Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Alumni; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Athletics (2)
Biogeochemistry (1)
Chemistry and Biochemistry; Research (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Global Education; Town-Gown (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences; Research (1)
Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
Physics (1)
Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
University Communications and Marketing (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
CIVIC LEADER HELEN DIX DEAD AT 96 10/04/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Published: October 3, 2013 4:00AM Helen Westcott Dix, whose husband, the late Robert C. Dix, was publisher of the Record-Courier, died Wednesday, Oct....


Athletics (2)
Kent State Athletic Director now highest paid in MAC 10/04/2013 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Athletic Director now highest paid in MAC Kent State's Athletics Director is now the highest paid AD in the Mid-American Conference. Joel Nielsen...

Kent State's Dri Archer is glad to be back in action for Northern Illinois matchup 10/04/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

By Elton Alexander, The Plain Dealer on October 03, 2013 at 1:30 PM, updated October 03, 2013 at 4:11 PM (PHOTO) Kent State's Dri Archer is glad to...


Biogeochemistry (1)
Natural radium turns up in fracking water (Lutz) 10/03/2013 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

...Shale led to a 570 percent increase in the volume of drilling wastewater since 2004, according to Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State University. In fracking, millions of gallons of chemically treated water and sand are forced underground to shatter rock and free trapped...


Chemistry and Biochemistry; Research (1)
Studies from Kent State University Have Provided New Data on Nanoparticles 10/03/2013 HispanicBusiness.com Text Attachment Email

...TN precursor (aminosilane-coated IONPs [IONP-Sil(NH2)]) with surface amine groups." The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Surface functional group conversion to carboxylic acid was accomplished by conjugating poly(ethylene glycol) diacid to IONP-Si(NH2)....


College of Business (COB) (1)
Kent State University's College of Business Administration Team Receives Top Honors 10/03/2013 PRLog Text Attachment Email

...undergraduate students learn and practice skills needed to develop business concepts and then compete in a team-based business concept competition. The Kent State University team of Kyle Holt, Haumed Rahmani, Josh Strenk, Danielle Flemister, Josephine Gilliland and Ken Collier, all entrepreneurship...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
KENT STATE LECTURER RECEIVES 2013 NURSE EDUCATOR WITH THE NURSE'S TOUCH AWARD 10/03/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Oct.3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State's Cathy Snelson honored for advancing professionalism, leadership and...


Global Education; Town-Gown (1)
KSU INTERNATIONALS ABOUT 10% OF POPULATION (Fanton) 10/04/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

KSU international students about 10% of city's population Published: October 4, 2013 4:00AM Kent truly is an "interna- tional city." Kent State...


KSU at Stark (1)
Fracking film 'Triple Divide' to be screened Wednesday in Stark County 10/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Beacon Journal staff report Published: October 3, 2013 - 10:32 PM A film that looks at shale drilling in northern Pennsylvania and how it was managed...


Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences; Research (1)
Study Data from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Rehabilitation Research 10/04/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...used to determine the degree to which a proposed theoretical model is supported by data." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "SEM has been growing in various disciplines as well as in rehabilitation research. It is the goal of this introduction to...


Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
0 comments Cleveland Arts listings for Oct. 4-10: Annual Autumn Art Walk this weekend in Little Italy & More: 10/04/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

Browsing the Arts calendar for Friday, Oct 4 Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until...


Physics (1)
2DO Listings for Oct. 4-Oct. 10 10/04/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

EXPOS & SHOWS Louise's Thrift and Consignment Store. 13906 Old State Road, Middlefield. Antiquities and Fine Arts Appraisal. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. today. Maltz...


Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Kent celebration 10/03/2013 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

A community celebration of the partnership between Kent State University and the city of Kent, represented by the new KSU Esplanade extension that now connects the university to downtown Kent, will...


University Communications and Marketing (2)
Public universities in billboard duel Competition for NE Ohio students fuels advertising, marketing drives (Harvey) 10/04/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

Kent State. Northeast Ohio's #1 choice among universities,” proclaims a billboard on Ohio 43 in Streetsboro as drivers head south to the university's...

3 comments Universities battle for students in Northeast Ohio (Harvey) 10/04/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio - “Kent State. Northeast Ohio's #1 choice among universities,” proclaims a billboard on Ohio 43 in Streetsboro as drivers head south to...


News Headline: CIVIC LEADER HELEN DIX DEAD AT 96 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Published: October 3, 2013 4:00AM

Helen Westcott Dix, whose husband, the late Robert C. Dix, was publisher of the Record-Courier, died Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013, at Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna following several years of declining health. She was 96.

Active in the community, she helped found, lead and participate in numerous civic undertakings, many of which she supported financially and with stories she wrote that were published in the Record-Courier.

She strongly supported charitable organizations in Portage County, her adopted home county, with her time and financial contributions. Kent State University, Hiram College, Robinson Memorial Hospital, the Coleman Foundation, the Burbick Foundation, the Portage County Gardeners, and the Portage Park District and Foundation were recipients of her generosity. Among other charitable institutions she supprted was her church, the United Methodist Church of Kent.

An energetic person, she was asked by many to volunteer because she was able to get the job done. She helped found the Kent League of Women Voters and was its last surviving charter member, the Kent State University Journalism Alumni Association, and the Blossom Music Center Women's Committee, leading its Ohio chapter for a year shortly after Blossom Music Center opened in 1968.

During the 32 years her husband served as a trustee of Kent State University, Mrs. Dix regularly entertained guests of the university at their home in Kent, assisted with Kent State's international student association, and avidly followed and supported Kent State's intercollegiate sports teams. They befriended and enjoyed the company of many faculty members over the years.

After the founding of what is now the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, she led in the creation of the medicinal herb garden on its campus. She also helped create the healing garden at Robinson Memorial Hospital. She was an ardent supporter of the Western Reserve Herb Society, Mrs. Dix writing and editing its newsletter for a time. At the age of 85 in 2002, she became the oldest person to go through Leadership Portage County, a nine-month experience she thoroughly enjoyed.

Her devotion to Kent State did not go unnoticed. In 2007, when she was 90, Kent State University awarded her its University Medallion and hosted a birthday celebration in her honor. She was a recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award and in the 1990s served as Grand Marshal of the Kent State Homecoming Parade. In 1957, she received the William Taylor Award for her work in founding the Kent State Journalism Alumni Association. The Daily Kent Stater editor's office is named in her honor. A fund she and her husband set up underwrites journalism scholarships annually. She received the KSU Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004.

Others were generous in their recognition, too. Robinson Memorial Hospital honored her in 1998 at a Robinson Society's Distinguished Giving reception and recently named a lobby for her and her husband. Hiram College inducted her into its Garfield Society in 2004. The Kent Area Chamber of Commerce in 1984 bestowed its Kent Medal for Public Service on her and in 2004 recognized her for a lifetime of contributions. The Portage Park District honored her in 2007 on her 90th birthday, recognizing her gift of 103 acres for a park in Ravenna Township. Ron Burbick, who developed Acorn Alley and resuscitated the old Kent Hotel, honored Mrs. Dix by putting her name on one of his buildings at 138 E. Main St. in Kent, where in the 1930s as a student, she edited and helped compose The Daily Kent Stater and reported for the Kent Courier- Tribune.

She and her husband were avid golfers and from the 1930s members of the Twin Lakes Country Club. She remained a member until its demise a few years ago.

She was adamant about the importance of education and a strong advocate of the public school system, which she and her husband told their children was a vital ingredient in the American success story. When her five children attended elementary school, she was a leader in the Parent Teacher Associations of their schools. As a mother, she stressed achievement and hard work both in the classroom and outside of it.

In the 1950s, her husband befriended a Swiss businessman, Marcel Durieux, who was using local newspapers to promote European and other international tours for Americans. She helped them organize tours for Portage County residents in Europe and Latin America. The experience furthered her interest in international politics, often a topic in the Dix household, and she enrolled in the late 1950s for a master's degree in political science at Kent State. She completed her degree in the early 1960s, specializing in Latin American politics.

Born in Pittsburgh on April 18, 1917, she was the daughter of John and Nellie (Salton) Westcott. With her two brothers, she was the oldest sibling in a family that moved frequently. Her mother, who had studied science at Cornell University in early 1900s, taught general science. Her father was an artist who took a variety of day jobs to support his family. The family moved several times, its financial position never secure. Residing a few years in Trenton, N.J., she was able to attend a Quaker elementary school founded by William Penn just outside of Philadelphia, where her mother taught general science. Her father worked as a gardener.

Eventually the family landed in Painesville, where she attended high school. The economic pressures of the Depression caused the family to break up. She spent her high school senior year alone in Painesville working in a boarding house for her keep.

A high school guidance counselor proved a turning point in her life by persuading her to attend Kent State University, where he found her a job in Kent waitressing at the Robin Hood, a fine restaurant in those days. Her interests were in newspapers. Kent State had journalism classes, but offered no journalism degree at the time so she obtained her bachelor's degree in business. She worked at the Daily Kent Stater, becoming one of the first women to serve as its editor. In addition to waitressing, she supported herself as a reporter for Scripps Howard's Akron Times Press and also at the Kent Courier-Tribune, where she caught the eye of her future husband, Robert, who was assisting his older brother Albert, then the publisher of the Ravenna Evening Record and the Kent Courier-Tribune.

Invited to interview for a job at Look Magazine in its New York City offices, she left Kent immediately after graduation. Within a day or two, her future husband, a pilot, telegraphed her to meet him at an airport in Deposit, a small town outside of Binghamton, N.Y. He flew there and asked her to marry him. She accepted and returned with him to Kent, the two getting married at the home of Albert Dix in Ravenna on June 15, 1938.

The Dixes resided in Kent. An enthusiastic gardener and, like her mother, interested in nature, Mrs. Dix took pleasure in the woods that surrounded her home and invariably experimented with new flower beds and trees she planted on the premises.

She was an avid birder. That led the couple to acquire a condominium on Sanibel Island in Florida in 1974 shortly after the island opened to development. In their senior years, the two of them wintered in Sanibel and Mrs. Dix often treated first-time visitors to a tour of Ding Darling Wildlife Preserve, the renowned bird sanctuary that occupies more than 30 percent of the island.

Her husband preceded her in death in 1996.

Mrs. Dix is survived by her five children: Robert (Nancy), Bonita Springs, Fla., David (Janet), Sugar Bush Knolls, Timothy, Colorado Springs, Colo., Dr. Darcy (Robert) Folzenlogen, Columbia, Mo., and Kristina (Gregory) Frost, Newark, Ohio. Also surviving is Geoffrey Thompson, Mountainview, Calif., who joined the Dix family in 1959 following the deaths of his parents. In addition, seven grandchildren, three step-grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and seven step-great-grandchildren survive.

