Report Overview:
Total Clips (33)
Admissions (1)
Alumni; Athletics (8)
Alumni; Students (1)
Art, School of (2)
College of Business (COB) (2)
Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of; Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Health Sciences (1)
Higher Education (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Music; Students (2)
Psychology (3)
Safety (4)
Students (1)
Theatre and Dance (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions (1)
Local news briefs - Oct. 20 10/21/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Open house Stark State College will host an open house from noon to 3 p.m. today in the college's Student Center, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township....


Alumni; Athletics (8)
Don James, former Kent State football coach and Washington icon, dies at 80 (Page) 10/21/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Legendary college football coach Don James -- who coached for four years at Kent State -- passed away Sunday of pancreatic cancer. He was 80 years old....

Don James, former Kent State and Washington coach, dead at 80 from pancreatic cancer 10/21/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

SEATTLE: Don James arrived in Seattle in the mid-1970s as an unknown. He built a Hall of Fame coaching career, turning the University of Washington into...

Herb Page, former Kent State teammates remember Don James (Page, George) 10/21/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Herb Page had some trouble at first putting into words what Don James meant to him. Page was on his way home from Atlanta, where his Kent State men's...

Former Kent State and Washington football coach Don James dies (Nielsen, Page, Haynes) 10/21/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

SEATTLE -- Don James, the former Kent State University football coach who led the Golden Flashes to their only Mid-American Conference championship in...

Kent State Mourns Loss of Coaching Icon 10/21/2013 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, OH — Kent State University is mourning the loss of coaching icon Don James, who passed away Sunday. James, 80, was a Massillon native who served...

Coaching legend Don James, a 'great mentor' of Nick Saban's, passes away after bout with cancer 10/21/2013 al.com Text Attachment Email

Coaching legend Don James, who was Nick Saban's coach at Kent State and has been repeatedly cited as Saban's biggest influence, died Sunday. He was 80...

Pinkel's mentor, Don James, passed away Sunday 10/21/2013 Kansas City Star Text Attachment Email

Missouri coach Gary Pinkel's college coach at Kent State and his professional mentor, legendary Washington coach Don James, died Sunday. The Huskies...

Former Kent State football coach Don James dies 10/21/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

Don James, the longtime University of Washington football coach who led the Huskies to a share of the national championship in 1991, died Sunday. He was...


Alumni; Students (1)
Kent celebrates comic arts 10/21/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Tom Batiuk, creator of the comic Funky Winkerbean, signs a book for John Logar and his son, Cameron, both of Uniontown, during the first-ever Kent Comic...


Art, School of (2)
Art Notes 10/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Tuesday Two New Shows — Kent State University School of Art will open Abstract Painting in Northeast Ohio , curated by Martin Ball and featuring the work of Gianna Commito,...

HCTV Program Schedule for Oct. 21 - Oct. 27 10/19/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Starting Friday, the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation's Gallery presents the Graduate Student Exhibition of the Kent State University Department of Art.


College of Business (COB) (2)
Kent State University's College of Business Administration ranked (Spake) 10/20/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's College of Business Administration undergraduate and graduate programs recently placed in the top rankings of two major news...

KSU business programs rank high (Spake) 10/20/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State College of Business Administration's Master of Business Administration programs were recognized in the Princeton Review's The Best 295...


Entrepreneurial and Business Innovation, Center of; Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Innovative visions often start at university level (Anokhin) 10/20/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

University of Akron president Luis Proenza likes the word “innovation.” Not as a buzzword, he insists, but rather as the driving force behind the...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Burton D. Morgan Foundation awards more than $1.119 million in grants (Campbell) 10/20/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...facilitate access to technology resources on campuses in our region," said Hoover. Foundation Trustees also approved a grant in the amount of $100,000 for Kent State University Foundation's Margaret Clark Morgan Endowed Scholarship Fund, as a tribute to Margaret Clark Morgan, who passed away in September....


Health Sciences (1)
Your Tax Dollars at Work: Researcher Q&A with Dr. Angela Ridgel, Ph.D., Kent State University (Ridgel) 10/21/2013 parkinsonsaction.org Text Attachment Email

PAN will be highlighting how federal funded research, such as at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), supports researchers and their work in YOUR communities....


Higher Education (1)
Business news briefs -- Oct. 18 10/18/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Area colleges ranked Kent State is the largest university in Northeast Ohio, according to a newly compiled list of colleges and universities in the Oct. 14 print edition...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Schools to be honored 10/20/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

...categories on the latest Ohio Department of Education Report Card. Maplewood Local School District will receive a special recognition, sponsored by Kent State University-Trumbull, for receiving A's in all three categories. The partnership, doing business as the Eastern Ohio Education Partnership,...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
'The Addams Family' to play Nov. 5-6 at Kent State University-Tuscarawas 10/18/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Phoenix Entertainment will present the musical comedy “The Addams Family” at 7:30 p.m. Nov 5-6 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE. The show focuses on Wednesday Addams who has fallen in love with a sweet, smart young...

'The Addams Family' to play Nov. 5-6 at Kent State University-Tuscarawas 10/18/2013 New Philadelphia Times-Reporter Text Attachment Email

Phoenix Entertainment will present the musical comedy "The Addams Family" at 7:30 p.m. Nov 5-6 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE. The show focuses on Wednesday Addams who has fallen in love with a sweet, smart young...


Music; Students (2)
Violinist Yang Zeng to perform a free concert 10/21/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

As part of the Kent Free Library's Sunday music series, distinguished violinist Yang Zeng will perform a free concert at 2 p.m. Oct. 27. Zeng...

Music from the Western Reserve presents violinist Zeng at Christ Church Episcopal 10/19/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...China-Germany,Young Euro Classic Festival Orchestra in 2010, performing at the Nanjing Arts Institute Concert Hall and the Shanghai Concert Hall. A student at Kent State University, Yang is currently studying with Cathy Meng Robinson and Jung-Min Amy Lee and has also studied with Benny Kim. Zeng participated...


Psychology (3)
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Could Help Lower Blood Pressure 10/19/2013 Huffington Post, The Text Attachment Email

...present moment -- could help lower blood pressure among people who are on the brink of hypertension, according to a small new study. Researchers from Kent State University found that people with prehypertension -- meaning they have borderline high blood pressure that does not yet necessitate medication...

How To Use Your Mind to Lower Blood Pressure 10/20/2013 eMaxHealth Text Attachment Email

...started treatment yet If you are at risk for high blood pressure If you have a family member or friend who has high blood pressure Experts at Kent State University recently published the results of their study of high blood pressure and meditation and found that use of a stress reduction...

High Blood Pressure Lowered By Technique Incorporating Meditation and Yoga (Hughes) 10/19/2013 MedIndia Text Attachment Email

...meditation and yoga can benefit patients with high blood pressure or 'prehypertension', reveals a new study. The study by Joel W. Hughes, PhD, of Kent State (Ohio) University included 56 women and men diagnosed with prehypertension. One group of patients was assigned to a program of mindfulness-based...


Safety (4)
Police looking for suspects in robbery near Kent State University 10/21/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Police are searching for two men they believe assaulted and robbed a resident of an apartment complex near Kent State University early Monday. ...

(VIDEO) Police search for two suspects after a robbery near Kent State University 10/21/2013 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Kent Police are looking for two men accused of a robbery early Monday morning near Kent State University. Kent Police tell Newschannel5...

Kent: Victim assaulted during burglary at College Towers Apartment 10/21/2013 WOIO-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, OH (WOIO) - One person was assaulted during an overnight burglary in Kent. It happened Monday just after midnight at the College Towers Apartment....

Kent Police seek two male suspects after overnight robbery, assault 10/21/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT -- Police are seeking two males who assaulted and robbed a resident at the College Towers apartment complex at 1800 Rhodes Road shortly after midnight....


Students (1)
Delta Gammas help Kent Lions 10/21/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

During the last week of October, the Kent Lions prepare thousands of dozens of carnations for delivery during the club's annual carnation sale. The...


Theatre and Dance (2)
Out-Of-The-Box auction features more than 40 boxes 10/19/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...Educator Award -- Andrea Shearer, Dance Educator, KSU Dept. of Dance & Theatre Collaboration Award -- Docs Who Rock, United Way of Summit County and The University of Akron People interested in attending Arts Alive! can receive an invitation by calling 330-376-8480. Reservations start at $100...

Out-Of-The-Box auction features more than 40 boxes 10/19/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...Educator Award -- Andrea Shearer, Dance Educator, KSU Dept. of Dance & Theatre Collaboration Award -- Docs Who Rock, United Way of Summit County and The University of Akron People interested in attending Arts Alive! can receive an invitation by calling 330-376-8480. Reservations start at $100...


News Headline: Local news briefs - Oct. 20 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Open house

Stark State College will host an open house from noon to 3 p.m. today in the college's Student Center, 6200 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township.

The event will offer information about transferring a Stark State College associate degree to a bachelor's degree program at Ohio State University, the University of Akron, Kent State University and other institutions in Ohio and nationwide.

