Report Overview:
Total Clips (43)
African Community Theatre; Pan-African Studies; Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
Alumni (2)
Alumni; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Art, School of; Students (1)
Athletics; Homecoming; Students (1)
Athletics; Institutional Advancement; Renovation at KSU (1)
Black Squirrels (1)
Board of Trustees; Hotel and Conference Center; KSU Esplanade; Office of the President; Town-Gown; University Relations (7)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC); College of Education, Health and Human Services; College of Nursing (CON); University Relations (1)
College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
History; Jewish Studies (3)
Homecoming (1)
Homecoming; Office of the President (1)
Hospitality Management (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Students (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (1)
KSU at Stark (4)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
KSU Museum (1)
Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
Office of General Counsel (2)
Partnerships (1)
Recreational Services (1)
Students (2)
Town-Gown (1)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

African Community Theatre; Pan-African Studies; Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
Karamu's Terrence Spivey Becomes Newest Director-in-Residence @ KSU (Gooden; Stillings) 10/04/2013 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

Kent State University recently announced the appointment of Terrence Spivey — the Artistic Director of Cleveland's historic Karamu House — as their...


Alumni (2)
KSU grad writes novel, 'Rekindled' 10/05/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS Hillary Craig, a Kent State University graduate, has released a new book, “Rekindled,” available in paperback and Kindle format. The book tells the story of Abra...

Fourth Annual Pasta Dinner & Scholarship Fundraiser 10/06/2013 Mentor Patch Text Attachment Email

The Lake County Chapter, Kent State University Alumni Association's� main scholarship fund raiser will be on Thursday, October 17, 2013 at the Painesville Elks Club, 723 Liberty...


Alumni; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Memorial service Sunday for Portage County civic leader Helen Dix, 96 10/07/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: A memorial service will be held Sunday for Helen Dix, a Portage County civic leader and widow of the late publisher of the Record-Courier. Mrs....


Art, School of; Students (1)
Bazaars and Craft Fairs 2013 10/05/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent Art in the Carriage House When: Oct. 20, 2-5 p.m. Where: 1102 N. Mantua St. Features: Artwork of the late Kent State University Professor Peter A. Slusarski and his students. Pottery, ceramic sculpture/ornaments, mixed media paintings.


Athletics; Homecoming; Students (1)
VIDEO: Web Video of the Day: Kent State Dance Off 10/07/2013 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

Some special guests joined the morning crew for the Web Video of the Day! Check out the Kent State University Dance Off click here: http://fox8.com/2013/10/04/web-video-of-the-day-kent-state-dance-off/...


Athletics; Institutional Advancement; Renovation at KSU (1)
Kent State breaks ground on new baseball, softball hitting facility (Duncan) 10/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Homecoming weekend was also a special one for the Kent State University baseball and softball programs. Groundbreaking for a new baseball and softball...


Black Squirrels (1)
BLACK SQUIRRELS They're just a gray squirrel with a different coat 10/06/2013 Daily Record - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...black coat. In some places, they're revered and protected, with towns across the United States actually importing squirrels to have a black population. Kent State University, for instance, is known for its black squirrel population, after purposely importing 10 of them from Canada in 1961. The...


Board of Trustees; Hotel and Conference Center; KSU Esplanade; Office of the President; Town-Gown; University Relations (7)
KSU's esplanade to be named for Lefton (Lefton) 10/05/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...extension was formally opened at a ceremony held at the arch near Main and Willow Streets on Friday. The $3.3 million dollar project connects the Kent State University campus with downtown. “There is no more vibrant city than Kent,” said University President Lester Lefton. He declared the...

Link between Kent, KSU to be named for Lester Lefton (Lefton) 10/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

City, university and state leaders help dedicate $3.3 million pathway extension Kent City Manager Dave Ruller called the Esplanade the metaphorical...

OUR VIEW: Esplanade symbolic of KSU, Kent partnership 10/07/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Naming new greenspace area for lefton is a fitting tribute Kent State University and its host community may be enjoying a closer relationship than at any time since Kent welcomed the founding of Kent State...

Officials mark completion of pathway connecting city and college (Lefton) 10/04/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...President Kent City Manager Dave Ruller called the Esplanade the metaphorical exclamation point on collaborative projects realized between the city and Kent State University. But that story is far from over. "This is just one piece of a much bigger plan," said KSU President Lester Lefton....

Pathway connects KSU to downtown Kent (Lefton) 10/04/2013 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...president KENT, Ohio - What many considered a college and a town is now being referred to as "a college town" after the dedication of a pathway that connects Kent State University to downtown Kent. On Friday afternoon, the Kent State University Esplanade near Main and Willow streets was dedicated....

Esplanade to honor departing KSU President Lester Lefton (Vincent; Hilton) 10/05/2013 PredictWallStreet.com Text Attachment Email

Kent State University, Kent, OH October 04, 2013 (The Daily Kent Stater, provided by UWIRE, a division of Uloop via Comtex) -- Kent State's...

NAME OF THE NEW KENT STATE UNIVERSITY ESPLANADE TO HONOR UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT LEFTON 10/04/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Oct.4 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Kent State University Esplanade will be named the Lester A.Lefton Esplanade...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC); College of Education, Health and Human Services; College of Nursing (CON); University Relations (1)
Celebrations 10/05/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Education ATI Nursing Education, an online provider of programs nationwide, recognized Cathy Snelson of Akron, an associate lecturer of nursing at Kent State, as one of four Nurse Educators With the Nurse's Touch. More than 700 nurses were nominated for the award. Kent State's College...


College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
IdeaBase in Kent celebrates grand opening with ribbon cutting (Dowling) 10/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Members of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce joined the staff of IdeaBase (formerly The Tannery) for the grand opening of the integrated marketing communication...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Kent State Lecturer Earns Nursing Award (Snelson) 10/06/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

...qualities that make certain nurses so memorable? How do they teach students to have “the nurse's touch?” Just ask Cathy Snelson, associate lecturer at Kent State University's College of Nursing and resident of Akron, Ohio. Snelson was recently recognized by ATI Nursing Education as one of four Nurse...


History; Jewish Studies (3)
Seminar to explore women and the Holocaust 10/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...session on finding resources with Barbara White, general manager of branch services at the Akron-Summit County Public Library. Factor, an instructor at Kent State University, and Hexter are both Holocaust educators. Hexter and White are members of the Ohio Council on Holocaust Education. Cost of...

South Side News & Notes: 18th annual seminar explores women and the Holocaust 10/04/2013 Leader Publications - Online Text Attachment Email

...from a grant from the Rose & Larry Schwartz Holocaust Education Fund with the Akron Legacy and Endowment Fund of the JCBA. The Jewish Studies Program at Kent State University is also providing funding.

Seminar to explore women and the Holocaust 10/05/2013 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

...session on finding resources with Barbara White, general manager of branch services at the Akron-Summit County Public Library. Factor, an instructor at Kent State University, and Hexter are both Holocaust educators. Hexter and White are members of the Ohio Council on Holocaust Education. Cost of...


Homecoming (1)
Good Morning Cleveland 10/05/2013 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Also today, kent state's homecoming celebrations kick off in 45 minutes or so. The festivities begin with the bowman cup 5k and homecoming parade down main street....


Homecoming; Office of the President (1)
Spirits high for KSU Homecoming 10/05/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University enjoyed a break in the clouds Saturday morning for the annual KSU Homecoming Parade. Above, the KSU Marching Band entertains...


Hospitality Management (1)
PROFILES IN HIRING: Horseshoe Casino Cleveland and Thistledown racino (Scheule) 10/06/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...with hospitality management programs have taken note of the opportunities in the gaming industry and are preparing students with courses as specific as Kent State University's casino management and operations class. The class has boasted a full roster and waiting list about six years, said Barbara...


Hotel and Conference Center; Students (1)
The To-Do List -- week of Oct. 6 • 10/07/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Brookside Country Club, 1800 Canton Ave. NW, Canton. Silent auction, basket raffle, live auction and fashion show by the Fashion Student Organization at Kent State University. $35, advance only. 330-289-6623 or email sicanton.starkcounty@soroptimist.net. Jewel of Portage County Gala — 6 p.m. in...


Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (1)
KSU Hotel to host Brunch Bunch fundraiser 10/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Members of the Thanksgiving Brunch Bunch committee are gearing up for Portage County's charity "fun-raiser," which will celebrate its 45th year at a new...


KSU at Stark (4)
'TRIPLE DIVIDE' EXPLORES FRACKING: FILM TO BE SCREENED AT KSU STARK CAMPUS 10/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...of Environmental Protection will be shown Wednesday in Jackson Township. Triple Divide will be screened at 6:30 p.m. in the Main Hall auditorium of Kent State University's Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. The movie, by filmmakers Joshua B. Pribanic and Melissa Troutmen, takes its name from...

Kent State Stark to host 'Triple Divide' screening on Oct. 9 10/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The film, Triple Divide, will be shown Oct. 9 in Jackson Township. The film will be screened at 6:30 p.m. at Kent State University's Stark Campus. Meet in the Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. The movie by filmmakers Joshua B....

What's going on here? Preparing for new signage 10/05/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

WHAT IS IT? Crews are moving dirt on the Kent State University at Stark campus near University Drive and Frank Avenue NW. WHY ARE THEY DOING THAT? Dirt must be moved to provide a level...

'Clapton Tribute' is Oct. 12 at PAC 10/04/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA  “Clapton Tribute: Evolution” and special guest Brimstone will be on stage at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12. Eric Clapton has been a major influence and icon who inspired artist Christopher Wintrip....


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Easements are next step for Western Reserve Greenway 10/06/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...trail. Instead, the trail will be built just west of the tracks. The county owns some of the land that will be used for Phase 3. The other entities are Kent State University, the Mahoning Valley Economic Development Corp. and Economic Development Rail II Corp. — all quasigovernment entities. The...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Clapton Tribute Band: Evolution with special guest Brimstone to perform at Kent State Tuscarawas PAC 10/04/2013 Bargain Hunter - Tuscarawas Edition - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Clapton Tribute Band: Evolution and special guest Brimstone are onstage at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on Oct. 12 at 7:30 p.m. Through the years, Eric Clapton has been a major influence and icon who inspired artist,...

Menopause The Musical: A funny, laugh-out-loud musical on the change 10/04/2013 Bargain Hunter - Tuscarawas Edition - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The international hit show Menopause The Musical is coming to the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas on Oct. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased now at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac...


KSU Museum (1)
St. Louis art gallery features old Hollywood costumes 10/07/2013 Fibre 2 Fashion Text Attachment Email

...Missouri, the featured exhibits at the event are sourced from the collections of the famous St. Louis native and Fox Theatre restorer Mary Strauss as well as Kent State University and Paramount Pictures. The exhibited range includes dresses worn by Norma Shearer (Marie Antoinette, 1938), Elizabeth Taylor...


Library and Information Science (SLIS) (1)
PROFILES IN HIRING: Explorys 10/07/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

In just four short years, Explorys has grown from four employees to more than 100 — and the Cleveland Clinic spinoff says it is not done hiring yet. ...


Office of General Counsel (2)
Reporters' Notebook: Oct. 7, 2013 (Vincent) 10/06/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Not that they're being anti-social, mind you Kent State University issued a cease and desist order to its students last week, requesting they refrain from using the university's logos and trademarks...

Kent State cautions students against unlawful use of university logos (Vincent) 10/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Some social media pages changed avatars last week in reaction to a warning from Kent State University about the unauthorized use of the college's many...


Partnerships (1)
NEOMED marks anniversary with new facilities 10/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

ROOTSTOWN TWP.: The Northeast Ohio Medical University is marking its 40th anniversary with two new buildings — the first major additions to the rural campus since its...


