Report Overview:
Total Clips (25)
About Kent State; Black Squirrels (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics; Office of General Counsel (4)
Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Biogeochemistry (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (4)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
English (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Geography (1)
Human Resources (1)
KSU at Geauga (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Esplanade; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
Physics (1)
Research (1)
Safety (1)
University Relations (1)


Headline Date Outlet

About Kent State; Black Squirrels (1)
The Colleges Most Obsessed With Squirrels 09/27/2013 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

Students at Yale University were horrified recently when they returned to campus and didn't see any squirrels. At least one person quickly assumed there...


Art, School of (1)
MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend – Sept. 27 09/27/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

... For more things to do, visit Enjoy.Ohio.com. KENT Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham — Through Oct. 5 at Kent State University Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. 330-676-1549. Room of Relief, an Installation Designed by Three Master Printmakers: Curlee...


Athletics; Office of General Counsel (4)
Kent State drops lawsuit against Bradley University over Geno Ford hiring 09/27/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has dropped its lawsuit against Bradley University over the Peoria, Ill., school's hiring of former Kent State basketball coach Geno...

Kent State drops contract claims against Bradley 09/27/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Kent State University has dismissed its claims against Bradley University for alleged contract interference involving former men's basketball coach...

Kent State drops contract claims against Bradley 09/27/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has dismissed its claims against Bradley University for alleged contract interference involving former men's basketball coach Geno...

Kent State drops contract claims against Bradley 09/27/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University has dismissed its claims against Bradley University for alleged contract interference involving former men's basketball...


Athletics; Town-Gown (1)
Coaches vs. Cancer of Northeast Ohio Tip-Off Reception on Oct. 3 (Senderoff) 09/27/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

For the second consecutive year, Kent State men's basketball coach Rob Senderoff and his area coaching rivals will join forces to celebrate the beginning...


Biogeochemistry (1)
Calculating the true cost of a ton of mountaintop coal (Lutz) 09/26/2013 Alexanders Gas & Oil Connections Text Attachment Email

...require converting about 310 square miles of the region's mountains into surface mines, according to a new analysis by scientists at Duke University, Kent State University and the Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies. Creating 310 square miles of mountaintop mine would pollute about 2,300 kilometers...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (4)
EAST SIDE HOUSING PROJECT TO STAMP OUT BLIGHT: 09/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...intersection of Fourth Avenue and Chittenden Street, where one of the new houses will be built, directly across from Robinson school. EANDC teamed up with Kent State's Urban Design Collaborative six months ago to develop a revitalization plan for East Akron, aimed at transforming an aging area of the...

Project will transform East Akron; 27 new homes to be built, other plans in works 09/26/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...intersection of Fourth Avenue and Chittenden Street, where one of the new houses will be built, directly across from Robinson school. EANDC teamed up with Kent State's Urban Design Collaborative six months ago to develop a revitalization plan for East Akron, aimed at transforming an aging area of the...

Akron announces a $7 million investment in east-end neighborhoods 09/27/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Infill housing is the first part of long-term project to replenish neighborhoods Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/36943 Development...

Groundbreaking construction encourages investment in East Akron community 09/26/2013 Akronist Text Attachment Email

...automatic garage doors. The Robinson Homes East project is a part of the larger East Akron Neighborhood Revitalization Plan which included help from Kent State University's Urban Design Collaborative. Besides the 27 new homes, the Revitalization Plan will include lead paint abatement, weatherization...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Recent Findings from Kent State University Has Provided New Information about Health Profession 09/27/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...summarize the effects of different strategies employed in surveys of health professionals." Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "An estimated overall survey RR among health professionals was 0.53 with a significant downward trend during the last half...


English (1)
Area educators, libraries observe Banned Books Week (Sturr) 09/26/2013 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...popular week for libraries and bookstores to host events to draw attention to the problem of censorship. Robert Sturr Associate professor of English at Kent State University Stark said Banned Book Week is a way to encourage sharing of thoughts and ideas – even those that may be unpopular. "Our...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Margaret Clark Morgan carved own niche with philanthropic efforts 09/27/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

For most of her life, Margaret Clark Morgan was the quiet but steady woman behind the man, supporting her husband as he built his multimillion dollar company...


Geography (1)
World Series of Wine judging: See how wine is evaluated for November tasting event (Carlucci) 09/27/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio -- In November, thousands of wine lovers will converge in Cleveland for the Heinen's/WVIZ World Series of Wine. Bottles of assorted...


Human Resources (1)
Should Kent State Ban Smoking, Tobacco on Campus? 09/26/2013 Twinsburg Patch Text Attachment Email

Monday Kent Patch broke the news that a committee has recommended products on campus. The majority of respondents on answered: yes.We want to know what...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Cleveland Clinic researchers study health of living kidney donors following surgery; results are reassuring, they say (Maianu) 09/26/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...follow-up, said his recovery has been going well, apart from a little pain and discomfort. ?The first week was rough,? said Maianu, 35, an academic advisor at Kent State University?s Geauga Campus. Home from the hospital three days after surgery, he is slowly regaining his strength. Before Crecco?s diagnosis,...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Laugh-filled musical coming to Performing Arts Center 09/26/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

The international hit ?Menopause The Musical? is coming to the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9. Tickets range from $33 to $48 and can be purchased now at the Performing Arts Center box...


KSU Esplanade; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Kent undergoes a major transformation 09/27/2013 Akron Legal News Text Attachment Email

When the economic downturn began in the United States over five years ago, many local governments began cutting back, but that wasn't the case in the city...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences (1)
New Disability Research Data Have Been Reported by Investigators at Kent State University 09/27/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...than receiving transition services later (i.e., by age 16) for young adults with ASD." Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "To do this, the outcomes achieved by two matched groups were examined-453 young adults from states requiring transition services...


Physics (1)
Cleveland 2Do listings for Sept. 27-Oct. 3: 09/27/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Planetarium. Smith Hall, Room 108, E. Summit St. 330-672-2246 or planetarium.kent.edu/users/planet. Introduction to the Autumn Sky....


Research (1)
7 Credit Mistakes that Could Wreck Your Retirement 09/26/2013 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

...event. A recent study by Demos finds that Americans aged 50 and over have an average credit card balance of $8,278, compared to $6,258 for people under 50. Kent State University researchers found that elderly people are more likely than any other age group to file for bankruptcy. As Gerri Detweiler,...


Safety (1)
KSU robber gets probation 09/27/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A man who attempted to rob a Kent State University student in December 2012, but was foiled by the intended target, has been sentenced to probation...


University Relations (1)
Kent State VP awarded Fulbright (Harvey) 09/27/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's Vice President for University Relations Iris E. Harvey has been selected for a U.S.- France International Education Administrators...


News Headline: The Colleges Most Obsessed With Squirrels | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Students at Yale University were horrified recently when they returned to campus and didn't see any squirrels. At least one person quickly assumed there was a conspiracy afoot, but the university insisted it did not use any sort of squirrel termination program.

But Yalies aren't the only ones who love their campus squirrels.

Penn State University has its own "squirrel whisperer," Beloit College used squirrels as spokespeople and Princeton University cherishes their beloved black squirrels.

We went through and picked out the dozen or so colleges that are most obsessed with squirrels and listed them below in no particular order.

Oberlin College
Oberlin's squirrels have "rock star sta­tus." One of them, Albus, is pretty big in the blogosphere.

Princeton University
Black squirrels are not common on the East Coast, but for whatever reason, there are a lot of them in Princeton, N.J.. There's a myth that a biology experiment is the reason for so many squirrels, but another legend suggests a devoted town residents, Moses Taylor Pyne, imported black and orange squirrels to match Princeton's colors. Regardless of why they're in Princeton, the community loves 'em.

Lehigh University
Happy squirrel appreciation day, @LehighSquirrel! I know that all of Lehigh appreciates you, even though we're all slightly terrified of you. Another Pennsylvania school where the squirrels apparently show no fear around humans, and have been known to throw acorns at students.

University of Texas - Austin
Click here to view video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/colleges-squirrels_n_3984272.html
Students were devastated when a beloved white squirrel was killed in a terrible bike accident. Reader writes in that "every Longhorn who ever lived wrote a Facebook status about it. Head coach Mack Brown was seen crying in the street and President Bill Powers couldn't eat for days. We love that squirrel! And all squirrels for that matter!" (We're guessing Brown and Powers didn't go that far, but point taken that everyone was bummed.) Another reader further explained to HuffPost about the love for these little critters:
The second noteworthy point about the squirrels here is that there is an abundance of large albino squirrels. That's right- they are completely white and have red eyes. Students often refer to these immaculate specimens as "The Albino Squirrel" although there are in fact many that inhabit UT campus. These squirrels are so important to us students that we even created a tradition (or to be more accurate a commonly believed superstition) a number of years back that is directly related to them: If at any time on the day of an exam, prior to the exam, a student catches a glimpse of an albino squirrel on campus, he or she need not worry because they will do well on the exam.
There's even a campus chapter of the Albino Squirrel Preservation Society. KVUE reports:
The squirrels are such a UT fixture that the Texas Exes added info about them in the campus tour guide.
Hook 'em, squirrels!

Macalester College
Click here to view video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/colleges-squirrels_n_3984272.html
Students have had squirrels jump on their feet, seen the critters refuse to move away from them and display "big and bold personalities." Some students consider them the unofficial mascot of the college. "I feel like they have more of a conspiracy going on," Alana Horton said. "If you walk across campus, at least five squirrels will be there looking at you, like they're coordinated."

