Report Overview:
Total Clips (35)
African Community Theatre; Pan-African Studies; Theatre and Dance (1)
Art, School of; Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services; Music (1)
College of Education, Health and Human Services; Office of General Counsel (1)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Podiatric Medicine (1)
Computer Science; Modern and Classical Language (MCLS); Students (1)
Entrepreneurship (1)
Facilities Planning and Operations; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (3)
Global Education; Office of the Provost (1)
Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (2)
Human Resources (2)
KSU at Stark (7)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music (3)
Safety; Students (1)
Students (3)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

African Community Theatre; Pan-African Studies; Theatre and Dance (1)
Karamu's Terrence Spivey Becomes Newest Director-in-Residence @ KSU (Gooden; Stillings) 11/15/2013 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

Kent State University recently announced the appointment of Terrence Spivey — the Artistic Director of Cleveland's historic Karamu House — as their...


Art, School of; Music; Theatre and Dance (1)
Holiday Arts Fun in Akron 11/15/2013 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State School of Music Presented at Wright-Curtis Theatre Kent State University Center for Performing Arts Vocal performance majors...


College of Education, Health and Human Services; Music (1)
Graphic: The evolution of musical education 11/16/2013 Blast Text Attachment Email

...well as tuning, melody, percussion, timing, and even writing music. To learn more about the the evolving technology in music education, created by Kent State University, take a look below at the infographic below. http://blastmagazine.com/the-magazine/technology/tech-reviews/music-tech/90202/


College of Education, Health and Human Services; Office of General Counsel (1)
Ex-Kent State Ph.D-Candidate's Lawsuit: No Such Thing as 'Plagiarism' in First Drafts 11/15/2013 Scene - Online Text Attachment Email

Carrie Pfeiffer-Fiala, 45, was a Ph.D candidate in education at Kent State and was one dissertation away from finishing her degree last fall when she got caught up in allegations of cheating. Now, she's suing the...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Barbara Broome began education at Kent State Trumbull 11/18/2013 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

KENT Barbara Broome, Ph.D., a native of Braceville, was appointed dean of Kent State University's College of Nursing, effective March 17, 2014. Broome...


College of Podiatric Medicine (1)
The BizList: Kent State University 11/18/2013 Plain Dealer Text Email

KSU will offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals at its College of Podiatric Medicine's Independence location. The 23-month program is slated...


Computer Science; Modern and Classical Language (MCLS); Students (1)
Kent start-ups looking for new home (Jin) 11/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Four small businesses to lose office space, assistance as incubator set to close Come Dec. 1, four start-up business in Kent will find themselves ...


Entrepreneurship (1)
TECHudson to close doors 11/15/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...alliances with an academic institution would make it difficult to raise operating funds from outside organizations. “We had very good discussions with Kent State University and other incubators, but in the end, the slowed economy made these organizations unable to commit to TECHudson,” he said. ...


Facilities Planning and Operations; Renovation at KSU; Town-Gown (1)
2015 eyed for start of Summit Street Improvement Project (Euclide) 11/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A long-eyed initiative to improve safety and traffic flow through one of Kent's busiest corridors could begin in 2015. A timeline for the Summit Street...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (3)
Blogger helps girls love their shapes 11/16/2013 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...are perfect just as they are. “Something I wish someone would have told me when I was 17,” the 20-year-old Pfieffer said. A second-year student at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising and minoring in fashion media, the petite brunette said Seventeen magazine contacted her because...

Blogger helps girls love their shapes 11/17/2013 Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...are perfect just as they are. “Something I wish someone would have told me when I was 17,” the 20-year-old Pfieffer said. A second-year student at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising and minoring in fashion media, the petite brunette said Seventeen magazine contacted her because...

Blogger helps girls love their shapes 11/17/2013 Chillicothe Gazette - Online Text Attachment Email

...are perfect just as they are. “Something I wish someone would have told me when I was 17,” the 20-year-old Pfieffer said. A second-year student at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising and minoring in fashion media, the petite brunette said Seventeen magazine contacted her because...


Global Education; Office of the Provost (1)
Kent State University hopes to partner with top Indian universities (Diacon; Fantoni) 11/17/2013 New Delhi Pioneer Text Attachment Email

With its strategy set on expanding its reach, Kent State University plans to spend $ 3 million a year towards global education and to achieve this aim, it is planning to convert its existing Delhi...


Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (2)
City of Kent and Chamber of Commerce to award local residents and businesses on Thursday 11/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...reports that Kent Area Chamber of Commerce and the City of Kent will award its Tree City Award recipients at an event beginning at 6 p.m. on Thursday at the Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center. The highest honor of the Reed Medal for Public Service will be given to Kent community leader...

Doris Brown, Kent community leader, honored by chamber 11/15/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...Area Chamber of Commerce and City of Kent have announced the winners of their respective annual Tree City Awards that will be given on Thursday at the Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center, 215 S. DePeyster St. Doris Brown, a longtime Kent community leader, will be the recipient of...


Human Resources (2)
Former Kent State manager faces child pornography charges 11/16/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

Nov. 16--A former Kent State University business manager is facing child pornography charges stemming from three years ago when he worked at the university. A Portage...

Former KSU Manager faces Child-Porn Charges 11/16/2013 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

A indictment by a Portage County Grand Jury has named a former business manager at Kent State University on child-porn charges. 56-year-old Jeffrey Berghoff of Stow faces 25 counts of pandering sexually-oriented material involving...


KSU at Stark (7)
Cleveland theater auditions for Nov. 15 and beyond 11/15/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Stark Theatre. Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave., Jackson Township. William Mastrosimone's "Cat's Paw." Roles available for...

WALSH AIDS ENTREPRENEURS 11/15/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...alliance brings together a group of organizations including the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, JumpStart Inc., the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University Stark, Stark Development Board, Stark State College, Technology Accelerator Alliance, University of Mount Union and a group...

Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) 11/16/2013 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...specials. Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy? "There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even...

Billie Jean King shares life lessons at Kent State at Stark 11/17/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Tennis champion and activist Billie Jean King spoke Tuesday night at Kent State at Stark about the role relationships and personal education play in a person's success. Twenty-time Wimbledon champion Billie Jean...

Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) 11/16/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...specials. Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy? "There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even...

Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) 11/16/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

...specials. Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy? "There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even...

Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) 11/17/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...specials. Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy? "There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Blackstone LaunchPad program available Kent (Schillig) 11/16/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Blackstone LaunchPad is now available at the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. It is a free program to help new and existing entrepreneurs develop their business ideas...

Blackstone LaunchPad program available Kent (Schillig) 11/16/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Blackstone LaunchPad is now available at the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. It is a free program to help new and existing entrepreneurs develop their business ideas...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in New York (Nov. 15) 11/16/2013 TMCnet.com Text Attachment Email

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Nov. 15 -- The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in New York. *** Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Nov. 15 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,580,144)...


Music (3)
Kent State presents Singing Outside the Box this Saturday and Sunday 11/17/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

November 16,2013 09:47 PM GMT Kent State University will present Singing Outside the Box, the latest offering in its Fall Opera Scenes Program, at 7:30 p.m. this Saturday and Sunday....

Kent State students work with Southeast band 11/18/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University jazz professor Bobby Selvaggio and a small KSU student combo worked with the Southeast High School band earlier this month. The session...

Kent State University New Music Series with Guest Artists Yang Jin, Pipa 11/16/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NEW MUSIC SERIES THE KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE FRANK WILEY, DIRECTOR GUEST ARTIST YANG JIN, PIPA...


Safety; Students (1)
Kent State student injured after being struck by car 11/17/2013 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing Route 59 in Kent the evening of Nov. 12. Zhengliang Feng,...


Students (3)
12 Hour Knit-A-Thon 11/15/2013 Kent Patch Text Attachment Email

Sponsored by Knitting For Those in Need at Kent State University and Gina's Journey. In addition to knitting hats and scarves for those in need as we typically do, we will be knitting for 12...

Hudson High School Business Club introduces students to local businesses 11/16/2013 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...materials. Former Hudson High School students also attended the Day in Business to share their experiences. Samantha Sandone is a freshman at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising. She was vice president of business club last year. "I'm hoping to tell students how business...

Documents: Frat Hazing Included Paddling and Caning 11/16/2013 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...by Monica Volante KENT, OH — New details are emerging about the allegations of hazing that may have taken place at the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Kent State University. According to documents released by a Kent State investigation sub-committee, there was circumstantial evidence of hazing...


Town-Gown (1)
OUR VIEW: Kent should reach out to incubator tenants 11/17/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...been a good spot to host small start-ups, it has rented for approximately $2,500 per month and has an asking price of approximately $280,000. Neither Kent State University nor the city could construct a similar building for that price and one that is well located in Davey Industrial Park, but near...


News Headline: Karamu's Terrence Spivey Becomes Newest Director-in-Residence @ KSU (Gooden; Stillings) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name: Josh Usmani
News OCR Text: Kent State University recently announced the appointment of Terrence Spivey — the Artistic Director of Cleveland's historic Karamu House — as their newest Director-in-Residence.  Spivey has been a staple of Karamu House for ten years, and currently serves on the board of trustees for Community Partnership for Arts and Culture (CPAC).  At Kent State he will serve as director for works produced through the Department of Pan African Studies' African Community Theatre (ACT) in collaboration with the School of Theatre and Dance.

Says Spivey, “I am excited to be part of this collaboration between Kent State University's Pan African Studies African Community Theatre and the School of Theatre and Dance. It's a perfect platform for future practicum at the historical Karamu House for their students.  My vision for ACT is for it to be a collegiate theatre program to be reckoned with in Northeast Ohio and beyond to the highest standards of professionalism.”

These high standards undoubtedly will come from his time at Karamu House.  Originally called “Settlement House,” Karamu's founders — Russell Jelliffe and Rowena Woodham — believed in the highest standards of excellence in the arts, not for the sake of excellence, but because they believed this pursuit of excellence required the greatest demands on individuals to fulfill the promise of their infinite potential.

Spivey certainly knows a thing or two about realizing potential.  In 2011, he was honored with a proclamation from Mayor Frank Jackson and a resolution by Coucilwoman Mamie Mitchell for his contributions to the arts locally, regionally and nationally.  Originally from Kountze, Texas, Spivey received his degree in Theatre from Prairie View A&M University before spending nearly two decades in New York City.  During his time in NYC, he appeared in many productions of various projects and even formed his own theatre company before moving to Cleveland to serve as Artistic Director at Karamu House.  He is a member of the prestigious National Theatre Conference and previously served as adjunct professor at Kent State.

Dr. Amoaba Gooden, Chair of Kent State's Department of Pan-African Studies, states, “The Department of Pan-African Studies is pleased to have Mr. Terrence Spivey join us as Director-in-Residence for the 2013-2014 academic year. Mr. Spivey's residency will reinvigorate our theatre program and assist the Department with reestablishing connections with KSU's surrounding community while providing an opportunity for many to experience innovative and diverse artistic talents that gives expression to the Black World experience.”

His first project at Kent will be to direct the Fall 2013 production of No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs written by John Henry Redwood.  The production will run from Fri 11/22 – Sun 12/1 in Ritchie Hall at KSU.  The play revolves around the Cheeks family of Halifax, NC in 1949.  The title refers to real, unbelievably common signs posted in the region during that era.  The play examines prejudice and one's transcendence beyond it.

Cynthia Stillings, the Director of KSU's School of Theatre and Dance, says, “The School of Theatre and Dance is excited that Pan-African Studies has invited Terrence to join them as Director-in-Residence.  The University is very fortunate to have an artist that is recognized nationally for his outstanding work in theatre.  Students will benefit greatly from working with Mr. Spivey!”

The African Community Theatre was established in 1970 to bring awareness and appreciation of the experiences of African Americans through theatrical performance. ACT and Karamu House have always been open and welcoming to members of the community regardless of gender, sexuality, race, class and/or ethnicity.  This partnership is sure to benefit Karamu and Kent State, but most importantly the students who will be introduced to high standards as both artists and human beings.  This is a very exciting opportunity for everyone involved.

Don't miss the performances at ACT this season.  No Niggers, No Jews, No Dogs runs November 21-24st and December 5-8th.