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 at the United Methodist Church of Kent, with the Rev. David Palmer officiating. The family will receive friends at a reception at the church immediately following. Cremation will take place. Burial will be in Standing Rock Cemetery. S.C. Bissler and Sons Funeral Home and Crematory in Kent is handling arrangements.

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News Headline: Kent State Athletic Director now highest paid in MAC | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Athletic Director now highest paid in MAC
Kent State's Athletics Director is now the highest paid AD in the Mid-American Conference. Joel Nielsen has received a two-year contract extension that amounts to an 18 percent pay raise, bringing his salary to just over $300,000. His pay will continue to increase by $40,000 a year until 2017. During Neilson's tenure, Kent State's football team went to its first bowl game in 40 years last spring, the baseball team made the College World Series and the women's gymnastics team also landed its first ever NCAA championship appearance.

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News Headline: Kent State's Dri Archer is glad to be back in action for Northern Illinois matchup | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By Elton Alexander, The Plain Dealer
on October 03, 2013 at 1:30 PM, updated October 03, 2013 at 4:11 PM

(PHOTO) Kent State's Dri Archer is glad to be back in action for Northern Illinois matchup

KENT, Ohio -- It's mid-season in the world of college football, and so far this has not been the script Dri Archer had for his final campaign at Kent State.

A preseason All-American in August with Heisman Trophy aspirations became a sideline ornament after just three touches in the first game of the season. An ankle injury slowed Archer's 4.21 40-yard dash speed down to a walk.

"It's been a tough, tough last four weeks,'' Archer said. "I've never had any injuries like this, high school, nowhere. I just tried to rest, stay off of it.''

Meanwhile, life without Archer, and one of his offensive line escorts, Pat McShane, led to a 1-3 start for the Golden Flashes, and tough going offensively. The rushing game that powered KSU to an 11-3 season and MAC East title in 2012 just was not there.

Yet with Archer's return last week in a 32-14 victory at Western Michigan, it was like the clouds broke and sun shined once again. The human highlight reel was back in action.

"Having Dri back was huge,'' head coach Paul Haynes said. "All the teams know who he is and where he is on the field. You don't have to give him the ball all the time to make things open up."

Archer only carried nine times for 83 yards -- a 9.2 per carry average that's right in line with his 9.0 from last season -- and caught five passes for another 55 yards, including a touchdown.

"The first play Colin (Reardon) threw me a little pass,'' Archer said. "I made contact with another player and realized I was good. But going into it, I knew I was going to be OK. In warmups, I was feeling pretty good.''

--
(PHOTO)Kent State running back Dri Archer is trying to regain the form he showed in last year's MAC Championship game against Northern Illinois at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan.
--

The real plus was that tailback Trayion Durham now had room to operate his 6-1, 240-pound frame. With Archer lining up all over the field, the defense could not focus on Durham, who responded with a 26-carry, 154-yard game with a pair of touchdowns. Included was a 65-yard run.

"I think I was more excited than he was on that play,'' Archer said. "I was on the sidelines for that one, but I was running down the field just like he was. He's built for power, but he's got more speed than you think.

"As I go, he goes. As he goes, I go. It has always been like that,'' Archer said. "When I'm there, they can't key on him, and when he's got it going, they can't put all their attention on me.

"Now they have to look out for both of us. They don't know who is going to get the ball, how or when. That's how we've been feeding off each other the past few years.''

That's against most teams. One team that bottled Archer up last season was Northern Illinois, which defeated Kent, 44-37, in the MAC Championship game. The undefeated Huskies (4-0, 0-0) travel to Kent (3-2, 1-1) for the Golden Flashes' homecoming on Saturday.

It is a game Archer is primed to play.

"Before the season, this is definitely one of the games I marked on the calendar,'' Archer said. "I really wanted it for homecoming, and for Northern Illinois. I got my brother and my nephew coming, my mother and my best friend coming.''

In last season's MAC title game, Archer scored a 15-yard rushing TD for a 7-0 lead, but was held to 15 yards rushing for the game. He had 81 yards on five receptions, but had a 70-yard reception go through his hands, foiling a potential KSU scoring drive.

"I play last year through my head all the time, especially the losses,'' Archer said. "It all happened so fast. I don't even remember it hitting the ground.

"It hit right in my hands, hit the ground, then back in my hands. It was so quick. Everybody thought I caught it. I thought I caught it. That's how fast it happened. That was the best ball I ever saw (QB) Spencer (Keith) throw, and I dropped it.''

It's highly unlikely that Archer comes close to the 1,429 yards rushing, 561 yards receiving and 24 touchdowns from 2012. he'll be lucky to see three kickoffs come his way, much less return three for touchdowns as he did last season. WMU did not kick his way, and it's almost certain NIU will do as it did in the MAC title game and avoid kicking his way as well.

"I knew that was going to happen,'' Archer said. "We were playing for field position. I was back there just in case they did kick it deep, I was ready to return it."

Which goes back to just how important it is for Kent State just to have the 5-8, 175-pound speedster on the field. The threat of what he might do is just as great as what he can do. Especially when everybody knows he is healthy.

"I feel good,'' Archer said Monday. "There is still a lot of games ahead of me. I knew after the game I was going to be sore, body sore but not ankle sore. My ankle was probably the least hurt of everything. I'm good to go."

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News Headline: Natural radium turns up in fracking water (Lutz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Naturally occurring radiation brought to the surface by gas drillers has been detected in a Pennsylvania creek that flows into the Allegheny River, illustrating the risks of wastewater disposal from the boom in hydraulic fracturing.

Sediment in Blacklick Creek contained radium in concentrations 200 times above normal, or background levels, according to the study, published yesterday in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. The radium, along with salts such as bromide, came from the Josephine Brine Treatment Facility about 45 miles east of Pittsburgh, a plant that treats wastewater from oil and gas drilling.

“The absolute levels that we found are much higher than what you allow in the U.S. for any place to dump radioactive material,” Avner Vengosh, a professor at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and co-author of the study, said in an interview. “The radium will be bio-accumulating. You eventually could get it in the fish.”

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has been blamed for contaminating streams and private water wells after spills from wastewater holding ponds or leaks from faulty gas wells. The report exposes the risks of disposing of the surging volumes of waste from gas fracking. The EPA is developing new standards for disposing of gas-drilling waste.

For decades, Pennsylvania disposed of wastewater from oil and gas drilling at commercial treatment plants that discharged into rivers and streams. A natural-gas boom brought on by fracking in a geologic formation called the Marcellus Shale led to a 570 percent increase in the volume of drilling wastewater since 2004, according to Brian Lutz, assistant professor of biogeochemistry at Kent State University.

In fracking, millions of gallons of chemically treated water and sand are forced underground to shatter rock and free trapped gas. As much as 80 percent of the fluid returns to the surface along with radium, and salts such as sodium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine and bromide.

Water treatment “has been Pennsylvania's go-to method for decades,” Lutz said in an interview. With fracking “we were seeing these systems being overwhelmed. They were just taking too much waste, leading to water-quality problems.”

While earlier studies have identified radiation in drilling wastewater, the new report is the first to examine the long-term environmental impacts of dumping it in rivers. Proper treatment can remove a substantial portion of the radioactivity in wastewater, although it does not remove many of the other salts, including bromide, Vengosh said.

“Our findings indicate that disposal of wastewater from both conventional and unconventional oil and gas operations has degraded the surface water and sediments,” Nathaniel Warner, a postdoctoral researcher at Dartmouth College and co-author of the study, said in a statement. “This could be a long-term legacy of radioactivity.”

Blacklick Creek is a tributary of the Conemaugh River, which flows into the Allegheny. In 2011, regulators found high levels of bromides in western Pennsylvania rivers, prompting some plants that supply Pittsburgh and other cities to change the way they treat drinking water.

Bromide, which is not toxic, can combine with disinfectants used at drinking-water treatment plants to produce cancer-causing compounds.

Radium is a naturally occurring metal that can accumulate in plants and animals and be transferred through the food chain to humans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We're getting better at reducing the amount of wastewater produced by shale gas wells, but the total wastewater volume continues to grow rapidly,” Lutz said. “There simply isn't disposal infrastructure in place.”

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News Headline: Studies from Kent State University Have Provided New Data on Nanoparticles | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: HispanicBusiness.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Research findings on Nanoparticles are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and their surface modifications with therapeutic or diagnostic (theranostic, TN) agents are of great interest. Here we present a novel one-pot synthesis of a versatile general TN precursor (aminosilane-coated IONPs [IONP-Sil(NH2)]) with surface amine groups."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Surface functional group conversion to carboxylic acid was accomplished by conjugating poly(ethylene glycol) diacid to IONP-Si(NH2). The NPs were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and cell uptake profile of the nanoparticles were evaluated in-vitro using cultured liver cells (HepG2). Oleylamine (hydrophobic) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model drugs were attached to IONP-Si/-PEG(COOH)."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The ability of IONP-Sil(NH2) to bind small interfering RNA (siRNA) is also shown."

For more information on this research see: One-Pot Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Functional Silane Shells: A Versatile General Precursor for Conjugations and Biomedical Applications. Langmuir, 2013;29(34):10850-10858. Langmuir can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Langmuir - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/langd5)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting V. Yathindranath, Kent State University, Dept. of Chem & Biochem, Kent, OH 44242, United States. Additional authors for this research include

Z.Z. Sun,

M. Worden,

L.J. Donald,

J.A. Thliveris,

D.W. Miller and T. Hegmann (see also Nanoparticles).

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News Headline: Kent State University's College of Business Administration Team Receives Top Honors | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College of Business Administration Immersion Week Winners - Oct. 3, 2013 - KENT, Ohio -- Entrepreneurship Immersion Week is an intensive, weeklong entrepreneurship boot camp where undergraduate students learn and practice skills needed to develop business concepts and then compete in a team-based business concept competition.

The Kent State University team of Kyle Holt, Haumed Rahmani, Josh Strenk, Danielle Flemister, Josephine Gilliland and Ken Collier, all entrepreneurship majors or minors from the College of Business Administration, competed against students from nine other Northeast Ohio colleges and universities in August at Hiram College. Their winning idea was for AvaKare, a company looking to revolutionize children's hospital wear, which took second place, earning them a $1,500 cash prize.

“Entrepreneurship Immersion Week was the most intense, sleep deprived and rewarding week of my life,” says Gilliland, an entrepreneurship major. “The skills I learned and the people I was able to interact with have truly changed my life. Entrepreneurship Immersion Week has opened so many doors for me that the only question now is, which one should I take?”

Kent State had a large presence during the events including at Alumni Night with 18 students, alumni, faculty and staff representing the College of Business Administration. Additionally, Denise Easterling, instructor of entrepreneurship at Kent State's College of Business Administration, and Julie Messing, executive director for Kent State's Blackstone LaunchPad, were both at Hiram College, providing workshops and coaching students throughout the week.