Mary Baldwin College
Any school that adorns the nickname the Fighting Squirrels obviously deserves to be on this list.

DePauw University
DePauw has some huge squirrels. One HuffPost staffer insisted they are "mutants." On top of that, they're known for acting strange and doing flips in the grass.

Beloit College
Click here to view video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/colleges-squirrels_n_3984272.html
Beloit's "squirrels" made a video to explain what it's like for them to live at the college. The school said they estimate 200,000 or so squirrels are around campus.

Yale University
Yale students were worried this fall that their campus squirrels were the victims of a mass killing by school officials, but the university insisted they had no squirrel termination program.

University Of Chicago
The University of Chicago community created t-shirts with the slogans "University of Chicago: Where the squirrels are cuter than the girls" and "University of Chicago: Where the squirrels are more aggressive than the guys."

Rice University
Rice glorifies their squirrel population. Some of them are reportedly pretty fat, maybe because they fill up on breadsticks and waffles.

Harvard University
Click here to view video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/colleges-squirrels_n_3984272.html
Harvard squirrels are fine walking right up to you, "sometimes a bit too close," as one Crimson writer put it. The university has documented the strange encounters with the small mammals in the Harvard Squirrel Archive, showing news articles from as far back as 1882 about interactions with the cute little guys.

Luther College
The Luther squirrels are also known to be huge, and maybe a little too friendly.

Vassar College
There is a legend at Vassar that the squirrels on campus are the "returned souls of English majors who couldn't find jobs after graduation." Maybe. But there is definitely a "Vassar Squirrel Association" whose president sometimes writes op-eds about human behavior.

Drake University
Drake students tried to elect a squirrel to the student senate, multiple times. That squirrel apparently has some anger issues, judging by its Twitter account.

Kent State University
At Kent State, the black squirrel has been an unofficial mascot for decades. A reader notes that Kent State has:
Black Squirrel 5K Race - Black Squirrel Festival (already on its 32nd year) Black Squirrel Radio - KSU Black Squirrels Twitter account Black Squirrel statues around campus and downtown Kent.

Haverford College
Another college which not only boasts a squirrel as a mascot, but a black squirrel at that. The school also has a comedy group called Her Majesty's Black Squirrels.

Vanderbilt University
Vandy has its own squirrel newscast, a "Squirrelcast," if you will. I guess it's needed since they have a 3:1 squirrel to student ratio.
Click here to view video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/colleges-squirrels_n_3984272.html

Penn State University
Penn State loves their squirrels. They have a popular Facebook page dedicated to Sneezy the Squirrel, a little critter who allows a student to place silly hats on his head. They have the PSU Squirrel Twitter account sharing his thoughts about campus. The university has used squirrels to remind students to drink responsibly. Apparently these are the most friendly squirrels in all the land. Valley Magazine says they aren't sure "what's in the acorns around here, but seriously, Penn State squirrels are a species all their own."

University Of Michigan
The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor has "The Squirrel Club" where students and staff can get together to feed the little critters. "Ready…set…waggle!"

Northwestern University
Northwestern students constantly worry about the small mammals jumping on their bike seats and other "squirrel-on-human aggression," the Daily Northwestern reports. Squirrels have apparently lost all fear of humans and view people as "walking vending machines." As one HuffPost editor attested: the squirrels are "pure evil."

Washington University in St. Louis
The Squirrels of Wash U Facebook page documents multiple incidents of squirrels frightening students by doing things such as jumping out of trash cans or stealing their lunch. The university calls their email system "SquirrelMail." One HuffPost editor who attended the university said there was a legend that the squirrels on campus were drunk, because some of the mulch Wash U used came from Anheuser Busch's woodchips. That editor also claimed to have witnessed a squirrel getting carried off by a hawk, squealing the entire time.

University of Indianapolis
UIndy uses squirrels to combat littering and smoking. They have crazy squirrels. They also have @daUINDYsquirrel. One reader shared this testimony:
We have resident squirrels near Good Hall that regularly block the sidewalk, demanding food in exchange for safe passage. A history professor, who shall remain nameless, once stopped mid-lecture to address the issue. “It won't be long,” he said, “until we see an article in The Reflector about students dying from violent squirrel attacks.”
Did we leave out a school you think deserves to be on this list? Email us and tell us why at college@huffingtonpost.com.

HONORABLE MENTION:

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Morningside College

University of Indianapolis

University of Louisville

Wartburg College

Cornell University

University of North Carolina

University of Southern California

Union Presbyterian Seminary

Rollins College

University of Illinois

Columbia University

University of California-Berkeley

Middlebury College

University of Notre Dame

Drew University

College of William & Mary

Goshen College

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

University of Delaware

Brevard College

Fresno State University

Wesleyan University

Western Kentucky University

St. Norbert College

Southwestern University

Agnes Scott College

Click here to view video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/colleges-squirrels_n_3984272.html

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News Headline: MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend – Sept. 27 | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Once again, the Ohio.com staff has compiled a list of local upcoming events for this weekend and beyond. So check out a few things going on in your community or nearby neighborhoods.

For more things to do, visit Enjoy.Ohio.com.

KENT

Recent Landscapes: Works by Doug Unger, Ben Bassham and Charles Basham — Through Oct. 5 at Kent State University Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St. 330-676-1549.

Room of Relief, an Installation Designed by Three Master Printmakers: Curlee Raven Holton, Veronica Ceci and Francine K. Affourtit — Through Oct. 11 in Kent State University School of Art Gallery, second floor of the School of Art Building, Kent State University. There will be a closing reception 5-7 p.m. Oct. 10. 330-672-1379.

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News Headline: Kent State drops lawsuit against Bradley University over Geno Ford hiring | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has dropped its lawsuit against Bradley University over the Peoria, Ill., school's hiring of former Kent State basketball coach Geno Ford. However, Kent State's breach of contract suit against Mr. Ford himself — a case in which Kent State already has won a $1.2 million judgment — remains ongoing.

In a statement on its website, Bradley said Kent State attorneys “dismissed the pending lawsuit” on Wednesday, Sept. 25. A trial was scheduled to begin Oct. 7 in Portage County.

“It is not clear why Kent State used taxpayer dollars to pursue this case against Bradley and then withdrew it less than two weeks before trial,” said Bradley attorney Bill Kohlhase in the statement. “In my experience, however, plaintiffs do not dismiss a case if they believe they would receive a damage award by going to trial. As a result of the dismissal, it is as if the case against Bradley never was filed.”

Bradley said in its statement that it has “consistently maintained that Kent State consented on multiple occasions to Ford interviewing for the Braves head coaching position.”

Michael Cross, Bradley's athletic director, said in the statement, “Our actions during the hiring of Coach Ford, just like the hiring of all our staff members, were ethical, legal and transparent. President (Joanne) Glasser and all of us associated with the issue have always been confident that the hiring of Coach Ford was completely appropriate. We are very pleased that Bradley University's position is effectively supported by this dismissal.”

Kent State's position

Kent State, not surprisingly, sees the issue somewhat differently.

Emily Vincent, director of media relations for Kent State, issued an email statement that acknowledged the dismissal of the lawsuit against Bradley. Kent State said the action “means it will proceed to enforce its contractual rights against Ford. This next step is based upon the Portage County Common Pleas decision.”

The rest of the statement read as follows:

“Further, the voluntary dismissal of Bradley University preserves the ability to seek recovery versus Bradley in the event Ford is unable to satisfy judgment. In the event that Kent State needs to reassert its claims against Bradley, there is already an established record through sworn statements, witness testimony and other evidence.

“Based upon that record and the facts of this case, the court determined that Bradley University intentionally interfered with the contract between Kent State University and Geno Ford and that such interference was not justified.”

Holding court

Mr. Ford in March 2011 agreed to become head basketball coach for Bradley. At the time, he had four years remaining on his Kent State contract, which paid him $300,000 per year. Kent State in April 2011 sued both Mr. Ford and Bradley.

On July 12, Portage County Common Pleas Judge John A. Enlow granted a request for judgment against Mr. Ford for breach of his employment contract and damages. He ordered Mr. Ford to pay Kent State $1.2 million in damages.

Asked about Bradley's position in aiding Mr. Ford's cause in court following the dismissal of the lawsuit against the university itself, Mr. Cross told the Peoria Journal Star, “I wouldn't want to divulge what our defense or approach is at this point.”

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News Headline: Kent State drops contract claims against Bradley | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State University has dismissed its claims against Bradley University for alleged contract interference involving former men's basketball coach Geno Ford, who left the Golden Flashes in 2011 to coach at Bradley.

Kent State earlier won a $1.2 million judgment against Ford. The lawsuit claimed Ford didn't have permission to terminate his Kent State contract, which was scheduled to expire in 2015.

Bradley says its actions and Ford's actions in the interview process were legal and transparent.

A Kent State spokeswoman says dismissing the claims against the Illinois university still allows the Ohio school to pursue litigation against Bradley if Ford doesn't fulfill the earlier judgment.

Ford's teams went 68-37 in three seasons at Kent State. His Braves are 25-42 in two seasons, with an 18-17 record last season.

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News Headline: Kent State drops contract claims against Bradley | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has dismissed its claims against Bradley University for alleged contract interference involving former men's basketball coach Geno Ford, who left the Golden Flashes in 2011 to coach at Bradley.