Representatives from Stark State's partner four-year institutions will be on hand to answer questions.

For more information, visit www.starkstate.edu.

Return to Top



News Headline: Don James, former Kent State football coach and Washington icon, dies at 80 (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Legendary college football coach Don James -- who coached for four years at Kent State -- passed away Sunday of pancreatic cancer. He was 80 years old.

While his biggest national legacy was as the 18-year head coach at Washington in the Pac 10, the man who became known as "The Dawgfather" began his head-coaching career at Kent State.

Beginning in 1971, James had a four-year run at KSU where he led the Golden Flashes to a 25-19-1 slate, including the only MAC championship in school history (1972) and the first bowl game. He was named MAC Coach of the Year that season.

Yet arguably his biggest legacy is the list of icons he coached, including current KSU golf coach Herb Page, Missouri head football coach Gary Pinkel, Alabama head coach Nick Saban, NFL Hall of Fame linebacker Jack Lambert, and numerous others.

"Sad day today,'' Page said as he waited on a plane to return from a golf tournament with his team. "Deja vu, really. We played the University of Washington yesterday. Kind of sad. He just touched so many men. He was a great coach, but just a wonderful, wonderful man.

"I have modeled my coaching after him, my whole career. This touches folks a lot of ways. I'm so glad we got together last August. That means even more to me now.''

James and the 1972 championship team, including the reclusive Lambert, Gerald Tinker, Pinkel and many more players, returned to Kent for a weekend of celebration last August that was a treat both for the former players and fans.

"I will cherish that," Page said.

James is survived by his wife, Carol, three children and 10 grandchildren. A public memorial service will be announced later this week.

Return to Top



News Headline: Don James, former Kent State and Washington coach, dead at 80 from pancreatic cancer | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SEATTLE: Don James arrived in Seattle in the mid-1970s as an unknown. He built a Hall of Fame coaching career, turning the University of Washington into a powerhouse program that won a share of a national championship.

No wonder he'll forever be referred to around the school as “The Dawgfather.”

James, the longtime Washington coach who led the Huskies to a share of the 1991 national title, died at his home Sunday from the effects of pancreatic cancer. He was 80.

James had been undergoing treatment for the disease since late September.

James was 178-76-3 as a head coach at Kent State and Washington, counting three forfeit victories with the Huskies. After going 25-19-1 in four seasons at Kent State, he was 153-57-2 at Washington from 1975-92 and led the school to a six-pack of Rose Bowl appearances. His crowning moment came in 1991 when Washington had the most dominant defense in the country, and beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl to finish 12-0. The Associated Press media poll gave Miami — James' alma mater — the national championship, while the coaches' voted in favor of Washington in their poll.

“His accomplishments as a football coach stand alone, but what made him truly special is the quality of man he was away from the game,” current Washington coach Steve Sakrisian said. “The guidance and leadership he instilled into this program and community are still felt today, and will continue to be felt here for a long, long time.”

James' image was displayed on the video board outside the entrance to Husky Stadium on Sunday afternoon. Thoughts poured over social media from former players, fellow coaches and fans who watched the Huskies program rise under James' leadership.

He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Carol, their three children and 10 grandchildren. The school said details on a public memorial service would be released at a later date.

“It's hard to put into words how much it hurts to lose a man like Don James,” Missouri coach Gary Pinkel said Sunday night. “He was my coach, my mentor, my friend, and he had such an amazing influence on my life, both personally and professionally.”

James played quarterback at the Miami, graduating in 1954 with a degree in education. He went on to serve as a commissioned second lieutenant in the U.S. Army and was as an assistant coach at Florida State, Michigan and Colorado.

He was an unknown when he arrived in Seattle in 1975, taking over for Jim Owens. He came from Kent State, where he led the Golden Flashes to the Mid-American Conference title in 1972. While at Kent State, James coached future Hall of Famer Jack Lambert and future college coaches Nick Saban and Pinkel.

“He was a special man and meant the world to me,” Saban said Sunday night. “There aren't enough words to describe not only the great coach he was, but how much he cared for people and the positive impact he made in the lives of everyone he came in contact with. Coach James was my mentor and probably did more than anybody to influence me in this profession.”

It didn't take long for Washington to become a contender under James. The Huskies went 6-5 in his first year after winning six games combined in the final two years Owens was coach. By 1977, led by quarterback Warren Moon, they beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl.

It was the first of James' six Rose Bowl trips, topped by the 34-14 win over Michigan in 1991. Only once — his second season — did the Huskies have a losing record, winning at least six games every other year. Washington won 10 games seven times and went to a bowl game in 14 seasons under James. Washington nearly won the national title in 1984 after beating Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl, only to be edged out in the voting by BYU. The Huskies were also in line for the title in 1990 before losing at home to UCLA.

Between the end of the 1990 season and November 1992, the Huskies won 22 straight games before losing 16-3 at Arizona on Nov. 7. The Huskies lost two weeks later to Washington State in a snowy Apple Cup in Pullman, but still served as the Pac-10 representative in the Rose Bowl. That New Year's Day, Michigan got payback for the loss a year earlier with a 38-31 win in what turned out to be James' final game.

James knew penalties were coming from the conference after an investigation of reports during the 1992 season that quarterback Billy Joe Hobert received $50,000 in loans from an Idaho businessman. Among the violations found by the Pac-10 were improper loans to athletes, free meals provided to recruits and improper employment of athletes by boosters. The conference also cited a lack of institutional control over funds provided to students hosting recruits.

But James protested when the conference added an additional year to the Huskies bowl ban, making it a two-year penalty. The Pac-10 also limited Washington's football scholarships and recruiting visits, and prohibited the university from sharing in television rights fees for one year.

James was 60 years old when he resigned less than two weeks before the 1993 season began. He was replaced by longtime assistant Jim Lambright.

“I have decided I can no longer coach in a conference that treats its players and coaches so unfairly,” James said in his letter of resignation.

He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997.

James remained connected to the Huskies' program. He was a regular visitor at practices after his resignation and served on the committee that helped in the redesign of Husky Stadium. James gave his annual preseason speech to the current Washington squad in August and attending the first game at the renovated stadium on Aug. 31 against Boise State. It was shortly after that his health took a significant turn.

James had two surgical procedures in September at Virginia Mason Medical Center for what was called a gastro-intestinal issue. James' family issued a statement after the surgeries announcing that he was resting comfortable following the hospital stay but would be beginning chemotherapy treatment for a malignant tumor on his pancreas and asked for privacy.

“Coach James set the standard for this program and for all of us. It's the reason you all are sitting here. It's the reason I'm here,” Sarkisian said recently. “Husky football and what it all stands for is what he created and I was so happy he was able to come to the first game against Boise and the opening of Husky Stadium because if anybody deserved to be in that building that night it was him.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Herb Page, former Kent State teammates remember Don James (Page, George) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Herb Page had some trouble at first putting into words what Don James meant to him.

Page was on his way home from Atlanta, where his Kent State men's golf team had just completed play at the U.S. Collegiate Championship on Sunday afternoon, when he caught word that James had passed away earlier in the day due to the effects of pancreatic cancer at the age of 80.

Page, one of the most successful coaches in the history of collegiate men's golf, learned his most valuable lessons in coaching while serving as the kicker for the Kent State football teams James coached in 1972 and '73. That 1972 squad captured what remains the only Mid-American Conference championship in the history of the Kent State football program.

"It's obvious he was a great coach. The legacy he leaves as a coach is phenomenal. But personally he was a wonderful man at a great time in my life," said Page, a native of Ontario, Canada, who was a star golfer at KSU before joining the football team.

"He taught a lot of young men like me how to win, what it takes to win. He was a great influence on me."

James had a positive influence on every young man who was able to meet his demands as a strict disciplinarian back in the early 1970s. Not every player stuck it out after James took over in 1971, but those that did were rewarded ­-- both then, and in the future.

Page has led his golf program to three top-10 national finishes and is a member of numerous hall of fames, including the Ontario Golf Hall of Fame and the Golf Coaches Association of America Hall of Fame. And he's actually been upstaged by several former teammates.

Nick Saban, who played defensive back for James at KSU from 1971-72, has won the past two national championships as head football coach at Alabama and has the Crimson Tide in position to collect their third in a row this season.

"He was a special man and meant the world to me," Saban said Sunday night. "There aren't enough words to describe not only the great coach he was, but how much he cared for people and the positive impact he made in the lives of everyone he came in contact with. Coach James was my mentor and probably did more than anybody to influence me in this profession."

Gary Pinkel, a star tight end on the Flashes' squads from 1971-73, has won 170 games as head football coach at Toledo and Missouri. He currently has his Tigers unbeaten and ranked No. 5 in the country.

"It's hard to put into words how much it hurts to lose a man like Don James," Pinkel said. "He was my coach, my mentor, my friend, and he had such an amazing influence on my life, both personally and professionally."