Recreational Services (1)
If your idea of the Cuyahoga only runs through the Flats, you need to get to know the rest of the river 10/06/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

...journey's over. Middle Cuyahoga Most of us didn't know this section until the Crooked River Adventures opened three years ago. This outreach of Kent State University is run by fresh-scrubbed college students and instructors who take education seriously. Paddlers must watch a safe-practices...


Students (2)
The HeldenFiles: KSU to hold graphic storytelling festival 10/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A festival devoted to comic strips, comic books and other forms of “graphic storytelling” will be on Oct. 19 in the Kent State University Student Center. The first Kent Comic Arts Festival will include celebrity guests like local lights Tom Batiuk and Derf Backderf,...

Fall fundraising dinner set for Friday in Kent 10/07/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The students of United Christian Ministries at Kent State University are preparing for their fall fundraising dinner to be held at 6 p.m. Friday in Pierson...


Town-Gown (1)
What used to be a college and a town is now a college town 10/04/2013 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

>>> New tonight, what used to be a college and a town is now a college town. This afternoon a special walkway was dedicated which connects kent state university to downtown kent. Bob jones shows us it marks another step in transforming an area already experiencing an economic boom. >>...


University Press (1)
2013 Evergreen Book Medals 10/04/2013 Independent Publisher, The Text Attachment Email

...fresh fruits and vegetables with decreased cancer risk across the board." Bronze: The Heart's Truth: Essays on the Art of Nursing, by Cortney Davis (Kent State University Press) "I learned that nursing is an odd, mysterious, humbling, addicting, and often transcendent profession… The stories...


News Headline: Karamu's Terrence Spivey Becomes Newest Director-in-Residence @ KSU (Gooden; Stillings) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University recently announced the appointment of Terrence Spivey — the Artistic Director of Cleveland's historic Karamu House — as their newest Director-in-Residence.  Spivey has been a staple of Karamu House for ten years, currently serving on their board of trustees.  At Kent State he will serve as director for works produced through the Department of Pan African Studies' African Community Theatre (ACT) in collaboration with the School of Theatre and Dance.

Says Spivey, “I am excited to be part of this collaboration between Kent State University's Pan African Studies African Community Theatre and the School of Theatre and Dance. It's a perfect platform for future practicum at the historical Karamu House for their students.  My vision for ACT is for it to be a collegiate theatre program to be reckoned with in Northeast Ohio and beyond to the highest standards of professionalism.”

These high standards undoubtedly will come from his time at Karamu House.  Originally called “Settlement House,” Karamu's founders — Russell Jelliffe and Rowena Woodham — believed in the highest standards of excellence in the arts, not for the sake of excellence, but because they believed this pursuit of excellence required the greatest demands on individuals to fulfill the promise of their infinite potential.

Spivey certainly knows a thing or two about realizing potential.  In 2011, he was honored with a proclamation from Mayor Frank Jackson and a resolution by Coucilwoman Mamie Mitchell for his contributions to the arts locally, regionally and nationally.  Originally from Kountz, Texas, Spivey spent nearly two decades in New York City.  During his time in NYC, he appeared in many productions of various projects and even formed his own theatre company before moving to Cleveland to serve as Artistic Director at Karamu House.  He has previously served as a leader at the National Theatre Conference and an adjunct professor at Kent State.

Dr. Amoaba Gooden, Chair of Kent State's Department of Pan-African Studies, states, “The Department of Pan-African Studies is pleased to have Mr. Terrence Spivey join us as Director-in-Residence for the 2013-2014 academic year. Mr. Spivey's residency will reinvigorate our theatre program and assist the Department with reestablishing connections with KSU's surrounding community while providing an opportunity for many to experience innovative and diverse artistic talents that gives expression to the Black World experience.”

His first project at Kent will be to direct the Fall 2013 production of No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs written by John Henry Redwood.  The production will run from Fri 11/22 – Sun 12/1 in Ritchie Hall at KSU.  The play revolves around the Cheeks family of Halifax, NC in 1949.  The title refers to real, unbelievably common signs posted in the region during that era.  The play examines prejudice and one's transcendence beyond it.

Cynthia Stillings, the Director of KSU's School of Theatre and Dance, says, “The School of Theatre and Dance is excited that Pan-African Studies has invited Terrence to join them as Director-in-Residence.  The University is very fortunate to have an artist that is recognized nationally for his outstanding work in theatre.  Students will benefit greatly from working with Mr. Spivey!”

The African Community Theatre was established in 1970 to bring awareness and appreciation of the experiences of African Americans through theatrical performance. ACT and Karamu House have always been open and welcoming to members of the community regardless of gender, sexuality, race, class and/or ethnicity.  This partnership is sure to benefit Karamu and Kent State, but most importantly the students who will be introduced to high standards as both artists and human beings.  This is a very exciting opportunity for everyone involved.

Don't miss the performances at ACT this season and stay tuned to Cool Cleveland for future updates on the times and dates of the performances.

http://www.kent.edu/cas/pas

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News Headline: KSU grad writes novel, 'Rekindled' | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS

Hillary Craig, a Kent State University graduate, has released a new book, “Rekindled,” available in paperback and Kindle format.

The book tells the story of Abra Ryan, who moved with her family to North Carolina. She and her husband thought they had it made. But when Abra goes back to work for the first time since her children were born, a woman from the past proves she will do nearly anything to take her family away.

Craig lives in Columbus with her husband, Andrew.

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News Headline: Fourth Annual Pasta Dinner & Scholarship Fundraiser | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mentor Patch
Contact Name: Larry Disbro
News OCR Text: The Lake County Chapter, Kent State University Alumni Association's� main scholarship fund raiser will be on Thursday, October 17, 2013 at the Painesville Elks Club, 723 Liberty Street, Painesville, Ohio. Raffles, auctions and a great pasta dinner highlight the evening! $15.00 per ticket. Includes salad, pasta dinner, soft drinks & five auction tickets. Cash Bar Available.� Doors open at 5:30 p.m. with dinner being served from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.� � Register on-line: www.KSUAlumni.org; via e-mail at LakeCountyKSU@AOL.com; or by calling Larry Disbro at 440-255-4119. Walk-ups accepted, just RSVP and pay at the door (cash & check only).

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News Headline: Memorial service Sunday for Portage County civic leader Helen Dix, 96 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: A memorial service will be held Sunday for Helen Dix, a Portage County civic leader and widow of the late publisher of the Record-Courier.

Mrs. Dix, 96, of Kent died Wednesday at Robinson Memorial Hospital.

“She was a hard worker and found community engagement very fulfilling,” said her son David, who is the current publisher of the Record Courier, which is owned by his family's Dix Communications.

Mrs. Cox had deep roots in Portage County, attending Kent State University on the advice of a high school guidance counselor in Painesville.

She graduated from KSU with a bachelor's degree in business and a master's in political science with a specialty in Latin America.

Journalism was her big love, but KSU did not offer a degree in that at the time. So she made do editing the university's Daily Kent Stater, one of the first women — if not the first — to do so.

She went on to write unbylined articles in the Record-Courier. She also helped to found the KSU Journalism Alumni Association and edited the newsletter for the Western Reserve Herb Society.

She led a busy life that included everything from canning to helping to found the Portage County League of Women Voters to leading the Blossom Music Center's Women's Committee.

She was especially passionate about nature and gardening.

Rose Darling of Twin Lakes said she remembers “that Helen brought in numerous wild flowers to the club because she had a big woods around her house. I was very impressed that she knew the names of so many.”

Mrs. Dix helped to found the medicinal herb garden at what is now the Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown and a healing garden at Robinson Memorial Hospital.

She and her husband, Robert, who died in 1996, had five children.

“She always encouraged us to work hard and aim high and if we disappointed her, she made sure we knew it,” her son David said.

The Dixes were generous with their time and money. When her husband was a KSU trustee for 32 years, she helped to entertain guests of the university, the international student association. She also was a big fan of the athletic teams. The university's Dix Stadium is named for her husband.

Mrs. Dix received many accolades during her lifetime, including KSU's Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004, induction into Hiram College's Garfield Society in 2004 and the Kent Medal for Public Service from the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce in 1984.

In addition to David, Mrs. Dix leaves Robert of Bonita Springs, Fla.; Timothy of Colorado Springs, Colo.; Dr. Darcy Folzenlogen of Columbia, Mo.; and Kristina Frost of Newark.

The memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday at the United Methodist Church of Kent with the Rev. David Palmer officiating. A reception will follow at the church.

Arrangements are being handled by Bissler & Sons Funeral Home and Crematory in Kent.

The family suggests memorial contributions be made to one of Mrs. Dix's favorite charities — Kent State, Hiram College, Robinson Memorial Hospital, Coleman Professional Services or the Portage Park District.

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News Headline: Bazaars and Craft Fairs 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent

Art in the Carriage House

When: Oct. 20, 2-5 p.m.

Where: 1102 N. Mantua St.

Features: Artwork of the late Kent State University Professor Peter A. Slusarski and his students. Pottery, ceramic sculpture/ornaments, mixed media paintings.

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News Headline: VIDEO: Web Video of the Day: Kent State Dance Off | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some special guests joined the morning crew for the Web Video of the Day!

Check out the Kent State University Dance Off click here:

http://fox8.com/2013/10/04/web-video-of-the-day-kent-state-dance-off/

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News Headline: Kent State breaks ground on new baseball, softball hitting facility (Duncan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Homecoming weekend was also a special one for the Kent State University baseball and softball programs.

Groundbreaking for a new baseball and softball hitting facility at Schoonover Stadium took place Saturday morning, as lead donor Dave Edmonds joined Kent State University President Dr. Lester Lefton and Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen to greet a crowd of supporters, donors, coaches, staff and student-athletes that gathered for the event.

"To see all the development and to see all the activity around the program today with this facility that's coming for both the men and women, it's really exciting to watch," said Edmonds, a 1980 KSU grad who played baseball for the Golden Flashes. "I really believe it's going to make a difference in student-athletes' lives today and in future generations."

Flashes softball coach Karen Linder stressed how the facility will allow her players a place to practice.

"We're excited about this hitting facility because it gives us a place we can call our home," said Linder. "It really is going to have a huge impact on the success of our program."

The project is made possible by a lead gift of $500,00 by Edmonds and a donation of $100,000 by fellow KSU baseball alum Tom Cole (1972).

First-year KSU baseball coach Jeff Duncan remarked on the strong relationships that make projects like the hitting facility possible.

"When you have a program that has so much tradition like our Kent State baseball program, our alumni are so proud and they always want to give back," said Duncan. "The support here between the administration, our alumni and community is unbelievable."

The facility upgrade is part of the 'Building Champions' initiative, the biggest fundraising project in the history of the Kent State Athletic Department.

The initiative will generate money from private donors to fund a $25 million dollar investment in athletic scholarships and a $35 million dollar investment in various enhancement projects.

The hitting facility is part of continuing upgrades to the Kent State baseball facilities at Schoonover Stadium.

In 2005, a field turf surface was installed, along with an underground drainage system, new dugouts, bullpens, backstop and outfield fencing. For the 2007 season, a home locker room, players' lounge, restrooms and concession stand were added. The updated scoreboard in right field was installed in 2008.

Last season, Kent State baseball played night games after the addition of lights at Schoonover Stadium. The hitting facility and a new parking area for the 2014 season are made possible by both public and private funding.

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News Headline: BLACK SQUIRRELS They're just a gray squirrel with a different coat | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily Record - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Have you noticed more and more black squirrels lately?

You have, probably, if you live in the city, but according to the Division of Wildlife's Suzie Prange, the wild rural population hasn't had a similar numbers explosion.