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News Headline: Holiday Arts Fun in Akron | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State School of Music

Presented at Wright-Curtis Theatre

Kent State University Center for Performing Arts

Vocal performance majors showcase their talents in this oh-so-entertaining series of opera vignettes directed by Marla Berg. 330-672-2787 or www.kent.edu/artscollege



Dance 2013: This Time

Kent State School of Theatre & Dance

Presented at E. Turner Stump Theatre

Kent State University Center for Performing Arts

New modern dance and jazz choreography by KSU faculty members performed by the emerging professional dancers of the future. 330-672-2787 or www.kent.edu/artscollege



Holiday Sale

Kent State Downtown Gallery

141 E. Main St., Kent

A great opportunity to purchase handmade, one-of-a-kind ceramics, glass, jewelry, and much more. Proceeds to benefit the student artists. 330-676-1549 or www.kent.edu/artscollege



Carols & Confections

Kent Chorale Society

Presented at Cartwright Hall

Kent State University

Enjoy a wide variety of seasonal melodies including Gregorian chant, contemporary carols, Hanukkah music and Renaissance songs – all followed by coffee and desserts. 330-672-2172 or www.kent.edu/artscollege


Copyright © 2013 WKSU Public Radio

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News Headline: Graphic: The evolution of musical education | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Blast
Contact Name: Blast Magazine Newsroom
News OCR Text: Musical education has evolved well past the days of singing along as a teacher plays the piano. Today, psychologists understand that strong links between the mind's processing of information and the processing of music exist. As such, it can be possible to boost your memory creation and information retention just by playing music.

Does Music Education Benefit Our Children?

Seventeen out of twenty people believe that a student who participates in a music class will do better in school, while sixteen of twenty say that learning a musical instrument helps a student to achieve; fourteen of twenty say that a student who does learn a musical instrument will be less likely to have disciplinary issues at school. Do these predispositions hold up?

Facts And Stats

The inclination of people polled is accurate in many instances: a high school student in a music class will have a better GPA than one who is not in a music class. The Netherlands, Japan, and Hungary are three nations that excel at education — each country has music training at the earliest levels of education. Even in the United States, some of the schools with the highest levels of achievement spend as much as thirty percent of the school in coursework that emphasizes art and music.

Tech And Music

Teachers can use multimedia displays to help teach music in the classroom. An iPad or tablet allows the teaching of music theory and history as well as tuning, melody, percussion, timing, and even writing music.

To learn more about the the evolving technology in music education, created by Kent State University, take a look below at the infographic below.

http://blastmagazine.com/the-magazine/technology/tech-reviews/music-tech/90202/

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News Headline: Ex-Kent State Ph.D-Candidate's Lawsuit: No Such Thing as 'Plagiarism' in First Drafts | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Scene - Online
Contact Name: Doug Brown
News OCR Text: Carrie Pfeiffer-Fiala, 45, was a Ph.D candidate in education at Kent State and was one dissertation away from finishing her degree last fall when she got caught up in allegations of cheating. Now, she's suing the school for two counts of breach of contract, one count of negligent supervision, one count of defamation, and one count of unjust enrichment. In the suit filed earlier this month, she's asking the Ohio Court of Claims to reinstate her at Kent State or be given the degree, along with at least $25,000 in damages.

Last fall, Pfeiffer-Fiala turned in a 55-page draft of the first chapter of her dissertation that her professor deemed plagiarized. She explained to the professor "that she knew that citations were incomplete in the draft; plaintiff was not taking credit, and that any citation omissions were inadvertent would be addressed in the editing process and subsequent iterations towards a final submission... Defendant chose to knowingly, recklessly, or negligently disregard this knowledge and arbitrarily and/or maliciously accuse plaintiff of plagiarism even though both parties knew the document to be merely an incomplete first draft submission."

At an "academic hearing panel" in January, she presented "evidence of her innocence" but the panel "did not look at and ignored a majority" of it, the suit says. She was found to have plagiarized, lost her appeal to the school and withdraw. The school didn't follow the proper plagiarism guidelines causing her to miss out on the degree she had spent $50,000 to get, it says.

Pfeiffer-Fiala has a long C.V. listing her two other degrees from Kent State and dozens of her contributions in academic journals as well as her teaching career at the university and as an adjunct professor at Cleveland State, according to her website.

Click here to read suit:
http://www.clevescene.com/scene-and-heard/archives/2013/11/15/ex-kent-state-phd-candidates-lawsuit-no-such-thing-as-plagiarism-in-first-drafts

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News Headline: Barbara Broome began education at Kent State Trumbull | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Barbara Broome, Ph.D., a native of Braceville, was appointed dean of Kent State University's College of Nursing, effective March 17, 2014.

Broome succeeds Susan Stocker, Ph.D., who served as interim dean since Aug. 1, 2013. Stocker held the interim position as well as her duties as dean of Kent State University at Ashtabula while the search for a permanent dean was conducted. Stocker will return to her position as dean of Kent State at Ashtabula.

Broome attended Braceville schools and graduated from LaBrae High School in 1972.

Her father, John Shelton, was a factory worker, Braceville constable and a Trumbull County deputy sheriff. Her mother, Catherine, was a homemaker and domestic worker.

Broome, a registered nurse, attended the Hannah Mullins School of Practical Nursing in Salem. She received bachelor of science in nursing and master of science in nursing degrees from KSU, and her doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing.

At present, she is associate dean, professor and chairwoman of the Community-Mental Health Department at the University of South Alabama College of Nursing.

“As a graduate of Kent State's College of Nursing, I know firsthand the exceptional quality of education there,” said Broome, who said she is honored to return to the Kent State family.

After receiving a master's from Kent State, Broome, who began her education at Kent State at Trumbull in Champion, was an assistant professor of nursing, as well as a recruiter, adviser and mentor to nursing students at the university's Kent and Trumbull campuses.

“The regional campus system impacts so many people,” said Broome, who has been with the University of South Alabama since 1999.

Her research and areas of interest include mental health, adult health, women's health and minority issues and aging issues in urinary incontinence in men and women.

She developed the Broome Pelvic Muscle Self-Efficacy Scale, which has been translated into several languages and has been used in national and international studies. She has contributed to and edited numerous journal articles on topics such as bullying, incontinence, aging and mentoring; and has secured some $2.5 million for mental-health education, elderly-health screening and continence care.

Among her many honors, she was commencement speaker at Kent State at Trumbull in 2011 and received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Kent State's College of Nursing in 2000.

She and her husband, Howard Broome, also from Braceville, have two adult children, Cassandra Broome and Howard Broome Jr.