Jack Lambert, an All-American linebacker for the Flashes who played for James from 1971-73, is in the NFL Hall of Fame after a stellar career with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

"He made us champions," Page added. "He touched a lot of people, but he made us champions."

A coach with such incredible influence on his players is never merely a coach. James was a father-figure to his players, teaching them how to succeed in sports and in life.

"Little did I know back then that for over two years I got to sit in the room and learn from one of the greatest football coaches of all time not just how to coach football, but how to coach and how to teach," said Page. "I learned a lot in that room that I use today."

No doubt that 1972 All-MAC performers Larry Poole, Greg Kokal, Eddie Woodard, Alonzo Curry, Mike Perlin, Gary Turner, Walt Vrabel, Daryl Hall, Gerald Tinker, Don Robinson, Bernard Harmon, Jeff Murrey, Dan Rector, Page, Pinkel, Lambert and their teammates all used the lessons in life taught by James to help them both on and off the field.

Many of those players and their wives attended a reunion at Kent State before the 2012 season-opener honoring the 40-year anniversary of that 1972 championship squad.

"He came out and watched our golf team play in Palm Springs two years ago," Page recalled. "He came out, got a cart and watched me coach the golf team. We talked about the reunion then, and you know what he asked me to do? To make sure we reached out to the wives of the coaches that have passed on. That was the most important thing to him, and I'll never forget that. He was just a class act. Everything he did it was never about him, it was about making people around him feel good and get better."

James addressed the 2012 Flashes before their season opener, and they went on to earn a school-record 11 wins and end a 40-year bowl drought -- dating back to the '72 squad's Tangerine Bowl appearance -- by securing a bid to the GoDaddy.com Bowl.

"He talked about how the '72 team started out as a bunch of misfits and all came together," said current KSU defensive coordinator Brian George. "And he told our guys how they were capable of doing the same."

Page's voice trailed off as he remembered James, the most influential mentor in his life.

"I'm a little choked up thinking about him and what he meant to so many of us," said Page. "He was a great leader. He was a special man."

Return to Top



News Headline: Former Kent State and Washington football coach Don James dies (Nielsen, Page, Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SEATTLE -- Don James, the former Kent State University football coach who led the Golden Flashes to their only Mid-American Conference championship in program history in 1972, died Sunday at his home from the effects of pancreatic cancer at the age of 80. He had been receiving treatment for the disease since late September.

"Coach James revitalized the program," said Kent State Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen. "Our thoughts are with his wife, Carol, and his family."

James took over a struggling Kent State football program in 1971, and went 3-8 overall and 0-5 in the MAC during his first season. But his second squad, which featured First Team All-MAC performers Jack Lambert at linebacker and Gary Pinkel at tight end, went 4-1 in the MAC and defeated Toledo 27-9 in the regular season finale to capture the 1972 conference title. The Golden Flashes earned a bid to the Tangerine Bowl, where they lost to Tampa 21-18 in Orlando.

Lambert went on to become an NFL Hall of Famer after a standout career with the Pittsburgh Steelers, while Pinkel has enjoyed a highly successful career as a head coach at Toledo and Missouri. His Tigers are currently unbeaten and ranked No. 5 in the country.

James returned to campus just last season to be honored along with the players and coaches from 1972, who celebrated the 40th anniversary of their MAC championship season. Over 50 players and their wives attended events over the weekend, including Lambert, who made a rare public appearance since retiring from the NFL.

Herb Page, the kicker on that '72 KSU squad who has headed the perennial national power Kent State men's golf team since 1978, said that while the players were thrilled to see each other they all attended the reunion for one main reason: James.

"Thank goodness we had the reunion and he got to come back (to Kent)," said Page. "I remember the luncheon where he took the microphone and he introduced every player in the room. He knew every player, told a story about each and every one of us, and handed us our championship watches 40 years after the (title season). That memory is very special."

James' third edition of Flashes was probably his best overall, as the squad finished 9-2 overall and 4-1 in the MAC but wound up second in the conference. One of his top players that season was Nick Saban, who now leads two-time defending national champion and current No. 1-ranked Alabama.

"(I) can't tell him how much we appreciate all that he's done for us and our career. So, thanks," Saban said in September after learning of James' illness.

Following a 7-4 season in 1974, James signed a five-year contract to coach the University of Washington. He wound up 25-19-1 in four seasons at Kent State.

Current Flashes head coach Paul Haynes, a star defensive back at KSU from 1987-91, never worked directly with with James but knew all about the man who put Kent State football on the map long ago.

"This is a very sad day in the Kent State football family. We lost a great coach and great person in Don James," said Haynes. "I know he was a very disciplined guy and a very focused guy who got the most out of his players because he demanded excellence."

James went on to become one of the legendary coaches in college football history, compiling a 176-78-3 record at Kent State and Washington. He went 153-58-2 with the Huskies from 1975-92 and led the school to a six-pack of Rose Bowl appearances. His crowning moment came in 1991 when Washington had the most dominant defense in the country, and beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl to finish 12-0. The Associated Press media poll gave Miami -- James' alma mater -- the national championship, while the coaches' voted in favor of Washington in their poll.

"His accomplishments as a football coach stand alone, but what made him truly special is the quality of man he was away from the game," current Washington coach Steve Sakrisian said. "The guidance and leadership he instilled into this program and community are still felt today, and will continue to be felt here for a long, long time."

James played quarterback at the Miami, graduating in 1954 with a degree in education.

He was an unknown when he arrived in Seattle in 1975, taking over for Jim Owens. It didn't take long for Washington to become a contender. The Huskies went 6-5 in his first year after winning six games combined in the final two years Owens was coach. By 1977, led by quarterback Warren Moon, they beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl. It was the first of James' six Rose Bowl trips, topped by the 34-14 win over Michigan in 1991. Only once -- his second season -- did the Huskies have a losing record, winning at least six games every other year. Washington won 10 games seven times and went to a bowl game in 14 seasons under James. Washington nearly won the national title in 1984 after beating Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl, only to be edged out in the voting by BYU. The Huskies were also in line for the title in 1990 before losing at home to UCLA.

Between the end of the 1990 season and November 1992, the Huskies won 22 straight games before losing 16-3 at Arizona on Nov. 7. The Huskies lost two weeks later to Washington State in a snowy Apple Cup in Pullman, but still served as the Pac-10 representative in the Rose Bowl. That New Year's Day, Michigan got payback for the loss a year earlier with a 38-31 win in what turned out to be James' final game.

James knew penalties were coming from the conference after an investigation of reports during the 1992 season that quarterback Billy Joe Hobert received $50,000 in loans from an Idaho businessman. Among the violations found by the Pac-10 were improper loans to athletes, free meals provided to recruits and improper employment of athletes by boosters. The conference also cited a lack of institutional control over funds provided to students hosting recruits.

But James protested when the conference added an additional year to the Huskies bowl ban, making it a two-year penalty. The Pac-10 also limited Washington's football scholarships and recruiting visits, and prohibited the university from sharing in television rights fees for one year.

James was 60 years old when he resigned less than two weeks before the 1993 season began. He was replaced by longtime assistant Jim Lambright.

"I have decided I can no longer coach in a conference that treats its players and coaches so unfairly," James said in his letter of resignation.

James remained connected to the Huskies' program. He was a regular visitor at practices after his resignation and served on the committee that helped in the redesign of Husky Stadium that was unveiled earlier this season. James gave his annual preseason speech to the current Washington squad in August and attending the first game at the renovated Husky Stadium on Aug. 31 against Boise State. It was shortly after that his health took a significant turn.

James had two surgical procedures in September at Virginia Mason Medical Center for what was called a gastro-intestinal issue. James' family issued a statement after the surgeries announcing that he was resting comfortable following the hospital stay but would be beginning chemotherapy treatment for a malignant tumor on his pancreas and asked for privacy.

"Coach James set the standard for this program and for all of us. It's the reason you all are sitting here. It's the reason I'm here," Sarkisian said recently. "Husky football and what it all stands for is what he created and I was so happy he was able to come to the first game against Boise and the opening of Husky Stadium because if anybody deserved to be in that building that night it was him."

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State Mourns Loss of Coaching Icon | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OH — Kent State University is mourning the loss of coaching icon Don James, who passed away Sunday.

James, 80, was a Massillon native who served as the Golden Flashes' head football coach from 1971-1974. He helped the Flashes to the program's only Mid-American Conference Championship in 1972. That season, James was named MAC Coach of the Year after the Flashes made their second bowl appearance in school history.

In 1975, James left Kent State for the University of Washington, where he lead the Huskies to six Rose Bowls and a national title in 1991.

James had an influence of a number of players, including current Alabama coach Nick Saban and current Missouri coach Gary Pinkel.

This year, James made a surprise appearance at a team meeting before Kent State's season opener. Head Coach Paul Haynes plans to honor James in Saturday's game against Buffalo.

Return to Top



News Headline: Coaching legend Don James, a 'great mentor' of Nick Saban's, passes away after bout with cancer | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: al.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Coaching legend Don James, who was Nick Saban's coach at Kent State and has been repeatedly cited as Saban's biggest influence, died Sunday. He was 80 years old.