Black squirrels are actually just a gray squirrel with a black coat. In some places, they're revered and protected, with towns across the United States actually importing squirrels to have a black population. Kent State University, for instance, is known for its black squirrel population, after purposely importing 10 of them from Canada in 1961.

The black color phase of a gray squirrel is the result of two recessive genes coming together. If a dominant gene gray squirrel mates with a recessive gene black squirrel, the offspring will be gray. It takes two recessive genes to create a black squirrel. Two black squirrels will always produce black offspring.

"Where it happens more is where the population is confined," said Prange, a wildlife biologist at the Waterloo Research Station in Athens. "Where there's not a lot of movement of squirrels.

"In the wild, (black squirrels) should be relatively rare."

That's why squirrel hunters think of a black squirrel as a trophy, although a small one at that. Think of it as a deer hunter taking an albino or piebald deer, or a black bear hunter harvesting a cinnamon color phase bear.

"Red foxes have a lot of color phases, too," said Prange, noting she often gets calls asking if shooting a black fox is legal. "I tell them, 'if it's in season, you can shoot them.'

"They're all a novelty," she added. "They're pretty, but just a genetic variation."

In fact, Prange admits that not a lot of sportsmen understand that a black-phase squirrel is just a gray squirrel covered in black fur. Under that black coat, the two squirrels are identical.

In the past, the Division of Wildlife tracked data on black squirrels, although from a small sampling and far from scientific as it noted information provided in voluntary squirrel hunter diaries. The state has since gone to a small-game questionnaire, but Prange noted that there were some trends that showed up over the years.

"For some reason, Van Wert County is the black squirrel capital of Ohio," she said. "The population is pretty stable as far as where they show up."

Prange says she always fields a few questions each year on where a hunter might best find black squirrels in the wild.

"Hunters are excited when they get one, but I don't think a lot of hunters are going out of their way to find black squirrels," she said.

Ohio's squirrel hunting season remains open through Jan. 31, 2014, with a daily bag limit of 6 and legal shooting hours from 1/2-hour before sunrise to sunset.

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News Headline: KSU's esplanade to be named for Lefton (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Mary Ann Ferguson-Rich
News OCR Text: KENT: Town and gown are now officially connected in the city of Kent.

In the midst of rain showers, the University Esplanade extension was formally opened at a ceremony held at the arch near Main and Willow Streets on Friday.

The $3.3 million dollar project connects the Kent State University campus with downtown.

“There is no more vibrant city than Kent,” said University President Lester Lefton. He declared the project a successful collaboration between both public and private sources, along with city, state and federal governments.

“The best is yet to come,” said Lefton, citing the economic development underway in downtown Kent, and the growing national prominence of Kent State.

Jane Murphy Timken, chairwoman of the Kent State Board of Trustees, announced that the esplanade will be named the Lester A. Lefton Esplanade, in honor of the president, who retires next July.

She described the area as a “vibrant campus and a newly vibrant city,” and said “there could not be a more fitting tribute to President Lefton than naming the esplanade, which now physically and symbolically connects town and gown, in his honor.”

The esplanade was built in a partnership of Kent State, the city of Kent and the Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority.

To complete the project, the university acquired 40 properties between Lincoln Street and Haymaker Parkway.

The 1,000-foot extension has been under construction since July 2012. Kent State contributed $2.582 million to the extension, with the $700,000 coming from a grant that Kent State and the city received from the Ohio Department of Transportation.

The extension links PARTA'S Gateway multimodal transit center, private developments from Acorn Alley and Fairmount Properties, and the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

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News Headline: Link between Kent, KSU to be named for Lester Lefton (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City, university and state leaders help dedicate $3.3 million pathway extension

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller
called the Esplanade the metaphorical
exclamation point on
collaborative projects realized
between the city and Kent State
University.
But that story is far from over.
“This is just one piece of a
much bigger plan,” said KSU
President Lester Lefton.
More than 100 members of
the community and university
gathered Friday at the arch
of the recently
completed
$3.3 million extension
of the
Esplanade —
the pathway that runs through
KSU and connects the campus
to downtown Kent — to dedicate
the physical and symbolic
link bridging city with university.
As a variety of citizens and officials
waited out a downpour,
clouds eventually broke, shining
a bright spotlight on the structure
and the group gathered to
honor the fruits of collaboration.
“This is a symbol of an important
era of new town-gown cooperation,”
said Jane Timken,
chairwoman of the KSU Board
of Trustees.
Timken then announced
trustees will vote to name the
walkway the Lester A. Lefton
Esplanade in December in honor
of the efforts of the KSU president,
who will retire in July after
eight years in the post.
Timken said trustees
credit Lefton with leading
KSU to “new heights
of achievement.”
“Our vote will make
this Esplanade a symbol
of the high esteem in
which Dr. Lefton will always
be held,” she said.
Ruller — who quipped
the pathway may now
be better known as the
“L'Esplanade” — said
the dedication is bittersweet.
“Our little pile of dirt is
all grown up,” said Ruller
sentimentally.
Ohio Sen. John
Eklund and State Rep.
Kathleen Clyde presented
proclamations to the
city and university honoring
the Esplanade.
Both described the
project as an example
of what can be achieved
when cities and universities
work in harmony to
realize a vision of progress.
“Indeed this project
convincingly demonstrates
how very much
can be accomplished by
a group of conscientious
people with clear objectives
and firm resolve,
and we applaud them on
their tremendous work,”
said Clyde, a Kent resident.
“In the years to
come, this fine walkway
will undoubtedly have
a positive influence on
the character and conditions
of the KSU campus
and our surrounding
region.”
Further symbolizing
collaboration between
the city, the university
and the area's business
sector, Sandra Reid, vice
president of The Davey
Tree Expert Co., dedicated
a 35-foot tall pin
oak “partnership” tree
planted just off the Esplanade
near downtown
Kent. Such trees, she
said, were often used to
tie together timbers in
wooden structures, appropriately
symbolizing
unification and teamwork.
The Esplanade project
was originally approved
amongst KSU master
plans in 1996, with the
first funded portions of
the project completed
between 2004 and 2006.
Since 2007, KSU has
spent more than $10 million
acquiring 40 acres
worth of properties between
Lincoln Street
and Haymaker Parkway
(S.R. 59) to build out the
extension funneling pedestrians
to and from
campus and downtown.
The extension, finished
in August, marks
the completion of the
path that stretches from
Haymaker Parkway to
Risman Plaza. The overall
project is one of many
realized through unified
efforts between the city,
university, federal, state
and business sectors to
mold Kent into a model
college town.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Esplanade symbolic of KSU, Kent partnership | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Naming new greenspace area for lefton is a fitting tribute

Kent State University and its host community may be enjoying a closer relationship than at any time since Kent welcomed the founding of Kent State Normal School more than a century ago. The partnership between the two has played a major role in the transformation of Kent into a true college town, one that has become known nationwide as a model for progress through cooperation.

The dedication of the University Esplanade, the pedestrian walkway linking the campus to downtown Kent, was a fitting celebration of the partnership between the two as Kent State celebrated its first Homecoming since the completion of the walkway and many of the improvements in the downtown area.

Meeting Friday at the arch that has become a landmark in what some call 21st Century Kent, representatives of the campus and the community joined in a dedication ceremony that included the Partnership Tree, a pin oak planted on the Esplanade. The tree was donated by the Davey Tree Expert Co., which has been headquartered in Kent for more than a century, and -- like the university -- is an important partner in the downtown development effort.

The decision to name the Esplanade in honor of retiring President Lester Lefton, a surprise announcement at Friday's ceremony, is a fitting tribute to the Kent State leader, who was one of the driving forces for the project.

KSU has embraced its role in the community through its involvement in Kent's revitalization, making a major investment in the downtown area with the construction of the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

The construction of the Esplanade represents another major investment on behalf of the university, which spent more than $10 million to acquire numerous properties in the Erie-Willow Street area to enable construction of the walkway. In their place is a beautiful green space that is a new focal point for the community.

Forty years ago, the construction of Haymaker Parkway -- also known as the S.R. 59 bypass -- provided motorists with an easier way to travel through Kent, but also resulted in the separation of the campus from the community. The four-lane highway, with fencing on both sides, was a symbolic and literal dividing line between the two. The university's decision, perhaps coincidental in the aftermath of the events of May 4, 1970, to expand the campus eastward -- away from downtown Kent -- exacerbated that sense of separation.

Construction of the Esplanade has essentially reversed that separation, bringing instead a sense of unity between the campus and the downtown area. A pedestrian standing at the entrance to the Esplanade on South Lincoln Street near Rockwell Hall can enjoy an unimpeded view of downtown Kent, with easy access to the new developments there -- and a pedestrian standing at Erie and DePeyster streets can see all the way to Kent State for the first time in the university's history. And, for the first time since the S.R. 59 bypass was created, Erie Street is no longer a dead end street, but a direct route into the heart of downtown Kent.

The University Esplanade is another sign of what can happen when agendas are put aside in favor of cooperation and partnership for a better community. It is a beautiful addition to Kent, its dedication Friday a proud moment for both Kent State and Kent and a proud personal tribute to President Lefton.

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News Headline: Officials mark completion of pathway connecting city and college (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Jeremy Nobile
News OCR Text: Esplanade will be named in honor of outgoing KSU President

Kent City Manager Dave Ruller called the Esplanade the metaphorical exclamation point on collaborative projects realized between the city and Kent State University.

But that story is far from over.

"This is just one piece of a much bigger plan," said KSU President Lester Lefton.

More than 100 members of the community and university gathered Friday at the arch of the recently completed $3.3 million extension of the Esplanade -- the pathway that runs through KSU and connects the campus to downtown Kent -- to dedicate the physical and symbolic link bridging city with university.

As a variety of citizens and officials waited out a downpour, clouds eventually broke, shining a bright spotlight on the structure and the group gathered to honor the fruits of collaboration.

"This is a symbol of an important era of new town-gown cooperation," said Jane Timken, chairwoman of the KSU Board of Trustees.

Timken then announced trustees will vote to name the walkway the Lester A. Lefton Esplanade in December in honor of the efforts of the KSU president, who will retire in July after eight years in the post.

Timken said trustees credit Lefton with leading KSU to "new heights of achievement."

"Our vote will make this Esplanade a symbol of the high esteem in which Dr. Lefton will always be held," she said.

Ruller -- who quipped the pathway may now be better known as the "L'Esplanade" -- said the dedication is bittersweet.

"Our little pile of dirt is all grown up," said Ruller sentimentally.

Ohio Sen. John Eklund and State Rep. Kathleen Clyde presented proclamations to the city and university honoring the Esplanade. Both described the project as an example of what can be achieved when cities and universities work in harmony to realize a vision of progress.

"Indeed this project convincingly demonstrates how very much can be accomplished by a group of conscientious people with clear objectives and firm resolve, and we applaud them on their tremendous work," said Clyde, a Kent native. "In the years to come, this fine walkway will undoubtedly have a positive influence on the character and conditions of the KSU campus and our surrounding region."

Further symbolizing collaboration between the city, the university and the area's business sector, Sandra Reid, vice president of The Davey Tree Expert Co., dedicated a 35-foot tall pin oak "partnership" tree planted just off the Esplanade near downtown Kent. Such trees, she said, were often used to tie together timbers in wooden structures, appropriately symbolizing unification and teamwork.

The Esplanade project was originally approved amongst KSU master plans in 1996, with the first funded portions of the project completed between 2004 and 2006.

Since 2007, KSU has spent over $10 million acquiring 40 acres worth of properties between Lincoln Street and Haymaker Parkway (S.R. 59) to build out the extension funneling pedestrians to and fro campus and downtown.