Brad Baumeister, a student at Kent State, competed on a blended team with students from Case Western Reserve University and Hiram College. The team from Ashland University placed first and John Carroll University's team took third place at the event.

For more information about Kent State's College of Business Administration, including the Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation, visit .For more information about Kent State's Blackstone LaunchPad, visit .Photo

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News Headline: KENT STATE LECTURER RECEIVES 2013 NURSE EDUCATOR WITH THE NURSE'S TOUCH AWARD | Email

News Date: 10/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Oct.3 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State's Cathy Snelson honored for advancing professionalism, leadership and communication skills among nursing students

Florence Nightingale battled a bumbling bureaucracy, Clara Barton famously dodged bullets, but today's nurses face challenges all their own as the linchpin of a high-tech healthcare system that asks them to be a skilled care provider, information sharer, wellness educator and quality control expert, all wrapped into one.Nurse educators excel at teaching the technical knowledge and skills, but how do they teach students the qualities that make certain nurses so memorable? How do they teach students to have "the nurse's touch?"

Just ask Cathy Snelson, associate lecturer at Kent State University's College of Nursing and resident of Akron, Ohio.Snelson was recently recognized by ATI Nursing Education as one of four Nurse Educators With the Nurse's Touch, an award that recognizes nurse educators who excel at preparing their students for the full spectrum of challenges that await them in practice.

Competing among nearly 700 nominations, Snelson impressed judges with her integration of professional and interpersonal skills into their nursing practice and the education of students.These skills include teaching nursing students how to stay healthy, manage work-related stress, be a patient advocate, convey professional behaviors and attitudes, use nursing informatics and technology, and function as a leader of the healthcare team.

Snelson teaches these concepts by making herself a living example, according to her nominator: "Cathy is the golden standard of professional nursing educators ...Cathy can balance teaching the details of pathophysiology with kindness and caring to help students work through the daily stresses of nursing school.Cathy stressed ...always remaining patient focused and always communicating clearly and accurately."

To honor their commitment to incorporating professionalism and interpersonal skills into their curriculum, Snelson will receive Nurse's TouchTM for one year.Nurse's Touch is a unique product that uses video simulation to teach professional and interpersonal skills.

Snelson also receives a complimentary reservation at the 2014 ATI National Nurse Educator Summit in Orlando, Fla.The summit is a four-day professional development conference featuring hundreds of nurse educators from across the country.Snelson will receive free registration, room and board, and a $500 travel voucher.

"Nurses require a special set of skills to provide safe, quality nursing care, and this includes interpersonal skills like communication, professionalism and leadership," said Sheryl Sommer, director of nursing education and curriculum at ATI Nursing Education."Nursing programs have limited time and resources which mean these curriculum areas are not always a top priority in the classroom.We want to raise awareness of this need and celebrate educators who incorporate professional and interpersonal skills into their teaching to help develop future nurses so they are prepared for the on-the-job demands and are positioned to lead within healthcare teams."

To read more about Snelson and other winners, please visit www.atinursestouch.com/nt-award-winners.html.

For more information about Nurse's Touch, visit www.atinursestouch.com or view videos at www.youtube.com/user/ATINursingEducation.

ATI Nursing Education is the leading provider of online learning programs that are instrumental in improving faculty effectiveness and student and program outcomes in nursing schools across the country.Currently, the company works with more than 20,000 nurse educators, approximately 2,100 colleges and universities nationwide, and more than 225,000 students.ATI Nursing Education has played a role in helping more than 1 million students pass the NCLEX, the U.S.nursing licensing exam.ATI Nursing Education is part of Ascend Learning.Founded in 2010, Ascend Learning provides technology-based educational, curriculum and assessment solutions for healthcare and other professional industries.For more information, visit www.ascendlearning.com/companies/ati-nursing.

For more information about Kent State's College of Nursing, visit www.kent.edu/nursing.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: KSU INTERNATIONALS ABOUT 10% OF POPULATION (Fanton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU international students about 10% of city's population
Published: October 4, 2013 4:00AM

Kent truly is an "interna-

tional city."

Kent State University now has about 2,400 international students, representing 100 nations around the globe. Those students, many of whom come to Kent with their families, account for about 10 percent of the city's population.

That's "an extraordinary percentage" for "a small town in the Midwest," Dr. Marcello Fantoni, associate provost for global education at KSU, observed during this week's Bowman Breakfast. Because of this, Kent can be viewed as a laboratory in international relations, welcoming a diverse population into its midst.

Kent State has enrolled students from abroad for decades, but in recent years has made an effort to increase its international representation to broaden the diversity of the campus, enabling students who will compete in a globalized 21st Century world to interact with those who come here from other nations.

A visitor to downtown Kent may notice students from other cultures whose presence may be apparent because they dress differently or speak in languages foreign to most ears.

A century ago, Kent residents also noticed new residents who looked differently and whose voices echoed lands of origin such as Italy, Poland, the Austro-Hungarian empire and other European nations. Many of them were railroad workers or other laborers and their families. Unlike today's "internationals," however, their presence wasn't necessarily welcomed.

Many of those who came to Kent in the early 20th Century ultimately settled there, while many of today's international residents may stay for a relatively brief time -- four or eight years, depending on their academic plans at Kent State. During their stay, however, they will share in the life of the community; some may live in our neighborhoods, marry and start families, and have children who will learn in our schools.

Every visitor, in his or her own way, may serve as an ambassador of a land that few of us will have the opportunity to experience. And residents of Kent, for their part, ought to realize that their response to the visitors in their midst, makes them ambassadors, too.

Very few communities of Kent's size have an opportunity to experience a global presence. Diversity enriches a community. Kent, to its credit, appears to have welcomed its international visitors.

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News Headline: Fracking film 'Triple Divide' to be screened Wednesday in Stark County | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Beacon Journal staff report
Published: October 3, 2013 - 10:32 PM

A film that looks at shale drilling in northern Pennsylvania and how it was managed by the state's Department of Environmental Protection will be shown Wednesday in Jackson Township.
Triple Divide will be screened at 6:30 p.m. in the Main Hall auditorium of Kent State University's Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.
The movie, by filmmakers Joshua B. Pribanic and Melissa Troutmen, takes its name from the area of Potter County, Pa., where three continental divides for streams meet. It is an area where drillers have been active.
Triple Divide was developed by Public Herald, an investigative grass-roots group based in Coudersport, Pa. It is headed by Pribanic, a native of Sandusky, Ohio.
The movie premiered last March in Coudersport.
You can also get information on the film at http://tripledividefilm.org.
Doors open at 6 p.m.
After the movie, there will be a panel discussion.
Speakers are Greg Coleridge of the Northeast Ohio American Friends Service Committee; Kathryn Hanratty of the Native Plant Society and the People's Oil and Gas Collaborative of Ohio; Alison Auciello, Ohio organizer for Food & Water Watch; and Elyse Hirsch, co-founder of the Stark-Summit Coalition, volunteer local coordinator for Food & Water Watch and board member of the Buckeye Forest Council.
The screening is being presented by the Biology Club, the Stark-Summit Coalition, Stark Concerned Citizens, Food & Water Watch and the Buckeye Forest Council.
Admission is free.
Refreshments will be provided.

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News Headline: Study Data from Kent State University Update Knowledge of Rehabilitation Research | Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 OCT 4 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Rehabilitation Research. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) is a collection of statistical techniques used to determine the degree to which a proposed theoretical model is supported by data."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "SEM has been growing in various disciplines as well as in rehabilitation research. It is the goal of this introduction to provide a conceptual overview of SEM."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This statistical technique can facilitate a better understanding of large data sets involving theoretical models that have become more frequent in this discipline."

For more information on this research see: A conceptual overview of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) in rehabilitation research. Work-A Journal of Prevention Assessment & Rehabilitation, 2013;45(3):407-415. Work-A Journal of Prevention Assessment & Rehabilitation can be contacted at: Ios Press, Nieuwe Hemweg 6B, 1013 Bg Amsterdam, Netherlands.

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting W.R. Merchant, Kent State University, Sch Lifespan Dev & Educ Sci, Kent, OH 44240, United States. Additional authors for this research include J. Li, A.C. Karpinski and P.D. Rumrill.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Rehabilitation Research, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

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News Headline: 0 comments Cleveland Arts listings for Oct. 4-10: Annual Autumn Art Walk this weekend in Little Italy & More: | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Browsing the Arts calendar for Friday, Oct 4

Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday). Closes all major holidays. $7; $5, those 65 and older and students with ID; free for youth ages 17 and younger. Free admission the third Thursday of the month. Exhibit: "With a Trace: Photographs of Absence." Collection from the museum with additions from Northeast Ohio collectors Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell, featuring works by Christopher Bucklow, Margaret De Patta, Adam Fuss, Alison Rossiter, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Minor White from 1939-2010. Through Sunday, Jan. 26. Exhibit: "Real/Surreal." An exhibition that examines how artists employed what have long been considered two distinctly approaches to art – Realism and Surrealism. Through Sunday, Nov. 3. Exhibit (Judith Bear Isroff Gallery): "Line Color Illusion: 40 Years of Julian Stanczak (paintings and prints)." Through Sunday, Nov. 3. Event: "Free Thursday." Free all-day gallery admission, plus special programming throughout the day that includes art talks, films, classes, concerts and other special events. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday.
Allen Memorial Art Museum. 87 N. Main St., Oberlin. 440-775-8665 or oberlin.edu/allenart. A strong permanent collection makes the Allen well worth a trip to Lorain County. The Weltzheimer/Johnson House (a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian House, 1948-50), 534 Morgan St., is open the first and third Sundays of the month, from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Free. Exhibit: "Regarding Realism," realists depicted the world aroud them, from landscapes and rural scenes to the grittiness of urban life. Through Sunday, June 22. Exhibit: "Modern and Contemporary Realisms," featuring works from colorful expressionist paintings of the early 20th century to highly detailed photo-realist works by Chuck Close and Audrey Flack. Through Sunday, June 22. Exhibit: "The Human Comedy: Chonicles of 19th-Century France," featuring 150 works -- primarily lithographs reproduced in the French popular press. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Exhibit: "Harold E. Edgerton, Seeking Facts," works by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor, who pioneered flash photography techniques. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Tuesday Tea Talk: Sebastiaan Faber, director of the Oberlin Center for Language and Cultures, on ObeiMAPS, a web interface that allows users to find connections between museum collections, academic courses, faculty expertise, and study-away programs at Oberlin College. 2:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday). Closed major holidays. Free admission to the permanent collection. Admission may apply to touring exhibitions. Exhibit (Gallery 114): "Renaissance Textiles." About 15 Italian silks, velvets and altar frontals of the 14th and 15th centuries from the museum's collection. Through Sunday, Dec. 1. Exhibit (Atrium): "Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads." Installation of 12 bronze sculptures representing the animals of the Chinese zodiac. Through Sunday, Jan. 26. Exhibit: "Praxiteles: The Cleveland Apollo." The museum's ancient bronze sculpture "Apollo Sauaroktonos" from about 350-275 BC is the subject of a focus exhibition. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. Exhibit (Prints and Drawings Galleries): "Less Is More: Minimal Prints." Features about 50 works, including Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt and Frank Stella, from the 1960s and '70s when a style of flat geometric shapes was popular. Through Sunday, Oct. 20. Traveling Exhibit: "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome." Featuring over 150 objects, this exhibition celebrates Sicilian culture of the fifth to third centuries BC, when its art, architecture, theater, poetry, philosophy, and science left a stamp on both mainland Greece and Rome. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. $15; $13, senior citizens and students; $7, children ages 6-17. Free for CMA members and children ages 5 and under. Guided Tours. Trained volunteer docents lead visitors through permanent collections and free exhibitions. Tours depart from the information desk in the atrium. Free. 1:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. MIX/Muse Event (in Atrium): "The 20th PechaKucha Night Cleveland," an evening of art, discussion and cocktails. 7 p.m. today. $10. Details: go to clevelandart.org/eventgs/special-events/mix-muse. Art Stories: "Color, Color Everywhere." Storytime program designed for children ages 2-5 and their favorite grown-up. Space is limited. 10:30-11 a.m. Thursday. Free, but reservation required. Call 216-421-7350,.