James was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He spent the bulk of his coaching career at the University of Washington, which announced the news of his passing.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to Coach James' family," Saban said in a university-released statement. "He was a special man and meant the world to me. There aren't enough words to describe not only the great coach he was, but how much he cared for people and the positive impact he made in the lives of everyone he came in contact with.

"Coach James was my mentor and probably did more than anybody to influence me in this profession. Like I've said before, I didn't plan on going into coaching. He saw something in me and asked me to stay on at Kent State as a graduate assistant after my playing career was over. I really enjoyed it, got hired full time and went on from there.

"From an organizational standpoint, our program today is run much like he ran his program. He was very organized, efficient, and did an outstanding job of defining expectations for players, coaches and everyone in the organization.

"He was always personal and inspirational to players and people around him. He wanted you to reach your full potential as a football player, but more importantly, he wanted you to do well in school and become the best person you could be so you would be successful in life. He was the same way when it came to assistant coaches or anyone who worked for him, you were a better person because of the time you spent with Coach James."

James coached 18 seasons as Washington, leading the Huskies to six conference championships and the 1991 national title. During his 22 seasons as a head coach, he amassed a record of 178-76-3.

Born in Massillon, Ohio, James played quarterback at Miami (Fla.) and earned his master's degree at Kansas. He held assistant coaching positions at Florida State, Michigan and Colorado before landing his first head coaching gig at Kent State in 1971.

James was Saban's head coach at Kent State during Saban's final two seasons as a Golden Flashes player. Though Saban wasn't exactly itching to become a coach, James offered Saban a role as a graduate assistant in 1973.

"I didn't grow up wanting to be a coach," Saban said in Sept. 2011. "He recognized that and asked me to be a coach, to be a graduate assistant, when I didn't have any intentions of being that.

"The only reason I did it was that my wife had another year of school. So I couldn't move and take a job. I had to stay there and do something, so I did it. I really enjoyed it and continued to do it, got hired full time and went on from there."

When James was hospitalized in September, Saban offered his condolences to James, whom he called a "great mentor."

"Don James probably did more than anybody in this profession to influence me," Saban said in 2011. "From an organizational standpoint, our program is run a lot the same that Don James ran his program. Very well-organized, efficient, defining things that are expectations for players, coaches and everyone in the organization.

"He was always personal and inspirational to players and people around him. A great leader. He certainly impacted me and I certainly appreciate all he's done, and will continue to do. Every time I call him and ask him something, he gives me a lot of good input."

Missouri coach Gary Pinkel was a graduate assistant along with Saban under James at Kent State. James spoke with AL.com before Alabama faced Missouri last season.

"They were more interested in learning the total concept,” James said. "Gary was on offense. It interested him the offensive concepts that we had, and Nick was the same way on defense. He wanted to know more than just about his position, and that enables you to be a better player."

James is survived by his wife, Carol, three children: Jeff, Jill and Jeni, and 10 grandchildren.

Return to Top



News Headline: Pinkel's mentor, Don James, passed away Sunday | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kansas City Star
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Missouri coach Gary Pinkel's college coach at Kent State and his professional mentor, legendary Washington coach Don James, died Sunday.

The Huskies athletic department announced his passing Sunday afternoon.

James, 80, a College Football Hall of Fame coach who led Washington to a share of the 1991 national championship, had been battling pancreatic cancer.

Known as “The Dawgfather,” James went 153-58-2 in 18 seasons at Washington from 1975-1992.

“The James family would like to thank the thousands of friends, former players and fellow coaches, and fans who prayed and expressed their love and support for Don these past few weeks,” the release from Washington's athletic department read.

Pinkel also released a statement about James' passing Sunday night:

“It's hard to put into words how much it hurts to lose a man like Don James. He was my coach, my mentor, my friend, and he had such an amazing influence on my life, both personally and professionally. The program we built at Toledo and here at Missouri is Don James' program, it's a tribute to how he developed men and built football teams. This is a tough, tough day, and I'm so sorry for his wife, Carol, and the James family, as well as the entire Washington Huskies family. Coach
James was a legend, and if I'm remembered for anything, I hope that it might be that I helped carry his legacy forward.”

James was the American Football Coaches Association's coach of the year in 1977 after leading the Huskies to the Rose Bowl for the first time.

When James retired, his 10 bowl victories were the fourth-most in college football history behind only Alabama legend Paul “Bear” Bryant, Penn State's Joe Paterno and Florida State's Bobby Bowden.

A native of Massillon, Ohio, James played quarterback at Miami (Fla.) in the early 1950s. He later earned a master's degree in education at Kansas, where he was a graduate assistant for the football team and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

He went on to serve as an assistant coach Florida State, Michigan and Colorado before taking the reins at Kent State in 1971.

He went 25-19-1 and led the Golden Flashes to a Mid-American Conference championship and the program's first bowl appearance in 1972.

Pinkel was a tight end at Kent State under James and later joined James' staff at Washington as the tight ends coach in 1976.

Pinkel spent the next two years at Bowling Green as a wide receivers coach before returning to James' staff from 1979-90 as the Huskies' wide receivers coach for five seasons and offensive coordinator for seven.

James, who went 176-78-3 overall in his coaching career, won five Pac-10 championships at Washington (1980-81, 1990-92).

It was James who warned Pinkel after Missouri knocked off Oklahoma in 2010 that the next game would be the toughest of his career.

Pinkel may not have heeded that advice the way he should have three years ago, but he learned his lesson — just one more lesson imparted by James — in leading the Tigers to consecutive wins against ranked teams for the first time in 40 years Saturday.

Return to Top



News Headline: Former Kent State football coach Don James dies | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Don James, the longtime University of Washington football coach who led the Huskies to a share of the national championship in 1991, died Sunday. He was 80.

The university said James died at his home from the effects of pancreatic cancer.

James was named head coach at Kent State in 1971. He was 25-19-1 in four seasons with the Golden Flashes. He was named the Mid-American Conference Coach of the Year in 1972, when he led the Golden Flashes to a conference title and their first-ever bowl game appearance in the Tangerine Bowl.

James was 176-78-3 at Kent State and Washington, going 153-58-2 in 18 seasons with the Huskies from 1975-92. His 1991 team topped the coaches' poll, while Miami was the national champion in The Associated Press' media poll.

He led the Huskies to six conference titles.

James played quarterback at the Miami (Fla.), graduating in 1954 with a degree in education.

He was born in 1932 in Massillon, Ohio. He graduated from Massillon Washington High School in 1950.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent celebrates comic arts | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tom Batiuk, creator of the comic Funky Winkerbean, signs a book for
John Logar and his son, Cameron, both of Uniontown, during the
first-ever Kent Comic Arts Fest held Saturday at Kent State University.
The one-day event featured the works of more than a dozen of the area's
most well-known cartoonists and illustrators, including P. Craig Russell,
Jill Thompson, Batiuk, Derf Backderf, Scott Hampton and Galen Showman.
To see more photos, visit www.recordpub.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Art Notes | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Dorothy Shinn
News OCR Text: Tuesday

Two New Shows — Kent State University School of Art will open Abstract Painting in Northeast Ohio , curated by Martin Ball and featuring the work of Gianna Commito, Mark Keffer, Steve McCallum, Erik Neff, Dana Oldfather, Scott Olson, Lorri Ott and John Pearson in the Downtown Gallery, 141 E. Main St., Kent; and American Abstract Artists • A Selection , curated by Scott Olson and Gianna Commito, in the School of Art Gallery, the Art Building, KSU. A reception for the shows will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday at each location. For more information, call Anderson Turner, KSU School of Art galleries director at 330-672-1369 or go to http://galleries.kent.edu .

Return to Top



News Headline: HCTV Program Schedule for Oct. 21 - Oct. 27 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Starting Friday, the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation's Gallery presents the Graduate Student Exhibition of the Kent State University Department of Art.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State University's College of Business Administration ranked (Spake) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's College of Business Administration undergraduate and graduate programs recently placed in the top rankings of two major news publications.

The Kent State College of Business Administration's Master of Business Administration programs were recognized in the Princeton Review's The Best 295 Business Schools: 2014 Edition.

The Princeton Review does not rank the business schools hierarchically from one to 295, or name a best business school overall. Instead, it reports 11 ranking lists, and each list names the top 10 schools in a specific category.

Students attending Kent State's College of Business Administration who were surveyed by the Princeton Review for the book noted the college's friendly students and its solid preparation in accounting and general management.

"For the College of Business Administration to be listed in the Princeton Review's 2014 best business schools ranking is a testament to the outstanding faculty and staff who develop and deliver excellent business education programs, publish impactful research and engage with the business community," said Deborah Spake, dean of KSU's College of Business Administration. Last month, Kent State also placed in the Best Undergraduate Business Programs ranking 159 out of 342 by U.S. News & World Report from its 2014 edition of Best Colleges. Since the 2013 edition, Kent State moved up in the ranking from 166 to 159. Overall, Kent State earned a coveted spot in the first-tier list in the Best National Universities category and also received a Top Public School, National Universities ranking.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU business programs rank high (Spake) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State College of Business Administration's Master of Business Administration programs were recognized in the Princeton Review's The Best 295 Business Schools: 2014 Edition.