The extension, completed in August, marks the completion of the path that stretches from Haymaker Parkway to Risman Plaza. The overall project is one of many realized through unified efforts between the city, university, federal, state and business sectors to mold Kent into a model college town.

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News Headline: Pathway connects KSU to downtown Kent (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name: Bob Jones
News OCR Text: University esplanade named for KSU president KENT, Ohio - What many considered a college and a town is now being referred to as "a college town" after the dedication of a pathway that connects Kent State University to downtown Kent.

On Friday afternoon, the Kent State University Esplanade near Main and Willow streets was dedicated. It was revealed that the pathway will be named the Lester A. Lefton Esplanade, honoring Kent State President Lefton.

Last spring, Lefton announced he will retire from the presidency of Kent State, effective July 1, 2014.

"There could not be a more fitting tribute to President Lefton than naming the esplanade, which now physically and symbolically connects town and gown, in his honor," said Jane Murphy Timken, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees.

The path is built around economic development that has transformed Kent in recent years.

It's considered a vital connection to PARTA's new Kent Central Gateway multimodal transit center, private developments from Acorn Alley and Fairmount Properties, and the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.

The resurgence of the area started when private investor, Ron Burbick, decided to start investing in the downtown area because he didn't like what he saw.

"It was almost like a ghost town because there was nothing to do in Kent. Unless you wanted a beer or a tattoo, you were pretty much out of luck," Burbick said.

He would eventually spent $22 million developing Acorn Alley. There have been three phases of the project and 38 businesses are now tenants there.

"There's probably $20 million in revenue that's being spent in Kent that wouldn't have been spent before," Burbick added.

Gwen Rosenberg owns Popped, a gourmet popcorn shop, and said her business has been bursting. She's considering further expansion.

"I really do believe I am the beneficiary of a lot people's hard work over the last couple of decades," Rosenberg said.

Lefton pointed out that $130 million was spent through a public-private partnership to jumpstart the major development.

He called the esplanade "the special sauce" that links the city to the university.

"What he did is we purchased a bunch of land in between the city and the university, demolished a lot of rundown old homes and turned it into a beautiful park-like area," Lefton said.

Lefton said negotiations are on-going with developers for other possible projects, including high-end supermarkets and movie theaters.

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News Headline: Esplanade to honor departing KSU President Lester Lefton (Vincent; Hilton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: PredictWallStreet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University, Kent, OH October 04, 2013 (The Daily Kent Stater, provided by UWIRE, a division of Uloop via Comtex) -- Kent State's Board of Trustees announced Friday the newly completed Esplanade will be named after President Lester Lefton.

Jane Murphy Timken, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees, made the announcement at the Esplanade Dedication and Grand Opening event.

"There could not be a more fitting tribute to President Lefton than naming the Esplanade, which now physically and symbolically connects town and gown, in his honor," Timken said. "With a clear vision, a commitment to excellence and unshakable optimism, Dr. Lefton has led Kent State to new heights of achievement in areas from academic quality to fundraising to international programs."

However, Timken said his affect on Kent State and the Kent community did not stop there.

"His successful efforts to help forge a new era of cooperation between the university and the city of Kent, make Kent one of America's best college towns and to transform Kent State's campuses into 21st century learning environments -- environments that cultivate student success now and for decades to come -- will surely stand among his crowning contributions," she said.

University spokeswoman Emily Vincent echoed Timken's opinion of the new name.

"Personally, I think it's a wonderful tribute and very fitting to name the Esplanade after President Lefton," Vincent said. "This is one of the many significant contributions he's made during his presidency, and I think he was very, very touched when it was announced today. He was surprised. Only a handful of people knew this was going to be announced today."

The name will be made official during the next Board of Trustees meeting, Vincent said.

Justin Hilton, senior associate vice president for University Relations, said the Board of Trustees made a great decision, honoring President Lefton in such a way that he actually became emotional.

"I thought it was absolutely fitting," Hilton said. "It really is sort of a crown jewel for him, and everybody felt that same way. I think that's why the Board of Trustees decided to really sort of bestow upon him this honor. It really, really, really meant a lot to him. He emotionally responded, which is rare. I just think it was fabulous."

The newly titled Esplanade already has a nickname thanks to Dave Ruller, Kent City Manager. He referred to the walkway as the "Lesplanade" soon after the naming was announced.

Lefton is Kent State's eleventh president, and he began his career with the Flashes in 2006. Under his presidency, the Esplanade was created with the Foundations of Excellence initiative, a collection of projects including new building development and building upgrades so that students, faculty, staff and all others can enjoy the campuses.

The Esplanade was open for pedestrian access in early August and now serves as a link from the university to the city and vice versa.

Contact Julie Myers at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

(C) 2013 http://www.uwire.com/ UWIRE, a division of http://www.uloop.com/ Uloop

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News Headline: NAME OF THE NEW KENT STATE UNIVERSITY ESPLANADE TO HONOR UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT LEFTON | Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Oct.4 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Kent State University Esplanade will be named the Lester A.Lefton Esplanade honoring Kent State President Lefton.The announcement was made Friday, Oct.4, by Jane Murphy Timken, chair of the Kent State Board of Trustees, at a community event held at the new University Esplanade arch near Main and Willow streets in Kent.The event celebrated the solid partnership between Kent State University and the city of Kent and the official opening of the University Esplanade extension that now connects the university to downtown Kent.

The naming will be made official through a resolution at the Dec.4 Board of Trustees meeting.Lefton has served as Kent State's chief executive officer since July 1, 2006.This past spring, he announced he will retire from the presidency of Kent State, effective July 1, 2014.Historically, the board has preserved the legacy of the university's leadership through naming opportunities.Rather than waiting for the end of the academic year, Timken said now is the perfect time to recognize Lefton, Kent State's 11th president, with all of the buzz and excitement coming from downtown Kent's redevelopment and the university's transformational projects.

"There could not be a more fitting tribute to President Lefton than naming the Esplanade, which now physically and symbolically connects town and gown, in his honor," Timken said."With a clear vision, a commitment to excellence and unshakable optimism, Dr.Lefton has led Kent State to new heights of achievement in areas from academic quality to fundraising to international programs.But his successful efforts to help forge a new era of cooperation between the university and the city of Kent; make Kent one of America's best college towns; and to transform Kent State's campuses into 21st-century learning environments - environments that cultivate student success now and for decades to come - will surely stand among his crowning contributions."

The University Esplanade is built around the economic development of downtown Kent, and is a vital connection between the university and downtown projects that include PARTA's new Kent Central Gateway multimodal transit center, private developments from Acorn Alley and Fairmount Properties, and the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center.It also provides a physical link and safe pathway for students to visit, enjoy and patronize local businesses; connects residents and visitors to the Kent Campus; and serves as a catalyst for changing the economy of the region by creating new jobs, spurring new investment and generating taxes to the state and local economy.

The successful collaboration between Kent State and the city of Kent has been recognized by several publications, including The New York Times, and by the International Town-Gown Association, which bestowed its inaugural award on Kent State and the city of Kent for the town-gown relationship that best represents the spirit of the association.

Under Lefton's leadership, Kent State is making one of the largest investments related to higher education in the region and in Portage County.The university's "Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future" initiative includes the construction of new buildings, facility upgrades to existing buildings and the creation of dynamic, new spaces at its Kent Campus and Regional Campuses.

For more information about Lefton, visit www.kent.edu/president.

For more information about the "Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future" initiative, visit www.kent.edu/foundations.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Education

ATI Nursing Education, an online provider of programs nationwide, recognized Cathy Snelson of Akron, an associate lecturer of nursing at Kent State, as one of four Nurse Educators With the Nurse's Touch. More than 700 nurses were nominated for the award.

Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services recognized seven alumni at its fourth annual awards ceremony. They are: Dean Hummel, a former counselor education professor at Ohio University and Virginia Tech; John Hall, chair of physiology and biophysics and director of the Mississippi Center for Obesity Research at the University of Mississippi Medical Center; Andrea Simms, a lecturer in teacher education at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh; Tameka Taylor, president of Compass Consulting Services in Beachwood;

Iris Harvey of Stow, Kent State vice president for university relations, was selected for a U.S.-France International Education Administrators Seminar award by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. She will be among 12 U.S. college administrators who will visit 12 universities in France this month.

Six students from Kent State's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative program received the Excellence in Student Planning Award from the Ohio chapter of the American Planning Association.

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News Headline: IdeaBase in Kent celebrates grand opening with ribbon cutting (Dowling) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Members of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce joined the staff of IdeaBase (formerly The Tannery) for the grand opening of the integrated marketing communication firm, located at 138 E. Main Street, Suite 203. This was KACC's 28th ribbon cutting of 2013. Among those participating, seated, were Sarah Rutherford, creative director; Kristin Dowling, business development manager; Ron Burbick, Acorn Alley I developer; Mayor Jerry Fiala; and Evan Bailey, operations manager.

"Our staff is made up of the top-performing students in the (Kent State University) College of Communication and Information (CCI)," said Dowling. "Our team is composed of visual communication design, public relations, advertising, computer science and marketing students that work with local, regional and national clients." For more information, visit www.ideabasekent.com.

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News Headline: Kent State Lecturer Earns Nursing Award (Snelson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Matt Fredmonsky
News OCR Text: Florence Nightingale battled a bumbling bureaucracy, Clara Barton famously dodged bullets, but today's nurses face challenges all their own as the linchpin of a high-tech healthcare system that asks them to be a skilled care provider, information sharer, wellness educator and quality control expert, all wrapped into one. Nurse educators excel at teaching the technical knowledge and skills, but how do they teach students the qualities that make certain nurses so memorable? How do they teach students to have “the nurse's touch?”

Just ask Cathy Snelson, associate lecturer at Kent State University's College of Nursing and resident of Akron, Ohio. Snelson was recently recognized by ATI Nursing Education as one of four Nurse Educators With the Nurse's Touch, an award that recognizes nurse educators who excel at preparing their students for the full spectrum of challenges that await them in practice.

Competing among nearly 700 nominations, Snelson impressed judges with her integration of professional and interpersonal skills into their nursing practice and the education of students. These skills include teaching nursing students how to stay healthy, manage work-related stress, be a patient advocate, convey professional behaviors and attitudes, use nursing informatics and technology, and function as a leader of the healthcare team.

Snelson teaches these concepts by making herself a living example, according to her nominator: “Cathy is the golden standard of professional nursing educators … Cathy can balance teaching the details of pathophysiology with kindness and caring to help students work through the daily stresses of nursing school. Cathy stressed … always remaining patient focused and always communicating clearly and accurately.”

To honor their commitment to incorporating professionalism and interpersonal skills into their curriculum, Snelson will receive Nurse's Touch™ for one year. Nurse's Touch is a unique product that uses video simulation to teach professional and interpersonal skills.

Snelson also receives a complimentary reservation at the 2014 ATI National Nurse Educator Summit in Orlando, Fla. The summit is a four-day professional development conference featuring hundreds of nurse educators from across the country. Snelson will receive free registration, room and board, and a $500 travel voucher.� “Nurses require a special set of skills to provide safe, quality nursing care, and this includes interpersonal skills like communication, professionalism and leadership,” said Sheryl Sommer, director of nursing education and curriculum at ATI Nursing Education. “Nursing programs have limited time and resources which mean these curriculum areas are not always a top priority in the classroom. We want to raise awareness of this need and celebrate educators who incorporate professional and interpersonal skills into their teaching to help develop future nurses so they are prepared for the on-the-job demands and are positioned to lead within healthcare teams.”