Kent State earlier won a $1.2 million judgment against Ford. The lawsuit claimed Ford didn't have permission to terminate his Kent State contract, which was scheduled to expire in 2015.

Bradley says its actions and Ford's actions in the interview process were legal and transparent.

A Kent State spokeswoman says dismissing the claims against the Illinois university still allows the Ohio school to pursue litigation against Bradley if Ford doesn't fulfill the earlier judgment.

"It is not clear why Kent State used taxpayer dollars to pursue this case against Bradley and then withdrew it less than two weeks before trial," said Bradley University attorney Bill Kohlhase. "In my experience, however, plaintiffs do not dismiss a case if they believe they would receive a damage award by going to trial. As a result of the dismissal, it is as if the case against Bradley never was filed."

Ford's Kent State teams compiled a 68-37 record in three seasons. After going 18-17 a year ago, his Braves are now 25-42 in two seasons.

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News Headline: Kent State drops contract claims against Bradley | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University has dismissed its claims against Bradley University for alleged contract interference involving former men's basketball coach Geno Ford, who left the Golden Flashes in 2011 to coach at Bradley.

Kent State earlier won a $1.2 million judgment against Ford.

The lawsuit claimed Ford didn't have permission to terminate his Kent State contract, which was scheduled to expire in 2015.

Bradley says its actions and Ford's actions in the interview process were legal and transparent.

A Kent State spokeswoman says dismissing the claims against the Illinois university still allows the Ohio school to pursue litigation against Bradley if Ford doesn't fulfill the earlier judgment.

Ford's teams went 68-37 in three seasons at Kent State. His Braves are 25-42 in two seasons, with an 18-17 record last season.

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News Headline: Coaches vs. Cancer of Northeast Ohio Tip-Off Reception on Oct. 3 (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For the second consecutive year, Kent State men's basketball coach Rob Senderoff and his area coaching rivals will join forces to celebrate the beginning of the college basketball season in a most productive way.

The 2nd annual Coaches vs. Cancer of Northeast Ohio Tip-Off Reception will be held Thursday, Oct. 3, at Mr. Anthony's in Boardman beginning at 7 p.m. The event will feature Senderoff along with University of Akron basketball coach Keith Dambrot, Cleveland State head coach Gary Waters and Youngstown State mentor Jerry Slocum. In addition, former Ohio State and Youngstown State football coach Jim Tressel will serve as guest speaker.

Senderoff said he actually enjoys spending time with his biggest rivals in early October.

"At this point we're all 0-0, so everybody's optimistic," he said. "We play all three teams this year, while Cleveland State and Youngstown State are big rivals and obviously ourselves and Akron are big rivals. We know each other from the games and from recruiting and things like that. But it's good for us to see there's a bigger picture in what we do, to interact with each other in an area where we're all on the same team and trying to do something to benefit this area and a great cause."

All four coaches took part in the inaugural event a year ago.

"As a tip-off to the season we're doing this event once again, which will raise money for the American Cancer Society," Senderoff explained. "The money raised will get used in Northeast Ohio, so anybody who attends the event is obviously supporting a good cause and helping people in this area."

Several changes have been made to make the event even better this year.

"They changed the format and made it a dinner this year instead of a breakfast," said Senderoff. "Coach Tressel is going to be the keynote speaker, which I think will attract some people. There's a lot of time and effort put into organizing it and making sure it's a first-class event, and then obviously the most important piece is having the support of people attending the dinner and being a part of the event."

Individual tickets for the tip-off reception are $75, while VIP tickets are $150 and include admission to the reception, cocktails, heavy hors d'oeuvres and entertainment. For more information on the Coaches vs. Cancer Tip-Off Reception, visit the Website http://coaches.acsevents.org/site/TR?fr_id=46610&pg=entry, or contact Kristy Kalnitzky (phone 888-227-6446 ext. 1220; email Kristy.Kalnitzky@cancer.org).

The Flashes basketball team is also currently selling wristbands ($3 for one, or 2 for $5), with all proceeds benefitting Coaches vs. Cancer of Northeast Ohio. To purchase a wristband call 330-672-8437.

PRACTICE STARTS TODAY

Kent State will hold its first official practice of the 2013-14 season today, with the season opener on Nov. 8 quickly approaching.

Every player on the roster will be full-go today except for sophomore point guard Kellon Thomas, who is still recovering from offseason knee surgery.

"I don't' think he'll be cleared for full-contact practice for another three or four weeks, but he's been progressing well," said Senderoff.

While most college basketball teams will be together for the first time in several months, the Flashes are fresh off their trip to the Bahamas just last month.

"Our guys are in good spirits and we're ready to go," said Senderoff. "I think the fact that we were all here for the summer and then went to the Bahamas gives me a little better idea of where we are right now in terms of our personnel and our strengths and weaknesses, what we need to really work on as we get to November."

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News Headline: Calculating the true cost of a ton of mountaintop coal (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Alexanders Gas & Oil Connections
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: To meet current U.S. coal demand through surface mining, an area of the Central Appalachians the size of Washington, D.C., would need to be mined every 81 days.

That's about 68 square miles - or roughly an area equal to 10 city blocks mined every hour.

A one-year supply of coal would require converting about 310 square miles of the region's mountains into surface mines, according to a new analysis by scientists at Duke University, Kent State University and the Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies.

Creating 310 square miles of mountaintop mine would pollute about 2,300 kilometers of Appalachian streams and cause the loss of carbon sequestration by trees and soils equal to the greenhouse gases produced in a year by 33,600 average U.S. single-family homes, the study found.

The study, published today in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE, is "the first to put an environmental price tag on mountaintop removal coal," said Brian D. Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State, who began the analysis as a postdoctoral research associate at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment last year.

While many studies have documented the severity of surface mining's impacts on local ecosystems, few have quantified the region-wide extent of the damage and provided the metrics needed to weigh the environmental costs of mountaintop mining against its economic benefits, Lutz said.

"This is a critical shortcoming," Lutz said, "since even the most severe impacts may be tolerated if we believe they are sufficiently limited in extent."

To help fill the data gap, the study's authors used satellite images and historical county-by-county coal production data to measure the total area of land mined and coal removed in the Central Appalachian coalfields between 1985 and 2005.

They found that cumulative coal production during the 20-year period totaled 1.93 billion tons, or about two years' worth of current U.S. coal demand. To access the coal, nearly 2,000 square kilometers of land was mined - an area similar in size to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The team calculated the average per-ton environmental costs of this activity by using previously reported assessments of the extent of stream impairment and loss of carbon sequestration potential associated with every hectare of land mined.

"Given 11,500 tons of coal was produced for every hectare of land disturbed, we estimate 0.25 centimeters of stream length was impaired and 193 grams of potential carbon sequestration was lost for every ton of coal extracted," said Emily S. Bernhardt, associate professor of biogeochemistry at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment.

That doesn't sound like much until you put it in perspective, she stressed.

"Based on the average carbon sequestration potential of formerly forested mine sites that have been reclaimed into predominantly grassland ecosystems, we calculate it would take around 5,000 years for any given hectare of reclaimed mine land to capture the same amount of carbon that is released when the coal extracted from it is burned for energy," she said.

"Even on those rare former surface mines where forest regrowth is achieved, it would still take about 2,150 years for the carbon sequestration deficit to be erased," said Lutz, who earned his PhD from Duke in 2011.

"This analysis shows that the extent of environmental impacts of surface mining practices is staggering, particularly in terms of the relatively small amount of coal that is produced," said William H. Schlesinger, president of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y. Schlesinger is James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Biogeochemistry and former dean of Duke's Nicholas School.

"Tremendous environmental capital costs are being incurred for only modest energy gains," he said. � The new study is the latest in an ongoing effort by Duke-affiliated scientists to better understand the environmental and human health consequences of mountaintop mining. Funding for the initiative comes from the Foundation for the Carolinas. Brian D. Lutz, Emily S. Bernhardt, William H. Schlesinger. PLOS ONE, September 12, 2013. DOI: � To meet current U.S. coal demand through surface mining, an area of the Central Appalachians the size of Washington, D.C., would need to be mined every 81 days.

That's about 68 square miles - or roughly an area equal to 10 city blocks mined every hour.

A one-year supply of coal would require converting about 310 square miles of the region's mountains into surface mines, according to a new analysis by scientists at Duke University, Kent State University and the Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies.

Creating 310 square miles of mountaintop mine would pollute about 2,300 kilometers of Appalachian streams and cause the loss of carbon sequestration by trees and soils equal to the greenhouse gases produced in a year by 33,600 average U.S. single-family homes, the study found.

The study, published today in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE, is "the first to put an environmental price tag on mountaintop removal coal," said Brian D. Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State, who began the analysis as a postdoctoral research associate at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment last year.

While many studies have documented the severity of surface mining's impacts on local ecosystems, few have quantified the region-wide extent of the damage and provided the metrics needed to weigh the environmental costs of mountaintop mining against its economic benefits, Lutz said.

"This is a critical shortcoming," Lutz said, "since even the most severe impacts may be tolerated if we believe they are sufficiently limited in extent."

To help fill the data gap, the study's authors used satellite images and historical county-by-county coal production data to measure the total area of land mined and coal removed in the Central Appalachian coalfields between 1985 and 2005.