Massillon Museum. 212 Lincoln Way 330-833-4061 or massillonmuseum.org. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday.; 2-5 p.m. Sunday. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Free. Exhibit: "Snap! In the Photobooth with Andy Warhol and Friends." Through Sunday, Oct. 13.

Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. 11400 Euclid Ave. 216-421-8671 or mocacleveland.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday). $8; $6, senior citizens; $5, students with valid ID. Free admission on the first Saturday of the month. Exhibit: "Everything All At Once," featuring works by four Cleveland-based artists (Jeffery Chiplis, Dana Depew, Elizabeth Emery and Jenniffer Omaitz). Through Sunday, Oct. 13. Exhibit: "Realization Is Better Than Anticipation," featuring 12 artists connected to Cleveland and surrounding region. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. Event: "Free First Saturday." MOCA Cleveland is free the first Saturday of the month. Sponsored by Medical Mutual. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Event: Presentation for Local Artists on Creative Captial Grants Program. 7 p.m. Thursday. Free, but reservation requested. Go to grants@creative-capital.org.

Transformer Station. 1460 West 29th St., Cleveland. 216-938-5429 or transformerstation.org. 12-5 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 9 p.m. Thursday). Free. Exhibit: "The Unicorn." Features works by five internationally-renowned contemporary artists: Neil Beloufa, Martin Soto Climent, Haris Epaminonda & Daniel Gustav Cramer and Shana Lutker exploring how memory is constructed by individuals looking backwards. Through Saturday Nov. 30.

ART -- GALLERIES
Beachwood Community Center Gallery. 23235 Fairmount Blvd. 216-292-1970 or beachwoodarts.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday. Exhibit: "Transformations, Honoring the Cancer Journey," featuring works from local cancer patients, caregivers and staff using a medical treatment device used in cancer care. Meet the Artists: 1:30-4 p.m. Sunday.

Breakneck Gallery. 17020 Madison Ave., Lakewood. 216-767-5610 or breakneckgallery.com. 4-7 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2-8 p.m. Saturday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "The Rock Show: A Show Where Local Artists and Bands Collide." Opening reception: 6-10 p.m. Saturday. Through Saturday, Nov. 2.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Beachwood branch, 25501 Shaker Blvd., Beachwood. 216-831-6868 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Free. Exhibit: Works by Hanna Levitin, Lili Rose and Stephanie Sibits. Meet the Artists: 2-4 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, Nov. 2.

Euclid Art Association. Euclid Public Library, East 222nd St. 216-261-5300. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Program: Chinese Watercolor Workshop with artist Mitzi Lai. Workshop: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. $35, members; $40, non-members.

Euclid Art Association. East Shore Methodist Church's Fellowship Hall, 23002 Lake Shore Blvd. 216-692-0538. Demonstration: Watercolor by Robert Moyer. Meet the Artist: 7 p.m. Monday.

James Douglas Studios. 2530 Superior Ave., Suite 401, Cleveland. 216-535-9152 or jamesdouglas.com. Exhibit: "Exclusive Press Preview." James Douglas, photography. Meet the Artist: 5-8 p.m. today.

Little Italy Art Walk. Mayfield and Murrary Hill roads, Cleveland. 216-707-9390 (Pennello Gallery) or clevelandlittleitaly.com. More than 30 galleries, studios and boutiques present handmade works by regional, national, and internationally known artists. Event: Annual Autumn Art Walk. Sale: 11-9 p.m. today-Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday.

Loren Naji Studio/Gallery. 2138 West 25th St., Cleveland. 216-621-6644 or lorennaji.com. 3-6 p.m. Friday, Tuesday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "The Director Never Yelled Cut." Works by Nancy Cintron, Tim Herron, Douglas Manry and Jamilla Naji. Meet the Artists: 6 p.m.-midnight today.

Mayfield Village Civic Center. 6622 Wilson Mills Road 440-442-5506 or artsegallery.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Exhibit: "Celebrating Creativity," featuring works by 20 local and national artists. Opening reception: 6-8:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Wednesday, Oct. 30.

Morgan Paper Conservatory. 1754 East 47th St., Cleveland. 216-361-9255 or morganconservatory.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Event: The sixth annual Benefit and Silent Art Auction. Featuring over 120 art pieces for auction as part of Octavofest, Northeast Ohio's month long celebration of book and papaer arts. Details, go to octavofest.org. Auction: 6 p.m. Saturday. $25; $20 Morgan members. Includes music and hors d-oeuvres.

Sculpture Center. 1834 East 123rd St., Cleveland. 216-229-6527 or sculpturecenter.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; noon-4 p.m. Saturday; or by appointment. Artist Talk: Artist-in-residence Przemyslaw Jasielski from Poznan, Poland, on the state of contemporary art in Poland and his won artwork. Talk: 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday.

Summit ArtSpace. 140 E. Market St., Akron. 330-376-8480 or akronareaarts.org. Noon-9:30 p.m. Thursday; noon-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. Exhibit: "First Impressions: Celebrating the Process of Printmaking." Continues through Saturday, Nov. 2.

Waterloo Arts. 15601 Waterloo Road, Cleveland. 216-692-9500 or artscollinwood.org. Event: "Zoetic Walls' Bomb Party: Imagine." Meet the Artists: 6-10 p.m. today.

BOOKS -- AUTHORS
Cleveland Public Library. Main Library's Louis Stokes Wing Auditorium, 525 Superior Ave. 216-623-2955 or cpl.org. Writers and Readers series: Comic book writer, artist and cartoonist Chris Ware on his craft. 2 p.m. Saturday.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Mayfield regional branch, 500 SOM Center Road, Mayfield. 440-473-0350 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Local Author Fair. 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Free. Meet a Local Author: Mickie Matheis, "Bedtime for Boo." 2 p.m. Saturday. Free, but registration requested.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Bay Village branch, 502 Cahoon Road, Bay Village. 440-871-6392 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Meet the Author: Bob Grau, "Five Million Steps: Thru-Hiking the Appalachian Trail." 10 p.m. Tuesday. Free, but registration requested.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Independence branch, 6361 Selig Drive, Independence. 216-447-0160 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Book Sale. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday. Through Monday, Oct. 14.

Hathaway Brown School. 19600 North Park Boulevard, Shaker Heights. 216-932-4214 or hb.edu. Learning for Life Speakers' series (Ahuja Auditrorium): Dr. Catherine Steiner-Adair, "The Big Disconnect." 7 p.m. Tuesday. Free, but registration required. Go to hb.edu/learningforlife.

Hudson Library and Historical Society. 96 Library St. 330-653-6658 or hudsonlibrary.org. Meet the Author: Scott Longert, "The Best They Could Be: How the Cleveland Indians Became the Kings of Baseball, 1916-20." 7 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Lakewood Public Library. 15425 Detroit Ave 216-226-8275 or lkwdpl.org. Program: "Attacking Writer's Block." 7 p.m. Tuesday. Free, but reservation required. Call 216-226-8275, ext. 127. Meet the Author: Paul Kuritz, "Fundamental Acting: A Practical Guide." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Free. Meet the Author: Alissa Nutting, "Tampa: A Novel." 7 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Peninsula Library. 6105 Riverview Road 330-657-2291 or peninsulalibrary.org. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. Fall Book Sale and Bizarre Bazaar. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.

Town Hall of Cleveland Speaker Series. PlayhouseSquare's Ohio Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave. 216-241-1919 or townhallseries.org. Speaker: William F. Baker, Ph.D. 6 p.m. Monday. $45. Student discounts available. Call 216-241-1919 or email admin@townhallseries.org.

BOOKS -- POETRY
Mahall's 20 Lanes. 13200 Madison Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-3280 or mahalls20lanes.com. Words Dance Poetry Festival. The first annual Words Dance Poetry Festival featured poets + open mic. Details: go to wordsdance.com/2013/08/words-dance-poetry-festival-2013.html 6 p.m. Saturday. Free.

DANCE
E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall. 198 Hill St., Akron. 330-972-7570 or ejthomashall.com. Performance: DanceCleveland presents BalletX. 8 p.m. Saturday. $11.50-$31.50.

Oberlin College. Warner Center Main Space, 30 N. Professor St. 440-775-8169 or oberlin.edu. Performance: Fall Forward annual Dance Concert, featuring original music by Oberlin students. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. $3, advance; $5, at door.

Ohio Conservatory of Ballet. Northwest High School's Puffenberger Hall, 8580 Erie Ave., Canal Fulton. 330-497-3288 or ohballet.com. Performances: Baladino. 7 p.m. Thursday.

PlayhouseSquare. Palace Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. Performances: Matthew Bournes "Sleeping Beauty: A Gothic Fairy Tale," featuring music by Tchaikovsky. 7:30 p.m. today, Tuesday-Thursday; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. $10-$75.