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News Headline: Seminar to explore women and the Holocaust | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Jenkins, Colette
News OCR Text: The 18th annual Holocaust seminar will explore the experiences and perspectives of women.

The seminar, hosted by the Jewish Community Board of Akron and the Lippman School, is 4 to 8 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Shaw Jewish Community Center, 750 White Pond Drive, Akron. It will focus on women who were victims, survivors and rescuers (both Jewish and non-Jewish).

The forum will feature a survivor and second generation panel. Panelists are survivors Lici Calderon, a dual resident of Akron and Delray Beach, Fla., and Betty Gold, of Cleveland, and Irene Adler, of Akron, who will share stories of her mother, Rose Schwartz. Sam Chestnut, head of the Lippman School, will serve as moderator.

A movie produced by the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage, called To Be a Woman in the Holocaust: Cleveland Stories, will also be shown. The film includes eyewitness testimony of four Cleveland survivors – Gita Frankel, Rina Frankel, Erica Gold and Rose Kaplovitz – and comments from Leatrice Rabinsky, a Holocaust educator.

The seminar will also include an historical overview with Esther Hexter; stories of rescuers shared by Sol Factor and a session on finding resources with Barbara White, general manager of branch services at the Akron-Summit County Public Library. Factor, an instructor at Kent State University, and Hexter are both Holocaust educators. Hexter and White are members of the Ohio Council on Holocaust Education.

Cost of the seminar is $12 or $18 with a boxed supper. Advance registration is required by Tuesday. CEU credits will be available for teachers. For more information and to register, go to www.jewishakron.org or call 330-869-2424.

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News Headline: South Side News & Notes: 18th annual seminar explores women and the Holocaust | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Leader Publications - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WEST AKRON — The Jewish Community Board of Akron (JCBA) and The Lippman School will present “Women and the Holocaust: Experiences & Perspectives — A Seminar” Oct. 14 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Shaw Jewish Community Center, 750 White Pond Drive.

Area teachers and other interested learners are invited to attend this 18th annual seminar. Advance registration is required by Oct. 8. Continuing education credit will be available for teachers. For details and online registration, visit www.jewishakron.org. The seminar, including a boxed supper (dietary laws observed) is $18; the seminar alone costs $12. For more information or a copy of the registration form, contact Mary Dean at JCBA at 330-869-2424 or mary_dean@jewishakron.org.

The seminar focuses on experiences, challenges and perspectives of women and young women who were victims, survivors and rescuers (both non-Jews and Jews). It features a survivor and second generation panel as keynote speakers. Sam Chestnut, head of school at The Lippman School, will moderate the panel.

“To Be a Woman in the Holocaust: Cleveland Stories,” a movie produced by the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage, will provide additional points of view. The film, made by Steven Hacker Films, features eyewitness testimony and memories of their mothers from four Cleveland survivors.

Other sessions include a Historical Overview with Esther Hexter and Women of Valor, stories of Jewish and non-Jewish rescuers with Sol Factor, both Holocaust educators.

Barbara White, general manager of branch services at the Akron-Summit County Public Library, will present “Resources: Asking Questions, Seeking Answers.”

Participants will explore “Teaching the Next Generation” in facilitated discussion groups for teachers and community learners. Groups will be led by award-winning teachers from the Greater Akron area.

Themes for each seminar correspond to the theme for the city of Akron Arts and Writing Contest. The 2014 contest theme is “Women of the Holocaust.” Copies of materials from the seminar will be available after Oct. 14 at www.akronohio/holocaust2.

Major funding comes from a grant from the Rose & Larry Schwartz Holocaust Education Fund with the Akron Legacy and Endowment Fund of the JCBA. The Jewish Studies Program at Kent State University is also providing funding.

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News Headline: Seminar to explore women and the Holocaust | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Oct. 05--The 18th annual Holocaust seminar will explore the experiences and perspectives of women.

The seminar, hosted by the Jewish Community Board of Akron and the Lippman School, is 4 to 8 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Shaw Jewish Community Center, 750 White Pond Drive, Akron. It will focus on women who were victims, survivors and rescuers (both Jewish and non-Jewish).

The forum will feature a survivor and second generation panel. Panelists are survivors Lici Calderon, a dual resident of Akron and Delray Beach, Fla., and Betty Gold, of Cleveland, and Irene Adler, of Akron, who will share stories of her mother, Rose Schwartz. Sam Chestnut, head of the Lippman School, will serve as moderator.

A movie produced by the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage, called To Be a Woman in the Holocaust: Cleveland Stories, will also be shown. The film includes eyewitness testimony of four Cleveland survivors -- Gita Frankel, Rina Frankel, Erica Gold and Rose Kaplovitz -- and comments from Leatrice Rabinsky, a Holocaust educator.

The seminar will also include an historical overview with Esther Hexter; stories of rescuers shared by Sol Factor and a session on finding resources with Barbara White, general manager of branch services at the Akron-Summit County Public Library. Factor, an instructor at Kent State University, and Hexter are both Holocaust educators. Hexter and White are members of the Ohio Council on Holocaust Education.

Cost of the seminar is $12 or $18 with a boxed supper. Advance registration is required by Tuesday. CEU credits will be available for teachers. For more information and to register, go to www.jewishakron.org or call 330-869-2424.

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News Headline: Good Morning Cleveland | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Also today, kent state's homecoming celebrations kick off in 45 minutes or so. The festivities begin with the bowman cup 5k and homecoming parade down main street. Then the golden flashes take on the northern illinois huskies. And big changes in kent. A new walk way known as the university now connects kent state to the town. Restaurants and retail shops are thriving in the area known as acorn alley and acorn corner. This place was jump started by a developer who invested 22 million of his own money. There are 38 new businesses in downtown kent and the university's president says more are on the way.

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News Headline: Spirits high for KSU Homecoming | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University enjoyed a break in the clouds Saturday morning for the annual KSU Homecoming Parade. Above, the KSU Marching Band entertains the crowd as it marches down East Main Street in front of the campus. President Lester Lefton waves to the crowd during his final Homecoming parade as KSU president. He will be retiring in July 2014. See more Homecoming photos on page A11.

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News Headline: PROFILES IN HIRING: Horseshoe Casino Cleveland and Thistledown racino (Scheule) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WHERE THE JOBS ARE

Even Karen Kaminski, a seasoned human resources executive, has been a bit surprised by the hiring process for the Horseshoe Casino Cleveland and the Thistledown racino.

With more than 40,000 people coming to Quicken Loans Arena for a recruiting event, it's no wonder Ms. Kaminski finds herself in new hiring territory.

“I've been in human resources for 20 years, and I have never experienced anything like that,” said the vice president of human resources at Horseshoe Casino Cleveland and Caesars Entertainment.

The Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park — set to open in December — hosted a similar informational job fair on Sept. 12.

More than 6,000 interested candidates attended to learn more about the 750 full-time positions being offered, said Michelle Scott, vice president of human resources for the Hard Rock Rocksino.

After online applications are reviewed, eligible candidates for the Hard Rock Rocksino are invited to a group interview. That process is causal and perspective employees respond to prompts like, “Talk about your favorite artist and convince us to come to dinner with the two of you,” Ms. Scott said.

“We're really just looking for their personalities,” she said. Those with big smiles, outgoing personalities and guest service-oriented mentalities advance to interviews with department managers and an assessment of their technical skills.

There are more than 100 open positions at the Hard Rock Rocksino, from front-of-the-house positions to upper management, but Ms. Scott said some of the positions in which people are most interested include marketing, management, food and beverage, IT, human resources, sales, accounting and guest services.

At the Horseshoe Casino and Thistledown, hiring also remains strong, with more than 2,500 joining the staff over the past year and half.

“It's really hard to identify a specific position that is hot,” Ms. Kaminski said. The human resources team is seeing applications from every industry possible. Although some open positions in management require college degrees or state licensing, many openings are entry level jobs that in part are available due to upward movement of staff within the company.

Northeast Ohio colleges with hospitality management programs have taken note of the opportunities in the gaming industry and are preparing students with courses as specific as Kent State University's casino management and operations class.

The class has boasted a full roster and waiting list about six years, said Barbara Scheule, associate professor and coordinator of Kent's hospitality management program.

“The opportunities are out there,” she said. “It's exciting to see our grads all over Northeast Ohio in a number of really nice positions.”

The big picture

“Hospitality is going nuts,” said Greg Forte, hospitality management dean for Cuyahoga Community College. He says the No. 1 concern for people opening restaurants and hotels right now is where are we going to find our workers?

Currently the accredited hospitality management degree and certificate program at Tri-C has about 550 students; however 75% of them are already fully employed in the hospitality industry, Mr. Forte said.

The program posts between 150 to 300 jobs in the sector every month, he said. Although some of these jobs are entry level positions, Mr. Forte also has posted a number of middle management opportunities including calls for sous chefs and front-of-the-house supervisors.

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News Headline: The To-Do List -- week of Oct. 6 • | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Cleveland Browns
News OCR Text: Saturday

Soroptimist International of Canton/Stark County Fundraiser — 10 a.m. at Brookside Country Club, 1800 Canton Ave. NW, Canton. Silent auction, basket raffle, live auction and fashion show by the Fashion Student Organization at Kent State University. $35, advance only. 330-289-6623 or email sicanton.starkcounty@soroptimist.net.

Jewel of Portage County Gala — 6 p.m. in the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, 215 S. Depeyster St., Kent. Music by AZjazz, food and drink, raffle prizes. Benefits Robinson Memorial Hospital. 330-297-8802 or www.robinsonmemorial.org/gala.

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News Headline: KSU Hotel to host Brunch Bunch fundraiser | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Members of the Thanksgiving Brunch Bunch committee are gearing up for Portage County's charity "fun-raiser," which will celebrate its 45th year at a new location.

"We are excited to announce that Brunch Bunch is coming back to downtown Kent where it originated on November 28, 1968," said committee member Dennis Missimi.

This year's event will be held at the new KSU Hotel and Conference Center on Thanksgiving morning, Nov. 28, from 8 a.m. to noon.

The annual event, which has become a Thanksgiving Day tradition in Kent, began when organizers, Richard "Moose" Paskert, Jack Urchek, and Larry Sisson snuck away from the hustle and bustle of the Thanksgiving morning preparation and found their way to Hahn's Fine Foods, a bakery and restaurant on South Water Street in downtown Kent. An impromptu auction raised about $235 for charity.

The Thanksgiving morning "coffee hour" has since become a long standing holiday tradition that has raised approximately $375,000 for various charities in Portage County by auctioning items from pencils and peanuts 45 years ago to more elaborate items today such as specialty gift baskets, sports memorabilia, Goodyear blimp rides, and items unique to Brunch Bunch.

With each year, the event has grown, attracting hundreds of people. It has changed locations along the way from Hahn's to Ace's Restaurant on North Water Street to Missimi's Restaurant on West Main Street to the Kent American Legion on Mogadore Road.

"The KSU Hotel and Conference Center is such a beautiful addition to our downtown area, and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to bring this event back downtown and carry on this heartwarming community tradition at such an outstanding venue," said Michelle Hartman, event chairwoman.

All proceeds raised benefit organizations that better the lives of Portage County residents.

Admission to the event is $3 for endless coffee, cider, and doughnuts. The committee is accepting donated items for the auction and monetary donations.

Donations can be dropped off at Hall-Green Agency, 146 N. DePeyster St. in Kent, Portage Community Bank in Ravenna at 1311 E. Main St. or at its Kent location at 1532 S. Water Street.

Raffle tickets also are available for cash prizes and gift cards.

For event information, contact Michelle Hartman at 330.815.4315.