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News Headline: The BizList: Kent State University | Email

News Date: 11/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU will offer the Executive MBA for Healthcare Professionals at its College of Podiatric Medicine's Independence location. The 23-month program is slated to begin in May 2014 and be located on KSU's campus in Independence.

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News Headline: Kent start-ups looking for new home (Jin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four small businesses to lose office space, assistance as incubator set to close

Come Dec. 1, four start-up business
in Kent will find themselves
without a home and faced with the
dilemma of moving elsewhere to
preserve and continue their work.
The small start-ups located in
the Regional Economic Growth
Corporation's Martinel Drive business
incubator have seen varying
levels of growth and investment,
but each was banking on contributing
to the local economy.
Graph SQL, a software company
founded by Kent State University
computer sciences professor
Rouming Jin that specializes in
graph analytics, has called the incubator
home for two years. During
that time, the company has
branched out into California's Silicon
Valley, with a staff of 10 fulltime
and 10 part-time employees,
including former employees
of tech giants including Google,
Twitter and IBM Research.
“This could be a very big deal,”
said Jin, noting that the powerful
data analyzing software the company
is creating has the potential
to cater to industries such as
social networks, e-commerce, finance,
housing and more.
Localingua, a seven-year-old
translation company founded by
Mario Morelos, works in various
media including technical manuals,
medical journals, voice overs,
marketing materials and more
Morelos said that
though Localingua's
small staff works from
states such as Texas,
Minnesota and Virginia,
having the incubator
office space has allowed
the company to
partner with KSU's
translation department
and offer internships
to students.
Anderson Aerospace,
an “Internet in the sky”
business, has a stateof-
the-art, low-cost,
low-weight aircraft antenna
prototype for
both commercial and
government use that
has the potential to
create high-tech manufacturing
jobs if the
necessary funding can
be found.
“We believe in the
product and know
there's a market out
there,” said Rick Anderson,
the company's
co-founder. “We
just need to raise the
funds so we can finish
up development and
get to work.”
Version 1 Creative, a
two-year-old web and
branding development
firm run by 24-year-old
Matthew Bender, has
grown steadily since
its launch, taking on a
number of clients and
giving Bender the ability
to offer freelance
work to KSU students.
Between August
and September, these
businesses learned
that the incubator
could no longer be sustained
by the Regional
Economic Growth
Corp., formerly known
as the Kent Regional
Business Alliance, or
KRBA. The incubator
program, which also
offered small business
counseling, workshops,
loan and grant assistance
and low-rent office
space, has been in
place for more than
20 years and boasts
the success of getting
the Kent-based, global
liquid crystal development
firm AlphaMicron
on its feet.
Jack Crews, CEO of
the incubator program,
said the time has come
for him to retire from
the non-profit organization
and declined to give
details about the organization
packing up.
In September, Kent
administrators and city
council worked together
to approve a bridge
lease to keep the incubator
at 277 Martinel
Drive open through Nov.
30 to attempt to find a
new entity to oversee
the program and at the
very least give the businesses
time to transition
out — a move that's created
mixed feelings of
graciousness and false
hope from the start-ups.
Jin and Morelos said
once the 90-day bridge
lease was approved,
not much interest was
shown by city officials
in learning about the
businesses within the
incubator. Jin feels that
perhaps more might
have been done to keep
the businesses in the
area if they knew the
potential.
“If they saw what we
are doing or knew who
our investors were, it
would change a lot,”
he said, adding that
he hoped to add a major
tech company to
the area in partnership
with KSU, but
that could change if a
new location doesn't
become available soon.
“We would all move to
California, that's another
option, but our
intention is to build
something in Kent.”
Anderson Aerospace,
which also hoped to
add to the local economy,
may face the need
to partner with an outof-
state company if
things don't pan out
locally soon.
“We don't really want
to move, but once we
have to pack everything
up and move it out, then
we'd look at everything,”
Anderson said.
Moving out of the
incubator won't be as
cumbersome for Morelos
or Bender, whose
companies are smaller,
web-oriented and mobile.
Both foresee moving
their businesses
back home for the short
term. Morelos intends
to stay in Kent if possible,
but Bender has no
plans to remain, though
he acknowledged gratefulness
toward the city
for trying to find him a
new location.
For Bender, the biggest
disappointment
is losing the creative
community the Martinel
incubator fostered.
“This place is young,
it was taking off and
there's so much potential
here,” he said. “We
grew some relations
between the businesses
helping each other
and now the doors are
getting shut.”
To compensate for
the lost services, Kent
is re-appropriating
$35,000 in grants from
the Regional Economic
Growth Corp. to the
Summit Medina Business
Alliance, which
will offer small business
counseling services to
Kent start-ups.
Still, the businesses
leaving the incubator
program feel Kent
will be set back with
the loss of the Regional
Economic Growth
Corp.'s services and
business development.
“I think there's a lot
of needs to fill, and I
don't want to say it's
the city's responsibility.
It could be private,
but we're losing something
significant,” Morelos
said.

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News Headline: TECHudson to close doors | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Schleis, Paula
News OCR Text: TECHudson, a 2-year-old business incubator that sought to nurture new entrepreneurs and create high-tech jobs for the future, will close its doors at the end of the year.

Its board of directors voted to dissolve the nonprofit, effective Dec. 31, Executive Director George Buzzy announced Friday.

The Hudson-based group has struggled to raise funds for its mission, and warned officials earlier this year that without a new revenue source, its days were numbered.

“We needed about $150,000 per year to continue to operate,” Buzzy said. “It became clear early on that the original model of a stand-alone entrepreneurial center without alliances with an academic institution would make it difficult to raise operating funds from outside organizations.

“We had very good discussions with Kent State University and other incubators, but in the end, the slowed economy made these organizations unable to commit to TECHudson,” he said.

Hudson City Council, though conflicted about its role in such an endeavor, agreed to foot most of TECHudson's start-up costs, granting it $174,000 in 2011, $200,000 in 2012 and $50,000 this year.

Throughout the process, council members told incubator leadership to find another source. While the incubator was able to generate some additional funding, it was not enough.

To date, the incubator has helped four startup companies.

Charles Wiedie, Hudson Economic Development Director, said, “We know that all the TECHudson leadership, including its board of directors, put tremendous effort into trying to make the organization self-sustaining.”