They found that cumulative coal production during the 20-year period totaled 1.93 billion tons, or about two years' worth of current U.S. coal demand. To access the coal, nearly 2,000 square kilometers of land was mined - an area similar in size to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The team calculated the average per-ton environmental costs of this activity by using previously reported assessments of the extent of stream impairment and loss of carbon sequestration potential associated with every hectare of land mined.

"Given 11,500 tons of coal was produced for every hectare of land disturbed, we estimate 0.25 centimeters of stream length was impaired and 193 grams of potential carbon sequestration was lost for every ton of coal extracted," said Emily S. Bernhardt, associate professor of biogeochemistry at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment.

That doesn't sound like much until you put it in perspective, she stressed.

"Based on the average carbon sequestration potential of formerly forested mine sites that have been reclaimed into predominantly grassland ecosystems, we calculate it would take around 5,000 years for any given hectare of reclaimed mine land to capture the same amount of carbon that is released when the coal extracted from it is burned for energy," she said.

"Even on those rare former surface mines where forest regrowth is achieved, it would still take about 2,150 years for the carbon sequestration deficit to be erased," said Lutz, who earned his PhD from Duke in 2011.

"This analysis shows that the extent of environmental impacts of surface mining practices is staggering, particularly in terms of the relatively small amount of coal that is produced," said William H. Schlesinger, president of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y. Schlesinger is James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Biogeochemistry and former dean of Duke's Nicholas School.

"Tremendous environmental capital costs are being incurred for only modest energy gains," he said. � The new study is the latest in an ongoing effort by Duke-affiliated scientists to better understand the environmental and human health consequences of mountaintop mining. Funding for the initiative comes from the Foundation for the Carolinas. Brian D. Lutz, Emily S. Bernhardt, William H. Schlesinger. PLOS ONE, September 12, 2013. DOI: � Powered by Content: � 1997-2

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News Headline: EAST SIDE HOUSING PROJECT TO STAMP OUT BLIGHT: | Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Warsmith, Stephanie
News OCR Text: NEIGHBORHOOD EFFORT TO START WITH 27 NEW HOMES, CREATING 'GREAT PLACE FOR PEOPLE TO LIVE'

Grady Appleton doesn't just want to build new houses.

He wants to rebuild a neighborhood.

Appleton, executive director of East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp. (EANDC), an organization that recently celebrated its 30th year, is thinking big with his latest project, which kicked off Wednesday with a groundbreaking.

This first phase involves the construction of 27 homes where dilapidated houses have been demolished - or soon will be - on 11 streets in East Akron in the area surrounding Robinson elementary. The second phase will include apartments for grandparents raising grandchildren, buildings on Arlington Street with a mix of housing and retail, and new uses for vacant lots, such as flower gardens, rain gardens and paths. The project will involve an investment of about $22 million in private and public funds over the next five years.

"This will be a great place for people to live," Appleton said at a news conference before the groundbreaking for the housing development, which has been dubbed Robinson Homes East.

The groundbreaking was held at a vacant lot near the intersection of Fourth Avenue and Chittenden Street, where one of the new houses will be built, directly across from Robinson school.

EANDC teamed up with Kent State's Urban Design Collaborative six months ago to develop a revitalization plan for East Akron, aimed at transforming an aging area of the city dotted with many vacant houses and empty lots where other rundown houses once stood. EANDC purchased 40 properties in the area, some vacant and others with houses that will be demolished, Appleton said.

The first phase of new houses will include 19 with four bedrooms and eight with three bedrooms in five different styles, both one and two story. The homes will be targeted to residents who are at 60 percent of the area median income or below, which is about $34,800 for a family of three. Residents may lease the houses for the first 15 years, with an option to buy.

The rent will be $450 to $600 a month for the three-bedroom homes, which will be 1,300 square feet, and $680 to $700 for the four-bedroom houses, which will be 1,500 square feet, Appleton said.

The East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp. will be the general partner, property manager and service coordinator of the housing development. Testa Builders is the general contractor.

Funding for the project will come from numerous sources, including low-income housing tax credits from the Ohio Housing Finance Agency, private equity from multiple banks through the Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing, a NeighborWorks America grant and federal home funds provided by the city of Akron.

Mayor Don Plusquellic pointed out that the city's contribution to the project involves federal funds that Congress has been cutting and that could be in further jeopardy. He said he wished he had thought to invite representatives from the offices of U.S. Reps. Tim Ryan and Marcia Fudge and Sens. Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman to the groundbreaking so they could see firsthand how the funds are being used to leverage private investment in neighborhoods.

"When they cut these programs, we don't have the ability to do these projects," Plusquellic said. "This is where it hits the ground. Right here. We need to continue these funds."

Plusquellic said more investment, not less, is needed in neighborhoods in Akron and other cities.

"The idea that, in America, we could look at places like Youngstown and Detroit as disposable ... Shame on us," he said.

"What these areas haven't had is the neighborhood development - the 'scheming' - that Appleton has provided," the mayor continued, referring to his tongue-in-cheek term for Appleton's plans. "This keeps bringing people back."

Appleton said his organization is still trying to secure financing for the next phase of the revitalization, which likely also will involve funding from numerous sources. He said he is hoping for many partnerships in the project, such as Robinson school, for example, potentially adopting a community garden.

"It will take a lot of participation from our stakeholders," he said.

Lenn Harper, a resident who lives on Fourth Avenue, stopped by the groundbreaking to see what the hubbub was about. He's glad to see money being put into the neighborhood, he said, although other services also are needed.

"What we really need is a laundromat," he said.

Harper said he also would like to see more of an effort to clean up the area.

Charles Brown, the principal at Robinson, said he has heard from several parents who are excited to see new houses going up and old ones coming down.

"That makes this a place where people want to be," he said.

Appleton said he's hoping the new houses will be built by June. Anyone interested in applying may contact EANDC's property management office at 330-724-1210.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Project will transform East Akron; 27 new homes to be built, other plans in works | Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Grady Appleton doesn't just want to build new houses.

He wants to rebuild a neighborhood.

Appleton, executive director of East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp. (EANDC), an organization that recently celebrated its 30th year, is thinking big with his latest project, which kicked off Wednesday with a groundbreaking.

This first phase involves the construction of 27 homes where dilapidated houses have been demolished -- or soon will be -- on 11 streets in East Akron in the area surrounding Robinson elementary. The second phase will include apartments for grandparents raising grandchildren, buildings on Arlington Street with a mix of housing and retail, and new uses for vacant lots, such as flower gardens, rain gardens and paths. The project will involve an investment of about $22 million in private and public funds over the next five years.

"This will be a great place for people to live," Appleton said at a news conference before the groundbreaking for the housing development, which has been dubbed Robinson Homes East.

The groundbreaking was held at a vacant lot near the intersection of Fourth Avenue and Chittenden Street, where one of the new houses will be built, directly across from Robinson school.

EANDC teamed up with Kent State's Urban Design Collaborative six months ago to develop a revitalization plan for East Akron, aimed at transforming an aging area of the city dotted with many vacant houses and empty lots where other rundown houses once stood. EANDC purchased 40 properties in the area, some vacant and others with houses that will be demolished, Appleton said.

The first phase of new houses will include 19 with four bedrooms and eight with three bedrooms in five different styles, both one and two story. The homes will be targeted to residents who are at 60 percent of the area median income or below, which is about $34,800 for a family of three. Residents may lease the houses for the first 15 years, with an option to buy.

The rent will be $450 to $600 a month for the three-bedroom homes, which will be 1,300 square feet, and $680 to $700 for the four-bedroom houses, which will be 1,500 square feet, Appleton said.

The East Akron Neighborhood Development Corp. will be the general partner, property manager and service coordinator of the housing development. Testa Builders is the general contractor.

Funding for the project will come from numerous sources, including low-income housing tax credits from the Ohio Housing Finance Agency, private equity from multiple banks through the Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing, a NeighborWorks America grant and federal home funds provided by the city of Akron.

Mayor Don Plusquellic pointed out that the city's contribution to the project involves federal funds that Congress has been cutting and that could be in further jeopardy. He said he wished he had thought to invite representatives from the offices of U.S. Reps. Tim Ryan and Marcia Fudge and Sens. Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman to the groundbreaking so they could see firsthand how the funds are being used to leverage private investment in neighborhoods.

"When they cut these programs, we don't have the ability to do these projects," Plusquellic said. "This is where it hits the ground. Right here. We need to continue these funds."

Plusquellic said more investment, not less, is needed in neighborhoods in Akron and other cities.

"The idea that, in America, we could look at places like Youngstown and Detroit as disposable ... Shame on us," he said.

"What these areas haven't had is the neighborhood development -- the 'scheming' -- that Appleton has provided," the mayor continued, referring to his tongue-in-cheek term for Appleton's plans. "This keeps bringing people back."

Appleton said his organization is still trying to secure financing for the next phase of the revitalization, which likely also will involve funding from numerous sources. He said he is hoping for many partnerships in the project, such as Robinson school, for example, potentially adopting a community garden.

"It will take a lot of participation from our stakeholders," he said.

Lenn Harper, a resident who lives on Fourth Avenue, stopped by the groundbreaking to see what the hubbub was about. He's glad to see money being put into the neighborhood, he said, although other services also are needed.

"What we really need is a laundromat," he said.

Harper said he also would like to see more of an effort to clean up the area.

Charles Brown, the principal at Robinson, said he has heard from several parents who are excited to see new houses going up and old ones coming down.