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News Headline: 'TRIPLE DIVIDE' EXPLORES FRACKING: FILM TO BE SCREENED AT KSU STARK CAMPUS | Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A film that looks at shale drilling in northern Pennsylvania and how it was managed by the state's Department of Environmental Protection will be shown Wednesday in Jackson Township.

Triple Divide will be screened at 6:30 p.m. in the Main Hall auditorium of Kent State University's Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

The movie, by filmmakers Joshua B. Pribanic and Melissa Troutmen, takes its name from the area of Potter County, Pa., where three continental divides for streams meet. It is an area where drillers have been active.

Triple Divide was developed by Public Herald, an investigative grass-roots group based in Coudersport, Pa. It is headed by Pribanic, a native of Sandusky, Ohio.

The movie premiered last March in Coudersport.

You can also get information on the film at http://tripledividefilm.org.

Doors open at 6 p.m.

After the movie, there will be a panel discussion.

Speakers are Greg Coleridge of the Northeast Ohio American Friends Service Committee; Kathryn Hanratty of the Native Plant Society and the People's Oil and Gas Collaborative of Ohio; Alison Auciello, Ohio organizer for Food & Water Watch; and Elyse Hirsch, co-founder of the Stark-Summit Coalition, volunteer local coordinator for Food & Water Watch and board member of the Buckeye Forest Council.

The screening is being presented by the Biology Club, the Stark-Summit Coalition, Stark Concerned Citizens, Food & Water Watch and the Buckeye Forest Council.

Admission is free.

Refreshments will be provided.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Kent State Stark to host 'Triple Divide' screening on Oct. 9 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Downing, Bob
News OCR Text: The film, Triple Divide, will be shown Oct. 9 in Jackson Township.

The film will be screened at 6:30 p.m. at Kent State University's Stark Campus. Meet in the Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

The movie by filmmakers Joshua B. Pribanic and Melissa Troutmen looks at shale drilling in northern Pennsylvania and how it was managed by the state's Department of Environmental Protection.

The movie takes its name from the area of Potter County, Pa., where three continental divides for streams meet. It is an area where drillers have been active.

The film was developed by Public Herald, an investigative grass-roots group based in Coudersport, Pa. It is headed by Pribanic, a native of Sandusky, Ohio.

The movie was premiered last March in Coudersport, Pa.

You can also get information on the film at http://tripledividefilm.org.

Doors open at 6 p.m.

After the movie, there will be a panel discussion.

Speakers are Greg Coleridge of the Northeast Ohio American Friends Service Committee; Kathryn Hanratty of the Native Plant Society and the People's Oil and Gas Collaborative of Ohio; Alison Auciello, Ohio organizer for Food & Water Watch; and Elyse Hirsch, co-founder of the Stark-Summit Coalition, volunteer local coordinator for Food & Water Watch and board member of the Buckeye Forest Council.

The screening is being presented by the Biology Club, the Stark-Summit Coalition, Stark Concerned Citizens, Food & Water Watch and the Buckeye Forest Council.

Admission is free.

Refreshments will be provided.

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News Headline: What's going on here? Preparing for new signage | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Edd Pritchard
News OCR Text: WHAT IS IT? Crews are moving dirt on the Kent State University at Stark campus near University Drive and Frank Avenue NW.

WHY ARE THEY DOING THAT? Dirt must be moved to provide a level area and solid base for a new sign. Topsoil was removed from the area and will be replaced by more compact dirt from a mound nearby. Kent State has been installing signs on the university?s campuses. The new signs are part of a streetscape project that also will see the university planting shrubs along Frank Avenue NW.

HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN GOING ON? Work for this sign started early in the week. The first new sign went up several months ago. Another sign was installed Thursday at University Drive and Dressler Road NW.

GOT A QUESTION? If you see something that makes you wonder, ?What?s going on here?? ask us to find out. Phone: 330-580-8484. Email: edd.pritchard@cantonrep.com. Fax: 330-454-5745.

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News Headline: 'Clapton Tribute' is Oct. 12 at PAC | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA  “Clapton Tribute: Evolution” and special guest Brimstone will be on stage at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12.

Eric Clapton has been a major influence and icon who inspired artist Christopher Wintrip. To pay honor to this legendary performer, Wintrip formed Evolution, an Eric Clapton tribute band. This performance will cover Clapton's musical career performing hit songs from The Yardbirds, Blues Breakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Derek & the Dominos, as well as  Clapton's solo career.

Also performing will be Brimstone, a well-known Canton-based band that is reuniting for this performance. The band evolved in 1970 from a combination of several traditional rock bands and performed in a variety of venues with other major artists, including Lynyrd Skynyrd, Harry Chapin, Peter Frampton, the Climax Blues Band and Rennaissance, among others.

Brimstone band members include Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of Kent State Tuscarawas, lead vocals; Chris Wintrip of Canton, guitar and vocals; Ken Miller of New Philadelphia, bass guitar and vocals; Jeff Miller of Wooster, percussion and vocals; and Dan Porter of Akron, keyboards.

“It has been nearly 40 years since we have performed together,” commented Andrews. “We are looking forward to performing songs from our album “Paper Winged Dreams” and several pieces that have never been recorded or released.”

Brimstone has been recognized as Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Honorees in the My Town Display.

Tickets range from $10 to $20 and can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free parking is available for all shows.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE.

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News Headline: Easements are next step for Western Reserve Greenway | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Staff report

WARREN

Trumbull County commissioners have authorized the mailing of letters to five property owners along the planned path of Phase 3 of the Western Reserve Greenway that seek to acquire easements for the trail.

Phase 3 will travel south from Champion Avenue in Champion Township near Research Parkway to the Trumbull County Engineer's Office at North River Road in Warren — about two miles.

The Warren part of the trail picks up across North River Road from the engineer's office.

Unlike earlier phases of the trail, the railroad tracks along the bike trail will not be removed for this phase, said Zach Svette, project coordinator for the Trumbull County MetroParks Board, which will run the trail. Instead, the trail will be built just west of the tracks.

The county owns some of the land that will be used for Phase 3. The other entities are Kent State University, the Mahoning Valley Economic Development Corp. and Economic Development Rail II Corp. — all quasigovernment entities.

The entities involved are supportive of the project, and he's hopeful acquiring the easements will go smoothly, Svette said.

If the entities take action as expected, the county commissioners could award construction bids by early 2014, and the trail could be ready to use by late 2014, officials say.

When Phase 3 is complete, only one portion of the Trumbull County part of the trail will remain incomplete — an area from the southern Warren limits traveling through Weathersfield Township to downtown Niles.

The Western Reserve Greenway is part of the Great Ohio Lake-To-River Greenway, which eventually will travel 100 miles from Lake Erie in Ashtabula to the Ohio River at East Liverpool.

Officials are planning for that phase, but it is years away. Warren and Niles recently completed trails through their communities.

The last phase the county completed was Phase 2 in 2004. It runs from state Route 305 in Champion south to Champion Avenue in Champion.

Other stories of interestAwesometownAir base furloughs of 400 end todayEastern Ohio legislators push for restoration of Homestead ExemptionConstruction on Lowellville?s Liberty Street project delayed until spring

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News Headline: Clapton Tribute Band: Evolution with special guest Brimstone to perform at Kent State Tuscarawas PAC | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Bargain Hunter - Tuscarawas Edition - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Clapton Tribute Band: Evolution and special guest Brimstone are onstage at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on Oct. 12 at 7:30 p.m.

Through the years, Eric Clapton has been a major influence and icon who inspired artist, Christopher Wintrip. To pay honor this legendary performer, Wintrip formed Evolution, an Eric Clapton tribute band. This performance will cover Clapton’s musical career performing hit songs from “The Yard Birds”, “Blues Breakers”, “Cream”, “Blind Faith” and “Derek & the Dominos”, as well as Clapton’s solo career.

Also performing will be Brimstone, a well-known Canton-based band that is reuniting for this performance. The band evolved in 1970 from a combination of several traditional rock bands and performed in a variety of venues with other major artists, including Lynyrd Skynyrd, Harry Chapin, Peter Frampton, the Climax Blues Band and Rennaissance, among others.

Brimstone band members include Dr. Gregg L. Andrews, dean and chief administrative officer of Kent State Tuscarawas, lead vocals; Chris Wintrip of Canton, guitar and vocals; Ken Miller of New Philadelphia, bass guitar and vocals; Jeff Miller of Wooster, percussion and vocals and Dan Porter of Akron, keyboards.

“It has been nearly 40 years since we have performed together,” commented Andrews. “We are looking forward to performing songs from our album, “Paper Winged Dreams” and several pieces that have never been recorded or released.”

“Paper Winged Dreams” is a unique progressive–art-rock work with influences from a wide range of music genres. Brimstone’s ambitious effort focuses on ensemble collaboration, lyrical content and vocal harmonies resulting in a delicate, introspective outcome. They have been recognized as Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Honorees in the My Town Display.

Tickets for Evolution and Brimstone can be purchased now at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free parking is available for all shows.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Menopause The Musical: A funny, laugh-out-loud musical on the change | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Bargain Hunter - Tuscarawas Edition - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The international hit show Menopause The Musical is coming to the Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas on Oct. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased now at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Set in a department store, where four women with seemingly nothing in common but a black lace bra, meet by chance at a lingerie sale. The all-female cast makes fun of their woeful hot flashes, forgetfulness, mood swings, wrinkles, night sweats and chocolate binges. A sisterhood is created between these diverse women as they realize that menopause is no longer “The Silent Passage.” It is a stage in every woman’s life that is perfectly normal.

Menopause The Musical is produced by GFour Productions and is the work of writer Jeanie Linders, director Seth Greenleaf and choreographer Daria Melendez. The laughter-filled 90-minute production includes parodies from the classics of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. It is estimated that nearly 11 million women have attended a performance since the 2001 opening in Orlando, Fla. Inspired by a hot flash and a bottle of wine, writer and producer Jeanie Linders created the show as a celebration of women who are on the brink of, in the middle of, or have survived “The Change.”

Menopause The Musical has entertained audiences across the country in more than 450 U.S. cities, nearly 300 international cities and a total of 15 countries. For more information, visit www.menopausethemusical.com.

The Performing Arts Center at Kent State Tuscarawas is located at 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia. Free parking is available for all shows.

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News Headline: St. Louis art gallery features old Hollywood costumes | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fibre 2 Fashion
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Marie Antoinette dress/Gina Grafos

A cinematic trip down memory lane, offering a nostalgic slice of opulent fashion extravaganza, is currently available at an exhibit featuring costumes from old Hollywood classics.

Titled as ‘Glamour: Costumes and Images from the Collection of Mary Strauss', the event offers a sneak peek into the magnificent world of film and theatre glamour through the past century.

Scheduled to run till December 28, 2013, the exhibit displays creations from several eminent costumers of yesteryears such as Adrian, Donald Brooks, Alexandra Byrne, Edith Head, Florence Klotz, Bob Mackie, Charles Le Maire, Nolan Miller, Irene Sharaff and Valentina.

Taking place at the Sheldon Art Galleries, Missouri, the featured exhibits at the event are sourced from the collections of the famous St. Louis native and Fox Theatre restorer Mary Strauss as well as Kent State University and Paramount Pictures.

The exhibited range includes dresses worn by Norma Shearer (Marie Antoinette, 1938), Elizabeth Taylor (Cleopatra in 1963, A Little Night Music in 1977 and Poker Alice in 1987), Susan Hayward (With a Song in my Heart, 1952) and Whitney Houston during her Pacific Rim Tour.

In addition to costumes, the event also showcases original sketches of dresses worn by Josephine Baker and Ann-Margret and movie posters as well as video clips depicting some of the costumes in their original films.