MUSIC -- ORCHESTRAL, OPERA
Apollo's Fire, The Cleveland Baroque Orchestra. "Virtuoso Orchestra." Francis Colpron, recorder; Kathie Stewart, traverso; and Debra Nagy, oboe; performs lively concertos by J.S. Bach, Telemann, Geminiani and Vivaldi. featuring works wreitten for the virtuoso orchestras of the 18th century at various locations through Sunday, Oct. 13. Tickets: $21-$68, adults; $10, full-time students with ID. Details: Call 216-320-0012 or 1-800-314-2535. For complete schedule, go to apollosfire.org. Concert: Apollo's Fire. First United Methodist Church. 263 E. Mill St., Akron. 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

Cleveland Orchestra. Severance Hall, 11001 Euclid Ave. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. Family Concert series: "Tchaikovsky Discovers America." William Eddins, conductor; with Classical Kids Live. 3 p.m. Sunday. $15-$30. Family Concert series: "Franck's Symphony in D." Marek Janowski, conductor; Matthew Polenzani, tenor; and Richard King, horn. Plus works by Faure and Britten. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. $31-$149.

Les Delices, Music of the French Baroque. "Woman Scorned," a program of wild, descriptive music depicitng temptresses and jilted lovers featuring mezzo-soprano Angela Young Smucker; with Debra Nagy, oboe; Julie Andrijeski, violin; Emily Walhout, viola da gamba; and Michael Sponseller, harpsichord at the following locations. Details: go to lesdelices.org or call 216-534-9208. Concert: Les Delices. Plymouth Church, UCC. 2860 Coventry Road, Shaker Heights. 4 p.m. Sunday. Pre-concert lecture at 3 p.m. $20-$30. William Busta Gallery. 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland. 8 p.m. Saturday. $20.

Metropolitan Opera: Live in HD. fathomevents.com. National CineMedia's Fathom presents Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin" Conducted by Valery Gergiev, with Anna Netrebko and Mariusz Kwiecien. Shown simultaneously at the following locations at 12:55 p.m. Saturday (Encore presentation at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday). Approximate running time: 180 minutes. Tickets: $16-$24 at the box office. Details: go to metopera.org/hdlive. Opera on Film: Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin." Cinemark Strongsville. Westfield SouthPark, Ohio 82 and Howe Road 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Cinemark 15. 8161 Macedonia Commons Blvd., Macedonia. 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Cinemark Tinseltown USA. 4720 Mega St., North Canton. 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Cinemark Valley View. 6001 Canal Road. 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Crocker Park Stadium 16. 30147 Detroit Road, Westlake. 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Hudson Cinemas 10. 5339 Darrow Road 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Montrose Movies Stadium 12. 4020 Medina Road, Akron. 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Severance Town Center Stadium 14. 3492 Mayfield Road, Cleveland Heights. 12:55 p.m. Saturday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

MUSIC -- RECITALS, COMMUNITY CONCERTS
Church of the Saviour. 2537 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-321-8880 or chsaviour.org. All Baroque Concert: "Eloquence and Elegance: Chamber Music of the Rococo," featuring the Ensemble Belvedere (Susan Shaw, baroque flute; Michael Tweed-Kent, baroque cello; and Jason Aquila, harpsichord). Featuring instrumental works of the early and mid-18th century or "rococo" period, and include sonatas by C.P.E. Bach, Franz Benda and J.J. Quantz. 2 p.m. Sunday. Offering.

Cleveland Institute of Music at Severance Hall. 11001 Euclid Ave. 216-791-5000. Concert: CIM Orchestra. Carl Topilow, conductor; HaeSun Paik, piano. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $5.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. Concert: L. Subramaniam, India's violin icon. 7:30 p.m. today. Preconcert talk at 6 p.m. on the reopening of the Indian and Southeast Asian galleries. $33-$51.

Hudson Library. 96 Library St. 330-653-6658, ext. 1010 or hudsonlibrary.org. Concert: Kent State University School of Music students. 2 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Lorain County Community College. Stocker Arts Center, 1005 N. Abbe Road, Elyria. 440-366-4040 or stockerartscenter.com. Concert: Eileen Burns' "Girl Singer -- Remembering the Ladies Who Sang with the Big Bands." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $15; $10, children 12 and under.

Oberlin College. Warner Concert Hall, 77 W. College St. 440-775-8044 or oberlin.edu. Concert: Contemporary Music Ensemble. Timothy Weiss, conductor; with guest performers eighth blackbird and composer-in-residence Benjamin Broening. 8 p.m. today. Free.

Trinity Cathedral. 2230 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-771-3630 or trinitycleveland.org. Brownbag concert: "Swingin' Music by the Four Clarinets." 12:10 p.m. Wednesday. Offering. Bring a lunch or purchase one for $5.

Trinity Lutheran Church. 2031 West 30th St., Cleveland. 216-751-7574 or clevelandbeckerath.org. Brownbag Concert: "Tao and How: Music by Buxtehude, Bach, Healey and others." Florence Mustric, organ. 12:15 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

University of Akron. Guzzetta Recital Hall, 157 University Ave. 330-972-8301 or uakron.edu/music. Most events free, unless indicated. Concert: UA Symphonic Band. Galen Karriker, conductor. 3 p.m. Sunday. Free. Concert: UA Jazz Combos. 8 p.m. Monday. Free. Concert: UA Jazz Ensembles. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Free. Concert: UA Concert Band. Joe Witkowski, conductor. 8 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

University of Akron. First Congregational Church, 292 E. Market St. 330-972-8301 or uakron.edu/music. Concert: UA Symphony Orchestra and UA Concert Choir. Guy Bordo and Vaughn Roste, conductors. Works by Geminiani and Beethoven. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Free.

THEATER -- PROFESSIONAL
Actors' Summit Theater. Greystone Hall, 6th Floor, 103 S. High St., Akron. 330-374-7568 or actorssummit.org. Rogers and Hammerstein's "A Grand Night for Singing." 8 p.m. Thursday. Preview (Thursday): $20. All other performances through Sunday, Nov. 3: $10-$33.

Akron Civic Theatre. 182 S. Main St. 330-253-2488 or akroncivic.com. "Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody." 8 p.m. today. $35-$45.

Beck Center for the Arts. 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-2540 or beckcenter.org. Mackey Main Stage: Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock's "She Loves Me." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 20. No performance Saturday, Oct. 19. $29; $26, senior citizens (ages 65 and up); $12, students with valid ID; $10 ages 12 and under. Studio Theater: Moises Kaufman's "33 Variations." 8 p.m. Thursday. Preview (Thursday): $10. All other performances through Sunday, Nov. 17: $10-$29.

Bodwin Theatre Company. 2555 Euclid Heights Blvd., Cleveland Heights. 216-229-0307. Peter Manos' "Golden." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. Free.

Cleveland Play House. 1407 Euclid Ave. 216-241-6000 or clevelandplayhouse.com. PlayhouseSquare's Allen Theatre's Second Stage: "Woody Sez: The Life & Music of Woody Guthrie." 7:30 p.m. today; 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Free Hootennies (jam session) following Sunday performance.$15-$65.

Cleveland Public Theatre. 6415 Detroit Ave. 216-631-2727 or cptonline.org. Holly Holsinger, Chris Seibert and Raymond Bobgan's "Insomnia: The Waking of Herselves." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Through Saturday, Oct. 26. $12-$28 ($12 Thursdays and Mondays; $3 discount for students/senior citizens Fridays and Saturdays). James Levin Theatre: SpringBoard: A Staged Reading Festival (the third annual festival of new plays through Sunday, Oct. 6): ): Sam Roberson's "Same Difference." 7 p.m. today and Sunday. $12. SpringBoard: A Staged Reading Festival (the third annual festival of new plays through Sunday, Oct. 6): ): Juliette Regnier's "Soiled" and Mary Weems' "Dirt." 7 p.m. Saturday. $12.

Dobama Theatre. 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-932-3396 or dobama.org. Donald Margulies' "Time Stands Still." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $19-$24. Students (full-time and under 25 with ID): $10. Rush tickets for ages 21 and under available for $5 five minutes before curtain and based on seat availability). All other performances through Sunday, Oct. 6.

Ensemble Theatre. 2843 Washington Ave., Cleveland Heights. 216-321-2930 or ensemble-theatre.org. Rajiv Joseph's "Animals Out of Paper." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 20. $22; $20, senior citizens; $12, students with ID.

Great Lakes Theater. Hanna Theatre, 2067 East 14th St., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or greatlakestheater.org. In repertory through Nov. 3: William Shakepeare's "Richard III" and Stephen Sondheim's "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.." Stephen Sondheim's "Sweeney Todd." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $15-$70. William Shakespeare's "Richard III." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. $15-$70.

Karamu Performing Arts Theatre. 2355 East 89th St., Cleveland. 216-795-7070 or karamuhouse.org. Lee Summers, Ty Stephens and Herbert Rawlings Jr.'s "From My Hometown: A Celebration of the American Dream in Classic R&B." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. $21-$30.

Lakeland Theatre. Lakeland Community College, I-90 and Ohio 306, Kirtland. 440-525-7134 or lakelandcc.edu/academic/arts/theatre/. Beverley Cross' translation of Marc Camoletti's "Boeing Boeing." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $13; $10, senior citizens; $7, students.

Pickwick & Frolic Restaurant and Club. Frolic Cabaret, 2035 East Fourth St., Cleveland. 216-241-7425 or pickwickandfrolic.com. Murder Mystery Musical: Michael Rogaliner's "Toga Party Terror." 7:15 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 26. $49.95, does not include tax and gratuity.

PlayhouseSquare. 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or playhousesquare.org. Kennedy's Cabaret Theater, basement of Ohio Theatre: Eric Schmiedl's "Kardiac Kid." 7:30 p.m. today and Thursday; 5 and 8:30 p.m. Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, Oct. 12. $25. State Theatre: Public Radio's "RadioLab Live: Apocalyptical" Tour. 8 p.m. today. $35-$45.

THEATER -- COMMUNITY
Baldwin Wallace University. Kleist Center for Arts & Drama's John Patrick Theatre, 95 E. Bagley Road, Berea. 440-826-2240 or bw.edu. William Shakespeare's "Henry IV, Part One." 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. $5-$10.

Brecksville Little Theatre. Brecksville Old Town Hall, Ohio 21 and 82. 440-526-4477 or brecksvillelittletheatre.org. James Valcq's musical parody of the 1950s scifi movies: "Zombies from the Beyond." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, Oct. 12. $12.

Case Western Reserve University. Eldred Theater, 2070 Adelbert Road, Cleveland. 216-368-6262 or case.edu/artsci/thtr. Jon Klein's "Betty the Yeti." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. $10; $7, senior citizens 60 and over; $5, students with ID.

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. Main Stage, 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Ken Ludwig's "Postmortem." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Saturday, Oct. 19. $18; $14, senior citizens and students.

Clague Playhouse. 1371 Clague Road, Westlake. 440-331-0403 or clagueplayhouse.org. Sam Bobrick's "The Psychic (A Murder Mystery of Sorts)." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $15-$16; $10, students with valid ID. Sold out performance: Saturday.