The college has a wide range of high-quality MBA programs, including full-time and part-time MBA programs, an MS in Accounting and an MA in Economics. The college also boasts Executive MBA programs in business and health care. Plus, the college has four dual-master's degrees with architecture, nursing, library science and translation.

The Princeton Review does not rank the business schools hierarchically from one to 295, or name a best business school overall. Instead, it reports 11 ranking lists, and each list names the top 10 schools in a specific category.

Students attending Kent State's College of Business Administration who were surveyed by the Princeton Review for the book noted the college's friendly students and its solid preparation in accounting and general management.

"For the College of Business Administration to be listed in the Princeton Review's 2014 best business schools ranking is a testament to the outstanding faculty and staff who develop and deliver excellent business education programs, publish impactful research and engage with the business community," said Deborah Spake, dean of Kent State's College of Business Administration. "Further, our students benefit from college initiatives that include a wide range of education abroad opportunities, career preparation workshops, experiential learning activities, and a commitment to internship and job placement. It is rewarding that the Princeton Review and other publications consistently recognize the college for its efforts."

Last month, Kent State also placed in the Best Undergraduate Business Programs ranking 159 out of 342 by U.S. News & World Report from its 2014 edition of Best Colleges.

Return to Top



News Headline: Innovative visions often start at university level (Anokhin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: University of Akron president Luis Proenza likes the word “innovation.” Not as a buzzword, he insists, but rather as the driving force behind the way the University of Akron does business and educates its students. After all, the word “innovation” appears in the university's latest strategic plan — Vision 2020 — more than a dozen times. Innovation is in the university's DNA, if you will.

Dr. Proenza likes the word so much he touted it in one of the university's regional Super Bowl commercials. The university even launched a so-called “innovation campus,” a research park of sorts where university researchers can mingle with the business community to launch new ventures.

“The bottom line is that universities play a very, very critical and essential role in the innovation ecosystem,” Dr. Proenza said.

Dr. Proenza has long been an advocate of higher education serving as the catalyst for innovation. Universities, for one, are where ideas can blossom into full-fledged business ventures. In addition, universities are where students are encouraged to think creatively and formulate ideas that can shape tomorrow's economy.

“If you are able to innovate across the full spectrum of our disciplines and the full spectrum of our community, you create the basis for economic success that without which, we would flounder and all whither away,” Dr. Proenza said.

The University of Akron, of course, isn't alone in its efforts to drive innovation. A bevy of Northeast Ohio's colleges and universities have stressed innovation in recent years, with many launching programs with innovation at their core. Baldwin Wallace University in Berea boasts its own Center for Innovation & Growth. Kent State, meanwhile, launched its own Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation.

On a very macro level, academics view higher ed's focus on innovation as being driven by the need for the United States to be more competitive on a global scale. The country, after all, isn't the only superpower in the world generating new ideas and technologies.

Also, companies simply aren't looking to hire graduates interested only in taking marching orders.

“Companies are saying they can't wait for a new employee to be 40 years old until they contribute a new idea,” said John Lanigan, the director for BW's center and a retired executive vice president and chief marketing officer for BNSF Railway Co., a Berkshire Hathaway company headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. “They need them to contribute a new idea when they're 22 years old.”

Teaching innovation

An April 2013 study from the Association of American Colleges and Universities indicated that 95% of employers say they give hiring preference to college graduates with skills that will “enable them to contribute to innovation in the workplace.” Also, employers say skills such as critical thinking and problem solving are more valuable than someone's field of study.

Academics like BW's Mr. Lanigan insist that it's possible to teach students to think like innovators.

For instance, he said part of the university's role is to instill that spirit of innovation. BW, for one, exposes its students to entrepreneurs through guest lectures in hopes of giving them the “courage to be innovative,” according to Mr. Lanigan.

“A lot of it is getting them in that mind-set and intentionally talking about what it means to be innovative and how you can think of new ideas,” Mr. Lanigan said. “New ideas aren't always revolutionary, they're evolutionary. Apple didn't invent the cell phone. They just took it to a whole new level.”

Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School of Management recently launched a department its leaders suggest will inspire students to work creatively to solve problems. Weatherhead's new Department of Innovation and Design incorporates faculty from the former marketing and policy studies and information systems departments.

Richard Buchanan, chairman of the new department, said employers are looking for people who can cross disciplines, think creatively and go beyond “best practices.” Students will interact with practitioners from outside typical business circles, such as product designers and architects. The idea is to demonstrate the creative problem-solving process they experience in their fields in hopes of translating it to the business world.

“This is a department that is now oriented to innovation, studying it and creating it,” Dr. Buchanan said.

Sergey Anokhin, who leads Kent State's Center for Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation, said that business schools haven't always promoted creative thinking. It wasn't until the 2000s, for example, when higher education really embraced the idea of entrepreneurship as a specific field of academic study.

“There's been a loss of belief in corporate America to an extent,” Dr. Anokhin said. “You can't rely on a 30-year career with a company, so many are taking entrepreneurship as a second major as a fallback. They're becoming masters of their own fate.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Burton D. Morgan Foundation awards more than $1.119 million in grants (Campbell) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Burton D. Morgan Foundation announced grants totaling $1,119,800 in September to support programs that focus on entrepreneurship for youth, college students, and adults.

The latest round of grants includes an award of $407,000 for the Western Reserve Historical Society to support a three year youth entrepreneurship program for students in grades 4-6 in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District.

"The Foundation is excited about the transformational potential of our grant to the Western Reserve Historical Society and the opportunity to inspire thousands of Cleveland students each year through the rich entrepreneurial history of our region," said Deborah Hoover, Morgan Foundation President and CEO.

"The program will build on the resources of the History Center in University Circle and Hale Farm in Bath to make the stages of our economic history come alive. We look forward to working with our partners to make this ambitious project a great success for the benefit of students as they think about their future careers."

Additional grants approved by the Foundation's Trustees in September include:

Case Western Reserve University - $69,000 to develop and produce a Massive Open Online Course about the role of entrepreneurship in transitioning economies, with a focus on lessons from Northeast Ohio,

Foundation for Teaching Economics - $15,000 to support 15 Northeast Ohio rising seniors to attend an Economics for Leaders program at the campus of their choice during the summer 2014,

Ideastream - $40,000 for support of Nightly Business Report,

Invent Now, Inc. - $96,800 for four Camp Invention sites during summer 2014, two in the Akron Public Schools and two in the Wooster City Schools,

Junior Achievement of East Central Ohio - $27,000 for entrepreneurship-related programming in the 2013-2014 academic year,

Junior Achievement of Greater Cleveland, Inc. - $50,000 for 2013-2014 middle school programs, high school programs, and the Student Company Program Challenge,

Junior Achievement of Mahoning Valley, Inc. - $35,000 for entrepreneurship-related programs in 2013-2014 ($25,000) and a $1-for-$1 challenge grant of $10,000 to pilot the "High School Heroes" and "Coder Dojo" programs,

Junior Achievement of North Central Ohio - $75,000 for 120 Junior Achievement classroom programs during the 2013-2014 school year,

Northeast Ohio Technology Coalition - $175,000 for the Regional Resource Mapping program in 2013-2014 and for cluster acceleration activities in FY13,

Youth Opportunities Unlimited - $30,000 for E CITY classroom-based programs in 2013-14,

"We are excited about the full range of entrepreneurship-related grants approved in this fall cycle, and are particularly pleased to be charting new territory through support of a Northeast Ohio ecosystem-focused MOOC, as well as NorTech's Regional Resource Mapping program, which will facilitate access to technology resources on campuses in our region," said Hoover.

Foundation Trustees also approved a grant in the amount of $100,000 for Kent State University Foundation's Margaret Clark Morgan Endowed Scholarship Fund, as a tribute to Margaret Clark Morgan, who passed away in September.

"This phenomenal donation from the Burton D. Morgan Foundation in honor of Margaret Clark Morgan is a perfect way to respond to her legacy. Mrs. Morgan truly served as a guiding light for the Fashion School and was directly (and through the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation) responsible for the success of many of our students as well as countless support for other innovations in the School. This contribution to her endowed scholarships in the school will help to raise our scholarship support to an even greater level in her name," said J.R. Campbell, Director of KSU's School of Fashion Design.

Since June, the Foundation also approved a number of small grants to support youth, collegiate and adult entrepreneurship programs. Among the recipients were: Hudson Library and Historical Society for prize money for Pitch Night -$5,000; and Montessori Development Partnerships for entrepreneurship program expansion in 2013-2014 at Montessori High School at University Circle -$7,500.