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News Headline: PROFILES IN HIRING: Explorys | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: In just four short years, Explorys has grown from four employees to more than 100 — and the Cleveland Clinic spinoff says it is not done hiring yet.

The company, which specializes in harnessing big data for use in health care, has almost doubled its work force each year since its founding, with the greatest growth in numbers occurring since 2011.

“There's an enormous amount of data out there that can be harnessed for the patient's benefit,” said Charlie Lougheed, a co-founder and the company's president and chief strategy officer.

The company, which recently moved to more than 20,000 square feet of space in the former Museum of Contemporary Art building, today works with more than 200 hospitals and 16 large health care networks.

But growing a work force in such a developing sector is no easy task. Mr. Lougheed said there is almost a 0% unemployment rate in high-tech and data services industries.

“These candidates are all getting offers from national players,” he said. “It's an intense marketplace.”

Mr. Lougheed credits his human resources team with getting the word out — locally and nationally — about Explorys and what it has to offer. The firm also stays active locally, participating in events such as Cleveland GiveCamp, an annual event that donates programming services to nonprofits.

A survey by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society confirms competition is stiff for talent: 79% of health care providers and IT vendors planned to hire additional staff in 2013.

Explorys is hiring for positions across the board: data scientists, analysts, client services, software engineers, sales and account managers and marketing.

The growing need for health care IT professionals, like those Explorys is seeking, accelerated the creation of a health informatics concentration at Kent State University.

The 2-year-old program, for which the school plans to seek accreditation, currently has 100 students, offering both a master's degree and a certificate.

Christine Hudak, concentration coordinator, said growth in the health care IT field is expected to continue as health care systems and others continue to implement electronic processes.

“Now we've got it, what do we do with it,” she said of the sentiment regarding the technologies. “There's so much work to be done.”

The big picture

Health care in general long has been touted as having strong potential for future job growth.

And while that remains true for the most part, recent announcements of future layoffs by major Northeast Ohio health systems show it is a sector facing many of the same challenges as other industries. On top of that, it's in the midst of adjusting to the new realities of health care reform.

But there is one area for which hiring is hot: health care IT.

In a 2013 survey by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, more than 85% of respondents (health care providers and vendors) indicated their organization hired at least one IT employee in the past year.

Clinical application support and help desk positions were the most popular at health care providers, while sales/marketing and field support employees were the most sought after by vendors and consulting firms.

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News Headline: Reporters' Notebook: Oct. 7, 2013 (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Not that they're being anti-social, mind you

Kent State University issued a cease and desist order to its students last week, requesting they refrain from using the university's logos and trademarks on social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.

The message, which was issued by the university's Office of General Counsel, said continued use of the trademarks and service marks without written consent from the university may result in disciplinary or legal action.

“If you are maintaining a social media account that incorporates a Kent State trademark or service mark without authorization, we ask that you immediately cease use of the mark,” the email said. “We further ask all students to refrain from any future unauthorized use of university trademarks or service marks on any social media site.”

In an email, Emily Vincent, a university spokeswoman, said there wasn't a particular incident that led to the directive. Ms. Vincent said the university's intent wasn't to discourage a “positive display of pride or support.”

“Our trademarks reflect on our university's style, character, traditions, strengths and values,” she said. “What we don't want is the university's trademarks to be used in poor taste that tarnishes the positive connotations associated with the Kent State trademarks.”

Asked whether Crain's would be discouraged from publishing the university's logo in its publication, Ms. Vincent said, “Of course you can use it.” — Timothy Magaw

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News Headline: Kent State cautions students against unlawful use of university logos (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some social media pages changed avatars last week in reaction to a warning from Kent State University about the unauthorized use of the college's many trademarked logos.

KSU's Office of General Counsel, which acts as the university's legal representative, emailed a message to students Sept. 30 reminding them that KSU logos are federally registered and that their use without written permission "may result in disciplinary and/or legal action."

KSU spokesperson Emily Vincent said she's not aware of any time the university needed to pursue legal action against a trademark violator. She added the message was not in response to a particular event or directed at a specific person or social media account.

"Universities across the country are seeing an increase in unauthorized use of their trademarks," she said.

"We, too, have seen an increase and want to address it with our students and make them aware that our logos are protected trademarks."

Some Twitter pages that focus on KSU groups and happenings but aren't officially tied to the university itself had been using some of the trademarked Kent State logos in their avatars and digital backgrounds. Such pages typically are run by students.

Following the university's announcement, those pages had replaced the KSU logo with other images.

Some inserted a statement on their profiles clarifying they aren't affiliated with university.

"The university's intent is not to discourage a positive display of pride or support of the university," Vincent said. "Our trademarks reflect on our university's style, character, traditions, strengths and values. What we don't want is the university's trademarks to be used in poor taste that tarnishes the positive connotations associated with the Kent State trademarks."

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News Headline: NEOMED marks anniversary with new facilities | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: ROOTSTOWN TWP.: The Northeast Ohio Medical University is marking its 40th anniversary with two new buildings — the first major additions to the rural campus since its inception.

Officials say the $37 million housing project and a $45 million research and graduate education facility will modernize and enhance the campus.

The new facilities “are very transformative,” said John Wray, vice president for business and finance. “It's a great opportunity for us to grow.”

NEOMED began as the six-year Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. State lawmakers carved out a campus in a Portage County field that was about the same distance from the three partner universities that contributed students — the University of Akron, Kent State and Youngstown State.

But much has changed since the college's heady launch to stem a general practitioner shortage in Northeastern Ohio.

The college since has been rechristened NEOMED and has added a pharmacy school and master's degree programs. It opened medical training to students at Cleveland State, Hiram College, Central State and elsewhere, and hosts a Bio-Med Science Academy for Rootstown High students.

Those changes convinced NEOMED officials that they needed to enhance their facilities. In the last couple of years, the medical college has begun to pump $176 million via bonds and private investments into improvements that will almost double the 450,000 square-foot campus.

For example, NEOMED is contributing $10 million to a $45 million Cleveland State facility that will serve medical college and CSU students.

It's also in the process of building a $70 million health, wellness and medical education building that will open in July and installing $14 million in parking and other infrastructure improvements.

But two big pieces of the new NEOMED are already up and running.

The campus has begun to move from a commuter campus to a residential one with the opening of the $37 million Village at NEOMED this fall.

Occupancy of the 339 beds in the apartments fell short of expectations with just 135 renters. Students shied away because they didn't know if the building would be done in time for the fall semester and because the campus doesn't offer any student activities, Wray said.

“But we've already started to sign up students for next fall and anticipate 300,” he said.

By then a medical fitness facility will be available in the health, wellness and medical education building, he said.

Also newly opened is the 80,000 square-foot research and graduate education facility with biomedical research labs and support rooms for more than 30 scientists and their teams.

Still more construction may be on the way to meet an expected enrollment of 1,550 by 2016, up from the 1,000 of today: a three- to four-story medical office building and maybe another housing unit.

NEOMED will begin its yearlong 40-year celebration with dedications of the new buildings and tours for invited guests today.

The Ohio General Assembly passed legislation establishing the medical college in 1973.

The first class of students began their studies at their home university in 1975, began their work at Rootstown in 1977 and graduated in 1981.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: If your idea of the Cuyahoga only runs through the Flats, you need to get to know the rest of the river | Email

News Date: 10/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name: Snook, Debbi
News OCR Text: A paddler's crooked peace

It's not a multiple-choice question anymore. The Cuyahoga — our embattled, 100-mile waterway — is all these things.

Just not all of it, or all the time.

If you're craving an encounter, look at it as a river of thirds. The upper Cuyahoga, with its headwaters in Geauga County, can be a spiritual visit, much of it remaining as undeveloped as it has been for 200 years. A section of the middle Cuyahoga, from Kent to Cuyahoga Falls, slips through green residential stretches and an occasional spot of low-level whitewater. And the lower Cuyahoga, in the city of Cleveland, rocks and rolls with industry – and the dark disguises that entails.

One way to measure the success of the river is to grab a paddle, get in a canoe or kayak, and ride it. Have you done that lately? There's still a chance, weather permitting, to do it this year.

A handful of canoe and kayak liveries are standing by until the end of October's colorful month. Yes, a handful. Where once there was only Camp Hi in Hiram, there are now three other businesses built on river recreation.

The Cuyahoga is appealing in new ways. More of us are determined to use hand-powered watercraft. Canoe and kayak registrations are at an all-time high, increasing from about 50,000 in 2002 to 107,000 in 2012, according to the Ohio Division of Watercraft. It's cheap, it's exercise, and it's not virtual.

Paddlers are meeting a changing Cuyahoga.

“It's becoming a real river again,” says Elaine Marsh, a principal with the advocacy group Friends of Crooked River.

Thanks to government money, two of the river's dams came down this year. Navigation miles increased, and the water is becoming healthier.

Remove a dam, Marsh says, and you remove something that collects sediment and chemicals. Without a structure to stop it, a river can better cleanse itself with a constant flow, she says. Life-giving oxygen is churned back into the water to support new fish and plant life, some of the best pollution filters.

Remove a dam and you also eliminate a structure known to take the lives of people when waters get rough.

The amount of sewage going into the river — a fact of life, downstream of Akron — is decreasing.

Marsh is pleased that sewage treatment has increased in many communities, greatly lowering contamination on “good” days. Happily, she also reports that the city of Akron and the Northeast Ohio Sewer District are building overflow systems that will keep the river from becoming a cesspool after storms.

“Twenty-three years ago, when we started Friends of Crooked River, there weren't that many people on the river,” Marsh says. “Now people are more comfortable with it, and the reason they're more comfortable is because we've improved the water quality and the information about water quality.”

Here's where you can go.

Upper Cuyahoga

If Randy Newman had written about this stretch of the crooked river, perhaps Cleveland would have done without another 15 minutes of the wrong kind of fame that his “Burn On” invited.

This headwater region is the exact opposite of what we see in the city, flowing through the Flats into Lake Erie. Near the lake, Rockefeller and other industrialists used the river as a drainpipe while building up the city's economy. Back then, nature seemed limitless. Pollution was linked with achievement.

But the Cuyahoga didn't start out that way, and still doesn't. From the lake, trace south on the river to Akron, hang a left and go north again through the Cuyahoga's U-shaped pattern. Launch your canoe or kayak at Eldon Russell Park in Burton and you're in a Disneyesque channel carved through mudflats at the edge of a forest. There always seems to be wildflowers in bloom and a kingfisher looking for fish food. Herons and beavers love the place, and so do the spatterdock lilies that punctuate the surface of the water with their glowing, ball-shaped yellow blossoms.

Go on a moonlight paddle offered by Geauga Park District and you might see mists creeping like ghosts across the water, and walls of fireflies.

On a day of comfortable temperatures, paddle the serpentine route to a quiet riverbank and close your eyes. Rest a bit. Listen to the wind, the birds. Feel the water's gentle movement. It's one of Northeast Ohio's most life-affirming moments.

The flow is so slow on this early part of the river that folks with their own boats can paddle 3 miles to a tavern (about an hour-and-a-half), get some food and paddle back in the same amount of time. Those without boats can rent from Camp Hi or Iron Horse Saloon (Troy Township) for easier one-way trips. Hoist a victory beer when your journey's over.

Middle Cuyahoga

Most of us didn't know this section until the Crooked River Adventures opened three years ago. This outreach of Kent State University is run by fresh-scrubbed college students and instructors who take education seriously. Paddlers must watch a safe-practices video and listen to last-minute instructions from staff.

