Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
African Community Theatre; College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Pan-African Studies; Students (1)
African Community Theatre; Hillel; Music; Theatre and Dance; Town-Gown (1)
Alumni; Board of Trustees (1)
Alumni; Wick Poetry Center (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design; Students (1)
Athletics (1)
Biological Sciences; Students (3)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Business (COB) (1)
KSU at Ashtabula (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music (1)
Plagiarism School; Students (1)
Public Policy and Health (Center for) (1)
Students (3)
Other (1)


Headline Date Outlet

African Community Theatre; College of Arts and Sciences (AS); Pan-African Studies; Students (1)
KSU's African Community Theatre plans provocative play (Spivey, Gooden) 11/13/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Terrence Spivey, artistic director of Karamu House in Cleveland since 2003, is doing double duty now as the 2013-2014 director-in-residence of Kent State University's African Community Theatre. The theater professional was brought in after the retirement of Fran Dorsey to reinvigorate...


African Community Theatre; Hillel; Music; Theatre and Dance; Town-Gown (1)
THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts 11/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

COMMUNITY The next Kent Community Dinner, “Celebrating the Jewish Community,” will take place at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Cohn Jewish Student Center...


Alumni; Board of Trustees (1)
2013 Business Hall of Fame: Virginia Albanese 11/14/2013 IBmag.com Text Attachment Email

After more than six years on top at FedEx Custom Critical, Virginia Albanese has transformed the FedEx corporate motto, People-Service-Profit, into a personal...


Alumni; Wick Poetry Center (1)
TEDxAkron: Six voices for dramatic show-and-tell (Hassler) 11/14/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kendra St. Charles' life changed in less than a half minute. “I remember hearing the people screaming — preparing to crash,” said St. Charles, whose...


Architecture and Environmental Design; Students (1)
Art notes: Students' ideas 11/13/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

In collaboration with Kent State University School of Architecture faculty, Akron Art Museum staff charged third-year architecture students to create a design for the museum's...


Athletics (1)
Decorated Kent State senior class honored before final home game vs. Miami 11/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Editor's Note: Kent State's game against Miami (Ohio) at Dix Stadium was not completed by the Record-Courier's presstime Wednesday night. For a complete...


Biological Sciences; Students (3)
A crazy Cretaceous conundrum: Intersex crabs 11/14/2013 MSNBC.com Text Attachment Email

...to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Such a large number of fossil crabs is "extremely rare," said AnnMarie Jones, a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio who presented a new analysis of the fossils here last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America....

Crazy Cretaceous Find: Intersex Crabs 11/13/2013 LiveScience.com Text Attachment Email

...to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Such a large number of fossil crabs is "extremely rare," said AnnMarie Jones, a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio who presented a new analysis of the fossils here last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America....

Crazy Cretaceous Find: Intersex Crabs 11/13/2013 Yahoo! UK and Ireland Text Attachment Email

...to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Such a large number of fossil crabs is "extremely rare," said AnnMarie Jones, a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio who presented a new analysis of the fossils here last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America....


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Learning From Legacy Cities (Schwarz) 11/13/2013 Architectural Record - Online Text Attachment Email

...admit we don't really know what's going to happen to a lot of these cities,” said Terry Schwarz, director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative at Kent State University. Toni L. Griffin, director of the J. Max Bond Center, said the forum achieved key goals, including producing a more robust...


College of Business (COB) (1)
Kent State College of Business Administration to Participate in Graduate Business Fair 11/13/2013 PRLog Text Attachment Email

... Breakfast will be provided and door prizes will be handed out at the conclusion of the program. The universities that will be in attendance are Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, John Carroll University, The Ohio State University,...


KSU at Ashtabula (1)
KSUA helps students get work with 'Dress to Impress' event 11/13/2013 Star-Beacon Text Email

...business attire, resume writing advice, personalized business cards, and a style consultation are just some of the perks offered to students who attend Kent State University of Ashtabula's Dress to Impress event Tuesday. The event will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at KSUA in the Blue and Gold Room...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Liquid crystal that twists and bends 11/13/2013 Phys.org Text Attachment Email

...interdisciplinary team of researchers assembled involving chemists at the Universities of Aberdeen and Hull, physicists at the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State University, USA, and electrical engineers at Trinity College in Dublin. The team has now reported the structure of the new phase in...


Music (1)
Classical music at KSU on Sunday 11/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

This weekend, enjoy an evening with the Kent State University orchestra or get down and dirty with this year's Kent Rock-Off competitors. KSU Orchestra...


Plagiarism School; Students (1)
Kent State: Unique approach to plagiarism 11/13/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...college and more kids are getting caught doing it. In some cases, plagiarism is an automatic "F" -- or even worse -- expulsion from school. But Kent State University is taking a new approach to this academic crime and giving some students a second chance. This is the country's only "plagiarism...


Public Policy and Health (Center for) (1)
Ravenna weighing merger of health unit (Hoornbeek) 11/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

City board favors joining county agency Should Ravenna become an official member of the Portage County Combined General Health District, or just...


Students (3)
Kent State student is hit by car, recovering 11/14/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing S.R. 59 in Kent Tuesday evening. Zhengliang Feng, 24, of...

Kent State student in 'satisfactory' condition after being struck by car Tuesday 11/13/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing S.R. 59 in Kent Tuesday evening. Zhengliang Feng, 24, of...

Kent State student in 'satisfactory' condition after being struck by car Tuesday 11/13/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing S.R. 59 in Kent Tuesday evening. Zhengliang Feng, 24, of...


Other (1)
Kent State student reportedly recovers after being hit by car on state Route 59 11/13/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A 24-year-old Kent State student was struck by a car while crossing state Route 59, according to the Record Courier. Zhengliang Feng is recovering at Akron...


News Headline: KSU's African Community Theatre plans provocative play (Spivey, Gooden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Clawson, Kerry
News OCR Text: Terrence Spivey, artistic director of Karamu House in Cleveland since 2003, is doing double duty now as the 2013-2014 director-in-residence of Kent State University's African Community Theatre.

The theater professional was brought in after the retirement of Fran Dorsey to reinvigorate the theater program and re-establish connections with KSU's surrounding community, according to Amoaba Gooden, chair of the Department of Pan-African Studies.

“My vision for ACT is for it to be a collegiate theater program to be reckoned with in Northeast Ohio and beyond, to the highest standards of professionalism,” Spivey said.

The program, previously referred to as “communiversity,” is a cross between community and collegiate theater that produces two works each year that give expression to the black experience. Spivey will work to strengthen the ties between ACT and Kent State's College of Arts and Sciences, and to bring in more students from the theater and dance department to work on and off stage at ACT.

“My main emphasis is to get students involved … really just branching out from Dr. Dorsey's mission and keeping the theater company alive and keeping it moving to the next generation.”

For Spivey's first ACT production, he'll direct a play by John Henry Redwood with a controversial title that this newspaper will print only in part because it is racially offensive — … No Dogs .

The play's full title refers to signs historically posted throughout towns in the Jim Crow-era segregated South that prohibited black and Jewish people access to public spaces. Redwood, a black playwright/actor/librettist/lyricist who died in 2003, was raised by his grandmother and aunt in Brooklyn but had family in Halifax, N.C.

“He felt he really wanted to write something through the African-American female eyes,” Spivey said of Redwood. “They're the spine and support and strength of mankind.''

… No Dogs will run Nov. 21-23 and Dec. 6-8 at Ritchie Hall, 225 Terrace Drive, Kent. Times are 6:30 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 1:30 p.m. Sundays. Cost is $10. Call 330-672-2300.

The play ran off-Broadway in 2001 and received a positive review from the New York Times among mixed reviews from other publications. It is set in 1949 Halifax, N.C., and tells the story of the black Cheeks family, focusing on both racism and anti-Semitism.

In this story, Rawl Cheeks must leave his wife and two daughters to do work out-of-state as a grave digger. Wife Mattie endures an act of violence while he is gone and must find the strength to make a momentous decision.

Other characters in the story include Yaveni, a Jewish scholar from Cleveland researching the effects of prejudice on black and Jewish people in the South, and the mysterious Aunt Cora, who harbors a dark secret.

The cast includes KSU students India Pringle and Damisha Jones as well as community actors India Burton, Caorl Eutsey, Paul Chace Coulter and Greg White, who recently appeared under Spivey's direction in Cut Flowers at Karamu.

The play contains adult content and strong language, so Spivey recommends it for ages 15 and up.

Spivey knows firsthand how the play's controversial title sells: It was produced under a different director at Karamu in 2004 and “it sold like crazy,” he said.

At ACT, audiences will have the chance to participate in post-performance discussions about racial issues. Spivey said his multigenerational cast has not shied away from the play's ugly content, which provides an educational look at the Jim Crow South and how it threatens to tear one family apart.

“We talk about how we can imagine how it really was. This is just a re-enactment,” Spivey said.

Spivey served as an adjunct professor in black theater history last winter at Kent State. In his new role at ACT, he also hopes to develop Pan African Studies showcases at Karamu in the future.

Spivey, a native of Kountze, Texas, lived in New York for 18 years, where he appeared in numerous off-off-Broadway plays. His collaborations in Cleveland have included the staged reading of Bridgette Wimberly's Saint Lucy's Eyes , starring Ruby Dee, at Cleveland Play House's FusionFest; the musical Caroline, or Change , at Dobama; and a co-production of The Great White Hope with Ensemble Theatre and Weathervane Playhouse in 2010.

The African Community Theatre was established in 1970. Cinnamon Small, outreach program coordinator for Pan-African Studies, said the production of … No Dogs is tied to the upcoming 85th birthday of Martin Luther King in 2014. ACT also will produce A Raisin in the Sun in April.

“Us having this new director [Spivey] reinvigorating the theater, it's going to bring more of an audience, more value to the theater community here at Kent State,” she said.

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News Headline: THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COMMUNITY

The next Kent Community
Dinner, “Celebrating the Jewish
Community,” will take place at
5:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Cohn
Jewish Student Center at Kent
State University. Coordinated
by All Together Now, Inc. the
revitalized Dinners from the
‘70s have been facilitating inclusion
and celebrating diversity
for almost a decade. The
nonprofit's goal is to create
peace on earth, one diverse
friendship at a time. There
will be a program led by student
leaders from Hillel and
dinner music by Guy Pernetti.
Boy Scout Troop No. 253,
Islamic Society of Akron and
Kent youth, Kent State University
students and student
leaders from Hillel will assist.
Songs by Hal Walker. Dinner
will be prepared by Hillel. In
response to Hillel's generosity,
it is requested those attending
bring canned good to
share with Kent Social Services
in Hillel's name. For more
information call, 330-678-
8760. Location: 613 E. Summit
St., Kent.

DANCE

Kent State University presents
“Dance 2013: This Time”
at 8 p.m. Nov. 22 and 23 and
2 p.m. Nov. 24 at the E. Turner
Stump Theatre. Location: 1325
Theatre Drive, Kent.

MUSIC

The Kent State University
Hugh A. Glauser School of
Music Orchestra will perform
“Hebrides Overture,” “Siegfried
Idyll,” Haydn's “Suprise Symphony”
and more at 3:30 p.m.
Nov. 17 in the University Auditorium.
Location: Cartwright
Hall, Terrace Drive, Kent.

THEATRE

Kent State University African
Community Theatre
presents its production of “No
Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs,”
written by John Henry Redwood
and directed by Terrenc Spivey
in Ritchie Hall from Nov. 21 to
24 and Dec. 6 to 8. The story
takes place in 1949 and the
title refers to signs commonly
posted in the region during
that time period. Tickets
are $10 at the door. Location.
Terrace Drive, Kent.

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News Headline: 2013 Business Hall of Fame: Virginia Albanese | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: IBmag.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: After more than six years on top at FedEx Custom Critical, Virginia Albanese has transformed the FedEx corporate motto, People-Service-Profit, into a personal mantra that shapes nearly everything she does.

Open the front doors to 889 Jonathan Ave. in Akron, and it's not what you see that hits you first, it's what you hear — the noisy chatter of lots of kids.

That's because 889 is a clubhouse for the Boys and Girls Club of the Western Reserve. Just before 4 o'clock, the kids are still caught in the rush of after-school excitement, not rowdy, but definitely still fueled by their midafternoon snacks. They're among the more than 2,000 school-age children the club serves each year, most of them at-risk kids from Akron.

At 4 p.m. sharp, the kids will settle in for Power Hour — a mandatory 60 minutes in their after-school programs devoted to homework help. Many days, FedEx Custom Critical CEO Virginia Albanese, the club's board president, makes the rounds. Albanese, who flirted with teaching before settling on business, has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and two kids at home, so she knows a thing or two about homework help.

Life Lessons

I try to branch out where I get my coffee every day, just because different coffee stations have different conversations. There's always a good discussion at the coffee pot.

In the nearly 27 years that I have worked here, we have never been closed. We are the elite of this business. Customers use us because they know nothing can go wrong.

If you can connect with people, communicate with people, make them understand what we're all trying to do as a group, people will do amazing things for you.

Communication is key — how we do it, when we do it.

I think you lead by example. Not-for-profits need contributions from these big companies. I like to contribute. I like our organization to contribute money where we also contribute manpower. I just don't want to be a check.

Anyone who wants to move their career ahead needs to take full ownership of the hard work and dedication that it takes to succeed. While others can give guidance and suggestions, I know that it is up to me to follow through, do my best, look for and ask for opportunities and never quit.

I want to win at everything.

Northeast Ohio is a great place to live. Make the most of it. If you say there's nothing to do here, you didn't really want to do anything anyway.

I really don't think about gender. I just look at myself as a businessperson — a business leader, a community leader, and at home, a mom. Every once in a while, I'll come across something that reminds me, like a recent golf outing where they held the luncheon before in the men's locker room, and I think, Should I go in there?

Today, though, Albanese isn't helping with math problems. She's showing off the clubhouse and everything in it: the gymnasium and the computer lab (both are buzzing after Power Hour) and the kids' art, which is everywhere, even on the ceiling tiles.

She can hardly wait to get started.

In what seems like a single breath, Albanese explains why she's been involved with the club for seven years.

“It's incredibly important, because these kids need to stay in school, get a good education, get a foundation, learn to be a good citizen, so they can grow up and work for a company like FedEx, right?” That last part sounds more like a foregone conclusion than a question.

That pay-it-forward approach is standard operating procedure for Albanese, and it just might be the key to her success.

Custom Critical is arguably FedEx's most specialized division.

It takes what FedEx does best — door-to-door expedited shipping — and bumps it up a notch. Some of its clients need time-definite service — shipments tracked and guaranteed within set intervals. Or, “they need high custodial control — we know where the shipment is all the time,” Albanese explains. “Or they need high security, because it's a high-value product, a one-of-a-kind.”

Think artwork, animals, pharmaceuticals, firearms.

Known for its superior customer service, Custom Critical moves about 700 ultra high-priority shipments daily, coordinated by the 600 employees at the company headquarters in Green. A few years ago, for instance, a hospital patient in California had a biopsy scheduled for Thanksgiving Day. The turnaround from surgery to lab needed to be immediate. The situation was, in every sense, critical. The agent in charge of the shipment stayed in near constant contact with the hospital, then the driver, then the lab. The agent even checked on the shipment during Thanksgiving dinner.

To get that level of commitment from her employees, Albanese is as attentive to them as they are to customers. She says it's an example of FedEx's longtime corporate motto: People-Service-Profit.

“If you treat people well, they will want to deliver good service, to do good for you and profits will follow,” she says. In an industry built on minutes and miles, Albanese knows people matter most.

This fall, at a lunch celebrating Custom Critical's first-quarter achievements, a hairnet-clad Albanese spent 2 1/2 hours giving out condiments and talking with employees at the end of the taco line. She sends handwritten letters celebrating work anniversaries and births, and acknowledging a death in an employee's family.

Every quarter, she holds “Visits with Virg,” a small group meeting with hourly employees and frontline leadership where she'll answer anything she can, from “What's on the cafeteria menu?” to “What's next for a certain business line?”

That same down-to-earth accessibility defines her leadership at the Boys and Girls Club, says Teresa LeGrair, the club's president and CEO.

“She doesn't talk over your head,” LeGrair says. “She makes herself available to make sure that we stay connected, and I get any support that I need from her. I don't take that lightly. … She's got a lot of demands on her time.”

Custom Critical stays in constant contact with its drivers. Its Qualcomm systems (imagine a Jetsons-style GPS) send free-form text and video messages to drivers. “I can basically climb into the cab with them,” says Albanese, “because one of the hardest things with a dispersed workforce is that they feel alone. From the time they make a pickup to the time they make a delivery, that can be a lot of windshield time.”

Keeping drivers and other employees feeling completely supported is better for the bottom line. Custom Critical has cultivated a fiercely loyal fleet of about 2,500 drivers, all of whom are independent contractors. The company is consistently recognized as one of the region's best places to work. The employee turnover rate at Custom Critical's call center — averaging just 13 percent annually — is half the industry average.

It's not easy to deliver results like these in an industry built on high-stress logistics. But Albanese is a knowledgeable industry veteran. She started at the company in 1986, when it was Roberts Express, as a customer-service agent. Albanese entered a management trainee program soon after.

By the time FedEx acquired the operation in 1998, Albanese was deep into upper management. In 2007, she became president and CEO of FedEx Custom Critical and the first woman to lead a FedEx company.

Even from the top, Albanese remains hands-on. She keeps her skills up in the operations area, taking customer calls several times during the year. Recently she took a refresher in customer service training.

“I love to get out on the floor and experience what our agents do every day,” she says. “It's good for me to feel how the revenue comes through the door, and we are exceeding [customer] expectations.”

Albanese emigrated from England to the United States when she was 9. She and her family lived near Canton, where her father worked as an engineer for the Timken Co.

She and her three older siblings had a tough transition. “School, social, the way everyone spoke — everything was new,” she recalls. She was moved ahead one grade in school to adjust for the difference in educational systems, setting that pattern of quick ascension that has defined her career.

Playing sports also helped ease the transition. Soccer was a logical entry point, since she had played in England with her brother. But she added softball, swimming and tennis — “my whole family grew up with a racquet in hand.” Competition became a means for assimilation.

“Competitive sports were introduced early and encouraged,” Albanese says. “We were taught to win and lose with grace.” She still prefers to win.
Music was also a big part of her childhood. Albanese remembers a family soundtrack packed with classic rock — a “good dose of Pink Floyd, Bob Seger, James Taylor, and Simon and Garfunkel.” In eighth grade, Albanese decided she wanted to play the drums, and after a year of private lessons, she joined the snare drum line in high school. By senior year, she was president of the band.

Her business career also began in high school, in Junior Achievement. With the help of the club's corporate sponsors, Canton's White Engines, Albanese practiced running a company, learning everything from producing goods and quality control to making payroll and the importance of a good sales and marketing team.

“We ran a good company, made a profit each year and earned a few awards along the way,” she says. Sounds familiar.

Albanese also learned about community involvement early. Her mother continuously emphasized “how one should live life as a community citizen.” As a 7-year-old in England, Albanese would visit a school for disabled kids at the end of her street during field days to help out. Even though the girls were little, they knew they were not there to win, but they “had a blast helping out” anyway.

As a high school student, Albanese made holiday deliveries with her mother for the Salvation Army. Her mother, the youngest of nine kids, was grateful to the Salvation Army for helping her family during World War II. Albanese remembers the grim conditions of a home she delivered to — plastic on the door, no furniture and no way to cook anything. “On that day, I realized the blessing that our family had,” she says, “and how much we needed to help those who were less fortunate.”

Albanese puts a civic spin on FedEx's People-Service-Profit motto. Between a robust corporate volunteer program and her own civic engagements, Albanese pushes for Custom Critical and its employees to make deep personal investments in the community.

She and her human resources team set yearly volunteering goals, calculating target hours per employee. Her expectations are realistic — not everyone will be able to hit the number. But she sees volunteering as an important tool for the community and company, so she pushes every opportunity she can.

“I believe our company gets back way more than we give when we do our volunteer week, especially when we go out as a group,” she explains. Last spring, she hung drywall at a Habitat for Humanity project with several employees, laughing and bonding over shared personal experiences such as the challenges of parenting teens. The payoff goes beyond simply filling a civic commitment.

“Who doesn't want to work for a company that really prides itself on giving back to the community?” she says. “People feel like, Hey, I work for a nice company!”

Albanese complements Custom Critical employees' volunteer work with her own civic involvement. On top of her work at the Boys and Girls Club, Albanese is a trustee for the Greater Akron Chamber, Akron Children's Hospital and Akron Community Foundation. Maybe that's a touch fewer board affiliations than some of her peers, but Albanese is purposeful, even picky, about where she spends her time.

Her criteria are simple but stringent. It has to be something that she “can really get behind and put hours into.” It has to be good for Akron, now and in the future.

Dan Colantone, president and CEO of the Greater Akron Chamber, says her ability to focus on priorities and outcomes was instrumental to her leadership. “In a challenging economic time, she helped us focus on the right priorities within an aggressive strategic plan.”

In the boardroom at the Boys and Girls Club, Albanese leans back in her chair and talks about the impact of the work she does here. It's true she works mostly behind the scenes. Aside from pitching in at Power Hour and her gift wrapping acumen at the annual holiday event, most of what Albanese does has to do with fundraising and offering Custom Critical's financial resources and some of its employees for volunteer help.

She believes she shows the kids at the club what's possible for them. They recently took a field trip to the Custom Critical headquarters. The kids saw everything: call center, cafeteria, information technology and the perennial elementary school favorite — trucks.

When the tour reached the boardroom, one little boy headed straight for Albanese's chair and made himself comfortable. “This is going to be my chair someday,” he said.

To Albanese, there is no better motivation.

CAREER TIMELINE

1969: She joins her family for her first volunteer work. “My mother was a role model for us throughout our lives by emphasizing the practice of giving back to those less fortunate or to the community in which we live. I have done the same with my
children.”

1972: Nine-year-old Albanese and her family move to Canton from Northampton, England, when her father, an engineer, joins Timken Co.

1981: She begins a four-summer stint at Timken working in accounting and employee benefits.

1985: Albanese graduates from Kent State University with a bachelor's degree in elementary education and begins substitute teaching in the Akron Public Schools.

1986: Decides she's better suited for business and joins Roberts Express call center as a part-time customer service agent. Within a few months, Albanese enters the management trainee program.

1990: While working in the training department at Roberts Express, she meets her husband, a new training hire, Bill Albanese.

1995: She earns an executive MBA in international business from Kent State.

1998: FedEx acquires Caliber System, the parent company of Roberts Express; Albanese becomes managing director of operations, safety and contract sourcing.

2000: Roberts Express becomes FedEx Custom Critical.

2007: Boys and Girls Club of the Western Reserve builds the Arlington Clubhouse on Jonathan Avenue. Albanese insists the kids get a gym on the premises. “We need to make sure that these kids don't think they're coming back to school.”

2007: After 20 years at the company, Albanese moves into the driver's seat as its first female president and CEO, the only female CEO in the FedEx family.

2010: Albanese becomes the first woman to lead the board at the Greater Akron Chamber in the organization's 106-year history. “I want people to think of me as a professional and somebody who is a good leader and can deliver results.”

2012: Albanese becomes one of 35 women around the world recognized as an International Women's Forum Fellow.

2013: She is appointed by Gov. John Kasich to return to her alma mater as a member of Kent State's board of trustees. She'll serve until 2022.

Life Lessons

I try to branch out where I get my coffee every day, just because different coffee stations have different conversations. There's always a good discussion at the coffee pot.

In the nearly 27 years that I have worked here, we have never been closed. We are the elite of this business. Customers use us because they know nothing can go wrong.

If you can connect with people, communicate with people, make them understand what we're all trying to do as a group, people will do amazing things for you.

Communication is key — how we do it, when we do it.

I think you lead by example. Not-for-profits need contributions from these big companies. I like to contribute. I like our organization to contribute money where we also contribute manpower. I just don't want to be a check.

Anyone who wants to move their career ahead needs to take full ownership of the hard work and dedication that it takes to succeed. While others can give guidance and suggestions, I know that it is up to me to follow through, do my best, look for and ask for opportunities and never quit.

I want to win at everything.

Northeast Ohio is a great place to live. Make the most of it. If you say there's nothing to do here, you didn't really want to do anything anyway.

I really don't think about gender. I just look at myself as a businessperson — a business leader, a community leader, and at home, a mom. Every once in a while, I'll come across something that reminds me, like a recent golf outing where they held the luncheon before in the men's locker room, and I think, Should I go in there?

Return to Top



News Headline: TEDxAkron: Six voices for dramatic show-and-tell (Hassler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kendra St. Charles' life changed in less than a half minute.

“I remember hearing the people screaming — preparing to crash,” said St. Charles, whose gripping tale of surviving a plane crash in a March snow and ice storm more than two decades ago was among several stories shared this month at the third TEDxAkron conference held at the University of Akron Student Union Theater.

TED stands for Technology, Entertainment and Design, and TEDx conferences are local conferences in which a variety of people give 18-minute talks.

TED videos can be found online and in podcasts.

About 130 people attended this year's event.

St. Charles, a 1970 Firestone High School graduate, said she changed seats twice before the crash of USAir Flight 405 on March 22, 1992.

Both people with whom she switched died in the crash, along with 25 others on what was supposed to be a flight from LaGuardia in New York City to Cleveland. Twenty-four passengers, including St. Charles, survived.

She was thrown upside down in her buckled seat into Flushing Bay in 4 feet of frigid water not far from the runway. She was able to unbuckle and crawl through burning debris back to the runway, where she passed out.

She suffered second- and third-degree burns and a punctured lung and was hospitalized for three weeks.

The crash that occurred during takeoff took only 22 seconds, St. Charles said.

“Life is precious. Life is good, but it is so much sweeter today,” she said. “Twenty-two seconds changed my life. Make your 22 seconds count.”

Another of the speakers, Akron developer Tony Troppe, told the audience of his love of restoring old buildings downtown and transforming “urban blight” into something of beauty. He said it takes vision to see what one can accomplish in life.

“Coming to the basketball line, even before you take the shot, you see the ball go through the hoop,” he said.

Look around for places where there are problems, he said, “so you can see yourself inserting your positive energy into that place.”

Troppe, 49, has restored numerous downtown buildings, including the Musica complex and the Gothic Building. He asked the audience “to be a blight fighter. Be a can-do-guru. ... It's all in our power.”

David Hassler, director of the WICK Poetry Center at Kent State University, spoke of the power of poetry and the “a-ha” moments, or the “womp” moments when one comes to understand the meaning and beauty of a poem.

“That leap of thought is like a spark,” said Hassler, 49, a native of Kent. “It is like if you rub two sticks together, you can rub two words together in a new way. ... You make new meaning with that spark.”

Hassler spoke of a program called Traveling Stanzas in which graphically designed poems are put on area public transit. And he read a poem a second-grade girl from Lima, Ohio, wrote when he was doing a poetry residence there.

“We were making new words for spring and putting them on the chalkboard,” he said.

The girl wrote this poem:

I'm going tulip crazy in this lilac city,

Dandelion faces smiling all around me.

I'm going daisy crazy in this mud delicious world.

“We will never be too old for poetry,” Hassler said.

Michael Gaffney, vice president of marketing/communications at United Way of Summit County, who will take over as president of Junior Achievement of North Central Ohio later this month, spoke of donating bone marrow.

“I'm not a brave man,” he said at the beginning of his talk when he said he spent much of his youth trying to avoid physical confrontations.

But when his brother, Shawn, was diagnosed with leukemia in 1987, Gaffney donated bone marrow in an attempt to save his brother's life.

While the donation did not save his brother's life — Shawn died in December 1988 at the age of 22 — Gaffney remembered the plea to be a donor.

Eleven years after the death of his brother, Gaffney's bone marrow was used to save the life of a South Carolina woman suffering from a rare blood disease.

“I am here to ask all of you to join the bone marrow donor registry,” said the 50-year-old Gaffney.

“Look for www.bethematch.org,”; he told the audience. “Become somebody's miracle.”

Classical trombonist Michael Bauer, 20, of Wadsworth, spoke of becoming motivated to excel in the trombone.

A University of Cincinnati sophomore trombone performance major, Bauer told the crowd that he came from a family where two older sisters excelled in school. As a freshman, he said, he was overweight and “had a terrible attitude” when he entered the Wadsworth High School band.

Something clicked, he said, as he was motivated by the band leader and then by his own goals. He wanted to become the best trombone player in his high school, a member of the all-state band and wanted to be principal trombone player of the all-state orchestra.

He achieved all the goals — and lost weight as well.

“I say this not to brag or boast ... but to impress upon everyone how a simple shift in mentality can create outstanding changes for yourself,” he said. “I truly believe music can save a kid.”

Barb Frye, a 47-year-old substance abuse counselor, motivational speaker, comedienne and author, spoke of how at age 18 she got into a car with a friend who had been drinking and became paralyzed from the shoulders down when the woman crashed the car.

“How many of you wished your life could be different?” she asked.

Frye was a freshman at Kent State University, having just graduated from Highland High School in Medina County, when the accident happened over the Thanksgiving break in 1984.

“In life, there are no do-overs,” the Granger Township woman said.

She said when she got into a car with a friend who had been drinking, her own thinking also was impaired after two beers. She spent 13 months in the hospital and then another year as an outpatient.

“It took me seven years to realize, ‘This is my life,' ” Frye said. “You are in your life. This is it. This is reality ... Start living it because the clock is ticking!”

The date for the 2014 TEDxAkron conference has not been set. For more information, got to www.tedxakron.com and www.ted.com

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News Headline: Art notes: Students' ideas | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Dorothy Shinn
News OCR Text: In collaboration with Kent State University School of Architecture faculty, Akron Art Museum staff charged third-year architecture students to create a design for the museum's proposed outdoor sculpture gallery. The challenge involved conceiving an outdoor space that can showcase contemporary sculpture, installation and multimedia work and also accommodate concerts, parties and possibly even a café. The flexibility the museum seeks for the area reflects its embrace of the museum's role as a cultural hub.

Museum staff members were joined by architects and local landscape architects to critique the students' projects midway through the semester and at its completion.

Students wrestled with the challenges to make the area a flexible, combined-event venue/art gallery. They also addressed such factors as security and maintenance, landscaping and surface materials.

Selections of the students' three-dimensional models, digital and hand-worked renderings are on view through Jan. 5 in the Corbin Gallery.

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News Headline: Decorated Kent State senior class honored before final home game vs. Miami | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Editor's Note: Kent State's game against Miami (Ohio) at Dix Stadium was not completed by the Record-Courier's presstime Wednesday night. For a complete game story, visit www.recordpub.com.

Kent State's 16 seniors, part of last year's decorated squad that earned the Golden Flashes' first bowl berth in 40 years, were honored before playing the final home game of their respective careers on Wednesday night at Dix Stadium.

The four-year seniors -- which include All-MAC performers Roosevelt Nix and Luke Wollet, four-year lettermen Mark Fackler and Zack Hitchens, and two-year starter Phil Huff -- need wins in their final two games to finish reach .500 for their careers (25-25). The Flashes (2-8 1-5 MAC) hosted Miami (0-9, 0-5) on Senior Night Wednesday, then will conclude the season on Tuesday by visiting Ohio (6-3, 3-2).

After starting their KSU careers with identical 5-7 overall and 4-4 MAC records in 2010 and 2011, the last two seasons have been a roller-coaster ride for these seniors. They played key roles on the most successful team in Kent State history a year ago (11-3, 8-0) that included a MAC East Division title and trip to the GoDaddy.com Bowl in Mobile, Ala., then slipped to 2-8 overall and 1-5 in the MAC in 2013 entering Wednesday night's game.

Nix has an excellent chance to earn First-Team All-MAC honors for the fourth consecutive season at defensive tackle, while Wollet made his 37th consecutive start at strong safety for Kent State on Wednesday. Fackler (defensive end) and Huff (center) started their 25th straight game against the RedHawks.

SENIOR BOWL HOPEFULS

Nix and senior speedster Dri Archer have been named to the Senior Bowl Watch List. Last year offensive lineman Brian Winters became just the second player in Kent State history to play in the Senior Bowl, and he was later drafted in the third round by the New York Jets. He has started the past five games for the Jets at guard.

Archer moved into third place in career all-purpose yards for the Flashes when he reached 4,714 in the first quarter on Wednesday, passing former star running back Eugene Jarvis.

MELCHIORI RETURNS

Kent State special teams star Anthony Melchiori made a surprising return to the field during Wednesday night's game against Miami from what was thought to be a season-ending hamstring injury.

Melchiori, a former Aurora High School star regarded as one of the nation's top punters, injured his hamstring while making a tackle on a kickoff return during the Golden Flashes' Oct. 12 game at Ball State. Days later Kent State head coach Paul Haynes said that he believed Melchiori was lost for the season.

Melchiori kicked the extra point after the Flashes scored a first-quarter touchdown against the RedHawks, and stayed in to kick off on the following play.

Melchiori entered Wednesday's contest averaging 44.5 yards per punt. Fourteen of his 35 punts ended with fair catches, and 14 were downed inside the 20-yard line.

Junior Andrew Horning, a former Stow High School star, has punted since Melchiori was injured and filled in admirably. Horning entered Wednesday's game averaging 37.4 yards per punt, with 14 of his 18 boots ending in fair catches. He also performed the punting chores against Miami.

Behind Melchiori and Horning, Kent State entered Wednesday's action ranked first in the MAC and 13th in the nation in net punting at 40.2 yards per attempt.

Melchiori also served as Kent State's kicker until he was injured, hitting 5-of-9 field goals. The Flashes have already received a verbal commitment from a kicking recruit, and hope Melchiori can return his focus to punting and kickoffs next season.

FLASHBACK

The largest crowd in Dix Stadium history watched Kent State and Miami, two nationally ranked teams, battle for first place in the MAC back in 1973. Miami defeated the Flashes 20-10 in front of 27,363 fans.

QUICK-HITTERS

Since the beginning of last season, Kent State is 11-0 when leading at halftime and 1-10 when trailing at the break. The Flashes are 2-0 when leading at the half in 2013.

This year Kent State is 0-7 when the opponent scores first and 0-7 when rushing for less yards than the opponent. Miami opened the scoring on Wednesday with a 33-yard field goal.

Six of the eight teams the Flashes have lost to are currently above .500, while Liberty -- which KSU defeated 17-10 in its season opener -- also sports a winning record at 6-4.

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News Headline: A crazy Cretaceous conundrum: Intersex crabs | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: MSNBC.com
Contact Name: Stephanie Pappas
News OCR Text: A crab with a male abdomen and a gonopore on the third and fourth legs. Normal male crabs have gonophores on the fifth leg.

DENVER — It's a crustacean conundrum: Why did some Cretaceous crabs sport both male and female characteristics?

The answer is unknown, but new fossil discoveries reveal that intersex crabs were a small but persistent part of the population in South Dakota during the Cretaceous Period — and a parasitic barnacle may have been to blame.

The fossils, excavated in South Dakota shale, are of Dakoticancer overanus, a quarter-size crab that lived about 68 million years ago. At the time, North America was split in half by the Western Interior Seaway, a shallow sea that harbored strange creatures like the toothy mosasaur, an apex predator that evolved from land-living lizards. [In Photos: Tiny Crabs Found in Fossil Reef]

The Dakoticancer crabs lived on the eastern shore of the sea, where roughly 2,500 fossil specimens of the species have been found. Gale Bishop, an emeritus professor at Georgia Southern University, excavated these specimens throughout the 1970s; the crabby collection now belongs to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Such a large number of fossil crabs is "extremely rare," said AnnMarie Jones, a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio who presented a new analysis of the fossils here last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.

In-between crabs

Jones is interested in population dynamics, an area that requires a large number of organisms to study. The crabs presented that opportunity, but she soon turned up something strange: A subset of the animals, about 1 percent, didn't fit neatly into male or female categories.

Instead, these strange crabs showed features of both. Typically, female crabs have broad abdomens and little openings called gonophores that release eggs on their third set of legs. Male crabs have narrow abdomens and gonophores to release sperm on their fifth legs.

The intersex crabs, however, were all mixed up. In most cases, they had narrow male abdomens with female-style gonophores on their third legs. Some, however, sported gonophores on their fourth legs, "which makes no sense," Jones told LiveScience.

"There's no modern analogy," she said. "It's incredibly frustrating."

Marine mystery

Unfortunately, none of the crabs' internal tissues fossilized, so there's no way to tell whether these intersex crabs had functioning reproductive systems, Jones said. It's also a mystery as to why the intersex crabs exist.

One possibility, Jones said, is that a contaminant in the water caused birth defects linked to the strange features. But if pollution was the problem, Jones would expect to see other fossil animals in the area with defects, and none have been found so far. A creepier possibility is that parasitic barnacles caused the strange sex characteristics. In modern oceans, parasitic barnacles can latch on to young male crabs, disrupting the glands that produce male hormones. The result is a male crab shaped like an adult female.

There's no fossilized evidence of barnacles on the Cretaceous crabs, so the parasite theory is speculation, Jones said.

"Hopefully, as research progresses, people will be able to find something similar, whether modern or extinct, and hopefully we'll be able to shed light on it," she said.

Copyright 2013 LiveScience

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News Headline: Crazy Cretaceous Find: Intersex Crabs | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: LiveScience.com
Contact Name: Pappas, Stephanie
News OCR Text: Normal specimens of male and female Dakoticancer overanus, a Cretaceous crab found in South Dakota.

DENVER — It's a crustacean conundrum: Why did some Cretaceous crabs sport both male and female characteristics?

The answer is unknown, but new fossil discoveries reveal that intersex crabs were a small but persistent part of the population in South Dakota during the Cretaceous Period — and a parasitic barnacle may have been to blame.

The fossils, excavated in South Dakota shale, are of Dakoticancer overanus, a quarter-size crab that lived about 68 million years ago. At the time, North America was split in half by the Western Interior Seaway, a shallow sea that harbored strange creatures like the toothy mosasaur, an apex predator that evolved from land-living lizards. [In Photos: Tiny Crabs Found in Fossil Reef]

The Dakoticancer crabs lived on the eastern shore of the sea, where roughly 2,500 fossil specimens of the species have been found. Gale Bishop, an emeritus professor at Georgia Southern University, excavated these specimens throughout the 1970s; the crabby collection now belongs to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Such a large number of fossil crabs is "extremely rare," said AnnMarie Jones, a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio who presented a new analysis of the fossils here last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.

In-between crabs

Jones is interested in population dynamics, an area that requires a large number of organisms to study. The crabs presented that opportunity, but she soon turned up something strange: A subset of the animals, about 1 percent, didn't fit neatly into male or female categories.

A crab with a male abdomen and a gonopore on the 3rd and 4th legs. Normal male crabs have gonophores on the 5th leg.

Credit: Image courtesy AnnMarie Jones

Instead, these strange crabs showed features of both. Typically, female crabs have broad abdomens and little openings called gonophores that release eggs on their third set of legs. Male crabs have narrow abdomens and gonophores to release sperm on their fifth legs.

The intersex crabs, however, were all mixed up. In most cases, they had narrow male abdomens with female-style gonophores on their third legs. Some, however, sported gonophores on their fourth legs, "which makes no sense," Jones told LiveScience.

"There's no modern analogy," she said. "It's incredibly frustrating."

Marine mystery

Unfortunately, none of the crabs' internal tissues fossilized, so there's no way to tell whether these intersex crabs had functioning reproductive systems, Jones said. It's also a mystery as to why the intersex crabs exist.

One possibility, Jones said, is that a contaminant in the water caused birth defects linked to the strange features. But if pollution was the problem, Jones would expect to see other fossil animals in the area with defects, and none have been found so far. A creepier possibility is that parasitic barnacles caused the strange sex characteristics. In modern oceans, parasitic barnacles can latch on to young male crabs, disrupting the glands that produce male hormones. The result is a male crab shaped like an adult female.

There's no fossilized evidence of barnacles on the Cretaceous crabs, so the parasite theory is speculation, Jones said.

"Hopefully, as research progresses, people will be able to find something similar, whether modern or extinct, and hopefully we'll be able to shed light on it," she said.

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News Headline: Crazy Cretaceous Find: Intersex Crabs | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! UK and Ireland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: DENVER — It's a crustacean conundrum: Why did some Cretaceous crabs sport both male and female characteristics?

The answer is unknown, but new fossil discoveries reveal that intersex crabs were a small but persistent part of the population in South Dakota during the Cretaceous Period — and a parasitic barnacle may have been to blame.

The fossils, excavated in South Dakota shale, are of Dakoticancer overanus , a quarter-size crab that lived about 68 million years ago. At the time, North America was split in half by the Western Interior Seaway, a shallow sea that harbored strange creatures like the toothy mosasaur , an apex predator that evolved from land-living lizards. [ In Photos: Tiny Crabs Found in Fossil Reef ]

The Dakoticancer crabs lived on the eastern shore of the sea, where roughly 2,500 fossil specimens of the species have been found. Gale Bishop, an emeritus professor at Georgia Southern University, excavated these specimens throughout the 1970s; the crabby collection now belongs to the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. Such a large number of fossil crabs is "extremely rare," said AnnMarie Jones, a graduate student at Kent State University in Ohio who presented a new analysis of the fossils here last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.

In-between crabs

Jones is interested in population dynamics, an area that requires a large number of organisms to study. The crabs presented that opportunity, but she soon turned up something strange: A subset of the animals, about 1 percent, didn't fit neatly into male or female categories.

Instead, these strange crabs showed features of both. Typically, female crabs have broad abdomens and little openings called gonophores that release eggs on their third set of legs. Male crabs have narrow abdomens and gonophores to release sperm on their fifth legs.

The intersex crabs, however, were all mixed up. In most cases, they had narrow male abdomens with female-style gonophores on their third legs. Some, however, sported gonophores on their fourth legs, "which makes no sense," Jones told LiveScience.

"There's no modern analogy," she said. "It's incredibly frustrating."

Marine mystery

Unfortunately, none of the crabs' internal tissues fossilized, so there's no way to tell whether these intersex crabs had functioning reproductive systems, Jones said. It's also a mystery as to why the intersex crabs exist.

One possibility, Jones said, is that a contaminant in the water caused birth defects linked to the strange features. But if pollution was the problem, Jones would expect to see other fossil animals in the area with defects, and none have been found so far. A creepier possibility is that parasitic barnacles caused the strange sex characteristics. In modern oceans, parasitic barnacles can latch on to young male crabs, disrupting the glands that produce male hormones. The result is a male crab shaped like an adult female.

There's no fossilized evidence of barnacles on the Cretaceous crabs, so the parasite theory is speculation, Jones said.

"Hopefully, as research progresses, people will be able to find something similar, whether modern or extinct, and hopefully we'll be able to shed light on it," she said.

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News Headline: Learning From Legacy Cities (Schwarz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Architectural Record - Online
Contact Name: John Gallagher
News OCR Text: The social impacts of urban redesign was a key theme of the 2013 Bruner Loeb Forum in Detroit.

Photo courtesy J. Max Bond Center

From left to right: Sally Young, Loeb Fellowship; Nicholas Hamilton, The American Assembly; Esther Yang, J. Max Bond Center; Anne-Marie Lubenau, Bruner Foundation; Jim Stockard, Loeb Fellowship; Toni Griffin, J. Max Bond Center; Simeon Bruner, Bruner Foundation; Dan Pitera and Krista Wilson, Detroit Collaborative Design Center; and David Mortimer, The American Assembly

The fine art of reimagining what post-industrial cities can become through better design took the spotlight last week at the 2013 Bruner Loeb Forum, held in Detroit, Michigan. Organized in partnership with the J. Max Bond Center on Design for the Just City, the Detroit Collaborative Design Center, and The American Assembly at Columbia University, the symposium drew an invitation-only roster of about 100 architects and planners, developers, government staffers, academics, and media to share best design practices and innovations from cities that struggle with chronic population loss and land vacancy.

The social impacts of urban redesign was a key theme. Resident involvement can prove particularly important in legacy cities because any project invariably encroaches on people already living there. Roberta Feldman of the University of Illinois at Chicago recounted the story of citizen involvement in the remaking of Chicago's Cabrini-Green housing project, razed and rebuilt as mostly market rate housing. Feldman said she and other advocates of public interest architecture were able to inject some democratic design strategies in what threatened to be just another yuppie upscale development. Residences for moderate income people from the old Cabrini-Green were included, as well as playgrounds, which the redevelopers had initially left out of their design plan for young professionals.

A popular theme during the work sessions was the removal of the expressways that had sliced and diced cities a generation or two ago. Case studies from Syracuse, Milwaukee, and other cities illustrated the trend. “Like weeds, the freeway in the city is the wrong thing. It's a failed experiment in America,” said urban planner Peter J. Park. “When you take freeways out of cities, they get better.”

A willingness to experiment with short-term pop-up installations found a lot of acceptance at Legacy Cities Design. The practitioners remained humbled by the lessons of previous city builders, when hubris led to massive projects that often wounded cities deeply. One antidote is a reliance on temporary projects as a city feels its was toward a new solution. “I think we have to admit we don't really know what's going to happen to a lot of these cities,” said Terry Schwarz, director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative at Kent State University.

Toni L. Griffin, director of the J. Max Bond Center, said the forum achieved key goals, including producing a more robust catalogue of real-world projects now underway in legacy cities and bringing people together who normally worked independently in their separate communities. “I think we want to continue the conversation in a way that deepens the amount of knowledge that we have about these cities and the design opportunities,” she said. “And I hope that we can continue to follow up in some way as an advocate for why design matters in these cities.”

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News Headline: Kent State College of Business Administration to Participate in Graduate Business Fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: - Nov. 13, 2013 - The will be holding a graduate business fair on the Case Western Reserve University campus Nov. 16.

The business event includes opportunities for students to hear from corporate representatives, current MBA students and admission staff members on the importance and value of a graduate business education.

Students will also have the opportunity to meet with individual schools for information and to get questions answered.

Breakfast will be provided and door prizes will be handed out at the conclusion of the program.

The universities that will be in attendance are Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, John Carroll University, The Ohio State University, and The University of Akron.The is comprised of 10 AACSB-accredited business schools in Ohio. Most of the schools offer full-time and part-time MBA programs and other graduate business degrees.

AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) is the highest level of accreditation awarded to business schools and requires an in-depth study of the program in terms of faculty, facilities, curriculum and students.

Kent State's College of Business Administration is an AACSB accredited school that offers seven graduate programs and four dual-degree programs. The graduate programs prepare students for management, staff and research positions in regional, national and international organizations.

The business fair will take place at the Dively Center located on the campus of Case Western Reserve University, 11240 Bellflower Rd., Cleveland, Ohio, 44106 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.To register, visit .Contact

Michelle Parrish

330-672-2717

mparris3@kent.edu

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News Headline: KSUA helps students get work with 'Dress to Impress' event | Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Star-Beacon
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nov. 13--ASHTABULA -- Free business attire, resume writing advice, personalized business cards, and a style consultation are just some of the perks offered to students who attend Kent State University of Ashtabula's Dress to Impress event Tuesday.

The event will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at KSUA in the Blue and Gold Room of the main building. The Hospitality Management Program students have been collecting gently used professional attire to distribute to students in hopes of preparing them for entering the professional world.

The Dress to Impress program, which offers free interview attire to KSUA students, runs all year. Interested students should contact KSUA Hospitality Management Society advisor, Mandy Ulicney, at (440) 964-4569.

The Meetings Management class is developing the format for the event. KSUA student Rachel Edge said, "I'm thrilled to be involved in the production of Dress to Impress! Attendees will definitely leave with great insight about how to present themselves in the professional world."

Those interested in helping with the Dress to Impress program may: donate gently worn business attire and/or shoes in any size for men or women; donate appropriate accessories; or become a sponsor.

For more information, contact Ulicney at the number listed above, or at mulicney@kent.edu.

Copyright (c) 2013 Star Beacon, Ashtabula, Ohio

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News Headline: Liquid crystal that twists and bends | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Phys.org
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Liquid crystals are used in most electronic handheld devices and TVs.

New and improved energy efficient digital screens as well as improved TV images could be just some of the benefits of a new discovery in the field of liquid crystals, which chemists from the University of Aberdeen have been involved with.

Liquid crystals are a technology that impacts on almost everybody, used as they are in devices such as mobile phones, computer screens and televisions. The vast majority of these devices use nematic liquid crystals.

Nematics are similar to conventional liquids, in which molecules are randomly oriented, but with a crucial difference. The molecules are preferentially ordered in one direction but when electrical fields are applied, they can be switched to another direction and act as shutters which can either let light through, or not.

The discovery of another kind of nematic phase three years ago by researchers from Dublin and Hull, and later identified by a team led from Southampton, was particularly exciting - not least because the new nematic phase can be switched much faster than the conventional nematic phase raising the possibility of much more energy efficient displays.

A large international research effort to understand the structure of the new nematic phase saw an interdisciplinary team of researchers assembled involving chemists at the Universities of Aberdeen and Hull, physicists at the Liquid Crystal Institute at Kent State University, USA, and electrical engineers at Trinity College in Dublin.

The team has now reported the structure of the new phase in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

The team found that the molecules are arranged in a 'twist-bend' structure with a periodicity of ~ 8nm - the length of two to three molecules, about 10 000 times smaller than the thickness of a human hair.

A technique called transmission electron microscopy was crucial to identify the new structure. The studies showed arch-like structures and periodic arrays, which are not observed for conventional nematics, but are typical for this new liquid crystal phase.

Professor Corrie Imrie, Chair of Chemistry at the University of Aberdeen said: "Since the beginning of the 20th century only three nematic phases have been identified. It's tremendously exciting to be involved in the identification of the fourth.

"This new twist-bend nematic phase not only has fascinating properties which provide a demanding test of our fundamental understanding of condensed systems, but also has very real application potential.

"These applications could be anything from really impressive fast switching display devices such as far improved colour TV screens and could even have benefits for biological sensors."

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News Headline: Classical music at KSU on Sunday | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This weekend, enjoy an evening
with the Kent State University
orchestra or get down and dirty
with this year's Kent Rock-Off
competitors.

KSU Orchestra
concert season

Kent State University
Orchestra introduces
new music director,
Charles Latshaw and
continues with the 2013-
14 concert season with
its second subscription
series performance at
3:30 p.m. Sunday in the
University Auditorium
at Cartwright Hall, 650
Hilltop Drive.
Enjoy three pieces,
including Mendelssohn's
“Hebrides
Overture” led by firstyear
conducting graduate
student Pamela
Burovac, Wagner's
“Siegfried Idyll” led by
Latshaw and Haydn's
“Surprise” Symphony.
Latshaw said audiences
should expect a
few extra surprises in
the performance.
Tickets are $15 for
adults, $13 for seniors
and KSU faculty and
staff, $8 for non Kent
State students, $5 for
children and free for
full-time Kent campus
students.
For tickets and more
information, call 330-
672-ARTS (2787) or visit
kent.edu/music.

Ready, Set, Rock-Off

Radiatarix, Blessed
Are The Sinners, Call
Of The Fallen, The
Baker's Basement, Intervoid,
Play Onwards,
Incite The Riot, For
All Intensive Purposes,
Dead End Job, Entendre
and Bashasauras
will duke it out in
this year's Kent Rock-
Off on Saturday at The
Outpost, 4962 S.R. 43.
The Rock-Off starts
at 4 p.m. Tickets are
$8 in advance and $10
at the door.

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News Headline: Kent State: Unique approach to plagiarism | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It's a type of cheating that happens at every college and more kids are getting caught doing it.

In some cases, plagiarism is an automatic "F" -- or even worse -- expulsion from school.

But Kent State University is taking a new approach to this academic crime and giving some students a second chance.

This is the country's only "plagiarism school."

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News Headline: Ravenna weighing merger of health unit (Hoornbeek) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City board favors
joining county agency

Should Ravenna become
an official member
of the Portage County
Combined General
Health District, or just
continue to contract with
the county as it has done
for the past six months?
John Hoornbeek of the
Center for Public Policy
and Health at Kent State
University presented
City Council with three
options Tuesday.
The meeting did not
address the issue of birth
and death certificates,
the only service the city's
health department now
provides, since the city
health board has not
made a decision about
the fate of that service.
The first option is to
extend its current contract
with Portage County,
which expires at the
end of this year.
The second would be
to merge with the county
department. That would
mean the annual $68,000
cost of the contract
would no longer come
out of the city's general
fund, since Ravenna
property owners would
be assessed the county's
levy. The city also
would have a seat on
the county's Board of
Health and its District
Advisory Council.
The third, and most
costly option, is to reinvigorate
the city's
health department
and pursue accreditation.
Council members
seemed to find that option
distasteful, especially
after learning
that would cost the
city more than $1.5 million
a year.
Council's Finance
Committee will discuss
the options at its meeting
on Monday. Mayor
Joseph Bica said he
is recommending the
city continue its contract
for another six
months, while pursuing
a full merger.
Lucy Ribelin of the
city's Board of Health
said the board favors
a merger, saying it is
interested in being
represented on the
county's board and in
accreditation. Duane
Porter, said the district
is pursuing accreditation
but has not finished
the process yet.
Only 17 health departments
nationwide are
accredited, Hoornbeek
said.

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News Headline: Kent State student is hit by car, recovering | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/14/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University
student is recovering
after being struck
by a car while crossing
S.R. 59 in Kent Tuesday
evening.
Zhengliang Feng, 24,
of Kent, was struck by
an SUV driven by Richard
Lebeau, 57, of Stow,
around 6:20 p.m. Tuesday
as he reportedly
stood in an eastbound
left-turn lane near Holly
Park Apartments
and Acme Fresh Market
in the 1700 block of
East Main Street, according
to a police report.
Kent Police Lt. Jim
Prusha said no charges
have been filed against
the driver at this time.
Feng was not in a crosswalk
at the time of the
accident.
Feng suffered unspecified,
“incapacitating”
injuries in the
accident, according
to police. Blood on
the pavement was observed
by officers.
Feng was initially
transported to Robinson
Memorial Hospital,
according to police,
and then transferred to
Akron City Hospital.
Feng, a senior at
KSU, is a resident of
one of the nearby
apartment complexes.

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News Headline: Kent State student in 'satisfactory' condition after being struck by car Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Jeremy Nobile
News OCR Text: A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing S.R. 59 in Kent Tuesday evening.

Zhengliang Feng, 24, of Kent, was struck by an SUV driven by Richard Lebeau, 57, of Stow, around 6:20 p.m. Tuesday as he reportedly stood in an eastbound left-turn lane near Holly Park Apartments and Acme Fresh Market in the 1700 block of East Main Street, according to a police report.

Kent Police Lt. Jim Prusha said no charges have been filed against the driver at this time. Feng was not in a crosswalk at the time of the accident.

Feng suffered unspecified, "incapacitating" injuries in the accident, according to police. Blood on the pavement was observed by officers.

Feng was initially transported to Robinson Memorial Hospital, according to police, and then transferred to Akron City Hospital.

Feng, a senior at Kent State, is a resident of one of the nearby apartment complexes.

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News Headline: Kent State student in 'satisfactory' condition after being struck by car Tuesday | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing S.R. 59 in Kent Tuesday evening.

Zhengliang Feng, 24, of Kent, was struck by an SUV driven by Richard Lebeau, 57, of Stow, around 6:20 p.m. Tuesday as he reportedly stood in an eastbound left-turn lane near Holly Park Apartments and Acme Fresh Market in the 1700 block of East Main Street, according to a police report.

Kent Police Lt. Jim Prusha said no charges have been filed against the driver at this time. Feng was not in a crosswalk at the time of the accident.

Feng suffered unspecified, "incapacitating" injuries in the accident, according to police. Blood on the pavement was observed by officers.

Feng was initially transported to Robinson Memorial Hospital, according to police, and then transferred to Akron City Hospital.

Feng, a senior at Kent State, is a resident of one of the nearby apartment complexes.

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News Headline: Kent State student reportedly recovers after being hit by car on state Route 59 | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/13/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A 24-year-old Kent State student was struck by a car while crossing state Route 59, according to the Record Courier.

Zhengliang Feng is recovering at Akron City Hospital after reportedly being hit Tuesday night by an SUV driven by Stow resident Richard Lebeau.

Kent police Lt. Jim Prusha told the Record Courier that no charges have been filed against Lebeau at this time.

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