Coach House Theatre. 732 W. Exchange St., Akron. 330-434-7741 or coachhousetheatre.org. Tom Ziegler's "Grace and Glorie." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. $20; $12, students.

Dark Room. The Church at Cleveland Public Theatre, 6407 Detroit Ave., Cleveland. 216-631-2727 or cptonline.org. Every second Tuesday of the month audience members, writers, actors and other theater artists come together to try out scenes of new plays. Open Mike Readings. Tuesday: sign-up for writers and actors at 7:15 p.m.; open mike session readings begin at 7:30 p.m. Suggested donation: $5. Writers can bring up to 10 pages of work to be read; actors will be cast on the spot.

GB Community Theatre. Ashtabula Arts Center, 2928 West 13th St., Ashtabula. 440-964-3396 or ashartscenter.org. "The Rocky Horror Show." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, Oct. 19. Not intended for children and contains material that may offend some people., $12-$14.

Huntington Playhouse. 28601 Lake Road, Bay Village. 440-871-8333 or huntingtonplayhouse.com. "Swinging on a Star: The Johnny Burke Musical Revue." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. One Sunday matinee: 2 p.m. Oct. 13. $20. Call for senior citizens and students prices.

Kent State University. Music & Speech Building's Wright-Curtis Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive 330-672-2787 or theatre.kent.edu. Oliver Goldsmith's "She Stoops to Conquer." 8 p.m. today-Saturday, Tuesday-Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Oct. 13. $16; $12, senior citizens ages 60 and over; $8, students with ID.

Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens. 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. 330-315-3287 or stanhywet.org. Murder Mystery: "Murder in the Mansion: A Thorny Situation." 7 p.m. Thursday. Through Friday, Oct. 25. Guests should arrive by 6:45 p.m. and be able to climb stairs. Comfortable walking shoes are suggested. $43; $35, Stan Hywet members.

TrueNorth Cultural Arts Center. Lorain County Metro Parks' French Creek Nature Center, 4530 Colorado Ave., Sheffield. 440-949-5200, ext. 221 or tncarts.org. Dale Wasserman, Mitch Leigh and Joe Darion's 'Man of La Mancha." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $16-$18; $10, youth.

Weathervane Playhouse. 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron. 330-836-2626 or weathervaneplayhouse.com. Emlyn Williams' "Night Must Fall." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Preview (Thursday): $15; $7.50 for college students and children ages 17 and under. All other performances through Sunday, Oct. 27: $21-$25; $7.50 for college students and children ages 17 and under.,.

AUDITIONS For the region's most comprehensive look at auditions at theaters and other arts organizations, go to cleveland.com/auditions.

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News Headline: 2DO Listings for Oct. 4-Oct. 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: EXPOS & SHOWS
Louise's Thrift and Consignment Store. 13906 Old State Road, Middlefield. Antiquities and Fine Arts Appraisal. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. today.
Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. 2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood. 216-593-0575 or maltzmuseum.org. Features a rich selection from the Temple Museum of Religious Art's collection of art and artifacts that includes ritual objects, sacred books and scrolls, and fine art from around the world. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Closed all holiday Mondays unless noted on the website. "Traitor-Spies, Lie and Justice Denied: The Dreyfus Affair." This famous case altered media, politics and society for the 20th century and beyond. Tuesday-Thursday. Free with museum admission.

HALLOWEEN
Barberton Historical Society. O.C. Barber Pig Farm, 248 E. Robinson Ave., Massillon. 330-830-1444. The Barber Haunt. This halloween event is located in the 100-year-old O.C. Barber Pig Barn. This year it has larger, more scary displays. 7:30-11 p.m. today-Saturday; 7:30-10 p.m. Sunday. $15.
Hauntville. 1579 W. River Road, Elyria. 440-655-0016 or elyriahauntedhouse.com. Hauntville. The haunted house is directly across Midway Mall in Elyria. Activities include: Zombie Hunt in 3D Paintball, First 4D Haunted Houses in Ohio. 7 p.m.-midnight today-Saturday; 7-10 p.m. Sunday and Thursday. Hauntville. Ohio's only 4D Haunted House. Ohio's scariest haunted houses with four mind-blowing attractions. Brand new Zombie Paintball Hunt in 3D. Shoot live zombies. Through Saturday, Nov. 2: 7-12:00 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 7-10:00 p.m. Sundays and Thursdays. http://www.elyriahauntedhouse.com/.
Rockin'-R-Ranch Spooky Ranch Nights. 19066 E. River Road (Ohio 252), Columbia Station. 440-236-5454 or spookyranch.com. Spooky Ranch at Rockin'-R-Ranch. Five attractions. Most technically advanced haunted hayride and haunted attractions in Ohio. Through Saturday, Nov. 2: 7-11:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 7-9:30 p.m. Sundays and Thursdays.

HIKING
Medina County Park District. Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. medinacountyparks.com. Mysterious World of Owls. Discover the amazing adaptations of these nocturnal birds of prey. 7 p.m. Saturday. Free.

RUNS
Cuyahoga Valley Career Center. 8001 Brecksville Road , Brecksville. 440-746-8210 or www.cvccworks.com. 5k race and 2 mile walk. 8:10 a.m. Saturday.

FAIRS/FESTIVALS
Huntsburg Pumpkin Festival. State Route 322 and State Route 528. Huntsburg Pumpkin Festival. There is not entrance fee and the contests, entertainment and attractions are free. Contests will include: apple peeling, pumpkin pie eating, bubble gum blowing, rock toss and nail pounding. 9 a.m. Sunday.
Lorain Public Library. South Lorain Branch, 2121 Homewood Drive. 440-277-5672. Hispanic Heritage Celebration. 2-4 p.m. Saturday.
Patterson Fruit Farm. 8765 Mulberry Road, Chester Township. 440-729-1964, 440-729-1964 or pattersonfarm.com. Patterson Farm Family Fun Fest. Wagon rides, slides, hikes, corn maze and pumpkins and pick apples. Pumpkin paintings available weekday afternoons from 2-6 p.m. and on the weekends. Cost: $4, includes pumpkin. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. today-Sunday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Monday-Friday: $4. Saturday-Sunday and NEOEA Day (Oct. 18): $8, adults and children, $6, senior citizens. Ages two and under are free everyday. Through Sunday, Oct. 27
Sirna's Farm & Market. 19009 Ravenna Road (Ohio 44), Auburn Township. 440-834-0696 or sirnasfarm.com. Annual Fall Festival 2013. Fall Harvest, featuring food and beverages, hay rides, obstacle course, games and contests, animal farm, and Police K-9 demonstrations. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $3, adults; $2, children; under three free. Through Sunday, Oct. 13.
St. Gregory of Narek Armenian Church. 678 Richmond Road, Richmond Heights. 216-381-6590 or stgregorynarek.com. Armenian Food Festival and Bazaar. Authentic Armenian food and pastries, cultural display, church tours. Plus Armenian music, entertainment and crafts. 5-9 p.m. today; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Free.
St. Stanislaus Parish Social Center. 6601 Baxter Ave., Cleveland. 216-341-9091 or ststanislaus.org. Polish Festival. Polish food, pastries, dancing, games, imports and tours of the church, Polish and domestic beers, wine and spirits. Hours are 5-9 p.m. Friday, 4-9 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Today-Sunday.
Williams on the Lake. 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Medina Beer Fest. 6-9 p.m. Saturday.

PARKS/OUTDOORS
Geauga Park District. Observatory Park, Robert McCullough Science Center, 10610 Clay St., Montville. 440-285-9516 or geaugaparkdistrict.org. Fall at Observatory Park. 6-11 p.m. today-Thursday.
Lake Metroparks. Penitentiary Glen Nature Center, 8668 Kirtland-Chardon Road, Kirtland. 440-256-1404 or lakemetroparks.com. Celebrating Black Squirrels. Noon-4 p.m. Sunday.
Lake Metroparks Farmpark. 8800 Chardon Road (U.S. 6), Kirtland. 440-256-2122 or lakemetroparks.com. Farmpark is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas, New Year's Day, Vintage Ohio. Open Martin Luther King Jr. and Presidents days . $6; $5, ages 60 and up; $4, ages 2-11; free for Farmpark members, children younger than 2, and active U.S. military personnel and their families, with ID.
Summit County Metro Parks. F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm/Visitors Center, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. 330-865-8065 or summitmetroparks.org. Fall hiking spree. Fall foliage is on display during this hike. Hike at least eight designated trails to receive hiking rewards. Hikes must be completed Sept. 1 through Nov. 30. Today-Thursday. $10 for first year hikers; $5 for veteran hilkers.

