have now demonstrated a smaller but quicker effect. The molecules in a nematic liquid crystal do not line up perfectly with one another, resulting in a finite distribution of orientations around that of the director. The magnitude of this variation affects the phase of light passing through the liquid crystal and as a result its intensity. Since an applied electric field changes that magnitude, it also changes the amount of light passing through. Physicists have known for decades that such an effect ought to exist. What Lavrentovich and co-workers have done is to prove experimentally that it does exist and that it takes place over much shorter timescales than the relaxation of molecular reorientation in conventional LCDs.

The researchers shone a helium?neon laser beam at a liquid crystal placed between two polarizing filters and subject it to a series of sharp voltage pulses. They found that the voltage pulses moved in step with changes in the intensity of the light reaching a detector on the far side of the liquid crystal. They observed the delay between the two to be minuscule ? of no more than about 30 nanoseconds ? both when the voltage was switched on and when it was switched off.

Team member Sergij Shiyanovskii explains that the lightning-quick response time even when the voltage is switched off is down to the fact that changes to the variation in molecular orientation do not depend on macroscopic properties of the liquid crystal, as is the case in conventional LCDs, but on an effect that (very slightly) changes the orientation of each molecule simultaneously.

Speedy display

According to Shiyanovskii, this effect might lead to improved LCD displays. He points out that current top-of-the-range LCD TV screens have refresh rates of 240 Hz, which is high enough for most kinds of viewing (although slower than competing plasma technology). However, to reach these speeds the red, green and blue components of each pixel must be switched at the same time and therefore laid out separately on the screen. Much faster switching times, he says, would allow colours to be switched one after another, using the same pixel, so tripling the screen's resolution.

Another potential benefit of this work could be improved fibre-optic and free-space communications. The electro-optic properties of liquid crystals are exploited to both split and steer beams of light running along fibres, so being able to switch them more quickly would allow higher data rates along such fibres, says Shiyanovskii.

However, while the newly demonstrated effect is very quick, it is also very small ? having led to fractional changes in intensity during the experiment of just a few per cent. The researchers are therefore trying to enhance it. Shiyanovskii points out that in their experiment, he and his colleagues used an off-the-shelf liquid crystal ? CCN-47 ? because it was simple and cheap to use. More tailor-made materials, he believes, should lead to a larger and therefore more exploitable effect.

The research is published in .

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News Headline: Eyes on the skies | Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson — author of “The Pluto Files: The Rise and Fall of America's Favorite Planet” — is known for making science accessible and fun. Tyson speaks at the Kent State University Presidential Speaker Series at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Kent Student Center Ballroom, 1075 Risman Drive. Tickets are sold out.


Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer

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News Headline: Gazebo latest addition to Kent State front campus (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/23/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This gazebo under
construction on
front campus at
Kent State University reflects
the university's goal
of creating a living, learning
community, according
to KSU officials. Tom Euclid,
associate vice president
of facilities planning
and operations, said the
gazebo will likely be completed
some time next
week

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News Headline: Downtown Jobs: 5 Things with Popped! Manager Becca Resnick | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Editor's note: Kent Patch's new series Downtown Jobs spotlights the hundreds of new workers brought to downtown Kent via the city's more than $100 million redevelopment.

Today we introduce you to Becca Resnick of Popped!Kent Patch: What's your job title, and is it a full or part-time position?

Becca Resnick: Assistant manager, part-time.Patch: What's your hometown, and what brought you to Kent?Resnick: Ravenna. I'm a student at Kent State University studying early childhood education.

Patch: What do you like most about working downtown?

Resnick: I love the involvement, and how many different types of people come into the shop and how many I get to meet. It's a fun working environment.Patch: Where's your favorite place to eat downtown?Resnick: Belleria's is probably my No. 1 place just because it's next door and they have a $2 deal, perfect for a college student.Patch: What's one thing most people might be surprised to learn about you?

Resnick: I can beat all three of my brothers in an eating contest.

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News Headline: Hudson HeART walk returns for second year | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson -- The HeART of Hudson art walk returns Oct. 10 from 5 to 9 p.m. in downtown Hudson.