Not that this section is a big challenge, although there is a noticeable current compared with the upper section. A beginner needs to keep up a bit of his or her paddling momentum to stay ahead of the flow. A few sizable riffles near the finish at Munroe Falls can provide a refreshing spray. There's also an option to continue to Headwaters Park in Cuyahoga Falls, with a few more riffles. Then the trip ends.

Downstream from there, the river drops 200 feet in a short period, says Marsh. Only the most experienced paddlers go there.

The water quality in the middle section is much better than it is in Cleveland, with plenty of bird and plant life to entertain. The current picks up because the river narrows as it runs under Ohio 59 and along downtown Kent.

The flow is simply joyful here, and the route feels like a sunken green corridor sweeping through the land. Daily life seems far removed.

Lower Cuyahoga

Those with a love of paddling and a love of Cleveland's gritty history can't help but yearn for a view from the water. Everything in the Flats looks monumental at that level, from piles of gravel to railroad tracks to lift bridges. An outfitter called River Cruiser Kayaking commonly sets up around the Independence area and lets folks paddle all the way to the mouth of the river, with or without guide services.

But there is a laundry list of cautions. After a storm, the bacteria level in the Cuyahoga south of Akron rises dramatically. The passage of massive freighters in the navigation channel closer to the lake calls for more maritime knowledge and paddling skill than most of us possess. A marine radio, a guide and a dose of bravado are places to start.

“While paddling in the navigation channel is legal,” Marsh says, “it's not anything we recommend at this time.”

Her group and many others are hard at work on researching a future Cuyahoga River water trail.

Such a trail would establish safe access points, Marsh says. They would be managed, and there would be maps and websites to tell paddlers the latest conditions.

“We need to get a lot more info out.”

And then get Randy Newman to write a new song.

see RIVER | C8

RIVER

Copyright © 2013 The Plain Dealer. All Rights Reserved. Used by NewsBank with Permission.

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News Headline: The HeldenFiles: KSU to hold graphic storytelling festival | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: System Administrator
News OCR Text: A festival devoted to comic strips, comic books and other forms of “graphic storytelling” will be on Oct. 19 in the Kent State University Student Center.

The first Kent Comic Arts Festival will include celebrity guests like local lights Tom Batiuk and Derf Backderf, special presentations and a limited number of vendors. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Among the presentations, in the center's Kiva auditorium, are Batiuk discussing 40 Years of Funky Winkerbean at 11 a.m.; Backderf talking about My Friend Dahmer at noon; Jill Thompson (Wonder Woman, Swamp Thing) and her Halloween Spooktacular, 1 p.m.; a Guide to Graphic Storytelling Master Class with P. Craig Russell (Dr. Strange, The Sandman), 2 p.m.; a panel on The Artists of the Graveyard Book with Thompson, Russell, Scott Hampton (Batman, Vampirella) and Galen Showman (Hellboy, Star Wars: Episode One), at 3 p.m., and a P. Craig Russell Piano Musicale to benefit the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund at 4:15 p.m.

There will also be a VIP party from 7 to 10 p.m. that evening in Kent's Zephyr Pub for mingling with the festival's celebrity guests. You must be 21 or older to attend the party.

A standard ticket is $15, or $10 for Kent State students with valid ID. A ticket including the VIP party is $75 and must be purchased in advance. You can find out more about the festival and tickets at www.kentcomicartsfest.com.

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News Headline: Fall fundraising dinner set for Friday in Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The students of United Christian Ministries at Kent State University are preparing
for their fall fundraising dinner to be held at 6 p.m. Friday in Pierson Hall of the
Kent United Methodist Church. Reservations are required and can be made online
at www.myucm.org or by calling 330-673-5687. Adult tickets are $20 and children 12
and under eat free. The menu includes and appetizer, salad and bread, cranberry chicken,
roasted redskin potatoes, green beans almondine, and chocolate brownie sundae. A vegetarian
meal is available upon request. Proceeds go to student programming and a freewill
offering will support Mission trips. “UCM” is an ecumenical campus ministry, serving
KSU since 1937.

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News Headline: What used to be a college and a town is now a college town | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >>> New tonight, what used to be a college and a town is now a college town. This afternoon a special walkway was dedicated which connects kent state university to downtown kent. Bob jones shows us it marks another step in transforming an area already experiencing an economic boom. >> Reporter: gwen offers dozens of made from scratch popcorn flavors. >> This is the original recipe. This is the carmel. >> Reporter: gwen opened her shop and business is bursting. >> We have expanded upstairs. >> Reporter: restaurants and retail shops are sprawling in the area known as acorn alley one and two and acorn corner. 38 businesses so far. Jump started by a developer who invested $22 million of his own dollars because he didn't like what he saw. >> It was almost a ghost town. There was nothing to do in kent unless you wanted a beer or a tattoo. >> Reporter: today the last divide between the town and kent state was removed. A walkway known as the universitiest apply nude connects the two. >> We purchased land in between the city and university, demolished run down homes and turned it into a beautiful park- like area. >> Reporter: a public, private, $138 million investment led to the development and created 700 jobs. >> Probably $20 million in revenue being spent in kent that wouldn't have been spent before. >> In a community of our size, those numbers are huge. Transformative impact. >> Reporter: much of the revitalization took place. >> I do believe I'm the beneficiary of a lot of people's hard work. >> Reporter: there are plenty of signs that even more progress is on the way. In kent, bob jones, news channel 5. >>> Discussions are on going with more developers which could bring in movie theaters and apartment-style homes to kent.

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News Headline: 2013 Evergreen Book Medals | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent Publisher, The
Contact Name: Jay Amberg
News OCR Text: Books Honored for Contributing to Positive Global Change

Five years into conducting the Living Now Awards and 12 years into this new millennium, we've launched the Evergreen Book Medals to commemorate world-changing books published since the year 2000.

We all seek healthier, more fulfilling lives for ourselves and for the planet, and books are important tools for gaining knowledge about how to achieve these goals for ourselves, our loved ones, and for Planet Earth.

Divided into five categories, these books are honored for their contributions to positive global change. Here are the Living Now Evergreen Book medalists.

Evergreen Medals for World Peace

Gold: Letters From Your Future: Reaching for Your Highest Potential in Times of Great Change, by Brett L. Bowden (CreateSpace)

"Things have been as they always have, until now. Now is the dawning of a new era, a era in which man will become more like he was in the beginning, when God and man breathed as one. No longer will the wall of separation divide the two. For the barriers are being broken down, even as these words are being written."

Silver: Tri Worlds: It's Time to Think as a Species, by Gil Mulley (Red Feather Publishing LLC)

"Our globe wallows in one mess after another because we human beings value our contrived differences exponentially more than our basic human sameness. We've divided our species into so many nationalities, cultures, ethnicities, political and religious beliefs that we now have no concept of our whole – our species – and what's best for its survival."

Bronze: The Rainbow Bridge: Bridge to Inner Peace and to World Peace, by Brent N. Hunter (Spirit Rising Productions)

"I discovered that the great perennial wisdom of all of the various religious perspectives was never available in an integrated form. After a series of profound spiritual awakenings and realizations, I recognized that one of my key life purposes is to illuminate the common ground in the world's major religions, revealing universal principles…"

Evergreen Medals for Health and Wellness

Gold: Dr. Max Gerson: Healing the Hopeless, by Howard Straus with Barbara Marinacci (Totality Books/Gerson Media)

“In the developing world, people's extreme vulnerability to infectious diseases is definitely linked to gross malnutrition and the change from wholesome, well-balanced native food to the high-tech diet of the so-called developed world,” writes Gerson's grandson, Howard Strauss. “As a culture we have also become programmed to believe that eating Big Macs and drinking sugary soda pop are desirable human traits.”

Silver: Breast Cancer: Reduce Your Risk with Foods You Love, by Robert Pendergrast, MD (Penstokes Press)

"Your best habit for cancer risk reduction day by day is to eat a large variety of healthy foods instead of focusing on just one or two in the “Top 10” list. A large amount of good science links a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables with decreased cancer risk across the board."

Bronze: The Heart's Truth: Essays on the Art of Nursing, by Cortney Davis (Kent State University Press)

"I learned that nursing is an odd, mysterious, humbling, addicting, and often transcendent profession… The stories patients reveal – with their complex emotional and physical histories and the multilayering of their lives – are as entrancing and as important as the greatest novel."

Evergreen Medals for Personal Growth

Gold: Rascal: Making a Difference by Becoming an Original Character, by Chris Brady (Obstaclés Press, Inc)

"Being a Rascal is an outpouring of who a person is on the inside. It is a spirit of willfulness and strength, a dynamic force that drives one forward toward a unique path and contribution. It is character in motion, originality in broad relief, uniqueness for the sake of being true to one's self and one's cause."

Silver: The Boy Who Saved My Life, Walking Into the Light with My Autistic Grandson, by Earle Martin (Bright Sky Press)

"Charlie likes himself. How profound that is.

With all of his limitations, of which I think he is somehow aware, he likes himself. He can experience frustration and sadness, and talk about it… and still he likes himself. At the end of the day, he chooses to find his glass half full."

Bronze: A Loving Guide to These Shifting Times, by Alice Inoue (CreateSpace)

"You may have had moments where you sensed that something was happening deeper within you than you've ever experienced before. It is simply the voice at the core of your being, nudging you into full expression of your soul. Listen closely to the message: it is saying, 'It is time.'"

Evergreen Medals for Spiritual Leadership

Gold: Up and In: Seven Keys to Unlocking Your Potential, by Steve Kubicek (Summit Partners LLC)

"If your heart yearns for a better tomorrow, then I challenge you to address this yearning by taking seriously the truths you are about to discover. Learn to apply them to your life. Accept the key principles and treasure truths offered here, allow them to lift you up and in, and then pass them on."

Silver: I Am Another You – A Journey to Powerful Breakthroughs, by Priya Kumar (Embassy Books)

"It is my purpose to communicate clearly and to use my life in service of the highest good for the highest number of purposes that there ever will be. I will measure the worth of my life with the quality of the world that I leave behind. I will live in love and that will be my identity for the world to know. I have found my purpose. I have found myself."

Bronze: Inner Peace – Global Impact: Tibetan Buddhism, Leadership, and Work, by Kathryn Goldman Schuyler (Information Age Publishing, Inc)

"Can the fusion of ancient wisdom teachings and Western education develop wise leaders? Only future sages will be able to answer, looking back at what happens during the rest of the twenty-first century. However, adding the pure, accurate transmission of these formerly secret “ear-whispered” Tibetan teachings to the clamorous mixture of elements in Western culture opens the possibility for a shift in the underlying Western paradigms."

Evergreen Medals for Nature Conservation

Gold: The Ethiopian Wolf: Hope at the Edge of Extinction, by Will Burrard-Lucas, Rebecca R. Jackrel and Jaymi Heimbuch (Lobelia Press)

"As much as their appearance and location, it is the wolves' behavior that inspires conservationists. The wolves build a village – they work as a group to protect their territory, they all help to raise each litter of pups… There's a beauty to that, and a lesson to be learned. It takes effort to create and care for a community, and these wolves embody that ideal. By helping one another, they are mentors for improving our planet."

Silver: Back to Eden: Landscaping with Native Plants, by Dr. Frank Porter (Orange Frazer Press)

"By creating wildflower gardens, we begin to understand what makes our natural areas unique. As wildlife begins to return to our landscape, we also begin to understand how our ecosystem functions. We should be gardening in harmony with nature – not in a battle against nature. We can begin finally to appreciate the beauty and importance of our native plants and wildlife."

"You will comprehend that the solutions to our current global problems lie not in more and larger Marvels but in balance, in letting yourself be touched by the world, in surrendering to your moment in time, in living deeply each day, in taking action that affirms life. Locally, wherever you are, and globally."

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