MUSEUMS
Baseball Heritage Museum. 530 Euclid Ave. (located in the Colonial Marketplace)., Cleveland. 216-789-1083 or baseballheritagemuseum.org. Showcases stories, photographs, letters, programs, uniforms and other game-used memorabilia. Hours: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday, Wednesday. Friday. Donations accepted. 216-789-1083 or baseballheritagemuseum.org.
Children's Museum of Cleveland. 10730 Euclid Ave. 216-791-7114 or clevelandchildrensmuseum.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Daily. $7, adults and children; free for 11 months and younger. Global Cardboard Challenge: “Day of Playâ€Â. Inspired by the short film, "Caine's Arcade," the Cardboard Challenge is a celebration of child creativity, expected to engage 1 million children from 70 countries. Mattress Firm is a sponsor, hosting events. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Free.
Cleveland Hungarian Heritage Society. Galleria at Erieview, 1301 East Ninth St. 216-523-3900 or jcu.edu/language/hunghemu. On the second floor of the Galleria. The museum's mission is preserving Hungarian culture and the experiences of Hungarians in Northeast Ohio. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. By appointment only Monday and Saturday. Free.
Croatian Heritage Museum and Library. 34900 Lake Shore Blvd., Eastlake. 440-946-2044 or croatianmuseum.com. Museum and library hours: 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays, 3-8 p.m. Fridays and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays. Group tours can be arranged.
Czech Cultural Center Museum and Library of Sokol Greater Cleveland. Bohemian National Hall, 4939 Broadway. 216-641-9777; 216-883-1970 (Saturday only) or sokolgreatercleveland.com. 10 a.m.- 1 p.m. Saturdays. Free. Authentic Czech Artifacts on Display. Czech costumes, marionettes and historical artifacts. Czech garnets and costume jewelry, crystal, pottery, books on sale in museum gift shop. Building tours available by appointment. Call 216-524-7722 or 216-561-7029. Exhibit runs through Dec. 27.
Dennison Railroad Depot Museum. 400 Center St. 740-922-6776 or dennisondepot.org. Museum and Whistle Stop Gift Shop, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. today; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday.
Dunham Tavern Museum. 6709 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-431-1060 or dunhamtavern.org. Stagecoach stop built in 1824, with artifacts from 1820 to 1860. Grounds feature barn, log cabin, heritage trail and gardens. Tours by appointment only (for 15 or more). Hours: 1-4 p.m. Wednesday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $3, adults; $2, children under 12; free, members.
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Learning Center and Money Museum. 1455 East Sixth St. 216-579-3188 or clevelandfed.org. Learn what gives money value while exploring 25 interactive exhibits in the main lobby. Free admission. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Closed holidays. Exhibit: "Propaganda and Patriotism: The Art of Financing America's War." Vintage War Bond posters designed by prominent American Artists. Through Thursday, Jan. 30.
Great Lakes Science Center. 601 Erieside Ave., Cleveland. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com. Admission: Great Lakes Science, $12-$14; Omnimax Theater, $9-$11; Great Lakes Science and Omnimax combo, $17-$19. Steamship William G. Mather Museum is open for the season. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day). Featuring hundreds of hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibitions, daily demonstrations and the Omnimax Theater. The Steamship William G. Mather is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in May, September and October; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday in June, July and August; and closed November through April. Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition. Features more than 250 artifacts conserved from the ship's debris, including the bell that was rung the night of the sinking. Visuals of the ship's construction that guests can walk through include the first and third-class cabins, boiler room, captain's bridge and more. Guests will encounter historical re-enactors. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. Hours: 10:15 a.m.-6 p.m. daily (till 6:30 p.m. the first Saturday of the month and holidays). Other exhibits close at 5 p.m. Admission is $24 for adults, $22 for ages 2-12 for nonmembers; $10 for members. Includes admission to the entire science center. Tickets for "Titanic" are timed; advance tickets may be purchased.
Holden Arboretum. 9500 Sperry Road, Kirtland. 440-946-4400 or holdenarb.org. The Holden Arboretum is an outdoor living museum that promotes the beauty and importance of trees and other woody plants to create sustainable and healthy communities in the Great Lakes region and beyond. Dogs at Holden: Dogs on a leash are welcome at the arboretum but not in the Myrtle S. Holden Wildflower Garden. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day . $6, ages 13 and older; $5, seniors 60 and over; $3, ages 6-12; free, members and ages 5 and under. Tram tours: $2. Reservations required.
Indian Museum of Lake County. Technical Center, Building B, 25 Public Square, Willoughby. 440-951-3813 or indianmuseumoflakecounty.org. Tour programs: home schools, schools and groups by reservation only. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday; 1-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Closed major holiday weekends. $2; $1.50, seniors; $1, students (K-12); free, preschoolers.
International Women's Air and Space Museum. Burke Lakefront Airport terminal lobby, 1501 N. Marginal Road, Cleveland. 216-623-1111 or iwasm.org. Self-guided tours 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. Guided tours 1 p.m. each Saturday. Research center and gift shop with original documents, photos and books. Center and gift shop: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Free.
James A. Garfield National Historic Site. 8095 Mentor Ave., Mentor. 440-255-8722 or nps.gov/jaga. James A. Garfield acquired this home in 1876 to accommodate his large family. Named Lawnfield by reporters, it was the site of the first successful front-porch campaign, which saw Garfield elected as 20th president of the United States in 1880. Following Garfield's assassination, the Memorial Library wing was added by Mrs. Garfield and her family, setting the precedent for presidential libraries. Summer hours through Oct. 31. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. School groups and adult groups are welcome by appointment. $5; free for children 15 and younger.
Lake View Cemetery. 12316 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-421-2665 or lakeviewcemetery.com. From April 1 through Nov. 19: Cemetery hours: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. daily. Tomb of James A. Garfield, 20th U.S. president, and Wade Memorial Chapel open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. To register for programs, call Mary C. Krohmer, director of community relations, at 216-421-2687.
Lakewood Historical Society. Oldest Stone House Museum, 14710 Lake Ave. 216-221-7343. Home built in 1838; displays memorabilia from pioneer past. 2-5 p.m. Sunday; 1-4 p.m. Wednesday. Closed December-January and major holidays.
Lorain County History Center. 284 Washington Ave., Elyria. 440-322-3341 or lchs.org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturday. $5, adults; $3, ages 13-18; $2 for 6-12; free, members and children under 6. Lorain County Historical Society: Sacred Landmarks Exhibition. This exhibition includes 14 posters of color and black-and-white photographs featuring the architecture of Lorain County churches that were built before 1900 and continue in operation today. Several artifacts are also on view. The exhibition is included with the price of admission. Exhibit runs through December. Free with admission.
Mill Creek Falls History Center. 8404 Webb Terrace, Cleveland. 216-271-9300 or slavicvillagehistory.org. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Monday through Friday by appointment. Learn about the history of the Slavic Village and Mill Creek neighborhoods.
National Cleveland-Style Polka Hall of Fame. 605 East 222nd St., Euclid. 216-261-3263 or clevelandstyle.com. Polka history and memorabilia. Free. Noon-5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday, Monday, Thursday and holidays. Exhibit: "All-Star Accordions: Clebrity Squeezeboxes and the Stories Behind Them." Through Friday, Jan. 31. Euclid City Hall Council Chambers, 585 East 222nd St., Euclid. 216-261-3263 or clevelandstyle.com. The 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award of the National Clevealnd-Style Polka Hall of Fame. Two winners of the four nominees (Dwight Gobely, LynnMarie Hrovat Rink and the late Jim Kozel and Frankie Zeitz) will be presented at the October meeting and Awards Show Preview Party. 7 p.m. Thursday.
Shaker Historical Society. 16740 South Park Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-921-1201 or shakerhistory.com. Hours: 2-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $5, nonmembers; $2, children 6-18; free, members and children under 6. Exhibit: "Michaelangelo Lovelace: Inner-City Life." Through Sunday, Nov. 10.
Stearns Farm. 6975 Ridge Road, Parma. 440-845–9770 or Stearnshomestead.com. Stearns homestead features two homes that are now museums, a general store, Yankee barn and farm animals. Noon-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October. Admission is free, but there is a charge for feed for the animals. Farmers Market. Buy locally grown produce. Rain or shine. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 5.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES
Just for fun
Cleveland Orchestra. Severance Hall, 11001 Euclid Ave. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. Concert previews are presented in Reinberger Chamber Hall one hour before each concert. Musical Rainbow series: "The Triumphant Trumpet." In Reinberger Chamber Hall: Jack Sutte, trumpet; Maryann Nagel, host; and Laura Silvefrman, piano. Program for ages 3-6. 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 11. $7.

Just for fun
Ridgeview Farm. 5488 Kinsman Road, Middlefield. 440-693-4000 or ridgeviewfarm.com. Ridgeview Farm has been in the Grover family for over four generations, with the fifth currently growing up on the same land. It is a working farm. Capture the Fall Before it Leaves. This farms offers hayrides, an 8 acre corn maze, sand box, petting barn and pick your own pumpkin. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; 2-4 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Theater
82nd Street Theatre. Abundant Life Community Church, 10143 Royalton Road Suites N and O, North Royalton. 440-877-1202 or alcc.cc. Disney's "Winnie the Pooh Kids." 7 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $7; $6, senior citizens and students.
Akron Civic Theatre. 182 S. Main St. 330-253-2488 or akroncivic.com. Bunnicula. Bunnicula is based on a book by Deborah and James Howe. 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

Zoos
Akron Zoological Park. 500 Edgewood Ave. 330-375-2550 or akronzoo.org. Summer season hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through October. Winter season hours: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Nov. 1 through April 30. $10; $8.50, seniors; $7, children 2-14; free, members ($2 parking for nonmembers). Over 50 acres with more than 700 animals from around the world, plus a train, carousel and Farmland. Grizzly Ridge exhibit features various species, highlighted by grizzly bears.
Greater Cleveland Aquarium. 2000 Sycamore St. 216-862-8803 or greaterclevelandaquarium.com. Features more than 40 exhibits, including a walk-through shark exhibit. Strollers and wheelchair accessible. Wheelchairs available on a first come, first serve basis; pass holders, free and non-pass holders, $5. Parking: $3, Monday-Friday; $5, Saturday, Sunday. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily with last admission at 4 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. $19.95; $17.95, seniors 60 and up; $13.95, children 2-12. Annual pass: $50, adults; $90, couple; $130, family (two adults and two children) with each additional child $25; seniors, $45; senior couple, $80. Military rate available at GCA ticket counter. The Greater Cleveland Aquarium Live Coral Exhibit. The new live coral exhibit emphasizes the importance of coral and why they need our protection. The GCA has been growing coral from fragments acquired from other institutions. This allows display of live coral without harming natural reefs. Exhibit shows a dozen species of corals. Ongoing exhibit. Free with admission.