The following grants were also made to Hudson Community Foundation to support programs in Hudson, the Foundation's home community: $1,500 for the HeART of Hudson Art Walk; $10,000 for Destination Hudson to purchase portable audio-packs to be used by groups touring Hudson; and $5,000 for Hudson's July 2013 fireworks display.

A complete list of grants awarded can be found by visiting the Foundation's website at bdmorganfdn.org/grants-awarded.

Return to Top



News Headline: Your Tax Dollars at Work: Researcher Q&A with Dr. Angela Ridgel, Ph.D., Kent State University (Ridgel) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: parkinsonsaction.org
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: PAN will be highlighting how federal funded research, such as at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), supports researchers and their work in YOUR communities. In fact, more than 80 percent of NIH's budget goes to more than 300,000 research personnel at more than 2,500 universities and research institutions. All across America, NIH funding is creating jobs and enhancing local economies.

In order to showcase your tax dollars at work in your community, we will be periodically featuring federal funded Parkinson's researchers from across the country. This month, PAN asks Dr. Angela Ridgel, Ph.D. of Kent State University in Ohio to tell us about her Parkinson's research.

PAN: Tell me a little about the history of your Parkinson's disease research.

AR: I have been working on Parkinson's disease since 2006. From 2006-2008, I worked with Dr. Jay Alberts at Cleveland Clinic where we started to do forced exercise experiments. In 2008, I started my own research lab at Kent State University. Since that time, we have published six papers on the motor and cognitive benefits of exercise and vibration therapy in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Currently, we are finishing up a two-year, NIH-funded study called “Development of an Intelligent Bicycle for Rehabilitation in Parkinson's Disease.” We are currently working on another grant which will build upon what we have discovered with this study.

PAN: Why did you choose to look at your specific topic?

AR: I have always had an interest in the neurobiology of movement. Parkinson's disease is a neurological disorder where movement is disrupted. Previous studies have shown that exercise can promote neuroplasticity, which is the ability of the nervous system to reorganize after an injury. In light of my interests and the need to understand how we can promote neuroplasticity in individuals with Parkinson's, it seemed like an important and timely research topic. While the medications that are prescribed for Parkinson's disease help to relieve the symptoms, they do not slow disease progression. There is a great need for interventions which can slow progression. We are hoping that studies in our lab will discover optimal interventions for Parkinson's.

PAN: This same study was funded in 2012 and 2013. Could you explain that?

AR: My grant from the NIH was a two year grant called an R21- Developmental/Exploratory Grant. The idea behind this project was to collect preliminary data for a larger study. We were able to design and test our intelligent bicycle prototype within this two-year period. Below is a summary of the current project:

Parkinson's disease affects about 1.5 million Americans. As Parkinson's progresses, the combined motor and non-motor symptoms often lead to decreased independence and increased reliance on caregivers and the healthcare system. Although many studies have documented the benefits of exercise, it is unclear what elements (i.e. dosage, intensity, intervention type) constitute an optimal exercise intervention for people with Parkinson's.

Each individual with Parkinson's has different symptoms and capabilities which make it challenging to design a single rehabilitation program that would be optimal for all. Furthermore, progression of the disease often requires re-assessments and changes to motor rehabilitation programs. The objective of this project is to construct an instrumented cycle and use this as a clinical tool to examine the associations between rider performance and changes in motor function.

This instrumented bike will be used to:

1.Extract features during cycling sessions and automatically assess rider motor skills with an instrumented bike and
2.Examine the importance of motor speed variability during accelerated cadence.
Individuals with Parkinson's disease will be randomized into one of two groups: 1) dynamic cycling or 2) static inertial load cycling. During dynamic cycling, motor output speed will vary. During static inertial load cycling, individuals will be directed to choose their own pedaling speed. Data from the instrumented bike will be collected continuously and motor function and balance tests will be completed before and after three exercise sessions. The intent is to establish a comprehensive database that covers the range of expected rider capabilities.

This project will provide an effective platform for researching the underlying mechanisms for improvements in motor function and for readily implementing a feedback system that can dynamically optimize the benefits of exercise in individuals with Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders.

PAN: What it the timeline for your research?

AR: We have completed collecting data for this initial grant and we are planning on completing the publication for this study over the next few months. We have another study beginning next week that will look at the sustainability of motor function improvements after a bout of dynamic cycling.

PAN: Why is this research important to people with Parkinson's?

AR: Our goal is to determine how exercise interventions can be used to promote neuroplasticity in Parkinson's disease. This information will assist in the development of trainers and devices that individuals could use to slow the progression of the disease.

PAN: What are the possible short-term and long-term changes that could come out of your research findings?

AR: We found that dynamic cycling (high cadence) promotes motor function improvement after only three sessions. Specifically, we found that tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and walking speed is improved in people with Parkinson's disease. The information that we collected in these initial experiments will assist us to improve our equipment to maximize these improvements and promote neuroplasticity. We hope that future studies in our lab will allow us to determine the optimal exercise program for individuals.

PAN: Do you need patients for a clinical trial? If so, how can they get involved?

AR: We always have ongoing studies that need volunteers. We cannot do this type of work without the assistance of research volunteers. Anyone who is interested should contact me via email at aridgel@kent.edu and we can discuss possible opportunities. Most of our studies require 4-6 visits to Kent State University.

PAN: If there was one thing you'd like people with Parkinson's to understand about your research, what would it be?

AR: All types of exercise are helpful for individuals with Parkinson's disease. However, my goal is to promote changes in the nervous system that will decrease the disability of the disease. In addition, I know that everyone with Parkinson's is different so exercise is not “one-size fits all.” My research hopes to design “individual-specific” interventions that can decrease motor and cognitive decline.

PAN: If there was one thing you'd like Members of Congress to understand about your research, what would it be?

AR: Clinical research is essential for continued progress against debilitating diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The goal of my work is to promote healthy aging and improved quality of life in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

Angela Ridgel Biography
Dr. Ridgel's research is focused on how aging and neurological disorders limit movement and cognition in humans. One of her current research projects examines how exercise can be used for neurorehabilitation in elderly individuals and those with Parkinson's disease. She is currently examining how motor and sensory interventions can improve balance, posture and gait in these populations. Her research is funded through a NIH R21 grant. She has ongoing research collaborations with Cleveland Clinic, University Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, and Rockwell Automation.

Return to Top



News Headline: Business news briefs -- Oct. 18 | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: System Administrator
News OCR Text: Area colleges ranked

Kent State is the largest university in Northeast Ohio, according to a newly compiled list of colleges and universities in the Oct. 14 print edition of Crain's Cleveland Business.

The list indicates that KSU's full-time equivalent enrollment is 30,710. The FTE is a measure of the number of students who take full-time loads and is not necessarily the same thing as a head count.

According to the Crain's list, the most costly institution in Northeast Ohio is the private Cleveland Institute of Music, where tuition, room and board run $54,250 a year. The most costly tax-supported university in Northeast Ohio is the University of Akron, where tuition, room and board run almost $20,500.

The institution with the lowest ratio of undergraduates to graduate students is the private Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, where 45 percent of students are undergraduates and 55 percent are graduate students.

The list also includes student-to-faculty ratios, costs, operating budgets and more.

Return to Top



News Headline: Schools to be honored | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Eastern Ohio P-16 Partnership for Education invites the community to join the celebration of the fourth annual “Excellence in Education – Celebrating our Schools” luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 29 at Mahoning County Career and Technical Center, 7300 N. Palmyra Road.

Tickets for the event are $25 and those interested can register by visiting the organization's website, www.easternohiop16.org.

Thirty-five school districts throughout Ashtabula, Columbiana, Mahoning and Trumbull counties will be recognized for receiving an A in the Value Added, Performance Index and/or Standards Met categories on the latest Ohio Department of Education Report Card.

Maplewood Local School District will receive a special recognition, sponsored by Kent State University-Trumbull, for receiving A's in all three categories.

The partnership, doing business as the Eastern Ohio Education Partnership, and Turning Foundation [Turning Technologies] will also recognize two area teachers for their innovation in education. The winners will be announced at the luncheon.

The scheduled guest speaker is Greg Darnieder, U.S Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's senior adviser, who will speak on College Access Initiative. Darnieder began his career in education as a middle-grades teacher.

In 2003, he established the Department of Postsecondary Education and Student Development at Chicago Public Schools, designing and implementing an assortment of postsecondary, academic, financial and social support programs. Duncan tapped Darnieder in 2009 to join his administration.

The partnership said it is grateful to its community partners: The Dominion Foundation, Youngstown State University, Kent State University at Trumbull, Eastern Gateway Community College and Turning Foundation.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'The Addams Family' to play Nov. 5-6 at Kent State University-Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Celine Clemens
News OCR Text: Phoenix Entertainment will present the musical comedy “The Addams Family” at 7:30 p.m. Nov 5-6 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE.

The show focuses on Wednesday Addams who has fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family. She asks her father, Gomez, to keep it a secret from his wife, Morticia.