In its second year, HeART of Hudson is a project of the 2011-12 Leadership Hudson class showcasing area artists and performers in downtown businesses and open spaces, said project managers Amy Johns said Betty Farmer. The event is free.

The event's title is intended to invite people into the "heart" of the community while revealing its exciting art scene.

Merchants at First & Main and Main Street will participate by hosting art installations as well as offering specials and/or refreshments at their establishments, Johns said.

"Come stroll between historic downtown Hudson and First & Main to experience and enjoy many boutique shops and restaurants hosting local artists presenting a variety of mediums, not to mention live music, food and drink," Farmer said.

Maps for the event and participating locations will be available at www.heartofhudson.com and in establishments on the art walk, Johns said.

"Each location will have balloons and maps," she said. "Come down, have dinner, shop a bit and enjoy the art."

A kickoff reception begins at 5 p.m. at the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation Gallery, 10 W. Streetsboro St. in Hudson. Maps, food and drinks will be available.

The Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation is the premier financial sponsor for the event, said Brenda Schneider, grant operations manager of the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation.

The gallery exhibit will feature art work from Kent State University graduate students, Schneider said. There will be visual artists in the office space and a musician in the gallery from Western Reserve Academy.

Other sponsors include the Burton D. Morgan Foundation; the Hudson Community Foundation and Leadership Hudson.

The Burton D. Morgan Foundation, 22 Aurora St., will be open and have signed Rockwell paintings on display that night, Johns said.

"We're dedicated to bringing together artists, the public and businesses for a greater understanding, appreciation and promotion of the arts in our community," Farmer said.

In addition, there will be two art classes available. The Hudson Society of Artists will host a watercolor sampler from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Old Church on the Green, 1 E. Main. St.

Participants will receive basic instruction to explore different techniques, Johns said. Materials will be provided as long as supplies last.

Hudson Society of Artists Barbara Faulkner, Gale Haller, Ann Kah, Lucy Karslake, Michelle Knapper, Evelyn Martindale, Rhonda Mitchell and Judy Pinckard will display their work at the Old Church and on the Green.

At 7 p.m. artist and performer Todd V will do a live performance and art painting on the First & Main Green.

The second art class begins at 7:30 p.m. in the studio of Shannon Casey, 70 W. Streetsboro St., Suite 105, where participants can work from a live model using charcoal and newsprint. It's free for all ages.

"Hudson doesn't have a lot of art studios and galleries yet there's a lot of talent in Hudson and the surrounding communities," Johns said. "People can see the talent and enjoy it for one night. It's a great partnership between artists, performers and merchants, who are offering specials that night."

Other artists include Karen Koch, an abstract artists who works in acrylic and watercolors; Alice Kiderman, a sculptor in marble and bronze; Marianne Hite employs various techniques such as fusing, enameling, sandblasting and laminating glass; Shannon Casey creates whimsical and figurative art and charcoal sketchings; photographer John Slater; Bob Pozarski works in contemporary and experimental stained glass; Cynde Hujarski creates jewelry from film negatives and metals; Don Getz creates watercolor sketches of landscapes in a travel journal; Lisa Demagall works with glass; Todd V is an artist and filmmaker; Diane Taninecz works with glass; Meagan Krapf is a chalk artist; Nadia Wearsch is a designer; Joan Colbert works in mixed media that emphasizes printmaking, collage and painting; and Sue Kido creates jewelry.

"There are twice the number of artist from last year," Johns said.

In addition there will be entertainers and performances during the evening. Singer/songwriter Ryan Humbert will perform pop/rock; Zach will bring hopeful and optimistic music; contact juggler Caty Petersilge will perform; Lisa & Heather Malyuk & Jeff Gill will play world music; Nikki and Pat Custy, members of Pitch the Peat, will perform on the celtic fiddle, accordion and sing traditional Irish music; and other musicians include violinist Yang Zeng; saxophonist Norman Tischler; and harpist Hanna Brady. In addition, Sienna Wearsch will perform ballet.

The Rotary Club of Hudson Clocktower developed the Leadership Hudson program in 2002 to focus on building leaders in the community. Each member attends classes to learn about government, business, leadership and community opportunities.