"That makes this a place where people want to be," he said.

Appleton said he's hoping the new houses will be built by June. Anyone interested in applying may contact EANDC's property management office at 330-724-1210.

(c)2013 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

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News Headline: Akron announces a $7 million investment in east-end neighborhoods | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Infill housing is the first part of long-term project to replenish neighborhoods

Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/36943

Development around the city of Akron has for decades tended to occur on the west side and sprawled farther and farther away from downtown. But lately the quiet, east side of town has been seeing some notable investment.

The new Goodyear headquarters and the renovation of its old headquarters amounted to more $375 million in investment in east Akron, and that doesn't count the public infrastructure outlays. Now the non-profit East Akron Community Development Corporation is kicking off a $7 million project to build 27 single-family houses on vacant properties.

Director Gray Appleton says his organization and Kent State's Urban Design Collaborative came up with about 20 other proposals to replenish the area, including "community gardens. It includes neighborhood pathways. It includes some different kinds of mixed development and inter-generational housing. This is where grandparents are raising their grandchildren. So we're going to build some more single-family homes as well but a number of other thingst.”
And to accomplish more, Appleton says he'll look to the neighbors themselves.

“We may ask some of the schools to take on a project. For instance, if the project calls for a community garden and that vacant lot is near a school, we might ask that school to take on that project or a church to take on that project.

"So we're going to pool together a partnership here of stakeholders in this community. “

Much of the money for the new housing comes from the sale of Low Income Housing Tax Credits. To meet the tax incentive requirements, the East Akron CDC will lease the new homes for 15 years and then allow renters the option to buy.

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News Headline: Groundbreaking construction encourages investment in East Akron community | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akronist
Contact Name: Chris Miller
News OCR Text: For the past 30 years, the East Akron Neighborhood Development Corporation (EANDC) has been bringing revitalization home to Summit County. On Sept. 25, 2013, EANDC broke ground on Robinson Homes East, a 27 single-family-home, development which will be central to the East Akron Neighborhood Revitalization Plan that will include housing rehabilitation efforts and vacant lot reuse.

"Since 1982, EANDC has worked successfully to strengthen the Akron-area by rebuilding neighborhoods, protecting property values and allowing residents to achieve the American dream," said EANDC Executive Director, Grady Appleton. "The Robinson Homes East is our latest effort to strengthen this community by adding new, high quality housing options."

The 27 unit infill housing project is for the Robinson School area, constructed on 11 different streets in the East Akron neighborhood. It will feature 19, 4-bedroom and 8, 3-bedroom homes. The homes will have four different floor plans and five homes will be single story ADA homes. Applebee said the rent for a three bedroom home will range from $450-$590 and $675-$690 for a four bedroom home. All 27 homes will have a detached one-car or two-car garage.

The unit amenities include a range, refrigerator, dishwasher, pantry, basement, carpet/vinyl flooring, central heat and air conditioning (including a 92% efficient furnace), a 40-gallon high efficiency water heater, porch with column beam, patio, window blinds, washer/dryer hook-ups and automatic garage doors.

The Robinson Homes East project is a part of the larger East Akron Neighborhood Revitalization Plan which included help from Kent State University's Urban Design Collaborative. Besides the 27 new homes, the Revitalization Plan will include lead paint abatement, weatherization and vacant lot management and reuse.

"We are spearheading a $7 million dollar investment in this community," Applebee said. "Today's groundbreaking ceremony is the first step in implementing this neighborhood. The East Akron Plan will change the look of this community, strengthen the bottom lines of property owners and encourage new investment – large and small."

Mr. Appleton was joined by Akron Mayor Donald L. Plusquellic. Representatives from the development's financial partners; Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing, Ohio Housing Finance Agency, Huntington Bank and NeighborWorks America made brief remarks followed by the traditional "overturning dirt" shovel photo opportunity.

Testa Builders is the general contractor for the project while RDL Architects, Inc. is the project architect. Constructed started in August and completion is anticipated by June 30, 2014.

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News Headline: Recent Findings from Kent State University Has Provided New Information about Health Profession | Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers detail new data in Health and Medicine. According to news reporting out of Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Surveys involving health care providers are characterized by low and declining response rates (RRs), and researchers have utilized various strategies to increase survey RRs among health professionals. Based on 48 studies with 156 subgroups of within-study conditions, a multilevel meta-regression analysis was conducted to summarize the effects of different strategies employed in surveys of health professionals."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "An estimated overall survey RR among health professionals was 0.53 with a significant downward trend during the last half century. Of the variables that were examined, mode of data collection, incentives, and number of follow-up attempts were all found to be significantly related to RR. The mail survey mode was more effective in improving RR, compared to the online or web survey mode. Relative to the non-incentive subgroups, subgroups receiving monetary incentives were more likely to respond, while nonmonetary incentive groups were not significantly different from non-incentive groups. When number of follow-ups was considered, the one or two attempts of follow-up were found to be effective in increasing survey RR among health professionals."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Having noted challenges associated with surveying health professionals, researchers must make every effort to improve access to their target population by implementing appropriate incentive- and design-based strategies demonstrated to improve participation rates."

For more information on this research see: Enhancing Surveys of Health Care Professionals: A Meta-Analysis of Techniques to Improve Response. Evaluation & the Health Professions, 2013;36(3):382-407. Evaluation & the Health Professions can be contacted at: Sage Publications Inc, 2455 Teller Rd, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320, USA. (Sage Publications - www.sagepub.com/; Evaluation & the Health Professions - ehp.sagepub.com)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y.I. Cho, Kent State University, Coll Public Hlth, Dept. of Hlth Policy & Management, Kent, OH 44242, United States. Additional authors for this research include T.P. Johnson and J.B. VanGeest.

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Area educators, libraries observe Banned Books Week (Sturr) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name: Carolynn Mostyn
News OCR Text: One of the most read books of 2012 and 2013 was "50 Shades of Grey," by E.L. James.

It was also anticipated that James' racy book would top the list of banned or challenged books. However, it was number four.

Topping the list at number one was a popular children's book, "Captain Underpants" by Dav Pilkey. This is not the first time the children's book has been in at the top of the list. It has been challenged many times throughout the last decade.

The week of Sept. 23 through Sept. 28 is Banned Books Week. It is the annual celebration of the freedom to read and is a popular week for libraries and bookstores to host events to draw attention to the problem of censorship.

Robert Sturr Associate professor of English at Kent State University Stark said Banned Book Week is a way to encourage sharing of thoughts and ideas – even those that may be unpopular.

"Our society is really dependent upon a free flow of ideas,” Sturr said, “and if we stop that, we are running risks to our democracy and the education of our children.”

Banned Book Week first began in 1982 when a large number of books were challenged in schools, bookstores and libraries. Since that time more than 11,300 books have been challenged.

According to the American Library Association (ALA) website, the weeklong celebration  "highlights the value of free and open access to information." Booksellers, publishers, journalists, librarians, teachers and readers are brought together in support of expressing ideas.

Books are often challenged because the content is not suitable for young readers and parents are usually behind the challenges. According to the ALA between 1990 and 2010 more than 10,000 challenges were filed on books. A challenge does not necessarily result in a book being banned from circulation. The questioned book is looked at carefully to determine if it is unsuitable. A wide variety of reasons for the challenge can range from the mention of suicide, contains sexually explicit content or is not suited for a particular age group.

"Captain Underpants" books have been challenged by educators and parents because of the "toilet humor" and the "attitudes" of the main characters. On the other side,  some have praised the series for the fact it gets boys to read.

"My kids read it and it helped to develop their language skills,” Sturr said. “It is the kind of book children gravitate toward."

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News Headline: Margaret Clark Morgan carved own niche with philanthropic efforts | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For most of her life, Margaret Clark Morgan was the quiet but steady woman behind the man, supporting her husband as he built his multimillion dollar company and dispensed millions to entrepreneur programs through a foundation in his name.

But when Burton D. Morgan funded a second foundation in his wife's name, she was ready to spread her own philanthropic wings.

“Being a modest person with a thrifty nature, mom was surprised and a little overwhelmed by her husband's generous action done in honor of her,” daughter Suzanne Morgan told the Beacon Journal on Thursday. “She was grateful that she could have her own foundation to support her own interests more fully.”

Mrs. Morgan — “Peg” to her friends and family — died Sunday in Santa Rosa, Calif., where she moved in 2011 to be near one of her children. She was 95.

A memorial service for the longtime Hudson resident will be held at 11 a.m. Oct. 9 at First Congregational Church of Hudson.

Mrs. Morgan was active in the Hudson-based Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation after it was formed in 2001, participating in board meetings and voicing her opinions and ideas. The organization awards grants in the areas of mental health, education and the arts.

“Mom read her grant materials with me through the years that she participated on the board,” Suzanne Morgan said. “We would discuss them together, talk them over and agree most of the time on how we would present the ‘Morgan' opinion.”

When her husband died in 2003, his will split about $100 million between his wife's foundation and his own Burton D. Morgan Foundation, whose mission is to preserve the free enterprise system.

The fact that he left both foundations an equal amount of assets sent his wife “the message that he wanted her to be an equal partner in their philanthropic efforts,” their daughter said.

Mrs. Morgan was born on Sept. 5, 1918, in Roanoke, Va., but she grew up in Kent and graduated from Kent Roosevelt High School as valedictorian of her class.