Tickets are $48-$70 and can be purchased at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/event/index.cfm.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'The Addams Family' to play Nov. 5-6 at Kent State University-Tuscarawas | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: New Philadelphia Times-Reporter
Contact Name: Celine Clemens
News OCR Text: Phoenix Entertainment will present the musical comedy "The Addams Family" at 7:30 p.m. Nov 5-6 at the Performing Arts Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE.

The show focuses on Wednesday Addams who has fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family. She asks her father, Gomez, to keep it a secret from his wife, Morticia.

Tickets are $48-$70 and can be purchased at www.tusc.kent.edu/pac/event/index.cfm.

Return to Top



News Headline: Violinist Yang Zeng to perform a free concert | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: As part of the
Kent Free Library's
Sunday music series,
distinguished violinist
Yang Zeng will
perform a free concert
at 2 p.m. Oct. 27.

Zeng studies under
the Miami String
Quartet at Kent
State University,
and is the Concertmaster
of the KSU
Orchestra, as well
as a member of the
Akron Symphony
Orchestra and the
Principle Second Violin
of the Mansfield
Symphony.

Zeng also has participated
in the Kent
Blossom Music Festival
and collaborated
with musicians
from the Cleveland
Orchestra.

Zeng former -
ly studied at the
Shanghai Conservatory
of Music,
where he played in
the Conservatory
Orchestra as well as
the Shanghai Sinfonietta.

Recently awarded
the Leopold Sipe
Memorial Award for
Excellence in Music
Performance, Zeng
also is an award-winning
challigrapher.

This free concert is
open to all ages.

For more information,
contact
the Adult Services
Manager Melissa
Ziminsky at Melissa.
Ziminsky@kentfreelibrary.
org or
330-673-4414.

Return to Top



News Headline: Music from the Western Reserve presents violinist Zeng at Christ Church Episcopal | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Music from The Western Reserve's distinguished music series continues its 31st season Nov. 3 with violinist Yang Zeng. Zeng is the 2013/14 season "featured young artist."

Zeng is a rising star and much sought after violinist. A native of Yunnan China, Yang began studying the violin at the age of 6. He continued his studies at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music with Jiyang Zhao, Qinglin Zhu, Qing Zheng and Shisheng Zheng. He also studied viola with Hancheng Lan and Xidi Shen. Zeng has performed at the Shanghai Concert Hall, Shanghai Oriental Art Center, Shanghai Grand Theater, as well as the Solon Center for the Arts .

Yang has played with the Shanghai,Conservatory Orchestra and the Shanghai, Sinfonietta. He was part of the China-Germany,Young Euro Classic Festival Orchestra in 2010, performing at the Nanjing Arts Institute Concert Hall and the Shanghai Concert Hall.

A student at Kent State University, Yang is currently studying with Cathy Meng Robinson and Jung-Min Amy Lee and has also studied with Benny Kim. Zeng participated in the Kent Blossom Music Festival where he performed chamber music and collaborated with the musicians of the Cleveland Orchestra. At KSU he is a member of several chamber music ensembles which are coached by members of the Miami String Quartet.

Zeng performed Dvorak Violin Concerto and Beethoven's triple concerto with the KSU Orchestra. In 2013,Yang was awarded the Leopold Sipe Memorial Award for Excellence in Music Performance and won the String Division of the Tuesday Musical competition. Yang is currently a member of the Akron Symphony Orchestra, principle second violin of the Mansfield Symphony and is concertmaster in the Kent State University Orchestra.

The concert venue is Christ Church Episcopal, 21 Aurora St., Hudson. Concert time is 5 p.m.

Tickets can be purchased at The Learned Owl in Hudson or at the door. Adult tickets, $18; students, free.

The concert is sponsored by the Hudson Community Foundation. There is a meet-the-artist reception immediately after the concert.

For more information on Music from The Western Reserve, follow them on

Return to Top



News Headline: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Could Help Lower Blood Pressure | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Huffington Post, The
Contact Name: Amanda L. Chan
News OCR Text: Stress reduction strategies based on mindfulness -- the practice of focusing on the present moment -- could help lower blood pressure among people who are on the brink of hypertension, according to a small new study.

Researchers from Kent State University found that people with prehypertension -- meaning they have borderline high blood pressure that does not yet necessitate medication -- have decreases in their blood pressure measurements if they undergo weekly sessions to learn mindfulness-based stress reduction practices.

The findings, which are published in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, are based on data from 56 men and women with prehypertension who had an average age of 50. Researchers had these participants either undergo eight weeks of sessions of mindfulness training, or just receive lifestyle advice and learn a muscle-relaxation activity.

By the end of the eight weeks, people who learned the mindfulness strategies had a greater drop in blood pressure levels than those in the lifestyle advice group. Specifically, the mindfulness group experienced a decrease in systolic blood pressure (the higher number on a blood pressure reading) of 5 millimeters of mercury, versus 1 millimeter of mercury in the lifestyle advice group. And the mindfulness group experienced a decrease in diastolic blood pressure (the lower number on a blood pressure reading) of nearly 2 millimeters of mercury, versus an increase of 1 millimeter of mercury for the lifestyle advice group.

Mindfulness might benefit other areas of health, too. Research has shown that the strategies could decrease levels of the stress hormone cortisol, lessen pain for people with certain chronic conditions, lower risk of depression and even improve sleep.

Return to Top



News Headline: How To Use Your Mind to Lower Blood Pressure | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/20/2013
Outlet Full Name: eMaxHealth
Contact Name: Deborah Mitchell
News OCR Text: Seventy percent of people with high blood pressure in the United States treat this disease with medication. If you are among the millions of people with hypertension, would you like to know how to use your mind to lower your blood pressure and avoid the side effects and expense of the drugs?

Your mind can be as good as drugs

The following news is important for several groups of people:

If you are taking medication right now to treat hypertension

If you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure but haven't started treatment yet

If you are at risk for high blood pressure

If you have a family member or friend who has high blood pressure

Experts at Kent State University recently published the results of their study of high blood pressure and meditation and found that use of a stress reduction program based on a common meditation technique called mindfulness can reduce blood pressure enough in some people so that they do not need drugs or they can at least delay that need. That program is appropriately called MBSR, or mindfulness-based stress reduction.

Mindfulness meditation is a technique that has been likened to watching a parade go by. That is, you sit quietly, breathe gently, and just let your thoughts go by without focusing on them, judging them, or getting caught up in them. In short, you just let it be and be present in the moment.

Use of this approach was shown to be effective in individuals who had borderline high blood pressure (prehypertension), which is defined as 120-139 mmHg systolic and 80 to 89 mmHg diastolic. Thirty percent of Americans have this form of the disease, which is associated with significant risks of cardiovascular disease.

How the study worked

This study was the first time MBSR had been evaluated in people with prehypertension. The 56 adults who participated in the study were not taking prescribed medication for their condition.

The adults were randomly assigned to one of two groups:

Group 1 participated in an MBSR program, which involved attendance at one session (lasting 2.5 hours) per week for 8 weeks. Each session involved three types of mindfulness training (body scan exercises, sitting meditation, and yoga) led by an experienced instructor. The subjects were asked to practice at home as well

Group 2 were shown a muscle relaxation exercise (progressive muscle relaxation) and given lifestyle advice regarding high blood pressure reduction

At the end of the 8 weeks:

Individuals in the MBSR group had an average reduction in systolic pressure of nearly 5 mmHg and a drop in diastolic pressure of nearly 2 mmHg

Participants in the control group had a less than 1 mmHg decline in systolic pressure and an increase of 1 mmHg in diastolic pressure

No significant difference in blood pressure was recorded between the two groups when 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure readings were compared

According to Joel W. Hughes, PhD, who headed the study, although the modest declines in blood pressure were similar to those people often experience when taking blood pressure medication. He and the other authors concluded that MBSR resulted in a reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure when compared with progressive muscle relaxation and that this drug-free approach may be a suitable complementary approach for people with prehypertension.

Other benefits of mindfulness meditation

Previous research has indicated that mindfulness meditation can be helpful with a wide range of health issues. For example:

A study published in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases reported on the ability of mindfulness meditation to reduce stress and fatigue in people with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or psoriatic arthritis

A recent study published in the Australian Family Physician noted that “mindfulness based approaches can be very helpful in managing chronic pain”

Patients with multiple sclerosis may experience relief from fatigue and depression when practicing mindfulness meditation

Mindfulness was found to rival drugs in the treatment of depression relapse

Although loneliness is not a disease, it can be stressful and depressing, and the practice of mindfulness meditation has been shown to be helpful

The bottom line

Mindfulness meditation has been shown to be an effective complementary tool for a variety of health concerns. This latest study has demonstrated that it is possible to use your mind to lower blood pressure and that this approach may be just as effective as drugs. If you are currently taking drugs for high blood pressure, do not stop using your medication without first speaking with your doctor.

Also read: Olive Leaf Extract Reduces Blood Pressure Like Captopril

REFERENCES

CDC: Vital signs: prevalence, treatment, and control of hypertension—United States, 1999-2002 and 2005-2008. MMWR 2011; 60(4): 103-8

Hassed C. Mind-body therapies—use in chronic pain management. Australian Family Physician 2013 Mar; 42(30: 112-17

Hughes JW et al. Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction for prehypertension. Psychosomatic Medicine 2013 Oct.