At the end of the year, each class develops a project to benefit the community. Past projects include Taste of Hudson (2003), the Veterans Memorial at Markillie Cemetery (2005-06); Hudson Farmers Market (2006-07); Screen on the Green (2010-11), HeART Walk (2011-12) and Race to the Taste (2012-13).

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News Headline: Memorial held for Taylor Robinson | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Cassandra Nist
News OCR Text: Memorial services were held Saturday for Taylor Robinson.

Robinson was reported missing in May 2013, her bones were located last week in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, just off of a popular hiking trail.

Robinson, 19, was a student at Kent State University when she was reported missing. Her death is considered a homicide. So far, there have been no arrests.

Services were held Saturday at noon at the Calvary Baptist Church located at 442 Bell Street in Akron, Ohio.

An investigator was slated to speak with the media Saturday regarding recent tips and leads into Robinson's homicide investigation.

Check back for the latest developments in this case.

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News Headline: Aviation Grounded by rain, kids still learn about flight | Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch
Contact Name: Feran, Tim
News OCR Text: Be prepared.

The Boy Scout motto was put to good use yesterday at Ohio State University's Don Scott Field as morning showers almost put a damper on the Youth Aviation Adventure Program's twice-a-year event.

In past years, good weather allowed the aviation program to bring in the local Experimental Aircraft Association chapter to offer plane rides, and helicopters would swoop in to give the kids a thrill.

But the morning deluge scrubbed any thoughts of sending Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts winging off into the clear blue or of choppers fluttering down to wow the crowd.

Organizers were prepared, however, setting up a half-dozen laptops equipped with flight-simulation programs.

"We used to do that after the program," said Tim Beach, Youth Aviation Adventure's Columbus coordinator. "But it's kind of a nice fill-in now that we don't have the helicopters here today."

Two local pilots, Dan Kiser and Steve Wathen, started the program in 1997. The idea was to help Wathen's son and friends earn their Boy Scout aviation merit badges.

Both the kids and the volunteers enjoyed the event so much that it soon began to grow. "We're now up to 27 locations in 16 states," Beach said. "We've put 12,000 kids through the program. But it started with 10 kids and two pilots, right here."

The fast-paced event usually offers 10 stations where volunteer instructors teach kids ages 12 to 18 about facets of aviation, such as airport operations (in the airport's old control tower) and preflight checklists (in one of the hangars).

Although the weather reduced attendance from its usual 400 participants, the 120 youngsters who showed up were enthusiastic.

Some stood near a six-seat plane -- the aerodynamics station -- as volunteer Pete Cross asked a small group of boys about the forces that keep a plane aloft.

One 12-year-old, Jonathan Hendrix of Troop 16 in Clintonville, quietly talked about how wings produce lift and about Bernoulli's principle. It was the Scout's first time at the airport, and when asked if he was enjoying the event, he answered eagerly, "Yeah."

"It's amazing how much the kids know," said Mark Sullivan, a board member of the Simon Kenton Council of the Boy Scouts, as he watched the wide-eyed boys. "They have to do advance reading for the event, and a lot of kids are exposed to a career prospect that they never would have given a thought to."

Among the program's proudest products is Drew Fowler, a 19-year-old sophomore at Kent State University.

"I got into it when I was 11 or 12, in the Boy Scouts," Fowler said. "My first merit badge was an aviation badge -- like these guys," he said, pointing to a small group of Scouts peering into the cabin of a single-engine plane.

On Aug. 3, Fowler passed the written, oral and practical tests and now has a pilot's license.

Although the program's curriculum is based on the requirements for earning the Boy Scout aviation badge, the event is open to the public. The next adventure at Don Scott Field is cleared for takeoff in the spring, Beach said, although the program will be offered before then at a nearby airport: on Oct. 5 at Newark-Heath Airport.

tferan@dispatch.com

Copyright © 2013 THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH and may not be republished without permission.

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News Headline: Grounded by rain, kids still learn about flight | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/22/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Be prepared.

The Boy Scout motto was put to good use yesterday at Ohio State University's Don Scott Field as morning showers almost put a damper on the Youth Aviation Adventure Program's twice-a-year event.

In past years, good weather allowed the aviation program to bring in the local Experimental Aircraft Association chapter to offer plane rides, and helicopters would swoop in to give the kids a thrill.

But the morning deluge scrubbed any thoughts of sending Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts winging off into the clear blue or of choppers fluttering down to wow the crowd.

Organizers were prepared, however, setting up a half-dozen laptops equipped with flight-simulation programs.

“We used to do that after the program,” said Tim Beach, Youth Aviation Adventure's Columbus coordinator. “But it's kind of a nice fill-in now that we don't have the helicopters here today.”& amp; amp; amp; amp; lt; /p>

Two local pilots, Dan Kiser and Steve Wathen, started the program in 1997. The idea was to help Wathen's son and friends earn their Boy Scout aviation merit badges.

Both the kids and the volunteers enjoyed the event so much that it soon began to grow. “We're now up to 27 locations in 16 states,” Beach said. “We've put 12,000 kids through the program. But it started with 10 kids and two pilots, right here.”

The fast-paced event usually offers 10 stations where volunteer instructors teach kids ages 12 to 18 about facets of aviation, such as airport operations (in the airport's old control tower) and preflight checklists (in one of the hangars).

Although the weather reduced attendance from its usual 400 participants, the 120 youngsters who showed up were enthusiastic.

Some stood near a six-seat plane — the aerodynamics station — as volunteer Pete Cross asked a small group of boys about the forces that keep a plane aloft.

One 12-year-old, Jonathan Hendrix of Troop 16 in Clintonville, quietly talked about how wings produce lift and about Bernoulli's principle. It was the Scout's first time at the airport, and when asked if he was enjoying the event, he answered eagerly, “Yeah.”

“It's amazing how much the kids know,” said Mark Sullivan, a board member of the Simon Kenton Council of the Boy Scouts, as he watched the wide-eyed boys. “They have to do advance reading for the event, and a lot of kids are exposed to a career prospect that they never would have given a thought to.”

Among the program's proudest products is Drew Fowler, a 19-year-old sophomore at Kent State University.

“I got into it when I was 11 or 12, in the Boy Scouts,” Fowler said. “My first merit badge was an aviation badge — like these guys,” he said, pointing to a small group of Scouts peering into the cabin of a single-engine plane.

On Aug. 3, Fowler passed the written, oral and practical tests and now has a pilot's license.

Although the program's curriculum is based on the requirements for earning the Boy Scout aviation badge, the event is open to the public. The next adventure at Don Scott Field is cleared for takeoff in the spring, Beach said, although the program will be offered before then at a nearby airport: on Oct. 5 at Newark-Heath Airport.

tferan@dispatch.com

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News Headline: Kent Sherman House moved to new home | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Kyle McDonald
News OCR Text: Saturday's rain couldn't keep the Kent Wells Sherman House from making its way through downtown Kent from a temporary spot on College Avenue to its final home on North Water Street.

After crossing Haymaker Parkway, Stein House Movers inched the 1850s Greek revival house along Erie Street, past its original location at Erie and Water streets, and north through the intersection with Main Street to 247 N. Water St., where it will permanently be located.

The effort to move the house, built in 1858 by Kent patriarch Zenas Kent and later transferred to Civil War surgeon Dr. Aaron Sherman, was organized by local preservationists who came to form Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc.

"It's a great step toward a new beginning and I think we'll really begin when we have the final part of the move, when the building is lowered to the new foundation walls," said Roger Thurman, vice-chair of Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc.

Kent State University had scheduled the former East Erie Street rooming house for demolition in 2012 to make way for the Esplande that now connects campus and downtown. Kent Wells Sherman House, Inc. formed with the intent of saving the home after its history was realized. To help the cause, KSU sold the house to the group for $1, assisted with moving costs and let it move to the university-owned plot where College Avenue dead ends, where the Sherman House sat for more than a year until a lawsuit contending the move was defeated.

Flyers announcing a Kent Historical Society fundraising campaign to aid the home's restoration were distributed to onlookers during the move Saturday.

"We didn't feel as though we were justified in (previously) asking for public support because of all the delays and the legal problems," Thurman said. "Now we feel justified. We proved our determination to get this project underway through all the difficulties."

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1127 or kmcdonald@recordpub.com

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