“Hudson continues to believe in the value of entrepreneurialism and what that means to our city's future. There are still many resources available ... ” he said, noting the local Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurial Research and regional groups such as JumpStart.

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News Headline: 2015 eyed for start of Summit Street Improvement Project (Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A long-eyed initiative to improve safety and traffic flow through one of Kent's busiest corridors could begin in 2015.

A timeline for the Summit Street Traffic Improvement Project is partly dependent on whether the city is awarded a $700,000 grant from the Akron Metropolitan Area Transportation Study. City Engineer Jim Bowling said officials should learn in the spring whether those funds will come through.

The project has already been awarded about $6 million in AMATS grants. A separate $4.2 million in funding has also been secured through the state's Highway Safety Program.

Because Summit Street is a main artery into Kent State University and downtown Kent, the city and school will spit the remaining costs of the 80 percent grant-funded project that will resurface East Summit Street between Lincoln Street and Loop Road, install traffic signals for new designated left-turn lanes (including one at Lincoln Street), create a median and two roundabouts that will replace current intersections outside Risman Plaza and the Student Recreation and Wellness Center.

City and university officials say the new features will enhance safety for pedestrians and improve traffic flow on the busy city and university artery ranked fourth worst in the entire AMATS region covering Portage and Summit counties.

The street sees an average of 14,300 vehicles daily, according to 2012 AMATS findings.

That stretch also has a strong pedestrian presence considering its campus location. The intersection at Summit Street and Campus Center Drive (located by the Kent State rec center) saw more than 1,000 walkers in a four-hour period on the afternoon of Wednesday, Oct. 2, according to AMATS.

"(The Summit Street) area can be gridlocked sometimes," said Tom Euclide, associate vice president of facilities planning and operations at Kent State. "We are a partner with the city on this because we think it's so critical to improve this corridor."

Bowling said the new street will be widened, which will permit the installation of bike lanes and the new left-turn lanes. The medians and new signals will help prevent intersection collisions, and the roundabouts in front of Risman Plaza will keep cars moving, he noted. Both will provide landscaped islands for those crossing the street.

"It's going to make getting to class and getting to work just that much more pleasurable," Euclide said.

Plans for the project began in 2007. Throughout the past six years, the city has been seeking out financing and feedback from the community and university, which has shaped the project's focus and design.

"This area is a big problem," Bowling said. "That's why the fix is so large in scope."

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News Headline: Blogger helps girls love their shapes | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name: Lou Whitmire News Journal
News OCR Text: St. Peter's grad featured in Seventeen magazine

• Skirts or dresses with peplums draw attention to your hips in the best way. The little flounce accentuates the natural curve of your body.

• Boyfriend jeans are an excellent choice for a relaxed, comfortable fit of pants that don’t suffocate your bottom half.

• Try to avoid shoes that have ankle straps or hit right at the ankle. It visually cuts you off and makes you seem wider and shorter than you really are.

• Tops with vertical stripes fill out the top half of your body (the smaller part for pears) and create the illusion of an overall balanced shape.

• Don’t wear skirts in clingy, thin fabrics. Thicker, more dimensionally stable fabrics ... allow a sleek silhouette.

Access her blog at someonelikeyou

MANSFIELD — St. Peter’s High School graduate Lauren Pfieffer recently was picked by Seventeen magazine to showcase her figure.

Pfieffer said the photographs featured items that every pear-shaped girl, (small at the top and bigger at the bottom) should have in her wardrobe, along with descriptions explaining why. Pfieffer said she was honored to represent the most common body type for females and show girls they are perfect just as they are.

“Something I wish someone would have told me when I was 17,” the 20-year-old Pfieffer said.

A second-year student at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising and minoring in fashion media, the petite brunette said Seventeen magazine contacted her because of her blog, which she calls, “Someone Like You.”

She started the blog four years ago as a sophomore in high school to create an online journal to document her thoughts and the evolution of her style.

“Originally, I wanted my blog to remain just for me, but somehow people found it and started reading,” Pfeiffer said. “I had no idea how much of an impact my blog would have on my life and the lives of others. It’s allowed me to share my personal experiences with my depression, OCD, and everyday struggles with people across the world, helping them in ways I never thought possible.

“I’ve also just been honored to be able to promote a healthy and real body image to young girls. To receive emails from girls that I helped them love their shape because of my pride in mine, or that I’ve helped them learn to dress for their body, has been the most rewarding experience.”

Pfieffer said her blog has changed her life.

“Without my blog I know that I wouldn’t have decided to study fashion in college. ... I can’t imagine doing anything else,” she said. “I know that God had me create a blog so that I could help others, whether it be with self-acceptance, problems fitting in, fighting mental illness, or just discovering who they are.”

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News Headline: Blogger helps girls love their shapes | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Lancaster Eagle-Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Lou Whitmire News Journal
News OCR Text: St. Peter's grad featured in Seventeen magazine

• Skirts or dresses with peplums draw attention to your hips in the best way. The little flounce accentuates the natural curve of your body.

• Boyfriend jeans are an excellent choice for a relaxed, comfortable fit of pants that don’t suffocate your bottom half.

• Try to avoid shoes that have ankle straps or hit right at the ankle. It visually cuts you off and makes you seem wider and shorter than you really are.

• Tops with vertical stripes fill out the top half of your body (the smaller part for pears) and create the illusion of an overall balanced shape.

• Don’t wear skirts in clingy, thin fabrics. Thicker, more dimensionally stable fabrics ... allow a sleek silhouette.

Access her blog at someonelikeyou

MANSFIELD — St. Peter’s High School graduate Lauren Pfieffer recently was picked by Seventeen magazine to showcase her figure.

Pfieffer said the photographs featured items that every pear-shaped girl, (small at the top and bigger at the bottom) should have in her wardrobe, along with descriptions explaining why. Pfieffer said she was honored to represent the most common body type for females and show girls they are perfect just as they are.

“Something I wish someone would have told me when I was 17,” the 20-year-old Pfieffer said.

A second-year student at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising and minoring in fashion media, the petite brunette said Seventeen magazine contacted her because of her blog, which she calls, “Someone Like You.”

She started the blog four years ago as a sophomore in high school to create an online journal to document her thoughts and the evolution of her style.