Return to Top



News Headline: High Blood Pressure Lowered By Technique Incorporating Meditation and Yoga (Hughes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: MedIndia
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Technique incorporating meditation and yoga can benefit patients with high blood pressure or 'prehypertension', reveals a new study.

The study by Joel W. Hughes, PhD, of Kent State (Ohio) University included 56 women and men diagnosed with prehypertension. One group of patients was assigned to a program of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR): eight group sessions of 2 and a half hours per week. Led by an experienced instructor, the sessions included three main types of mindfulness skills: body scan exercises, sitting meditation, and yoga exercises.

The other "comparison" group received lifestyle advice plus a muscle-relaxation activity. This "active control" treatment group was not expected to have lasting effects on blood pressure.

Researchers found that patients in the mindfulness-based intervention group had significant reductions in clinic-based blood pressure measurements. Systolic blood pressure (the first, higher number) decreased by an average of nearly 5 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), compared to less than 1 mm Hg with in the control group who did not receive the mindfulness intervention.

Diastolic blood pressure (the second, lower number) was also lower in the mindfulness-based intervention group: a reduction of nearly 2 mm Hg, compared to an increase of 1 mm Hg in the control group.

"Mindfulness-based stress reduction is an increasingly popular practice that has been purported to alleviate stress, treat depression and anxiety, and treat certain health conditions," Dr Hughes said.

The study is published in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine.Source-ANI

Return to Top



News Headline: Police looking for suspects in robbery near Kent State University | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Police are searching for two men they believe assaulted and robbed a resident of an apartment complex near Kent State University early Monday.

Authorities responded to a report of a burglary at College Towers Apartments in the 1800 block of Rhodes Road shortly after midnight, Kent police said in a news release.

They are searching for two men who allegedly assaulted a resident before taking several items and fleeing on foot.

The victim, who reportedly has several minor cuts and scrapes, refused medical treatment.

Police said the incident appears to be related to rumors of a shooting in the area that spread quickly through electronic media, however, there have been no reports of safety forces responding to any incidents of that nature Monday.

The men are described as two black males in their early 20s, both wearing dark clothing. One man was wearing a light colored t-shirt under a dark sweatshirt, police said.

Return to Top



News Headline: (VIDEO) Police search for two suspects after a robbery near Kent State University | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Kent Police are looking for two men accused of a robbery early Monday morning near Kent State University.

Kent Police tell Newschannel5 they responded to the College Towers Apartments just after midnight for a report of a robbery.

Police said that two black males assaulted a resident, stole several items from him and then took off on foot. No weapons were seen. The victim suffered some minor cuts and scrapes but refused medical attention.

This happened off of college property, so it is being handled by Kent Police. They are still searching for the suspects said to be in their early 20's and wearing dark clothing. One suspect had a light color shirt underneath a dark hoodie.

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/oh_portage/police-search-for-two-suspects-after-a-robbery-near-kent-state-university

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent: Victim assaulted during burglary at College Towers Apartment | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, OH (WOIO) - One person was assaulted during an overnight burglary in Kent.

It happened Monday just after midnight at the College Towers Apartment.

Two suspects reportedly assaulted the resident, stole several items and fled on foot. No weapons were seen. The victim received minor cuts and scrapes and refused medical attention.

Police tell 19 Action News the burglary appears to be related to rumors fueled on social media of a shooting in the area. Kent safety forces have not responded to any incidents of that nature.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Police seek two male suspects after overnight robbery, assault | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT -- Police are seeking two males who assaulted and robbed a resident at the College Towers apartment complex at 1800 Rhodes Road shortly after midnight.

According to authorities, the victim suffered minor cuts and scrapes during the incident in which two suspects stole several items.

The unidentified suspects fled the scene on foot.

The victim refused medical treatment.

Police say this incident "appears to be related to rumors of a shooting in the area that have spread quickly via electronic media." However, police say they have not responded to any such incident this morning.

Anybody with information is asked to contact the Kent Police Department.

Return to Top



News Headline: Delta Gammas help Kent Lions | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/21/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: During the last week of October,
the Kent Lions prepare thousands of
dozens of carnations for delivery during
the club's annual carnation sale.

The sale is the club's biggest fundraiser
and supports the club's various
sight projects.

Taking orders is the easy part of the
labor-intensive project. Members set
up a workspace in the garage at the
back of Richards Flower Shop in Kent.

A truck arrives loaded with carnations
that need to be cut and placed
into many heavy buckets of water and
placed in the cooler.

Then, assisted by the Delta Gamma
Sorority at Kent State University, the
Lions spend days folding thousands of
boxes and lining them with floral paper
before the boxes are each filled with
carnations and a packet of floral preservative
donated by Smithers Oasis.

While some Lions are packing carnations,
others set out sorting the many
orders and route them for delivery to
different areas throughout Portage
County, Tallmadge, Stow, Mogadore,
and Akron.

Then, the Lions members get their
assigned routes and load their cars
and vans and travel hundreds of miles
delivering the carnations. Many Delta
Gammas also assist the Lions in making
deliveries.

Carnations will be delivered on Nov.
1 to businesses and some residences
and on Nov. 2 to most area residences.

The Kent Lions appreciate the support
of area businesses and individuals
who order carnations from the Lions
every year.

To order carnations, contact Tony
DeLuke at 330-730-3117 or Fran Hardesty
at 330-678-4012.

Return to Top



News Headline: Out-Of-The-Box auction features more than 40 boxes | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The more than 40 boxes created for the Out-of-the-Box Auction, sponsored by the Akron Area Arts Alliance, can be seen from noon to 9 p.m. Oct. 24 and 31, and noon to 5 p.m. Oct. 25 and 26. On Nov. 2, the exhibition will be open noon to 9 p.m. for the Downtown Artwalk.

Summit Artspace Gallery, at 140 E. Market St., is also showing the First Impressions: Celebrating the Process of Printmaking through Nov. 2. Admission and parking are free.

Arts Alive! Awards

The Arts Alive! Awards are Nov. 3 at the Summit Artspace. Nine individuals and organizations will be honored, including:

Lifetime Achievement -- Mitchell Kahan, Museum Director Emeritus, Akron Art Museum

Outstanding Artist in Music -- Kurt Reed, Director of Hudson/Fairlawn Schools of Music

Outstanding Visual Artist -- Dorothea Barlowe, Nature Artist

Rising Young Star/Leadership -- Jacqueline Tinnemeyer, ArtCetera Chair

Volunteer Award -- Joan Colbert, Summit Artspace Gallery Coordinator

Patron Award ­-- Gayle and David Noble, Dance Outreach/Performances, CVYB

Outreach Award -- Akron Symphony and GroundWorks Dance Theatre

Arts Educator Award -- Andrea Shearer, Dance Educator, KSU Dept. of Dance & Theatre

Collaboration Award -- Docs Who Rock, United Way of Summit County and The University of Akron

People interested in attending Arts Alive! can receive an invitation by calling 330-376-8480.

Reservations start at $100 ($45 tax deductible) with proceeds going to the Arts Alliance.

Return to Top



News Headline: Out-Of-The-Box auction features more than 40 boxes | Attachment Email

News Date: 10/19/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The more than 40 boxes created for the Out-of-the-Box Auction, sponsored by the Akron Area Arts Alliance, can be seen from noon to 9 p.m. Oct. 24 and 31, and noon to 5 p.m. Oct. 25 and 26. On Nov. 2, the exhibition will be open noon to 9 p.m. for the Downtown Artwalk.

Summit Artspace Gallery, at 140 E. Market St., is also showing the First Impressions: Celebrating the Process of Printmaking through Nov. 2. Admission and parking are free.

Arts Alive! Awards

The Arts Alive! Awards are Nov. 3 at the Summit Artspace. Nine individuals and organizations will be honored, including:

Lifetime Achievement -- Mitchell Kahan, Museum Director Emeritus, Akron Art Museum

Outstanding Artist in Music -- Kurt Reed, Director of Hudson/Fairlawn Schools of Music

Outstanding Visual Artist -- Dorothea Barlowe, Nature Artist

Rising Young Star/Leadership -- Jacqueline Tinnemeyer, ArtCetera Chair

Volunteer Award -- Joan Colbert, Summit Artspace Gallery Coordinator

Patron Award ­-- Gayle and David Noble, Dance Outreach/Performances, CVYB

Outreach Award -- Akron Symphony and GroundWorks Dance Theatre

Arts Educator Award -- Andrea Shearer, Dance Educator, KSU Dept. of Dance & Theatre

Collaboration Award -- Docs Who Rock, United Way of Summit County and The University of Akron

People interested in attending Arts Alive! can receive an invitation by calling 330-376-8480.

Reservations start at $100 ($45 tax deductible) with proceeds going to the Arts Alliance.

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus