Report Overview:
Total Clips (16)
Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Human Resources (1)
African Community Theatre; Pan-African Studies (1)
Board of Trustees (2)
College of Business (COB) (4)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (2)
Music (3)
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Adult and Veteran Services, Center for; Human Resources (1)
Kent State pays tribute to veterans Thursday (Gallery) 11/08/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Scores of veterans and their family members joined various faculty and citizens Thursday on the Student Green at Kent State University's Risman Plaza for...


African Community Theatre; Pan-African Studies (1)
KSU African Community Theatre presents courageous "No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs" 11/07/2013 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's African Community Theatre (ACT) isn't afraid of a little controversy; after all, the title of their next play is called No...


Board of Trustees (2)
KSU trustees set meeting today 11/08/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Board of Trustees will gather for a special meeting at 1:30 p.m. today. The meeting will be held at the corporate offices of...

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES SPECIAL MEETING, NOV. 8 11/07/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Nov.7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: The Kent State University Board of Trustees will gather for a special meeting Friday,...


College of Business (COB) (4)
Oberlin College will create multipurpose athletic complex with $8 million gift: Higher Education roundup 11/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

OBERLIN, Ohio - Oberlin College has received an $8 million gift to update its football stadium to create a new multipurpose athletics complex. The...

Local news briefs - Nov. 8 11/08/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE MBA classes KENT: Kent State will offer an executive MBA for health-care professionals program at its College of Podiatric Medicine in...

Kent State to Offer Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals at College of Podiatric Medicine's Independence Location (Spake, Walker) 11/08/2013 InsuranceNewsNet - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University announces it will offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program at its College of Podiatric Medicine in Greater...

KENT STATE TO OFFER EXECUTIVE MBA FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS AT COLLEGE OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE'S INDEPENDENCE LOCATION (Spake, Walker) 11/07/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, Nov.7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University announces it will offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals...


KSU at Stark (1)
Cleveland Arts listings for Nov. 8-14: Checking out the sights during the Tremont ArtWalk & More 11/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State University. Stark Campus' Fine Arts Theatre, 6000 Frank Ave., Jackson Township. 330-244-5151 or stark.kent.edu/music. Nicky Silver's "The Maiden's...


KSU Museum (1)
2DO Listings for Nov. 8-Nov. 14 11/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (2)
(AUDIO) New type of liquid crystal is discovered at Kent State (Lavrentovich) 11/08/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Researchers at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute have discovered a new type of liquid crystal that twists and bends; how that may play out isn't yet...

New Liquid Crystal Structure Reported by Kent State Researchers (Lavrentovich) 11/08/2013 HispanicBusiness.com Text Attachment Email

A research group at Kent State University has described the structure of a new type of liquid crystal that had been predicted theoretically but never seen. The new...


Music (3)
Cleveland Arts listings for Nov. 8-14: Checking out the sights during the Tremont ArtWalk & More 11/08/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State University. Music & Speech Building's Wright-Curtis Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, 330-672-2787 or kent.edu/artscollege. Fall Opera Scenes Program:...

Akron music series features cutting-edge violinist, organist (Sallak) 11/08/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

One trailblazer defies the mainstream by shattering stereotypes about the organ and organists through both his showmanship and virtuosity. The other, a...

MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend--Nov. 8 11/08/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent Singing Outside the Box—At 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday guests are invited to enjoy Kent State University's Fall Opera Scenes Program that will feature scenes from Mozart, Bizet, Handel and many more from the 18th through the 21st...


Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) (1)
Parks for Soldiers at Schneider Park 11/07/2013 North Neighbor News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Mothers Chapter President Brenda Russell. Assisting with the obstacle course will be the student council from Oakwood Middle School and cadets from the Kent State University USAF ROTC program. The obstacle course race will take place throughout Schneider Park and the Stark Parks' Middle Branch...


