Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Admissions; Financial Aid (1)
Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
College of Public Health (COPH); Research (6)
Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Human Resources (1)
Geology; KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Partnerships (1)
Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions; Financial Aid (1)
College fair for adults to be held October 3 in Tower City Center 09/24/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...admissions process, applying for financial aid, scholarships and programs for adult learners. Participating institutions are: Baldwin-Wallace University, Cleveland State University, Cuyahoga Community College, Hiram College, Kent State University-Geauga, Lorain County Community College,...


Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Portage County launches social media sites for emergency preparedness and communication 09/25/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Next time there's a widespread emergency in Portage County, residents will be able to get updated information and advice on their computer or smart...


College of Public Health (COPH); Research (6)
Cleveland Clinic cutbacks: Are they really Obama's fault? 09/25/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

The Cleveland Clinic, the region's largest employer, announced last week that it was in the process of trimming $330 million from its budget for next year...

Akron General, KSU launch wellness partnership (Alemagno) 09/25/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University researchers who want to discover what motivates some people to stay active into their senior years have found a living laboratory...

Akron General, KSU team up for better health (Diacon, Alemango) 09/25/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

WILL COMBINE RESOURCES TO PROMOTE PROGRAMS AND FITNESS, AND TO COLLABORATE ON RESEARCH Two major regional institutions have joined forces to help...

Akron General, KSU Join Research Partnership Featured (Alemagno) 09/25/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Akron General is teaming up with Kent State University to form a new research partnership focusing on wellness and disease prevention. The Health and...

Kent State and Akron General form research partnership 09/25/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Kent State University is partnering with Akron General Health System to study factors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. The collaborative gives...

Akron General, Kent State Form Health and Wellness Collaborative (Diacon, Alemagno, McGimpsey) 09/25/2013 Club Insider News, The Text Attachment Email

AKRON, OH – Akron General Health System, a national leader in promoting wellness and disease prevention, and Kent State University, one of the nation's...


Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA); Human Resources (1)
Kent State committee recommends campus-wide tobacco bans (Jarvie) 09/24/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Devon Workman and Eliott Golod think a campus-wide smoking ban at Kent State University would be "ridiculous." The 18-year-old KSU freshmen, who live in Koonce Hall, say they're conscientious about their habit....


Geology; KSU at Stark (1)
Fossil record shows crustaceans vulnerable as modern coral reefs decline 09/24/2013 Innovations Report Text Attachment Email

...fish, said lead author Adiël Klompmaker, a postdoctoral researcher at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus who started the study at Kent State University. “We estimate that earth’s decapod crustacean species biodiversity plummeted by more than 50 percent during a sharp decline...


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent State's Stark campus to host college crash course for high school students 09/24/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Stark campus has set out to prepare high school students for college by inviting parents and future scholars to a course on...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Neighborhood plans cleanup 09/24/2013 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

VOLUNTEER FAIR PLANNED: Students, faculty and staff of Kent State University at Trumbull will have the opportunity to connect with local non-profit agencies to learn about volunteer and internship opportunities...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Rosenberry Foundation awards $212K in local grants 09/24/2013 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

...turf installation at Crater Stadium Dover Tornado Club Project; United Way of Tuscarawas County, $25,657.80 toward replacing heating and cooling units; Kent State University at Tuscarawas, $19,748, purchase a solar/wind/fuel cell energy training system; Claymont City Schools, $10,000, Project Lead...


Partnerships (1)
OUR VIEW A wise investment in education in Ravenna 09/25/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

$850,000 FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS 21ST CENTURY LEARNING CENTER Young people in Ravenna stand to benefit greatly as the community becomes the first in...


Public Administration-Public Policy (CPAPP) (1)
Lorain, Elyria health officials continue to discuss merger (Hoornbeek) 09/25/2013 Morning Journal Text Attachment Email

ELYRIA — The health departments of Lorain and Elyria already are sharing some resources, but more work is needed if the two agencies are to join. On Monday...


News Headline: College fair for adults to be held October 3 in Tower City Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - College Now Greater Cleveland is best known for helping high school students prepare for and graduate from college, but it also works with adults interested in starting or finishing their college education.

It will hold a college fair aimed at non-traditional students, veterans and students completing their GED who are looking to enroll in a college or post-secondary educational program.

The Adult Learner Night will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, October 3 in College Now?s resource center on the third floor of Tower City Center, at Public Square in Cleveland.

The free program will include information on the admissions process, applying for financial aid, scholarships and programs for adult learners.

Participating institutions are: Baldwin-Wallace University, Cleveland State University, Cuyahoga Community College, Hiram College, Kent State University-Geauga, Lorain County Community College, Polaris Career Center, Tiffin University and the University of Akron.

Information, including a link to register, is at collegenowgc.org or by calling 216-241-5587, extension 140.

For those unable to attend Adult Learner Night the resource center, above Peet's Coffee & Tea, is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

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News Headline: Portage County launches social media sites for emergency preparedness and communication | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Next time there's a widespread emergency
in Portage County, residents will
be able to get updated information and
advice on their computer or smart phone.

The county Office of Homeland Security
and Emergency Management announced
the launch Tuesday of “Portage Prepares,”
a website with links to Twitter and Facebook
to inform county residents before
and during emergencies. The launch recognizes
the importance and speed of social
media for people to get important information.

The Portage County Board of Commissioners
made the announcement at the
county emergency Operations Center in
Shalersville as part of National Preparedness
Month.

The Facebook page “Portage Prepares”
is at www.facebook.com/Portage Prepares.
It will be tweeting @PortagePrep.

Annette Petranic, interim director of
the county EMA office, said “residents can
go to the online site any time to see the
latest information about how to be safe
and prepare for the types of emergencies
that occur here in northeast Ohio.” The
site includes links to other agencies and
a newsletter on a variety of safety topics,
designed by Becky Lehman, health educator
for the Potage County Health Department.
They are one-page lessons on
how keep safe during different types of
emergencies. People without computers
or smart phones can call the county EMA
at 330-297-3607 or 1-800-772-3799 to have
a copy of the issue sent to them.

In times of no emergency, the web page
and social media will direct residents to
links on how to build a home emergency
kit, make a family plan and learn more
about how to best deal with emergencies.

When the county Emergency Operations
Center opens for a widespread
emergency, the sites will be used to give
residents immediate and accurate information
about the emergency from sources
including the county Emergency Management
Agency, the Portage County Sheriff's
Office, health departments, and local
communities. The sites also could include
information from the Ohio EMA and fed-
eral EMA, depending on
the scope of the disaster.

As part of the announcement,
Kent State University's
“Flash,” Hiram
College's “Terrier,” and
Northeast Ohio Medical
University's “Nate” the
walking whale helped assemble
an example of a
home disaster preparedness
kit, which was donated
to Freedom House, a
residential facility for veterans
in Kent.

Portage Prepares is the
result of a year-long collaboration
of county and
local agencies, offices and
volunteers.

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News Headline: Cleveland Clinic cutbacks: Are they really Obama's fault? | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Cleveland Clinic, the region's largest employer, announced last week that it was in the process of trimming $330 million from its budget for next year — a move that could result in an unspecified number of employee layoffs and thousands of early retirements.

While the Clinic conceded the cuts were, in part, fueled by the challenges brought on by health care reform, or Obamacare, the national media clung to soundbite. Fox News went as far as asking whether the health system was a “symbol for issues with Obamacare.”

Of course, the reasons for the looming layoffs at the Clinic and other hospitals across the country (and the region) are far more nuanced than just health reform. This U.S. News piece does a nice job of breaking down the myriad reasons why hospitals are cutting back.

In fact, a few hospital execs blame their respective states' reluctance to expand Medicaid eligibility as a reason for the cutbacks (a product of GOP resistance). Side note: Ohio, of course, still hasn't expanded the program, though it appears Gov. Kasich could have a trick up his sleeve.

The Clinic, of course, wasn't the first and won't be the last to layoff staff. Akron General and Summa have purged in recent months, with MetroHealth doing the same in recent years. And with the wave of mergers and acquisitions in the works, health care experts have told me further belt tightening could be on the horizon, especially as organizations look to meld their back-end operations.

Worth noting: The hometown paper of the Clinic's latest bedfellow, Community Health Systems, took a look at whether the layoffs would impact the burgeoning partnership. The answer, of course, is “no.” The Clinic stressed the layoffs were part of a strategy to ensure the Clinic was more efficient.

A Clinic spokeswoman told the paper that the partnership with the CHS should help the Clinic become even more cost-effective. The Clinic has cited CHS repeatedly as a top-flight hospital operator.