ETC.
Akron Zoological Park. 500 Edgewood Ave. 330-375-2550 or akronzoo.org. Summer season hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through October. Winter season hours: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Nov. 1 through April 30. $10; $8.50, seniors; $7, children 2-14; free, members ($2 parking for nonmembers). Green Energy Ohio Tour. 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday.
Avon Lake Public Library. 32649 Electric Blvd. 440-933-8128 or alpl.org. 1-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. Sunlight and Shadow -- Water Color Class. Artist Christine England offers a series of four watercolor classes Saturdays Oct. 14, 21 and 28 and Oct. 5. 9-11 a.m. Saturday. yes. $35-$40.
Cleveland Metroparks. Rocky River Reservation's Frostville Museum, 24101 Cedar Point Road, between Valley Parkway and Columbia Road, North Olmsted. 440-779-0280 or olmstedhistoricalsociety.org. Farmers Market. Featuring local farmers, producers, artisans and vendors who grow and/or produce their own goods. Each growing season is represented by a variety of different farmers. This is a family-oriented event with children's activities, cooking demonstrations, speakers and music each week. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. every Saturday through Oct. 26.
Cleveland Museum of Art's Viva! & Gala Around Town. Trinity Cathedral, 2230 Euclid Ave. 1-888-262-0033 or clevelandart.org/viva. Blessing of the animals. 10:10 a.m. Sunday.
Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds. 164 Eastland Road (off Bagley Road), Berea. 440-243-0090 or cuyfair.com. Carnival of Model Trains '13. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. $7.50.
Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 50. Hinde Field, 1819 Boos Road, Huron. 440-258-1761 or eaa50.org. Experimental Aircraft Association. 1:30 p.m. Saturday.
Judson Manor. 1890 East 107th St., Cleveland. 216-791-2555 or judsonsmartliving.org. A course: "Gertrude Bell: Queens of the Desert, Shaper of Nations." This course explores the life of and legacy of Bell, often referred to as the female "Lawrence of Arabia." The class starts (Wednesdays) Sept. 25 through Nov. 13. 10-11:30 a.m. Wednesday.
Kent State University Planetarium. Smith Hall, Room 108, E. Summit St. 330-672-2246 or planetarium.kent.edu/users/planet. Introduction to the Autumn Sky. This presentation will showcase the prominent autumn constellations, point out celestial objects that are visible to the naked eye, and tour our neighbors in the solar system. 8 p.m. today. Free.
Lakewood Center Plaza. Near the intersection of Warren and Detroit roads. downtownlakewood.org. Farmers Market. Locally grown produce, foods and handmade goods from over 20 area vendors. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. every Saturday through Oct. 5.
Lakewood Public Library. 15425 Detroit Ave. 216-226-8275 or lkwdpl.org. Lakewood Public Spelling Bee. Preliminary rounds are held on Oct. 3 and Oct. 10. Grades 2 to 4 will start at 4 p.m. and grades 5 to 8 at 4:45 p.m. Competitor Meet and Greet takes place Oct. 17 at 4 p.m. The championship takes place the following day, Oct. 18 with grades 2 to 4 competing at 6:30 p.m. and grades 5 to 8 at 7:15 p.m. in the Main Library Auditorium. 66registration required. Call216-226-8275.
Lorain County Metro Parks. Carlisle Reservation, Equestrian Center, 13630 Diagonal Road, Carlisle Township. 440-458-5121 or loraincountymetroparks.com. Fall hay Wagon Rides and Corn Maze. Horse-drawn wagons leave every fifteen minutes. Noon-3:30 p.m. Saturday.
Medina County Park District. Hidden Hollow Camp, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. medinacountyparks.com. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Those Amazing Spiders. Spiders come in many different sizes, shapes, and colors and are found just about everywhere, including homes. Join us to discover amazing facts about them. 3 p.m. Sunday.
Mesopotamia Village Commons. 8719 Ohio 534. mespofire.com. Mesopotamia Fall Heritage Day. The event brings together skilled artisans from the Greater Mespo area that specializes in traditional Amish and Yankee crafts. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.
North Union Farmers Market. Crocker Park, Crocker and Detroit roads, Westlake. 440-250-9268 or crockerpark.com. Farmers Market. Locally grown fresh produce for sale. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays through Dec. 21. Shaker Square Market, Shaker and Moreland boulevards, Cleveland. 216-751-7656. 8 a.m.-noon Saturdays through Dec. 21.
OhioGuidestone. MidTown Office, 3500 Carnegie Ave. , Cleveland. 440-260-8212 or ohioguidestone.org. Traveling Exhibit: "Hidden in Plain Sight," created by the Bath and Copley Township Police departments. The departments recreated the bedroom of the average teenager, but items that are taken for granted can be signals that the teenager could be involved risky or illegal activity (substance abuse, underage drinking, eating disorders or sexual activity). 6 p.m. Wednesday. Free. Adults only.
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. 1100 Rock and Roll Blvd. , Cleveland. 216-781-7625 or rockhall.com. Music memorabilia (exhibits, sounds and experiences of artists, songwriters and producers from every era). Rock 'n' Roll Cleveland Half Marathon. Participants in the race will move past notable landmarks throughout the city, including Progressive Field, Quicken Loans Arena, Browns Stadium, Great Lakes Science Center and the Tremont neighborhood. There will also be bands playing along the route. The race begins at the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame and ends at W. Superior Ave. and W. 3rd St. with a Finish Line Festival presented by Horseshoe Casino Cleveland. For information about the race visit Competitor.com. Sunday.
Shore Cultural Centre. 291 East 222nd St., Euclid. 216-289-8578 or shoreculturalcentre.com. Farmers Market. The market features locally grown and organic produce, baked goods, bedding plants, herbs, jams, honey, tea and more. Also features live music and regularly scheduled free activities for kids and families. 3-7 p.m. every Friday through Nov. 1.

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News Headline: Kent celebration | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/03/2013
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A community celebration of the partnership between Kent State University and the city of Kent, represented by the new KSU Esplanade extension that now connects the university to downtown Kent, will take place tomorrow afternoon at 3:30. the celebration will be held, rain or shine, at the new University Esplanade arch near Main and Willow streets in Kent . It's free and open to the public. The Esplanade is a connection between the university and downtown projects that include PARTA's new Kent Central gateway transit center, Acorn Alley and the new KSU Hotel and Conference Center.

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News Headline: Public universities in billboard duel Competition for NE Ohio students fuels advertising, marketing drives (Harvey) | Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Farkas, Karen
News OCR Text: Kent State. Northeast Ohio's #1 choice among universities,” proclaims a billboard on Ohio 43 in Streetsboro as drivers head south to the university's campus.

About 1,500 feet down the road is another statement:

“You Took Math. Do Some,” says a green billboard with a Cleveland State University seal. “More Internships. Better Value.”

“After nearly five years of trying, we finally got that billboard,” Rob Spademan, assistant vice president for university marketing and student recruitment, told CSU trustees this week. “We thought about putting ‘Next year, move off campus, way off,' with the CSU seal but didn't want to incite a riot,” he said with a smile.

CSU is seeking more students from Portage and Summit counties, but Kent State has its own battle plan. The same information on its Ohio 43 billboard flashes on electronic billboards on interstates leading to Cleveland.

As the number of high school graduates in Ohio continues to decline and public universities seek to improve the academic quality of their students — a requirement by the state — competition has probably never been so fierce, officials said.

And, not surprisingly, the focus is on highly populated Northeast Ohio, also the home to many public, private and for-profit higher education institutions.

Until about a decade ago, the three area public universities, CSU, Kent State and the University of Akron co-existed fairly well. Kent State was a residential campus while CSU and Akron were primarily commuter schools that drew traditional and non-traditional students from the immediate area.

But CSU and Akron dramatically remade their campuses, adding residence halls, new buildings and more amenities for students. And they sought students with higher academic credentials.

“We've seen increased competition over a period of years here,” said Wayne Hill, hired to fill the new position of associate vice president and chief marketing officer at the University of Akron in November, 2011.

“Not only the public universities are doing it, but the for-profits are actually the heaviest spenders in the marketplace. And no one should forget the privates.”

Spademan said one of the advertising agencies vying for CSU's business this fall said higher education institutions spent $5 million last year on media purchases in the Cleveland area.

“Cleveland is a target opportunity,” he told trustees as they discussed advertising. “The University of Toledo has a relationship with Cleveland schools. Ohio State University is here, and Ohio University has commercials and billboards. It is ironic because Cleveland's demographics are declining, but a lot of people are fishing here.”

Ohio State University opened its first student recruitment office in Cleveland last week.

Trustee Morton Levin asked Spademan if CSU should advertise in markets outside Cleveland.

“We don't want to start an advertising war,” Spademan said, then added that CSU has done some advertising in Akron and added the billboard near Kent State.

The University of Akron's primary market is Northeast Ohio, although it has done advertising in central Ohio, Hill said. Akron has run regional ads during the Super Bowl for over a decade.

He said Akron plans to add several Cuyahoga County billboards over the next several weeks.

Kent State does a lot of research to determine where its students come from, then invests a significant amount of money for marketing and advertising to get the best return on its investment, said Iris Harvey, vice president of university relations.

“In some ways, every university in Ohio competes with each other.”

Kent State launched a $1 million one-year TV campaign in 2010 featuring several of its successful alumni. The “Experience for Life” campaign has continued each year.

Kent also promotes its brand — “Excellence in Action.” CSU's brand, “Engaged Learning,” is a registered trademark.

The University of Akron doesn't have a tag line.

Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: 3 comments Universities battle for students in Northeast Ohio (Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - “Kent State. Northeast Ohio's #1 choice among universities,” proclaims a billboard on Ohio 43 in Streetsboro as drivers head south to the university's campus.

About 1,500 feet down the road is another statement.

“You Took Math. Do Some,” says a green billboard with a Cleveland State University seal. ”More Internships. Better Value.”

“After nearly five years of trying we finally got that billboard,” Rob Spademan, assistant vice president for university marketing and student recruitment, told CSU trustees this week. “We thought about putting ‘Next year move off campus, way off,' with the CSU seal but didn't want to incite a riot,” he said with a smile.

CSU is seeking more students from Portage and Summit counties but Kent State has its own battle plan. The same information on its Ohio 43 billboard flashes on electronic billboards on interstates leading to Cleveland.

As the number of high school graduates in Ohio continues to decline and public universities seek to improve the academic quality of their students – a requirement by the state - competition has probably never been so fierce, officials said.

And, not surprisingly, the focus is on highly populated Northeast Ohio, also the home to many public, private and for-profit higher education institutions.

Until about a decade ago the three area public universities, CSU, Kent State and the University of Akron co-existed fairly well. Kent State was a residential campus while CSU and Akron were primarily commuter schools that drew traditional and non-traditional students from the immediate area.

But CSU and Akron dramatically remade their campuses, adding residence halls, new buildings and more amenities for students. And they sought students with higher academic credentials.

IMAGE_15393057.JPG
View full size
Kent State University's billboard is seen by drivers heading south toward campus on Ohio 43 in Streetsboro.
Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
“We've seen increased competition over a period of years here,” said Wayne Hill, hired to fill the new position of associate vice president and chief marketing officer at the University of Akron in November, 2011.

“Not only the public universities are doing it but the for-profits are actually the heaviest spenders in the marketplace. And no one should forget the privates.”

Spademan said one of the advertising agencies vying for CSU's business this fall said higher education institutions spent $5 million last year on media purchases in the Cleveland area.

“Cleveland is a target opportunity,” he told trustees as they discussed advertising. “The University of Toledo has a relationship with Cleveland schools, Ohio State University is here and Ohio University has commercials and billboards. It is ironic because Cleveland's demographics are declining but a lot of people are fishing here.”

Ohio State University opened its first student recruitment office in Cleveland last week.

Trustee Morton Levin asked Spademan if CSU should advertise in markets outside Cleveland.

“We don't want to start an advertising war,” Spademan said, then added that CSU has done some advertising in Akron and added the billboard near Kent State.

The University of Akron's primary market is Northeast Ohio although it has done advertising in central Ohio, Hill said. Akron has run regional ads during the Super Bowl for more than a decade.

Hill said the university plans to advertise on several billboards in Cuyahoga County in the next several weeks.

Kent State does a lot of research to determine where its students come from then invests a significant amount of money for marketing and advertising to get the best return on its investment, said Iris Harvey, vice president of university relations.

“In some ways every university in Ohio competes with each other,” she said.

Kent State launched a $1 million one-year television campaign in 2010 featuring several of its successful alumni. The “Experience for Life” campaign has continued each year.

Kent also promotes its brand – “Excellence in Action.” CSU's brand, “Engaged Learning,” is a registered trademark.

The University of Akron doesn't have a tag line, Hill said, and he wouldn't say if it was considering one.

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