“Her father, though glad that she had done so well, had to tell her that he could not afford to send her to college,” the family said in a statement. But a one-year scholarship came with being the valedictorian, so she enrolled at Kent State University while working to earn money to complete her education. She eventually received a bachelor's degree from Miami University.

After graduation, she took a job as an executive secretary at B.F. Goodrich Co. in Akron. That's where she met her future husband, Burton D. Morgan, who was an engineer in the synthetic rubber department.

The couple married in 1941, and ended up living in five states during their first 17 years of marriage as Mr. Morgan “changed jobs frequently to explore the area of plastics and adhesives.”

When they finally settled down in 1959, they chose Hudson.

Mrs. Morgan's great-great-grandparents settled in Hudson in 1805, just six years after David Hudson established the town. Her grandparents were active in the local Underground Railroad, which helped Southern slaves escape to Canada. She was also a descendant of abolitionist John Brown.

Burt Morgan founded the Morgan Adhesives Co. in Stow, a company later renamed MACtac and now connected with the publicly traded Bemis Co. of Wisconsin.

“Being the maverick entrepreneur that Burt was, Peg was his quiet but firm companion along the way,” the family said.

The couple raised three children while Mrs. Morgan took an interest in supporting Blossom Music Center; Hopewell, a therapeutic farm community; and the fashion school at Kent State University.

They also traveled extensively in later years to many countries, mostly with the World Business Council, while documenting their adventures with photos and logs.

Mrs. Morgan also was preceded in death by a granddaughter, Deborah Morgan.

She is survived by her three children: Suzanne, Mary and Dave; four grandchildren, Mark Robeson III, Keith Riley, Brooke Riley and Tina Morgan; and four great-grandchildren, Tanner, Logan and Max Robeson and Colton Samuel Lewis.

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News Headline: World Series of Wine judging: See how wine is evaluated for November tasting event (Carlucci) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: INDEPENDENCE, Ohio -- In November, thousands of wine lovers will converge in Cleveland for the Heinen's/WVIZ World Series of Wine. Bottles of assorted varietals will be displayed, opened and tasted. Some special ones will have medals draped around their bottle necks and stand like proud Olympians wearing gold, silver or bronze.

Those medals aren't put there arbitrarily, and they aren't simply slapped on by the winemaker or grape grower.

They are earned - in a warehouse, of all places.

Thursday, more than two dozen knowledgeable wine enthusiasts sniffed, swirled, tasted and - yes - delicately spit wine in a classroom setting at Heidelberg Distributing Co.'s warehouse and offices in Independence.

In a room as quiet as a library, the group – made up of teachers, bloggers, wine-bar and restaurant owners and others – sat one person per table. At any given time, two to six glasses of wine stood in front of each, accompanied by tasting notes, a water bottle and a plastic red dump glass.

Tasters – most of whom are based in Northeast Ohio - sipped wines in 16 varietal categories broken into three price ranges ($15.99 and under, $16-$24.99, and $25 and over). They endure five hours of tasting, broken by a lunch break.

“Your palate's going to be tired by the end of the day,” said Ella Fong, special events and project manager for WVIZ/PBS and WCPN Ideastream. The public-broadcasting entity is the beneficiary of the upcoming 18th World Series of Wine event. Thursday's judging was the fourth year of competition. Fong said November's two-day event is one of the largest wine tastings east of Chicago.

“There is a true, technical logic in the way they set these wines up,” Fong said.

View full sizeThe marked boxes are part of an organizational system to get the right ones served at the right time for the judging.
Marc Bona, The Plain Dealer The person who prepares the wines for judging is Mike McKenney, Heidelberg's customer development manager. The assembly-line-like process of how the wines are received resembles a postal-service operation:

Suppliers – wineries – tell distributors what they want to be included among the 200 wines evaluated. They are grouped by varietal and price. Each wine must have a minimum 75 percent of its origin grape. Most important is inventory. Each winery must have enough of its bottles in stock to be delivered to the World Series of Wine.

Cases of red wines are opened, reboxed and marked for specific flights to be served to the judges. Kitchen temperature is set for 59 degrees, and the room is locked. White wines are stored in the warehouse's massive walk-in beer cooler, sharing space with thousands of kegs.

“We really try to keep integrity intact,” McKenney said.

Early in the morning three workers give the wines a “quality-control look,” he said. No one – judges, restaurant customers or those of us at home – wants to open a bottle and find it is corked. This process guards against that.

All-purpose glasses are shuttled in and out from the judges' tables and used for all categories, except champagne, which takes flutes.

One of the judges, Tony Carlucci, is an enologist and instructor at Kent State University who teaches classes on the geography of wine and coordinates “field-experience” winery trips. He lauds the importance of “sensory evaluation” from the blind-tasting process.

“When you taste blind, that's where you use all your senses,” he said. “It's very cool when you do tastings to do it blind, when you're not reading labels. You can pre-judge [with labels].

“It keeps your palate sharp.”

Ed Thompkins, beer and wine buyer for Heinen's, echoed Carlucci's sentiments about the process. Usually he evaluates wines for what will sell at a store. Thursday, though, he judged wine “on its own merits.”

“It's great to taste wine on a truly professional level,” he said. “It's a totally different perspective.”

In all, an undetermined number of wines will be scored high enough to be deemed winners and included among the 450 to 500 bottles at the World Series of Wine.

One final, and very trivial, note: Should the playoff-eligible Cleveland Indians make it to their own World Series, and if the series goes seven games, World Series of Wine organizers will have to shift into high gear. They will have less than 24 hours to make sure the Terrace Club is cleaned and ready for the first of the three tastings.

Heinen's/WVIZ World Series of Wine

What: The annual World Series of Wine, a fundraiser for WVIZ/PBS ideastream, offers three tasting sessions over two days. Seminars also will be offered.

Where: Progressive Field's Terrace Club, 2401 Ontario St., Cleveland.

When: 7:30-10:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1; 1-4 p.m. and 7:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2.

Cost: $75.

Info: wviz.org.

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News Headline: Should Kent State Ban Smoking, Tobacco on Campus? | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Monday Kent Patch broke the news that a committee has recommended products on campus.

The majority of respondents on answered: yes.We want to know what you think. Tell us in the comments below if you think the university should ban smoking and tobacco products.

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News Headline: Cleveland Clinic researchers study health of living kidney donors following surgery; results are reassuring, they say (Maianu) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston conducted the study, which involved analyzing health data from more than 69,000 living donors from 1998 to 2010 (representing 89 percent of such donors in the United States during that time).

While the data showed that patients experienced fewer medical complications over time, it also revealed that other health issues affecting donors -- depression, hypothyroidism, hypertension, and obesity -- have increased slightly.

More than one-third of kidney transplants in the U.S. involve organs coming from living donors. ?Unfortunately, there are only limited studies [that focus on] the health of living donors long-term and even short-term,? Jesse Schold, assistant staff at the Clinic?s Lerner Research Institute, and lead study author, told The Plain Dealer. ?Part of that is because our traditional national registries have a hard time capturing that data over an extended period of time.? One of the motivations for pursuing the research, Schold said, was to try to fill in some of that information gap, and to underscore the importance of long-term patient follow-up by hospital transplant teams.

To evaluate trends in the illnesses and complications experienced by donors, the researchers studied the health of more than 69,000 donors. They used data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a public database that each year compiles information from roughly 8 million hospital stays; and the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients.

The average age of the donors was about 40 years old. More than two-thirds of them were Caucasian, with 59 percent of donors female.

Among the major findings: ? Complications declined over time, from 10.1 percent in 1998 to 7.6 percent in 2010. ? Hospital length-of-stay following donation declined over time, from an average of 3.7 days in 1998 to 2.5 days in 2010. ? The rates of complications and length-of-stay for donors were comparable with other relatively low-risk abdominal surgeries that required the removal of an organ, such as appendectomies. ? Depression, hypothyroidism, hypertension, and obesity increased slightly over time. The ?fairly reassuring? findings back up anecdotal evidence and data collected from studies conducted at individual transplant centers, Schold said.

The increase in depression, hypertension (high blood pressure) and other conditions might be interpreted in two ways, he said. ?We might be doing a better job of capturing and documenting those risk factors, [or] there may be an increased prevalence,? he said, adding that either way, it provides critical information for researchers so they know to monitor those health issues closely.

For the next year, the transplant team at the Cleveland Clinic will keep tabs on the health of Octavian Maianu of Macedonia. On Aug. 20 he donated a kidney to his close friend Ryan Crecco, who 16 months before found out he was suffering from kidney failure.

Maianu, who has had his one-month follow-up, said his recovery has been going well, apart from a little pain and discomfort. ?The first week was rough,? said Maianu, 35, an academic advisor at Kent State University?s Geauga Campus. Home from the hospital three days after surgery, he is slowly regaining his strength. Before Crecco?s diagnosis, Maianu said he never thought about kidney disease or kidney transplant, much less becoming a donor. Of the countless friends who stepped up for the initial evaluation, Maianu and his wife, Jennifer, were the most promising matches; he turned out to be the best candidate.

Maianu is one of more than 1,500 living kidney donors to undergo surgery since the Clinic's kidney transplant program began in 1963. The Clinic has performed more than 4,200 kidney transplants in that time. ?Honestly, I feel like I never had surgery,? he said earlier this week. ?My quality of life hasn?t changed at all.? It?s a responsibility of the transplant community to continue paying attention to and evaluate the health of living kidney donors long after the initial surgery, Schold said. ?We already know from multiple studies that it provides a significant survival benefit to the recipient,? he said. But for the donors, ?We can?t just assume over time that we?re going to continue to see that these risks are low.?