“That's exactly one of the main reasons we partnered with them,” Clinic spokeswoman Eileen Sheil told the paper, adding that efficiency is not necessarily the strong suit of academic medical centers.

Working well together

Kent State University and Akron General Health System announced the two institutions have formed a collaborative for the study and promotion of wellness programs.

According to a news release issued this morning, Sept. 24, the collaborative “seeks to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles by integrating public health, basic science, and clinical and behavioral research and by developing and promoting evidence-based wellness practices.”

Teams of so-called “wellness investigators” will work on research projects to develop new models of disease prevention and new technologies that support wellness and the management of chronic disease.

Since at least 1996, Akron General has been a major player in the wellness space. The health system's current CEO, Dr. Thomas “Tim” Stover, help spearhead many of the initiatives. The health system operates three health and wellness centers, which blend clinical outpatient services with exercise and retail-oriented health services.

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News Headline: Akron General, KSU launch wellness partnership (Alemagno) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Cheryl Powell
News OCR Text: Kent State University researchers who want to discover what motivates some people to stay active into their senior years have found a living laboratory just a few miles away.

The medical fitness centers run by Akron General Health System in nearby Stow, Bath Township and Green attract participants who are older than typical gym members and more likely to be exercise novices, said Doug Ribley, the health system's senior vice president of health and wellness services.

But what gets them active?

And why do they keep moving?

These questions — and many more — will be explored through a new research partnership announced Tuesday between Akron General and the Kent State University College of Public Health.

The health system and university are creating a joint Health and Wellness Research Collaborative to research, develop and test programs that encourage healthy lifestyles and better management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes.

“I believe the Akron General wellness model is an innovation that will bring us a national model,” Sonia Alemagno, dean of Kent State's College of Public Health, said during an event at the Akron General Health and Wellness Center in Stow to announce the partnership.

For years, studies have shown an estimated 20 percent of the U.S. population accounts for about 80 percent of all medical costs, said Dr. Thomas “Tim” Stover, Akron General Health System's president and chief executive.

The goal of the new partnership, he said, is to develop wellness models that keep now-healthy Americans from becoming the next 20 percent.

The collaborative “has the potential to improve the health of millions of Americans by reducing the impact of chronic disease,” he said.

The health system already is working with 23 other hospitals, universities and municipalities from across the country to help those clients develop their own version of Akron General's popular Health & Wellness centers, he said. The research partnership with Kent State “is going to give us the boost we need to take this to the next level,” he said.

Researchers specializing in social and behavioral science can help determine what motivates people to embrace healthy lifestyles, Alemagno said.

Other experts within the College of Public Health also will be able to analyze data and provide a cost-benefit analysis of existing wellness programs and those being developed.

“There's been a huge void in this area over the years,” Ribley said of the research initiative. “This is long overdue.”

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News Headline: Akron General, KSU team up for better health (Diacon, Alemango) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WILL COMBINE RESOURCES TO PROMOTE PROGRAMS
AND FITNESS, AND TO COLLABORATE ON RESEARCH

Two major regional institutions
have joined forces
to help create a healthier
society.

Officials from Akron General
Health System and Kent
State University announced
the formation of the Akron
General-Kent State University
Health and Wellness
Research Collaborative on
Tuesday at the Akron General
Health & Wellness Center
— North in Stow.

The purpose is to use their
combined resources to research
and promote health
programs, work together on
various research projects —
including development of
technologies — and to encourage
physical activity and
healthy lifestyles.

Dr. Thomas Stover, president
and CEO of Akron General
Health System, said the
collaborative has the “potential
of improving the health
of millions of Americans
by reducing the impact of
chronic lifestyle-related disease.”

He said Akron General, in
a shift towards a model of
prevention that began about
20 years ago, now has three
health and wellness centers
in the area.

“With health-care reform
upon us, the shift towards
the concept of wellcare and
keeping people out of the
hospital is a national imperative,”
Stover said.

Doug Ribley, Akron General's
senior vice president
of health and wellness services,
said the centers combine
diagnosis of illness and
injury, treatment, rehabilitation
and prevention.

Ribley noted a statistic
that 75 percent of illness and
injury are a “direct result of
choices” individuals make.

“We can choose to exercise,
or not. We can choose
to make smart nutrition-
al choices, or not. We can
choose to smoke, or not.
We can choose to wear
a seatbelt, or not,” Ribley
said. “When you think
about that, that's remarkable.
Talk about the solution
to the health care
crisis.”

For KSU's part, Todd Diacon,
senior vice president
for academic affairs and
provost, said that joining
the collaborative is a reflection
of KSU's overall
goal to “add value,” including
in its research.

“We seek to generate
knowledge for knowledge's
sake, but we also seek
to generate knowledge
through the research to
improve the human condition,
to improve human
lives,” he said.

Sonia Alemango, dean
of KSU's College of Public
Health, said the collaboration
helps satisfy the
college's mission to create
public health leaders
who understand the importance
of prevention.

“I can't think of a better
place to train those leaders
and to give them access
to the leaders in the
nation than to have them
engage in this collaboration,”
she said.

Alemango said it also
meets the “second mission,”
to “create sustainable
public health innovation.”

“I believe the Akron
General wellness model
is an innovation that will
bring us a national model
and within that model will
be many different types of
intervention programs, innovation
technologies that
will come from this collaboration,”
said Alemango.

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News Headline: Akron General, KSU Join Research Partnership Featured (Alemagno) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Akron General is teaming up with Kent State University to form a new research partnership focusing on wellness and disease prevention.

The Health and Wellness Research Collaborative will focus on promoting wellness programs and prevention by incorporating research and development.

"Together we will promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles by integrating public health, basic science and clinical and behavioral research and by developing and promoting evidence-based wellness practices," said Dr. Tim Stover, president and CEO of Akron General Health System.

Dr. Sonia Alemagno, dean of Kent State's College of Public Health, hopes the partnership will be part of a national model.

"...and within that model, will be many different types of interventions, programs, innovations and technologies that will come from this collaborative."

Alemagno says a $50,000 grant has been provided by Kent State to create an interprofessional graduate education program.

"They'll work together, here [at Akron General], engaging in work with the practitioners and researchers at Akron General to create a platform for teamwork and for working together as we move towards lifestyle medicine changes."

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News Headline: Kent State and Akron General form research partnership | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University is partnering with Akron General Health System to study factors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

The collaborative gives Kent State students and researchers access to data from patients enrolled in Akron General's wellness programs.

The goal is to measure the effectiveness of fitness and rehabilitation programs at Akron General's three Health & Wellness centers.

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News Headline: Akron General, Kent State Form Health and Wellness Collaborative (Diacon, Alemagno, McGimpsey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Club Insider News, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: AKRON, OH – Akron General Health System, a national leader in promoting wellness and disease prevention, and Kent State University, one of the nation's leading public research universities, have formed a new collaborative for the study and promotion of wellness programs. The goal is to improve health and reduce the impact of chronic lifestyle‐related disease on the U.S. population.

The Akron General – Kent State University Health and Wellness Research Collaborative seeks to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles by integrating public health, basic science, and clinical and behavioral research and by developing and promoting evidence‐based wellness practices. Teams of wellness investigators will work on innovative pilot research projects to develop new models of prevention and new technologies that support wellness and the management of chronic disease.

“Since 1996, Akron General has been a recognized national leader in promoting wellness and disease prevention,” said Thomas L. “Tim” Stover, MD, MBA, president and CEO of Akron General Health System. “Akron General has embraced a model of care that represents a dramatic departure from traditional health care (sick care) and redirects focus and resources toward prevention, wellness, physical exercise and a continuity of care that is unique in America today. The Health and Wellness Collaborative with Kent State University takes our model of well care to the next level, providing outcomes research leading to a deeper understanding of the endemic behaviors and pathologies of chronic disease, and outlining effective strategies for better health.”

“This research collaboration will allow our students and researchers tremendous access to health and wellness data and create opportunities for many significant prevention breakthroughs,” said Todd Diacon, Kent State University senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. “This is a win‐win opportunity for both organizations that can only lead to new and better insights into the prevention and management of chronic, lifestyle‐related disease and good health for generations.”

The centerpiece of the Akron General commitment to wellness is its three Health & Wellness Centers, large outpatient community‐based facilities that bring together a range of clinical outpatient services with exercise and retail‐oriented health services, all in an effort to improve the health of the community.

In a comprehensive health and wellness center, there is a complete outpatient continuum of care, including diagnostic testing, treatment and rehabilitative services. Services include outpatient surgery, emergency medicine, physical therapy, sports medicine, sports performance, cardiopulmonary rehab occupational therapy, neurology and speech therapy.

“The focal point of each of Akron General's Health & Wellness Centers is its LifeStyles medical fitness facility, a state‐of‐the‐art fitness center where exercise programs are directed by physicians and focus on the prevention and treatment of lifestyle‐related disease, illness and injury through regular participation in medically supervised physical activity, nutrition and health education,” said Doug Ribley, senior vice president of health and wellness services at Akron General Health System. “Our focus is squarely on prevention.”

“This truly is a groundbreaking partnership that promotes and advances public health innovations through education, research and service,” said Sonia Alemagno, Ph.D., dean of Kent State's College of Public Health.

“Our partnership with Akron General highlights our commitment to healthcare research in the College of Public Health and across the university, research that is focused specifically on improved health outcomes in our region, and across the nation,” said Grant McGimpsey, vice president of research and sponsored programs at Kent State.

The collaborative will be funded by Akron General Health System, the Division of Research and Sponsored Programs at Kent State and the university's College of Public Health.

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News Headline: Kent State committee recommends campus-wide tobacco bans (Jarvie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Jeremy Nobile
News OCR Text: Devon Workman and Eliott Golod think a campus-wide smoking ban at Kent State University would be "ridiculous."

The 18-year-old KSU freshmen, who live in Koonce Hall, say they're conscientious about their habit. They don't smoke indoors. They respect the 20-foot policy from building entrances, and they make sure their butts find the garbage can.

"If someone doesn't like it, I'm not going to do it around them," Golod said. "I think we're pretty considerate about it."

Workman and Golod are in a minority of KSU students who use tobacco, according the results of a nearly year-long comprehensive survey conducted by the university's Tobacco-Free Campus Advisory Committee, which is recommending sweeping bans of all tobacco products across KSU's eight-campus system.

Responses were collected from 8,302 KSU-affiliated individuals, or roughly 17 percent of the all KSU students, faculty and staff. Of those surveyed, about 21 percent said they use tobacco in some form, according to the report. The largest sub-group of respondents comprised undergraduate students.

KSU President Lester Lefton charged the committee with researching the pros and cons of a tobacco ban in response to a recommendation from the Ohio Board of Regents made in July 2012 that all public university campuses across the state become tobacco-free zones in the interest of public health.

Greg Jarvie, KSU vice president for enrollment management and student affairs, is one of the co-chairs of the 20-person committee.

Jarvie said the mission was to present information on the topic, gauge the pulse of KSU individuals and make recommendations on how to implement a tobacco ban, should the university decide to.

A ban could promote better public health, but the biggest roadblock would be enforcement, he said.

"We know that it would be easier said than done," Jarvie said. "It's going to take some initiative."

Any ban would need passed by KSU trustees.

Madison Jordan, 19, a sophomore and non-smoker, said she grew up in an anti-smoking household. She hates being caught in the draft of a smoker's second-hand puffs whether eating or walking to class and "totally" supports a tobacco ban on KSU campuses.

"I get it's hard because you can't just tell someone what to do," said Jordan, a nutrition major. "but smoking is an inconvenience for a lot of people, I think."

Workman and Golod said they believe enforcement of a ban would be impossible. They also said they would probably find somewhere to sneak a smoke on campus.

"I think if we'd have to walk off campus to have a cigarette, that's just ridiculous," Workman said. "Why should I have to go hide to smoke a cigarette?"

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News Headline: Fossil record shows crustaceans vulnerable as modern coral reefs decline | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Innovations Report
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Many ancient crustaceans went extinct following a massive collapse of reefs across the planet, and new University of Florida research suggests modern species living in rapidly declining reef habitats may now be at risk.

Available online and scheduled to appear in the November issue of Geology, the study shows a direct correlation between the amount of prehistoric reefs and the number of decapod crustaceans, a group that includes shrimp, crab and lobster.

The decline of modern reefs due to natural and human-influenced changes also could be detrimental, causing a probable decrease in the biodiversity of crustaceans, which serve as a vital food source for humans and marine animals such as fish, said lead author Adiël Klompmaker, a postdoctoral researcher at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus who started the study at Kent State University.

“We estimate that earth’s decapod crustacean species biodiversity plummeted by more than 50 percent during a sharp decline of reefs nearly 150 million years ago, which was marked by the extinction of 80 percent of crabs,” Klompmaker said. “If reefs continue to decline at the current rate during this century, then a few thousand species of decapods are in real danger. They may adapt to a new environment without reefs, migrate to entirely new environments or, more likely, go extinct.”

Some scientists predict as much as 20 percent of the world’s reefs may collapse within 40 years, with a much higher percentage affected by the end of the century due to natural and human-influenced changes such as ocean acidification, diseases and coral bleaching.

The study is the first comprehensive examination of the rise of decapod crustaceans in the fossil record. Researchers created a database of fossils from the Mesozoic Era, 252 million to 66 million years ago, from literature records based on museum specimens worldwide. The data included 110 families, 378 genera and 1,298 species. They examined the patterns of diversity and found an increase in the number of decapod species was influenced by the abundance of reefs, largely due to the role of reefs as a provider of shelter and foraging. Researchers call this period the “Mesozoic decapod revolution” because of the 300-fold increase in species diversity compared with the previous period and the appearance and rapid evolution of crabs.

Compiling information about crustaceans on this scale has historically been a challenge for researchers because most decapods possess a fragile and weakly calcified exoskeleton that does not fossilize well.

“Only a scant fraction of decapod crustaceans is preserved in rocks, so their fossil record is limited,” said study co-author Michal Kowalewski, curator of invertebrate paleontology at the Florida Museum. “But, thanks to efforts of paleontologists many of those rare fossils have been documented all around the world, finally giving us a chance to look at their evolutionary history in a more rigorous, quantitative way.”

“This new work builds a good case for the role of reefs in promoting the evolutionary diversification of crustaceans,” said David Jablonski, a paleontologist in the department of geophysical sciences at the University of Chicago who was not involved in the study. “We have to take their argument for the flipside of that story very seriously. The positive relation between reefs and crustaceans implies that the damage caused to reefs by human activities — from overfishing to ocean acidification — is likely to have cascading consequences for associated groups, including crustaceans.”

Jablonski said the study could serve as an important springboard for future research.

“It would be very interesting to extend this analysis into the Cenozoic Era, the 65 million years leading up to the present day,” Jablonski said. “And it would be valuable to look at the spatial structure of the crustacean diversification, for example how closely their diversification was tied to the extensive reefs in the western Pacific and was damped in the eastern Pacific with their much sparser contingent of reefs.”

Study co-authors include Carrie E. Schweitzer with Kent State University at Stark and Rodney M. Feldmann with Kent State University.

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News Headline: Kent State's Stark campus to host college crash course for high school students | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Donna Rovan
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Stark campus has set out to prepare high school students for college by inviting parents and future scholars to a course on college planning.

The event, Get Started: A Crash Course in College Planning, will be held at 6 p.m. on Wednesday in Kent State Stark's main hall auditorium, located at 6000 Frank Road in Jackson Township.

High school juniors and seniors will learn the process of choosing the right college by addressing their needs, resources, program offerings and scholarships. The course will enable students the opportunity of to discuss majors, see what a college class is like and how to apply to a college. Students and parents will also learn about tuition costs, on campus jobs and how to compare different schools.

This event will help advise students on the types of questions to ask while searching for a school; also it will be a prelude to the upcoming Stark County College Fair. The fair will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Oct. 8 at the Canton Memorial Civic Center.

For more information on this event, please contact Amanda Paulus at 330-224-3289 or at apaulus3@kent.edu. Also visit www.stark.kent.edu/admissions/events/get-started.cfm for more information.

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News Headline: Neighborhood plans cleanup | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: Tribune Chronicle
News OCR Text: VOLUNTEER FAIR PLANNED: Students, faculty and staff of Kent State University at Trumbull will have the opportunity to connect with local non-profit agencies to learn about volunteer and internship opportunities available to them at a volunteer fair from 1 to 3 p.m. Tuesday at Kent State Trumbull. The event will be held in the technology building.

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News Headline: Rosenberry Foundation awards $212K in local grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/24/2013
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A $20,000 grant from the Harold C. and Marjorie Q. Rosenberry Tuscarawas County Foundation will help RTY Inc. finish a mechanical and electrical renovation of the carousel at Tuscora Park in New Philadelphia. The foundation?s selection committee recently awarded grants totaling $212,385 to charitable organizations in Tuscarawas County.

Work on replacing worn-out mechanic parts on the carousel will begin at the end of September, according to Carey Gardner, president of RTY, which is responsible for the operation of the Tuscora Park amusement rides, concessions, catering, amphitheater concerts and Park Place Teen Center.

The work will be done by the Carousel Works of Mansfield, which Gardner described as the world?s leading company in building new carousels and restoring vintage carousels.

RTY has raised about $120,000 for the renovation project, which began in the spring.

Earlier this year, the electrical system and lights were replaced on the carousel, as well as a new drive system, Gardner said. The new drive system gives patrons a smoother ride, while the lighting system is more energy efficient.

Later this month, workers will begin phase two of the project, which involves replacing 12 crankshafts on the carousel, he said. Three horses are connected to each crankshaft. Each horse is connected to a piston, and the pistons also will be replaced.

Gardner stressed that the carousel will retain its original character when the project is completed. ?The fun factor will still be there,? he said. He was grateful for the Rosenberry Foundation?s grant, describing the organization as a ?terrific community asset.? ?It?s just a wonderful organization,? Gardner said. ?Without it, the park wouldn?t be where it is.? Other organizations receiving grants include: Community Mental Healthcare, Inc., $8,295.20, furniture replacement for Crisis Stabilization Unit; Dover City Schools, $35,000 toward turf installation at Crater Stadium Dover Tornado Club Project; United Way of Tuscarawas County, $25,657.80 toward replacing heating and cooling units; Kent State University at Tuscarawas, $19,748, purchase a solar/wind/fuel cell energy training system; Claymont City Schools, $10,000, Project Lead the Way; Indian Valley Local Schools, $10,000, Project Lead the Way; Tuscarawas Valley Local Schools, $10,000, Project Lead the Way; New Philadelphia City Schools, $24,890, scoreboards for high school gymnasium Quaker Club project; Trinity Hospital Twin City, $17,710, purchase a Respironics V200 ventilator; Dennison Railroad Depot Museum, $15,954, replacement of exterior doors on the Dennison Depot; Zoar Volunteer Fire Department, Inc., $5,130, replacement of tables and chairs used for various civic and fundraising activities; The Ohio Historical Society, $10,000, rest room project at Fort Laurens Historical Site managed locally by Tuscarawas Heritage, Inc.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW A wise investment in education in Ravenna | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: $850,000 FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS
21ST CENTURY LEARNING CENTER

Young people in Ravenna
stand to benefit greatly as the
community becomes the first in
Portage County to participate in the 21st
Century Learning Center program, thanks
to an $850,000 federal grant that will provide
academic and youth development
services at Brown Middle School and
Ravenna High School.

The grant will be
administered by the
Community Action
Council of Portage
County in partnership
with the Ravenna
School District. Funding will come
from a five-year grant that will require no
matching funds at the local level.

The program is expected to begin by
mid-October, providing after-school activities,
including tutoring, for students
in grades 6 through 12. While it is geared
to improving the academic performance
of low-income and “at risk” students, it
also will be open to those who might want
to enroll to become better prepared for
college.

Superintendent Dennis Honkala, who
has stressed the need to improve academic
standards during his tenure as head of
the Ravenna district, said that he hopes
the program will enable the district to
improve its graduation rate and improve
services to low-income students. Ravenna
received a “C” on its state report card
for its graduation rate and an “F” in the
service category. Participation in the 21st
Century Learning program is a sign of responsiveness.

The program, which will be headed by
retired Ravenna teacher Amy Adams,
will be funded through a $200,000 grant in
each of its first three years, with reduced
grant funding in the final two years. The
21st Century program, which is a national
endeavor, has been implemented in about
40 Ohio communities, but never before in
Portage County.

In addition to the CAC, other partners
in the Ravenna program include Kent
State University, Northeast Ohio Medical
University, the Portage Area Regional
Transportation Authority and the Portage
County Access Network.

Adams said she hopes the program will
“have a huge impact” on the students who
participate in it. There is no question that
it sounds promising, a worthwhile investment
in Ravenna youth that, hopefully,
will bring big dividends in terms of academic
growth.

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News Headline: Lorain, Elyria health officials continue to discuss merger (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/25/2013
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ELYRIA — The health departments of Lorain and Elyria already are sharing some resources, but more work is needed if the two agencies are to join.
On Monday about 19 local government officials and Lorain and Elyria health workers gathered at Lorain County Community College for a three-hour retreat to continue discussion about consolidating their services.
The Lorain and Elyria health department boards both have approved resolutions declaring their intent to study how they might work together.
However, the health departments have not yet scored any money to pay for a feasibility study that would outline how the two might join, said Shara L. Davis, dean of Research, Institutional Effectiveness and Public Services at LCCC.
Even so, the merger talks continue and could move forward if the departments apply for a state Local Government Innovation Fund grant that pays for ways local governments can better deliver their services, Davis said.
The group heard from John Hoornbeek, director of the center for Public Policy and Health at Kent State University, who explained potential benefits and challenges when health departments merge.
“There's already been what I would call commendable efforts to share staff,” Hoornbeek said.
Lorain and Elyra already share the time of Health Commissioner Kathy Boylan, Medical Director Dr. Doug McDonald, who work through the Elyria agency, and Director of Nursing Kathy Loughrie, who works out of the Lorain department.
Consolidation tends to increase efficiencies of services for small jurisdictions with fewer than 100,000 people and tends to save money for the cities involved, Hoornbeek said. There also is some preliminary evidence that consolidation has positive effects relating to services, he said.
It is inconclusive, but there are some advantages to being large and providing services, Hoornbeek said. When combining two agencies, it forces staff to rethink the traditional work patterns they use in providing services, he said.
However, consolidation also can be disruptive with transition challenges for operations and may result in short-term reductions in external revenues, Hoornbeek said.
He added that consolidating organizations does not mean there won't be changes, and if Lorain and Elyria move in this direction there are going to be some of those challenges to deal with.
It appeared Lorain and Elyria would be the first two cities in Ohio to join, said Don Killinger, who is president pro tem of the Lorain City health board.
Hoornbeek confirmed they would be the first two noncontiguous cities in Ohio to join, but the officials would have to work out logistics. Lorain also contracts to provide nursing and environmental services for Avon Lake.
The process also does not happen overnight, he said, with agreement needed by the participating health departments and their boards, along with mayors and city councils. The governance structures also can be complex, he added.
“It takes time,” Hoornbeek said.
Any consolidation also will require both the cities to be financially healthy, Elyria Mayor Holly Brinda said.
She noted between Lorain and Elyria, her city has the smaller population but makes a larger financial contribution to its city health department.
Elyria also has about 15 full-time and nine part-time workers, while Lorain has about 10, Boylan said. Lorain's health workers also are not unionized, but Elyria's are, Lorain health board member Edward McNamara said.
Hoornbeek agreed and said her points “are fundamentally important” in examining whether to join. Both departments are adding to the financial burdens of their respective cities at time when the cities don't have money to spare, he said.
“The blunt truth is, consolidation itself does not guarantee sustainability,” Hoornbeek said.
Even the Local Government Innovation Fund grants top out at $50,000 and the health departments must find some matching funds — likely $25,000 to $40,000 — to apply for it, he said. They also need at least two committed local government partners, so Lorain and Elyria officials must decide if a merger is in their best interests, Hoornbeek said.
“There's no way around some form of a local match here,” he said.
The KSU Center for Public Policy and Health will assist the departments in seeking the grant, Hoornbeek said.
Other participants included: Lorain Mayor Chase Ritenauer; Lorain health board members Mary Santiago and Natalie Rodriquez; Lorain health department workers Fleming Mosely and Ann Boehnlein; Elyria health board members Bob Schloss, Regina Shockley, Suzin Stefanelli and Brian Lander; Elyria health department workers Tammy Dietsche, Deborah Conner and Dave Oakes; and Brian Frederick, president and chief executive officer of the Community Foundation of Lorain County.
The meeting had a second component as the health department workers also discussed strengths and new initiatives that will fit with Lorain County's Community Health Improvement Plan. The plan is a comprehensive guide that other health and public agencies will work with, including the Lorain County General Health District, the county Mental Health Board, Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services, Mercy Regional Medical Center, EMH Elyria Medical Center and Lorain County Metro Parks.
The strengths of the departments include experienced work forces, especially with public health nurses and education. As for new initiatives, they also suggested better communication to inform the public about the departments; expanding visits to parents of newborns; and working with schools, especially on teen pregnancy programs.

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