News Headline: Kent State pays tribute to veterans Thursday (Gallery) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Scores of veterans and their family members joined various faculty and citizens Thursday on the Student Green at Kent State University's Risman Plaza for the campus' annual Veterans Day observation ceremonies. The program included a flag-raising ceremony with the joint color guard from Kent State's Army and Air Force ROTC programs followed by remarks from veterans -- including guest speaker and current KSU student Andrew Altizer, former staff sergeant for the U.S. Air Force and a recipient of the Air Force's Airmen College Scholarship -- and KSU President Lester Lefton. Above, Altizer addresses the crowd. At left, Brittany Martin, sophomore and ROTC cadet, sings the national anthem.

To view gallery, please click on link:
http://www.recordpub.com/news%20local/2013/11/08/kent-state-pays-tribute-to-veterans-thursday-gallery

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News Headline: KSU African Community Theatre presents courageous "No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs" | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's African Community Theatre (ACT) isn't afraid of a little controversy; after all, the title of their next play is called No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs. Written by John Henry Redwood and directed by Terrence Spivey, No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs is set in 1949 North Carolina, where the Cheeks family — Rawl and his wife, Mattie, and their two daughters — makes its home. They are then visited by a Jewish scholar from Cleveland who's researching the effects of prejudice on both blacks and Jews, and a mysterious local black woman who “wanders around wrapped in a black garment with a dark secret.”

The title refers to signs commonly posted in the region in that era.

Says Director Terrence Spivey, “The audience will experience the true courage of a woman (Mattie Cheeks) taken through some harsh trials during the absence of her husband and the strength to face up to a decision that turns the play into an unexpected ending. It's a nail biter!”

Make sure to check out ACT, which is on a mission to become “a collegiate theatre program to be reckoned with in Northeast Ohio and beyond…”

http://kent.edu

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News Headline: KSU trustees set meeting today | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Board of Trustees will gather for a special meeting at 1:30 p.m. today. The meeting will be held at the corporate offices of The Davey Tree Expert Co. at 1500 N. Mantua St. in Kent.

No committee meetings will be held, and no recommendations or votes will be discussed or taken. Trustees will retire into executive session during the retreat to consider specific topics as provided for under Ohio's "Sunshine Law."

The board will hold its next, regular business meeting Dec. 4, at the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine, 6000 Rockside Woods Blvd. in Independence.

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News Headline: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES SPECIAL MEETING, NOV. 8 | Email

News Date: 11/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Nov.7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

The Kent State University Board of Trustees will gather for a special meeting Friday, Nov.8, at 1:30 p.m.The meeting will be held at the corporate offices of The Davey Tree Expert Company, which are located at 1500 N.Mantua St.in Kent, Ohio.

No committee meetings will be held, and no recommendations or votes will be discussed or taken.Trustees will retire into executive session during the meeting to consider specific topics as provided for under Ohio's "Sunshine Law."

The board will hold its next, regular business meeting Wednesday, Dec.4, at the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine, located at 6000 Rockside Woods Blvd.in Independence, Ohio.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

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News Headline: Oberlin College will create multipurpose athletic complex with $8 million gift: Higher Education roundup | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: OBERLIN, Ohio - Oberlin College has received an $8 million gift to update its football stadium to create a new multipurpose athletics complex.

The gift from the Austin E. Knowlton Foundation will allow the college to install an all-weather, multipurpose field at its stadium with artificial turf and lights, which will be used by nearly every athletics team or club sport.

The complex will also include a new press box, grandstands and a facility with locker rooms and meeting spaces for the campus community.

A groundbreaking ceremony will take place on November 16 at Savage Stadium before the football game against Hiram College.

The Austin E. Knowlton Athletics Complex will be named in honor of the late Ohio businessman who created the foundation through his estate to support colleges and universities throughout the Midwest.

Austin E. “Dutch” Knowlton was the owner and chairman of the Knowlton Construction Company, which his family started in Bellefontaine, Ohio. He graduated from the Ohio State University with a degree in architecture.

“We are beyond grateful for the Knowlton Foundation's vision and generosity,” says Natalie Winkelfoos, director of athletics and physical education at Oberlin in a press release. “The complex will lend itself as a location to strengthen relationships and connect with the greater community.”

Concerns raised about proposed rating system: A federal college ratings system may result in less access to higher education for disadvantaged minority and low-income students, college leaders and the public told U.S. Education Department officials at the first public forum on the proposal by President Barack Obama, Inside Higher Ed reported.

Dozens of students, faculty members, administrators, parents and advocacy groups testified Wednesday at California State University's Dominguez Hills campus.

The event was the first of four public forums the Education Department is holding this month to solicit feedback on how to develop a federal college ratings system that would tie federal aid to students based on how well the college meets certain metrics.

Several speakers lamented the decline in state funding for public education, according to Inside Higher Ed. Students relayed personal anecdotes about their struggles with large amounts of student loan debt. Several faculty members said they were concerned that a ratings system would be reductive and would not take into account the full value of a college education.

One central concern for many of the speakers, however, was the extent to which a ratings plan will help or harm students at community colleges and other institutions that serve disadvantaged populations.

Those students usually select a college based on convenience and location, not rankings, speakers said. They said underprivileged students would be denied access to education if they were to live in a community where local colleges performed poorly in the ratings system and they therefore received less federal aid.

Program for prospective MBA students: People interested in pursuing a master's degree in business administration can meet with officials from six universities to discuss MBA programs on Saturday, Nov. 16 at Case Western Reserve University.

The Ohio MBA Network Graduate Business Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the George S. Dively Building, 11240 Bellflower Rd.

Admissions staff and current MBA students from CWRU, Cleveland State University, John Carroll University, Kent State University, Ohio State University and the University of Akron will provide information and answer questions.

The event is free. Register at ohiombanetwork.org or call 216-368-6702.

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News Headline: Local news briefs - Nov. 8 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT STATE

MBA classes

KENT: Kent State will offer an executive MBA for health-care professionals program at its College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence next year.

The 23-month program will begin in May and will cost $44,900, including books, selected meals and a business experience trip to Geneva, Switzerland, and Paris.

Details about the program will be available at two information nights: at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 12 in Room A325 of the Business Administration Building at the Kent State main campus; and at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 14 at KSU's College of Podiatric Medicine, 6000 Rockside Woods Blvd., Independence.

More details are at www.kent.edu/business/grad/healthcaremba.

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News Headline: Kent State to Offer Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals at College of Podiatric Medicine's Independence Location (Spake, Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: InsuranceNewsNet - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University announces it will offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program at its College of Podiatric Medicine in Greater Cleveland beginning next year.

With the induction of the new class in May 2014, the 23-month program will take place on Kent State'sCollege of Podiatric Medicine campus in Independence, Ohio, located off of Interstate 77, south of Interstate 480 in the heart of Cuyahoga County.

"We're delighted to be able to partner with the College of Podiatric Medicine to offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare," said
Deborah Spake, dean of the College of Business Administration at Kent State. "By offering the program at a location that is centrally located and close to where many people live and work, we're being responsive to the needs of the market."

Spake is pleased the popular program is going to be offered at a Kent State medical facility.

"By being able to offer the program at the College of Podiatric Medicine, we are not asking professionals to go to a competitor's facility to take coursework," she said. "They are going to a Kent State facility for that program."

The Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program features a curriculum created to meet the demands and challenges of today's healthcare professional. The classroom is brought to life by outstanding faculty and respected executive lecturers from leading organizations in the healthcare industry.

When combined with the program's innovative online/on-site learning approach and a convenient, state-of-the-art facility,
Kent State's Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals is an excellent investment and valuable learning experience.

Kent State hopes to attract people who are interested in furthering their education once they have had a healthcare component in their jobs, according to Laurie Walker, Kent State's director of Executive MBA programs.

"Knowing all of the changes that have come with healthcare reform and the need for professionals to understand more about the business aspects of healthcare, this is the ideal transition for people to gain those skills," Walker said. To learn more about the program, interested individuals are encouraged to attend an information session. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet students and faculty and program administrators, while receiving important program information, including: * Admission criteria and application process

* Curriculum overview

* Program format and schedule

* Faculty interaction

* Current students and alumni experiences

* International trip highlights

Two information nights are scheduled for November. On

Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 6:30 p.m., the session will be held at the Business Administration Building, Room A325, on the Kent Campus. On Thursday, Nov. 14, at 6:30 p.m., a session will be held at Kent State'sCollege of Podiatric Medicine, located at 6000 Rockside Woods Blvd. in Independence.

For more information about the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program at

Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/business/grad/healthcaremba.

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News Headline: KENT STATE TO OFFER EXECUTIVE MBA FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS AT COLLEGE OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE'S INDEPENDENCE LOCATION (Spake, Walker) | Email

News Date: 11/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Nov.7 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University announces it will offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program at its College of Podiatric Medicine in Greater Cleveland beginning next year.

With the induction of the new class in May 2014, the 23-month program will take place on Kent State's College of Podiatric Medicine campus in Independence, Ohio, located off of Interstate 77, south of Interstate 480 in the heart of Cuyahoga County.

"We're delighted to be able to partner with the College of Podiatric Medicine to offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare," said Deborah Spake, dean of the College of Business Administration at Kent State."By offering the program at a location that is centrally located and close to where many people live and work, we're being responsive to the needs of the market."

Spake is pleased the popular program is going to be offered at a Kent State medical facility.

"By being able to offer the program at the College of Podiatric Medicine, we are not asking professionals to go to a competitor's facility to take coursework," she said."They are going to a Kent State facility for that program."

The Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program features a curriculum created to meet the demands and challenges of today's healthcare professional.The classroom is brought to life by outstanding faculty and respected executive lecturers from leading organizations in the healthcare industry.

When combined with the program's innovative online/on-site learning approach and a convenient, state-of-the-art facility, Kent State's Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals is an excellent investment and valuable learning experience.

Kent State hopes to attract people who are interested in furthering their education once they have had a healthcare component in their jobs, according to Laurie Walker, Kent State's director of Executive MBA programs.

"Knowing all of the changes that have come with healthcare reform and the need for professionals to understand more about the business aspects of healthcare, this is the ideal transition for people to gain those skills," Walker said.

To learn more about the program, interested individuals are encouraged to attend an information session.Attendees will have the opportunity to meet students and faculty and program administrators, while receiving important program information, including:

* Admission criteria and application process

* Curriculum overview

* Program format and schedule

* Faculty interaction

* Current students and alumni experiences

* International trip highlights

Two information nights are scheduled for November.On Tuesday, Nov.12, at 6:30 p.m., the session will be held at the Business Administration Building, Room A325, on the Kent Campus.On Thursday, Nov.14, at 6:30 p.m., a session will be held at Kent State's College of Podiatric Medicine, located at 6000 Rockside Woods Blvd.in Independence.

For more information about the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals program at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/business/grad/healthcaremba.For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

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News Headline: Cleveland Arts listings for Nov. 8-14: Checking out the sights during the Tremont ArtWalk & More | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University. Stark Campus' Fine Arts Theatre, 6000 Frank Ave., Jackson Township. 330-244-5151 or stark.kent.edu/music. Nicky Silver's "The Maiden's Prayer." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. 11/8/13-11/10/13 American Sign Language interpretation provided for Sunday performance. $10; $7, senior citizens, non-Kent State students, and children under 17.

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News Headline: 2DO Listings for Nov. 8-Nov. 14 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. . $5, adults; $4, senior citizens; $3, ages 18 and under. Free with Kent State ID and to the public on Sunday. "Arthur Koby Jewelry: The Creative Eye." Through Sunday, Oct. 5.(11/8-11/14)

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News Headline: (AUDIO) New type of liquid crystal is discovered at Kent State (Lavrentovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute have discovered a new type of liquid crystal that twists and bends; how that may play out isn't yet known

A new class of liquid crystals has been discovered by researchers at Kent State University.

WKSU's Jeff St.Clair reports the find opens new possibilities for liquid crystal technology.

Since their development in the 1970's, liquid crystals have spread everywhere. They're in the displays for your clock, computer, TV, and cell-phone.

But Kent State's Oleg Lavrentovich says a new type of liquid crystal opens a new era of possibilities for the technology.

“Prior to this research, there were just a few types of liquid crystals that people knew almost everything about. And suddenly you see a new structural organization that is different from everything that was known.”

Unlike the straight, rod-like “classic” liquid crystals, the new molecules bend in the middle.

Twist and bend
Lavrentovich says the new “twist-bend” molecules could allow for finer control of images.

“The new structure is much more complex than the structure of the standard liquid crystals used in displays and that means that you have more degrees of freedom to control this structure.”

Lavrentovich cautions that the new type of liquid crystal has just been discovered, and only time will tell how it will advance the technology.

But he says there's already speculation that it could result in breakthroughs in biological sensors, chemical catalysts, and yes, better computer displays.

The research was reported in the Nov. 5 issue of the journal Nature

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/37336

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News Headline: New Liquid Crystal Structure Reported by Kent State Researchers (Lavrentovich) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: HispanicBusiness.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A research group at Kent State University has described the structure of a new type of liquid crystal that had been predicted theoretically but never seen.

The new "twist-bend nematic" liquid crystal, one with a spiral twist, was observed by a Kent State research group led by

Oleg D. Lavrentovich, Ph.D., D.Sc., Trustees Research Professor of chemical physics and former director of the Liquid Crystal Institute(TM) at Kent State.

The new type of liquid crystal, akin to a new species in biology, might enable new technologies, ranging from faster-switching display devices to biological sensors, according to Lavrentovich.

The most widely known liquid crystal to date, called the nematic, made possible an entire industry of liquid crystal displays used in flat-panel televisions, mobile electronic devices and laptop computers.

"It remains to be seen whether this new liquid crystal can bring a similar level of revolutionary changes," said Lavrentovich.

The research was reported in the Nov. 5 issue of the journal Nature Communications.

The Kent State group collaborated with researchers in Ireland, who provided materials, and the United Kingdom, where scientists synthesized the molecules that were then observed with a Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) in the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State. The microscope, funded under a $15.2 million Ohio Third Frontier grant, made it possible to see the structure at the nanoscale level - down to one fifth of a nanometer.

The pitch, or distance between two spirals in the observed material, was 8 nanometers, about 10,000 times smaller than the thickness of a human hair. The same periodic pattern was reported last month by a research group at the University of Colorado. The TEM experiments at Kent State demonstrated that this periodicity is caused by a tilted spiral structure.

The spiral-shaped liquid crystal was predicted 40 years ago by a theoretical physicist at Brandeis University,

Robert B. Meyer, who is now a professor emeritus there. For the past 20 years, researchers have observed what Lavrentovich called "strange behavior" in some liquid crystals, and in some cases, "strange responses to electric fields." However, the structure of these "strange" liquid crystals remained a mystery.

He likened the difference between the "classic" liquid crystal structure and the new one to that between a straight rope and a twisted rope. The new type, the twist-bend nematic, is actually formed by two "classic" liquid crystal molecules that connect with a flexible chain that allows the new molecule to bend and twist in what was described as a tilted spiral.

"This little change brings such enormous structural differences," Lavrentovich said.

The next challenge will be to determine why this happens and to investigate what the new structure means for the development of new materials.

The Kent State research team led by Lavrentovich also included

Antal Jakli, Ph.D., professor of chemical physics;

Min Gao, Ph.D., research associate who supervises the facility housing the TEM; and three chemical physics graduate students. Two scientists in Ireland and three chemists in the U.K. also collaborated.

In addition to the Ohio Third Frontier grant, funding for the research came from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy.

For more information about research at Kent State, visit www.kent.edu/research.

For more information about Kent State'sLiquid Crystal Institute, visit www.lcinet.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Cleveland Arts listings for Nov. 8-14: Checking out the sights during the Tremont ArtWalk & More | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University. Music & Speech Building's Wright-Curtis Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive, 330-672-2787 or kent.edu/artscollege. Fall Opera Scenes Program: "Singing Outside the Box: Scenes from Mozart, Bizet, Handel and Others." 7:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. 11/9/13-11/10/13 $15; $13, senior citizens; $8, non-Kent State students; $5, children.

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News Headline: Akron music series features cutting-edge violinist, organist (Sallak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: One trailblazer defies the mainstream by shattering stereotypes about the organ and organists through both his showmanship and virtuosity. The other, a young violinist, has developed a cult following for his audacious fashions and provocative takes on classical music as performance art.

Next week, young avant-garde musicians Cameron Carpenter and Amadeus Leopold, both Juilliard-trained, virtuosic musicians who are shaking up the classical music world, will perform as part of E.J. Thomas Hall's Contemporaries series. The series' goal is to attract young concert-goers to hear accomplished, radically cutting-edge musicians within their age group.

The Contemporaries series kicked off Sunday with YouTube sensation 2Cellos, known for breaking boundaries between genres of music. On Wednesday, the 32-year-old Carpenter will undoubtedly dazzle and delight on the Mighty Wurlitzer Organ at the Akron Civic Theatre, followed by 25-year-old Leopold Saturday in an EJ UpClose performance with orchestra-only seating at E.J. Thomas Hall.

Both young men are on the cusp of exciting happenings in their career, with Carpenter poised to record his first Sony Classical album and launch a new, custom-made touring organ that has been seven years in the making. Leopold also is about to release a new album on a multimedia platform.

Big reputation

Carpenter has been described in the press as the most controversial organist in the world, a superstar of the 21st-century organ, an “ambitious radical” and a “maverick organist.” Music writers call him a “clever eclecticist” with “mind-blowing technique combined with charisma” who has built up one of the largest and most diverse repertoires of any organist in the world.

The unorthodox organist, who grew up in Meadville, Pa., fell in love with the instrument at age 4 and has always approached the organ from a secular rather than a religious point of view. He moved to Princeton, N.J., at 11 to attend the American Boychoir School as a boy soprano. He moved to New York in 2000, where he received his undergraduate and master's degrees from Juilliard.

Carpenter has made waves by loudly dismissing the traditional pipe organ in favor of the virtual pipe organ, a digital instrument that allows him to push the organ, which he calls “one of the great frontiers,” to new heights.

In concert, he is known for his flamboyance, including the glittery shirts he embellishes by hand, and for his habit of working the crowd before his performances.

Speaking by phone from Needham, Mass., on Oct. 28, Carpenter rhapsodized about his brand new touring organ, built there by Marshall & Ogletree, the same small company that built the new digital pipe organ for Trinity Church Wall Street after its old organ was destroyed in 9/11. Carpenter's digital pipe organ is the company's eighth.

“I'm just getting to know the instrument deeply,” said Carpenter, who added that he had just 11 rehearsal days left interspersed among seven concert tour dates until he records his debut Sony album Thanksgiving week on the new touring organ.

“It's extremely intense.”

Carpenter's album, to be released by Sony Classical in spring 2014, will combine a variety of his transcriptions of classic and modern music for organ — including a cycle of song treatments ranging from the American songbook to present day — with the world premiere recording of his new work Music for an Imaginary Film.

The musician says his new instrument combines the best of the classic cathedral pipe organ with the cinema organ. The modular new organ features a five-keyboard console; a parallel processing system with samples from several key organs; and a concert audio system designed to work from outside to TV, nightclubs and large concert halls.

Until now, Carpenter has adapted to organs at concert venues, as he will do with the Mighty Wurlitzer at the Akron Civic Theatre. Creating his own digital pipe organ, which Carpenter calls an “engineering masterpiece” that can be set up within three hours on tour, solves that problem.

“My sort of mandate of course has been to bring one of the great organs of the world wherever I perform,” Carpenter said. “I'll actually be giving my audiences my best as a violinist would” with their personal instrument.

“I believe it's the greatest organ in the world,” Carpenter said. “It has more color, more precision, more rhythm and more resources tonally in one place than there would ever be possible with a conventional pipe organ.”

He'll unveil the touring organ with a daylong festival March 9 at Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall.

In Akron, Carpenter must get to know the Mighty Wurlitzer before he decides what to play on it. He'll get about eight hours of rehearsal and hopes to play some Bach, French 20th century music and film music as well as do some improvisation.

Carpenter works to turn perceptions about organists on their ear: Rather than focusing on the instrument itself, he focuses on it as a vehicle of expression for a persona, and is dedicated to creating his own sound.

He's well aware that he's perceived as the “bad boy of the organ,” a moniker that he calls dismissive. In the organ world, “it takes no great, outstanding character to be a rebel,” he said.

Carpenter focuses on visuals such as appearance as a performer, but said the most interesting work has to do with the expression and emotion he discovers in the music.

Yet he doesn't think his controversial reputation is all bad: “I think everything that brings me to the attention of people who may benefit from hearing me or enjoy what I do is worthwhile.”

Creating a look

For performance artist Amadeus Leopold, visuals are extremely important, considering his music videos are an intrinsic part of his music making. The South Korean musician, born Hahn-Bin, combines music with drama and a visual element that's very personal to him, said his longtime teacher, Itzhak Perlman.

Leopold, who worked with Madonna on her MDNA album, has performed everywhere from the Louis Vuitton flagship store on Fifth Avenue in uptown New York to the Stone downtown, presented by the late Lou Reed and his wife, violinist and performance artist Laurie Anderson. He also spent two months playing his own performance series, Soliloquy for Andy Warhol, at the Andy Warhol exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in 2011.

His provocative fashions, makeup and hairstyles are part of his expression but also an attempt to make classical music relevant to young people. The music he plays is primarily 19th- and 20th-century classical repertoire, staged in visually striking ways.

Leopold changed his name last year to honor Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as well as his father, Leopold. The name also is a tribute to Leopold Auer, a 19th century Hungarian virtuoso violinist.

Leopold, speaking by phone from his new home base in Cleveland on Oct. 29, insisted that he sees no boundaries between classical and pop music. Growing up listening to the radio in South Korea, “classical music for me was pop music,” he said.

He moved from South Korea to California at age 11, relocating to New York at age 15 to study at the Juilliard School at the invitation of Perlman. As a young student, his Los Angeles teacher, Robert Lipsett, taught at Encore Strings Academy in Hudson, where Leopold spent six summers. He remembers fondly spending time at Angel Falls café and Mustard Seed Market, as well as sneaking into the University of Akron practice rooms to rehearse.

Leopold made his debut in 2008 at the Louvre in Paris. But after living a hectic performance artist's life for years in fast-paced New York, he decided “Ohio was where I wanted to be.”

“Because my performances are so incredibly taxing on the body … when I would think about a home, Ohio was the answer.”

“I really had an emotional attachment to Ohio,” said Leopold, who moved to Cleveland in May.

He said the move was all about getting off the hamster wheel and taking charge of his career. Now, he's preparing to release three full-length classical albums in 2014 titled The Renaissance Diaries of Amadeus Leopold, which will feature every work he has performed in his performance projects since his Paris debut. Leopold said the trilogy will not be traditional albums and will include music videos that go well beyond documentaries that often accompany classical music releases.

Whenever Leopold performs, he asks himself: “How do I express myself and how do I tell meaningful, personal stories to my audience?”

In Akron, he'll perform a concert he has designed exclusively for E.J. Thomas Hall, under the same title as his upcoming album. It will be his last public performance before he releases his album early next year. The show will be an X-ray of classical music history featuring 22 different composers.

Leopold's genres include baroque, romantic classical, avant-garde classical, Broadway and cinema. He plays 300-year-old music in everything from leopard prints to geisha getups, but insists comparisons between him and Lady Gaga are false.

“The heart and core of what I am is a vintage soul,” he said. “I'm more Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland and Jacques Brel than Lady Gaga.”

‘Multimedia affairs'

Bill Sallak, assistant professor of music at Kent State University who also teaches at the University of Akron, said Leopold reminds him of David Bowie, changing his persona often (think Ziggy Stardust) and using his way of dress and video as a way of communicating and disseminating his work.

“It sounds like he wants his documents to be multimedia affairs that are unified,” Sallak said of Leopold. “It sounds a lot like what Bjork did for her last album, called Biophilia.” That multimedia project encompassed music, apps, the Internet, installations and live shows.

Sallak said that Juilliard-trained musicians such as Leopold and Carpenter aren't necessarily pursuing classical careers with American orchestras, which aren't in a growth mode. Instead, they want to apply their classical knowledge to some aspect of mainstream music culture.

He said Carpenter's combination of virtuosity, passion and excitement about all the organ can do draws people to him: “I think it's great. I think the organ is one of those instruments that could use a cultural rehabilitation.”

Both Carpenter and Leopold are at the forefront of a wave of classically trained young musicians who are breaking down walls, Sallak said.

“We're in the very last stages of this highbrow-lowbrow division where there's classical music and there's popular music and there isn't a lot of dialogue between the two.”

“There is a critical mass of young people who are breaking down the barrier and … more and more of the classical old guard is coming around to realize that without tapping into this conversation, without this dialogue with mainstream culture, that the future of classical music is just not very bright.”

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News Headline: MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend--Nov. 8 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent

Singing Outside the Box—At 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday guests are invited to enjoy Kent State University's Fall Opera Scenes Program that will feature scenes from Mozart, Bizet, Handel and many more from the 18th through the 21st centuries. Tickets are $15 for adults, $13 for seniors and faculty and staff, $10 per person in groups of 10 or more, $8 for non-Kent State students, $5 for children and free for full-time Kent Campus undergraduate students. For more information, visit http://www.kent.edu/einside/events.cfm#3635961 or call 330-672-2787.

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News Headline: Parks for Soldiers at Schneider Park | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: North Neighbor News - Online
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News OCR Text: This annual event will be held on Sunday, Nov. 10 beginning at 12:55 p.m.

On Sunday Nov. 10, the Friends of Plain Township Parks, in cooperation with Plain Township and Plain Township Parks, will host the second annual Parks For Soldiers Event at Schneider Park.

The event consists of a brief commemorative ceremony followed by an obstacle course challenge.

A ceremony will begin at 12:55 p.m. with the national anthem. Several dignitaries will speak including Plain Township Trustees Scott Haws, Louis Giavasis and Al Leno; Stark County Commissioner Janet Creighton; United States Air Force Lt. Colonel Finkelstein; Nate Kalsek of the Marlboro Volunteers; Jim Woofter of the Marine Corps League, McKinley Detachment; and Canton-Akron Blue Star Mothers Chapter President Brenda Russell.

Assisting with the obstacle course will be the student council from Oakwood Middle School and cadets from the Kent State University USAF ROTC program.

The obstacle course race will take place throughout Schneider Park and the Stark Parks' Middle Branch trail to simulate a sampling of the military training the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces take part in. The course will be timed and marshaled by volunteers.

The registration fee is $15 before race day and $20 the day of. Registration is complimentary to all current and former men and women of the armed services. Entrants can register online at https://parksforsoldiers.eventbrite.com/ or mail-in entries can be sent to Plain Township Hall, 2600 Easton St. NE, Canton, Ohio 44721. Registration will close on race day at noon.

Proceeds raised will benefit the Canton-Akron Blue Star Mothers Chapter and Plain Township Parks.

All inquiries should be directed to Danette Lund, Friends of Plain Township Parks Board President, at danilund3@yahoo.com or event chair Rob Steinberg at rsteinberg@plaintownship.com.

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