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News Headline: Laugh-filled musical coming to Performing Arts Center | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The international hit ?Menopause The Musical? is coming to the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9. Tickets range from $33 to $48 and can be purchased now at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400.

The box office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Set in a department store, where four women with seemingly nothing in common but a black lace bra, meet by chance at a lingerie sale. The all-female cast makes fun of their woeful hot flashes, forgetfulness, mood swings, wrinkles, night sweats and chocolate binges.

A sisterhood is created between these diverse women as they realize that menopause is no longer ?The Silent Passage.? It is a stage in every woman?s life that is perfectly normal. ?Menopause The Musical? is produced by GFour Productions and is the work of writer Jeanie Linders, director Seth Greenleaf and choreographer Daria Melendez.

The laughter-filled 90-minute production includes parodies from the classics of the 1960s, ?70s and ?80s. It is estimated that nearly 11 million women have attended a performance since the 2001 opening in Orlando, Florida.

Inspired by a hot flash and a bottle of wine, Linders created the show as a celebration of women who are on the brink of, in the middle of, or have survived ?The Change.? ?Menopause The Musical�? has entertained audiences across the country in more than 450 U.S. cities, nearly 300 international cities and a total of 15 countries. For more information, visit www.menopausethemusical.com.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Dr. NE, New Philadelphia. Free parking is available for all shows.

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News Headline: Kent undergoes a major transformation | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Legal News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When the economic downturn began in the United States over five years ago, many local governments began cutting back, but that wasn't the case in the city of Kent. Instead of watching their pennies, officials in Portage County's largest city embarked on a massive downtown revitalization project.

“At the start of the downturn our city was in a state of disrepair,” said Daniel D. Smith, economic development director in Kent. “We had many blighted blocks in the downtown, which had accumulated over a few decades.”

“Our city began going into decline when we lost our industrial base,” said Mayor Jerry T. Fiala, who has lived in the city his entire life. “We were not dependent on steel like Youngstown, but we did have a lot of small rubber factories and machine shops that kept our tax base strong. When they started disappearing, the city began to decline.”

“In a lot of ways we were no different than other urban areas but we had one big asset, Kent State University, which gave us the potential that other places did not have,” said Smith.

With that in mind, city officials began laying the groundwork for a $110 million plus project that is quickly transforming the downtown into a destination for visitors looking to dine and shop.

The public-private partnership responsible for the changes was made up of the city of Kent, Kent State University, PARTA (Portage Area Regional Transit Authority) and three development companies—Fairmount Properties, The Pizzuti Companies and Ronald Burbick, who owns RLB Phoenix Properties.

“It took a coalition of willing and visionary people who could buy into the vision, which swung into high gear in 2008,” said Smith. “All six partners worked very hard together and there were times it looked like we might not be able to move forward.”

But progress it did and today the central business district now boasts three and a half renovated blocks that include 250,000 square feet of mixed-use space and two corporate anchor tenants (The Davey Tree Expert Company's Davey Tree Resource Group and AMETEK), along with the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, which opened this summer and offers boutique-style guest rooms and suites, the Phoenix project/Acorn Alley retail strip, a $26 million multimodal transit center and parking deck, a new county municipal courthouse, which is still under construction, as well as an esplanade that connects the western edge of the Kent State University campus to the central business district.

In October, Smithers-Oasis Company will become the third corporate anchor for the project. The global manufacturer and marketer of floral foam, floral accessory products, cellular growing media and post-harvest products will be located on the second floor of the Davey Tree Resource Group building at the corner of South Water Street and Haymaker Parkway. The Davey Tree Expert Company's main headquarters is located on North Mantua Street in Kent.

“Two of our three corporate anchors have a strong green horticultural theme,” said Smith. “The other, AMETEK, makes electric motors and electronic instruments.”

The Phoenix project was funded by Kent resident Ron Burbick, and is responsible for transforming a section of commercial space along East Main to Erie streets. It includes a pedestrian alleyway lined with shops known as Acorn Alley, which has three phases. The first part opened to the public in 2009, with Acorn Alley II and Acorn Corner getting up and running this year.

Acorn Corner is the site of the former Kent Hotel (or Franklin Hotel), which Smith said had been “a monument to blight” for nearly three decades. It is the new location of Buffalo Wild Wings, and will also house the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce, Marathon Financial Services, The Secret Cellar, a wine bar and jazz club and high-end apartments, among other things.

“In the last 30 months we have added over 50 businesses in the downtown, which is now kind of a unique blend of the new and old.”

Smith said some of the upcoming and current additions are Panini, Fresco Mexican Grill & Salsa Bar, Georgio's Pizzeria, Yogurt Vi, 4Cats Arts Studio, Figleaf Boutique, Gracylane (gifts & accessories), Shop 42, Don Palmieri Salon and Spa, Standing Rock Jewelers, Wild Earth Outfitters, Silver and Scents, The Fashion School Store, and many others.

“We still have some of our old favorites like Ray's Place, the Franklin Square Deli and Pufferbelly,” said Smith.

This year construction began on an additional five-story apartment building located Depeyster and Erie streets called The Legend. It will house Bricco restaurant and feature 32 high-end apartments, Smith said. The restaurant will open by the end of the year and the apartments will be completed in the spring of 2014.

Another highlight of the area is the Kent Stage, which opened in 2002 and hosts musical and theatrical performances and film festivals, catering to people of all ages.

“I would say our downtown offers something for everyone, in terms of food and entertainment,” said Smith.

He said the project is generating hundreds of thousands of dollars in new income and property taxes. “The city's initial investment of $3 million for property acquisition is quickly being repaid. The other $7 million in city funds required to complete the project is being generated from the project through the redirection of new property taxes.”

The downtown transformation also earned the city and university the 2013 Larry Abernathy Award from the International Town-Gown Association in recognition of the cooperation and collaboration between the two.

Kent State's campus has also been the site of development. The university has been buying properties in the surrounding neighborhood for several years. Officials plan to construct a new $40 million facility for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design along the esplanade extension. Also on the agenda, a new building for the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology, as well as the renovation and reorganization of the School of Art.

In addition, Smith said the esplanade extension continues a segment of the Portage County Hike and Bike Trail that links the entire community and the greater northeast Ohio region.

There is also a boardwalk around Kent's wastewater treatment plant.

“A lot of cities hide their wastewater treatment plants, we put a boardwalk around ours,” said Fiala.

Kent has joint economic development district agreements in place with

Franklin and Brimfield townships. Centennial Research Park along State Route 59 is part of the Kent-Franklin JEDD. It houses high-tech liquid crystal startup companies such as AlphaMicron and Crystal Diagnostics. The city is also home to Kent Displays, another company that works with liquid crystals. Officials support one business incubator on Summit Street in the municipal complex and it is currently full.

“We are working on creating a technology park along Mogadore Road, using a brownfield grant to clean up the area,” said Fiala.

Located in the west central portion of Portage County, what is now Kent used to be the villages of Carthage and Franklin Mills. The area was renamed Kent in 1864 in honor of Marvin Kent who was responsible for bringing a railroad through the town that played a major role in its development.

Kent became known as the “Tree City” in the late 1800s when John Davey, an expert horticulturalist, planted hundreds of trees throughout the city. He is the founder of the Davey Tree Company, one of the corporate anchor tenants in the city. The business is considered Kent's biggest private employer. Kent State University is the largest employer overall.

The city has close to 29,000 residents plus about 28,000 students when classes are in session.

“When we first revitalized the downtown we thought it would attract about 70 percent of the students and 30 percent of the residents, but what we've seen is the opposite,” said Fiala. “Businesses have very strong sales in the summer when classes are out. During the evening, we have a lot of residents congregating in the downtown because it is a very pedestrian-friendly place.”

“We are expecting to see a lot of traffic because of the new hotel and conference center,” said Smith. “The hotel has 94 units and the conference center can house about 300 people.”

With all of the activity, officials were able to avoid layoffs and service cuts.

“We always had a slim crew and when we lost people through attrition we did not replace them,” said Fiala. “We are hoping to enhance our staff in the future because many of our employees are overworked.”

Officials are also using Moving Ohio Forward money and other grants to demolish a handful of properties left vacant due to the downturn.

The parks and recreation department offers a host of activities for residents and visitors, including annual events.

“We have Halloween and holiday parties for both children and adults as well as a tree lighting contest in the downtown where Santa comes down on a train,” said Smith. “Our adult Easter egg hunt last year was very popular.”

There are almost 20 parks in Kent; the largest is Fred Fuller Park, which has over 56 acres. It is located along the Cuyahoga River and includes the Kramer Field Ball Field Complex.

In 2010, Crooked River Adventures, a canoe and kayak livery, opened at John Brown Tannery Park at 100 Stow Street.

“A lot of our parks are neighborhood parks,” said Smith. “We currently have 17 city parks with two more in the planning stages. The Kent State University Student Recreation and Wellness Center offer facilities on Kent's campus and around town.

“One of Kent's newest facilities is a fitness center located at 1205 W. Main. It offers many fitness classes like Zumba, kickboxing, circuit training and more to come in the future.”

There are a number of cultural attractions as well, such as the Kent State University Museum, which is located on the campus and a number of sites and districts in Kent are on the National Register of Historic Places.

Children who live in Kent are served primarily by the Kent City School District, with a small portion attending schools in the Field Local School District. Kent State University's main campus is located in the southeastern portion of the city. The university is known for the Liquid Crystal Institute, as well as being nationally recognized for a number of its other programs.

“The hope is that many of the students being trained at Kent State will become part of our future workforce,” said Fiala.

“We have made a great deal of progress with our downtown, but we're not done with our revitalization efforts yet. There are still things on the drawing board.”

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News Headline: New Disability Research Data Have Been Reported by Investigators at Kent State University | Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 SEP 27 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Data detailed on Disability Research have been presented. According to news originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "This study investigated whether receiving transition services early (i.e., by age 14) promoted better vocational outcomes than receiving transition services later (i.e., by age 16) for young adults with ASD."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "To do this, the outcomes achieved by two matched groups were examined-453 young adults from states requiring transition services be addressed by age 14 and 453 young adults with ASD from states requiring transition services be addressed by age 16. In each of the four years examined (i.e., 2006-2009), individuals from the early transition states were significantly more likely to be employed than individuals from the later transition group."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Further, early transition individuals who became employed appeared to earn more wages and cost less to serve."

For more information on this research see: Does Providing Transition Services Early Enable Students With ASD to Achieve Better Vocational Outcomes as Adults? Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 2013;38(2):88-93. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities can be contacted at: Tash, 1025 Vermont Ave, Nw 7TH Flr, Washington, DC 20005, USA.

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from R.E. Cimera, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States. Additional authors for this research include S. Burgess and A. Wiley.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Disability Research, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: Cleveland 2Do listings for Sept. 27-Oct. 3: | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Planetarium. Smith Hall, Room 108, E. Summit St. 330-672-2246 or planetarium.kent.edu/users/planet. Introduction to the Autumn Sky. This presentation will showcase the prominent autumn constellations, point out celestial objects that are visible to the naked eye, and tour our neighbors in the solar system. 8 p.m. today-Saturday.(9/27-9/28)

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News Headline: 7 Credit Mistakes that Could Wreck Your Retirement | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/26/2013
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: Adam Levin
News OCR Text: Yes, just like clockwork it happened again this year: I got older. As of this week, the Beatles song, "When I'm Sixty-Four," went from being a hypothetical to a reality for me. This means that next year, I will officially become a senior citizen.

It's a jarring prospect. Like most baby boomers, I don't feel especially old. We're the cool ones, the generation that brought America rock 'n' roll, yoga, and the belief that we can do well by doing good. With good reason, we view ourselves as eternally young, hip and savvy.

We are a confident generation, which is a good thing. But when it comes to the way we manage our financial lives - particularly our credit - that confidence can make us vulnerable. With that in mind, here are the top seven credit mistakes senior citizens make. When we grew up, 70 was old. Now 70 is the new 50. (80, however, is still 80.) Now the average life expectancy is 84 for men and 86 for women, according to the Social Security Administration. Among married couples where both partners are 65, there's a seventy percent chance that at least one person will live to 85, according to a report by the Society of Actuaries.

How to Fix It: Take Billy Joel's advice and don't go changin'. Or at least don't change too much. If you're 65 or older, the rules are the same as when you were 25. Treat credit as a long-term asset with important risks, responsibilities and benefits. Many seniors are justifiably proud of their financial accomplishments. They've paid off their mortgage, chopped up their credit cards, paid cash for their car.

But if the car dies, a financial emergency arises, or after the kids go off to college and the dog dies, you may need or decide to sell the family home and buy something more suitable. You may need a loan. And if you foreswore credit years ago, you might have become a "credit ghost" and your credit score likely has dropped, which means you will pay more money in interest.

How to Fix It: Don't fear credit. If you don't have a credit card, get one. Use it as you would a debit card, charging only what you can afford to pay in full at the end of each month. This will help rebuild your score, hopefully in time for the next emergency or life event. A recent study by Demos finds that Americans aged 50 and over have an average credit card balance of $8,278, compared to $6,258 for people under 50. Kent State University researchers found that elderly people are more likely than any other age group to file for bankruptcy.

As Gerri Detweiler, director of consumer education at Credit.com, wrote in a recent column, senior debt has many causes. More than a third of people over 50 with credit card debt use their cards to cover basic living expenses, Demos found. Afraid to seek advice from licensed financial professionals, they may fall prey to debt collection scams or get hoodwinked into withdrawing money from their retirement accounts to pay off credit cards.

How to Fix It: Avoid taking on too much debt. If you're concerned about debts you already have and don't know what to do, find an approvedcredit counseling agency. (Hint: Good ones don't tend to charge upfront fees.) Many senior citizens are drowning in student debt. Americans over 60 owe about $43 billion in student loans as of Q4 2012, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The average borrower over age 60 owes $19,521 in student loan debt, and 12.5 percent of them are delinquent on their payments. Some took college classes later in life. Others have debt leftover from school days long past, or cosigned on student loans for their children and grandchildren.

How to Fix It: Look Before You Leap. If you're a senior, think twice before signing for any student loan, whether for you or someone else. To help their kids or grandkids buy a car, get a mortgage or attend college, many seniors co-sign loans. What many don't realize is that lenders and credit reporting agencies don't distinguish between borrowers and the cosigners.

If the borrower fails to make on-time payments, the cosigner's credit score could take the same big hit. Embarrassing phone calls--and lawsuits--from debt collectors could follow.

How to Fix It: Just say no. Avoid co-signing loans. Lend money directly, which won't put your credit at risk. A monetary loan or gift could help a loved one get a secured credit card and start establishing credit of their own, without endangering your financial future. Only a quarter of all seniors regularly check their credit histories, according to a report by the Society of Certified Senior Advisors. Of those who do, 36 percent found errors, some of which were severely damaging their credit scores. How to Fix It: with each of the three major credit bureaus and sign up for tools such as Credit.com's free Credit Report Card, which allows you to see your credit profile and provides free scores that update monthly. A reverse mortgage can provide seniors extra money during retirement by tapping all the equity they've built up in their home. The loan is repaid only when they die, sell or move out of the home

However, reverse mortgages can also be complicated, and come with risks. The average age of seniors obtaining reverse mortgages is dropping, according to a report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and 70 percent of them take their payments in one lump sum. That could leave them with fewer financial resources to deal with moves or other future expenses, the bureau found. A growing number of reverse mortgage borrowers are at risk of foreclosure. Additionally, depending on the terms of the mortgage, the spouse of the reverse mortgage borrower might be forced to move out of their home when the borrowing spouse dies or moves into an assisted living facility.

How to Fix It: Do your homework. Meet with a certified financial advisor to see whether short- or mid-term reverse mortgage is right for you

It's a new age for me, as it is for America. As our generation gets older, more senior baby boomers will face questions about credit. The good news is that as we lead longer, healthier lives and the same good practices that got us so far will continue to help us now.

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News Headline: KSU robber gets probation | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A man who attempted
to rob a Kent State University
student in December
2012, but was foiled by the
intended target, has been
sentenced to probation
and ordered to get drug
treatment and find a job.
Philip A. Welker III, 38,
with a last known address
in Akron, was sentenced
to three years probation
by Portage County Common
Pleas Judge John Enlow
on Aug. 26.
Enlow also ordered
Welker to receive substance
abuse testing and
seek treatment if necessary,
get a GED and find
and keep a job.
Welker was accused of
approaching a KSU student
on Hilltop Drive on
the Kent campus on Dec.
10, 2012, and demanding
money.
The student instead
grabbed Welker, held him
at the scene and called
KSU police. They arrested
Welker and charged him
with robbery, a second-degree
felony.
Welker pleaded guilty to
third-degree felony robbery
in February, and faced
a minimum sentence of
probation or up to three
years in prison.

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News Headline: Kent State VP awarded Fulbright (Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 09/27/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Vice President
for University Relations Iris E.
Harvey has been selected for a U.S.-
France International Education Administrators
Seminar award by the
J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship
Board. The board is made up of
12 members appointed by the president
of the United States.
With this award, Harvey joins the
ranks of other distinguished Fulbright
alumni who have participated in the
program since its inception more than
60 years ago.
The Fulbright International Education
Administrators seminars provide
selected senior administrators
with the opportunity to gain in-depth
knowledge about the host country's
higher education system as well as to
establish networks of U.S. and international
colleagues. Grantees return
home with new relationships, deeper
understanding of other higher education
systems, and the enhanced ability
to serve international students and
encourage prospective study-abroad
students.
Harvey oversees Kent State's global
branding initiatives and directs
university communications, marketing
and media relations, regional engagement
and corporate affairs. She,
along with 11 other selected administrators
from across the U.S., will spend
three weeks in October in France with
stops in Bordeaux, Paris and Strasbourg
where they will visit with 12 universities,
meet with
French and European
Union officials and
attend events with industry
and U.S. Embassy
representatives.
“It's a great honor to receive a Fulbright
grant, and I am appreciative
of Kent State's support of this recognition,”
Harvey said. “In addition
to the incredible opportunity to dialogue
with officials from a dozen universities
in France, I am also excited
about meeting and learning about
how my counterparts at these institutions
are developing public-private
partnerships and helping to transform
their regional economies. That's
something extra I can bring back to
Northeast Ohio.”

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