“Originally, I wanted my blog to remain just for me, but somehow people found it and started reading,” Pfeiffer said. “I had no idea how much of an impact my blog would have on my life and the lives of others. It’s allowed me to share my personal experiences with my depression, OCD, and everyday struggles with people across the world, helping them in ways I never thought possible.

“I’ve also just been honored to be able to promote a healthy and real body image to young girls. To receive emails from girls that I helped them love their shape because of my pride in mine, or that I’ve helped them learn to dress for their body, has been the most rewarding experience.”

Pfieffer said her blog has changed her life.

“Without my blog I know that I wouldn’t have decided to study fashion in college. ... I can’t imagine doing anything else,” she said. “I know that God had me create a blog so that I could help others, whether it be with self-acceptance, problems fitting in, fighting mental illness, or just discovering who they are.”

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News Headline: Blogger helps girls love their shapes | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chillicothe Gazette - Online
Contact Name: Lou Whitmire News Journal
News OCR Text: St. Peter's grad featured in Seventeen magazine

• Skirts or dresses with peplums draw attention to your hips in the best way. The little flounce accentuates the natural curve of your body.

• Boyfriend jeans are an excellent choice for a relaxed, comfortable fit of pants that don’t suffocate your bottom half.

• Try to avoid shoes that have ankle straps or hit right at the ankle. It visually cuts you off and makes you seem wider and shorter than you really are.

• Tops with vertical stripes fill out the top half of your body (the smaller part for pears) and create the illusion of an overall balanced shape.

• Don’t wear skirts in clingy, thin fabrics. Thicker, more dimensionally stable fabrics ... allow a sleek silhouette.

Access her blog at someonelikeyou

MANSFIELD — St. Peter’s High School graduate Lauren Pfieffer recently was picked by Seventeen magazine to showcase her figure.

Pfieffer said the photographs featured items that every pear-shaped girl, (small at the top and bigger at the bottom) should have in her wardrobe, along with descriptions explaining why. Pfieffer said she was honored to represent the most common body type for females and show girls they are perfect just as they are.

“Something I wish someone would have told me when I was 17,” the 20-year-old Pfieffer said.

A second-year student at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising and minoring in fashion media, the petite brunette said Seventeen magazine contacted her because of her blog, which she calls, “Someone Like You.”

She started the blog four years ago as a sophomore in high school to create an online journal to document her thoughts and the evolution of her style.

“Originally, I wanted my blog to remain just for me, but somehow people found it and started reading,” Pfeiffer said. “I had no idea how much of an impact my blog would have on my life and the lives of others. It’s allowed me to share my personal experiences with my depression, OCD, and everyday struggles with people across the world, helping them in ways I never thought possible.

“I’ve also just been honored to be able to promote a healthy and real body image to young girls. To receive emails from girls that I helped them love their shape because of my pride in mine, or that I’ve helped them learn to dress for their body, has been the most rewarding experience.”

Pfieffer said her blog has changed her life.

“Without my blog I know that I wouldn’t have decided to study fashion in college. ... I can’t imagine doing anything else,” she said. “I know that God had me create a blog so that I could help others, whether it be with self-acceptance, problems fitting in, fighting mental illness, or just discovering who they are.”

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News Headline: Kent State University hopes to partner with top Indian universities (Diacon; Fantoni) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: New Delhi Pioneer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With its strategy set on expanding its reach, Kent State University plans to spend $ 3 million a year towards global education and to achieve this aim, it is planning to convert its existing Delhi office into a zonal office so that it can reach out to countries like Nepal, Bhutan, Bangaldesh and Sri Lanka. In order to make a strong base in the country, the university is also looking for top Indian universities for partnerships.

University's Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Todd A Diacon while talking to The Pioneer about their aims, said, “Our goal is to have at least 300 students from India. We currently have 176 Indian students and have already received nearly 600 applications. Along with that, we also want to develop bilateral projects with Indian universities for which we would be going around the country to select few domestic universities.”

Of all the courses, Diacon said, “Indian students are more interested in science programs like physics, biology, bio- medicine and computer sciences. Apart from that, journalism and communication courses have also started generating interests. This is why, we plan to meet academics from Jamia Millia Islamia to collaborate for our communication and journalism programmes. We would also be meeting heads of DY Patil College of Engineering.”

Kent State currently has four active partners in the country but going forward, the global university is working aggressively to join hands with more and more Indian universities. China currently has the largest international student population at Kent but Marcello Fantoni, Associate Provost says it is a changing trend.

“While the number of Indian students has gone up by nearly 25 per cent, it is currently third largest with China topping the tally with 970 students and Saudi Arabia with 675 students. But this trend is now changing as the Chinese student population has reached its saturation point. We now are expecting more and more Indian students in the coming years.”

The global university also understands that for some international students, education overseas can be difficult due to a higher tuition fees. In order to help students, the university also is planning to ramp up its current scholarship programme. “We are working on changing our scholarship programmes so that more students can be covered. Till now we had a separate scholarship fund which was not being review annually since the last five years. We would soon be reviewing it and expect it to grow by four times,” Fantoni added.

The university is not just helping students to study but is also ensuring that all their students are able to get the practical knowledge through internships. “We have also helped students in getting internships in top companies of their respective industries. Apart from that we have a very active placement office. Every student of Kent State can get work in the US after completing their course for upto 3 years.”

Kent State currently has over 250 programmes in majors and minors with students from over 97 countries outside the US and global offices in Beijing and Delhi. “Going forward, we plan to open another global office in Brazil. Along with that we are also working on an online orientation programme for all the students,” Diacon added. Being the largest online course provider in Ohio, Kent feels the next level of education lies in online teaching.

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News Headline: City of Kent and Chamber of Commerce to award local residents and businesses on Thursday | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Record-Courier reports that Kent Area Chamber of Commerce and the City of Kent will award its Tree City Award recipients at an event beginning at 6 p.m. on Thursday at the Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center.

The highest honor of the Reed Medal for Public Service will be given to Kent community leader Doris Brown, the President's Award will go to Charles Thomas of Ray's Place, Small Business Person of the Year will be awarded to David Sommers of David Sommers & Associates and the Immy Award will be presented to Buffalo Wild Wings and County Fire Protection. Awards will also be given to Popped! popcorn shop, Smithers-Oasis Co. and the Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center.

There will be a silent auction and appetizers/cocktails beginning at 6 p.m. followed by a dinner at 7 p.m. and the presentation of awards at 8 p.m. Tickets for the event are $40 and reservations must be made by Monday by calling the chamber office at 330-673-9855.

For more about the awards and event, click here.

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News Headline: Doris Brown, Kent community leader, honored by chamber | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Area Chamber of Commerce and City of Kent have announced the winners of their respective annual Tree City Awards that will be given on Thursday at the Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center, 215 S. DePeyster St.

Doris Brown, a longtime Kent community leader, will be the recipient of the W.W. Reed Medal for Public Service, which is the Kent chamber's highest honor.

Brown, who is affiliated with Cutler Real Estate in Kent, has been a Realtor for nearly 50 years. She was the first woman to serve as president of the Kent Area Chamber of Commerce. She is a past president of the Portage County Association of Realtors.

The chamber's other awards include:

Immy Award -- Buffalo Wild Wings and County Fire Protection

Small Business Person of the Year -- David Sommers of David Sommers & Associates

President's Award -- Charles Thomas, Ray's Place

The City of Kent will present awards to Popped! popcorn shop, Smithers-Oasis Co. and the Kent State University Hotel & Conference Center.

The event will include a silent auction and cocktails/appetizers starting at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m., followed by the awards presentations at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $40. Reservations are due no later than Monday and can be made by calling the chamber office at 330-673-9855.

Immy awards are given to publicly recognize quality businesses and/or individuals in the greater Kent area in support of economic retention, reinvestment and new facilities development.

The Small Business Person of the Year is presented to the small business person that exemplified the best of Kent's small enterprises with fewer than 30 employees.

The W.W. Reed Kent Medal for Public Service is bestowed on individuals, institutions, or organizations whose community service has resulted in the advancement of the common good, promotion of public welfare, or stimulation of public service. It was renamed in honor of W.W. Reed, a Kent civic leader and longtime leader of the chamber of commerce, in 2

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News Headline: Former Kent State manager faces child pornography charges | Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nov. 16--A former Kent State University business manager is facing child pornography charges stemming from three years ago when he worked at the university.

A Portage County grand jury indicted Jeffrey A. Berghoff, 56, of Stow, last week on 25 counts of pandering sexually oriented material involving a minor.

Authorities and Kent State are being tight-lipped about the investigation, and court documents reveal little about the accusations or why he was arrested now.

The allegations stem from January 2010 to September 2010.

County Prosecutor Vic Vigluicci declined to discuss details.

Nine of the counts are second-degree felonies and involve disseminating material, while 16 counts are fourth-degree felonies and involve possession, Vigluicci said.

Berghoff worked at Kent State for 26 years, leaving in October 2010. At the time, he was senior business manager with the College of Education, Health & Human Services in Kent.

His attorney, Thomas Sicuro of Ravenna, said he believed the allegations involve the use of Kent State computers.

"I'm pretty confident based on the account of what transpired that he gave me that he is not guilty of the charge and eventually it will end in acquittal for him," he said.

Berghoff pleaded not guilty Tuesday and was released on a $25,000 personal recognizance bond. His trial was set for Jan. 21.

A telephone message left Friday for Berghoff was not returned.

The university would not talk about the case.

"We don't comment on personnel matters," university spokesman Eric Mansfield said in an email.

The Beacon Journal filed a public records request to examine Berghoff's personnel file, but it was not available Friday.

The Ohio Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force and Kent State University police investigated the case, Vigluicci said.

Both agencies didn't return a phone call.

Berghoff was featured in the Beacon Journal this month after winning the top prize in West Point Market's second annual Bottle My Brew Ohio Homebrew Challenge.

He won a $1,000 cash prize and his beer is supposed to be brewed at Thirsty Dog Brewing Co. in Akron and released commercially.

Thirsty Dog co-owner John Najeway said he had no plans to brew the beer after learning about the indictment.

West Point owner Rick Vernon could not be reached for comment.

(c)2013 the Akron Beacon Journal (Akron, Ohio)

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News Headline: Former KSU Manager faces Child-Porn Charges | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A indictment by a Portage County Grand Jury has named a former business manager at Kent State University on child-porn charges. 56-year-old Jeffrey Berghoff of Stow faces 25 counts of pandering sexually-oriented material involving a minor. Berghoff left his post as a Senior Business Manager with the College of Education at the university in October 2010. The indictment claims he was engaged in child-porn activity apparently involving university computers between January and September that year.

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News Headline: Cleveland theater auditions for Nov. 15 and beyond | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Mark Rapp
News OCR Text: Kent State University Stark Theatre. Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave., Jackson Township. William Mastrosimone's "Cat's Paw." Roles available for two men and two women. This production is for mature audiences only due to violent content and strong language. 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, Nov. 19 and 21. Details: go to stark.kent.edu.theatre and click on Audition Information in the right-hand column. Performances: Feb. 14-23. Backstage crew (stage and assistant stage managers, assistants to lighting, scenic, sound and costume designers) available. Call Theatre Specialist Louis Williams at 330-244-3375.

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News Headline: WALSH AIDS ENTREPRENEURS | Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: staff, Compiled from
News OCR Text: Walsh University said it partnered with the Stark Entrepreneurship Alliance (SEA) to provide resources for entrepreneurs.

The alliance brings together a group of organizations including the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, JumpStart Inc., the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University Stark, Stark Development Board, Stark State College, Technology Accelerator Alliance, University of Mount Union and a group called ystark! The SEA is supported by the Stark Community Foundation and an AEP Local Economic Assistance Program grant.

Its website is www.starkentalliance.com/.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

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News Headline: Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name: Charita Goshay
News OCR Text: Fifty years after his tragic death, President John F. Kennedy has been elevated from a man to a myth. The 50th anniversary of his assassination Nov. 22, 1963, has spurred a slew of books, magazines, documentaries, feature films and television specials.

Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy?

"There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even with all the focus and all the studies that have been done. It still seems like there's no definitive answer. People happen to be fascinated by that idea.

"Everyone has their theories about what happened."

Heaphy said that interest in Kennedy's assassination is comparable with that of President Abraham Lincoln, though there's less uncertainty regarding Lincoln's death at the hands of John Wilkes Booth.

"The added element is Kennedy himself and his age when he died," she said. "There's a lot of emphasis on his family life, and the fact he had young children. And there's the whole mystique, not just around him but the Kennedy family as a whole. And there's the whole 'Camelot' myth that was put in place when he died.

"It's something we'd never really seen before and haven't since."

A GOOD PHRASE

"Certainly, he came along at a time when media fascination with a popular culture figure was high," said William Cunion, an associate academic dean and associate professor of political science and American history at the University of Mount Union in Alliance. "He was a young, attractive man with an attractive family. He was following the Eisenhower years; Eisenhower was quite a bit older. Kennedy had a lot of qualities that played very well into an emerging media age.

"Plus, he could turn a phrase. A good phrase will make a president hard to forget."

"He was a young, handsome man with a storybook-type family who changed the way we look at our president," said Randy Gonzalez, chairman of the Stark County Democratic Party and fiscal officer for Jackson Township.

AGE OF CAMELOT

Gonzalez said that the photogenic Kennedy was aided by the advent of television and a media protective of his indiscretions.

"His life was painted as 'Camelot,' and the people were happy to perceive it that way," he said. "So began the love affair with JFK, and it has only increased over the years."

Gonzalez added that Kennedy's 1960 campaign changed how people ran for office.

"It was the most 'grass-roots' campaign of its time," he said. "Labor organizations played a huge part in getting 'boots on the street,' right down to precincts and wards, which resulted in votes for JFK. He and his family were crisscrossing the states, and Hollywood was taking an active role in his support."

Page 2 of 3 - Gonzalez noted that Kennedy's televised debate with Vice President Richard Nixon set a new standard for future TV debates. "Millions of people could see Nixon sweating and looking intimidated, while JFK looked calm and a lot like the movie stars supporting him, which made a huge swing in the outcome," he said. "Television, from then on, became the largest and most influential part of every campaign."

Cunion said that Kennedy's presidency should be measured by his response to various crises rather than by his agenda.

"Kennedy's impact on the presidency was probably not enormous," he said. "He was reluctant to get drawn into some conflicts he rather would have avoided, both domestic, like the civil rights movement, and international events, like Cuba in 1962. I would not consider him a pivotal figure, in terms of the development of the office of the presidency. Certainly, he was a pivotal historical figure."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's legacy must be viewed in perspective.

"There's this whole mythology and legend, and we've lost sight of the human side of it, to a degree," she said. "It's important to remember that history is about people in all their greatness and in all their mistakes. You have to see it as a whole. I think Kennedy's entire presidency captures all of that."

Heaphy was born after 1963 but said she grew up hearing about "Camelot."

"There was always emphasis on the tragedy of a life cut short," she said. "It's fascinating to wonder what would have been different if Kennedy had lived. You can argue that about lots of people, but given the times in which Kennedy lived, you have to ask that seriously. What would have happened with Vietnam? That's such a big part of the recent past and colors so many things we do or don't do. The question is, would it have been different if Kennedy had lived?"

Gonzalez agrees. Since the assassination, "many personal stories have surfaced, and nearly every one brings a new chapter. All the assassination theories, rumors, books and movies have also added to the intrigue. Now, combine all that with the legacy of his family, the awful horrors they have suffered, and it all adds up to a great human-interest story that has grown for decades. Although I often ask myself, if he was not assassinated, what would or could have happened?"

Kennedy's election also broke other ground. Today, Catholics are 22 percent of the American population; however, in the 1960s, his faith triggered reticence among some voters. He remains the only Catholic ever elected to the presidency.

Cunion said America's diversity has increased markedly since 1960. Issues such as a candidate's religion have become less of a factor for most voters.

Page 3 of 3 - "In the last election, we had an African-American incumbent running against a conservative Mormon," he noted.

'BARE-KNUCKLE POLITICS'

The political atmosphere in the weeks leading up to Kennedy's death grew increasingly vitriolic. Just prior to Nov. 22, a Dallas newspaper published an anti-Kennedy ad that looked like a "wanted" poster.

"I hope this will cause people to take a moment and and think about the consequences of our actions," Heaphy said. "This is clearly a case where we can be reminded of that."

But Cunion said Kennedy wouldn't be surprised by the current state of politics.

"I think he would recognize the bare-knuckle politics," he said. "He came out of the political tradition where politics is winner-take-all. For him, the key opponents were people in his own party: The Southern Democrats were a thorn in his side, which is why he wanted to avoid the whole civil rights issue.

"Sometimes we romanticize the past, but it's not quite as collegial as we remember it to be. Kennedy knew what politics was: a game of winners and losers."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's death is a chapter of history that fascinates and repels us.

"History is not a comfortable thing," she said. "Human beings do great things and terrible things. That's why we're fascinated and appalled by these things. With the Kennedy assassination, we can't look elsewhere. It happened here, in our country. To our president."

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News Headline: Billie Jean King shares life lessons at Kent State at Stark | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tennis champion and activist Billie Jean King spoke Tuesday night at Kent State at Stark about the role relationships and personal education play in a person's success.

Twenty-time Wimbledon champion Billie Jean King said a person's inner and outer success depends on three things: relationships, a willingness to keep learning and the ability to solve problems.

"I think that's where we go wrong, is when we don't have the inner and the outer matching up," she said Tuesday.

King, who won 39 Grand Slam titles during her tennis career, spoke Tuesday evening as part of the Featured Speakers Series at Kent State University at Stark. The series will feature experts in politics, activism, education, literature and arts during the 2013-14 school year.

Cynthia Williams, coordinator of public relations, said the university distributed about 650 event tickets and none remained.

King shared lessons learned since her start in tennis at an early age. She learned about the sport from a friend, saved enough money to buy a racquet and took free lessons at a public park before having an "epiphany" at age 12.

Reflecting on the predominantly white tennis apparel, equipment and players, King asked herself why the sport wasn't more diverse and became determined to make it so.

"I knew then, if I could be number one in the world, then I might have an opportunity to change the world," she said.

Most known for defeating Bobby Riggs in the 1973 "Battle of Sexes," King credited the match for giving her a platform.

"That was about social change," she said. "That wasn't about tennis."

King also successfully fought for equal prize money for women and founded the Women's Tennis Association in 1970. She said Title IX, legislation passed in 1972 designed to end sex-based discrimination in schools that receive federal funding, was one of the most important laws for civil rights in the 20th century.

Still, King said there is work to be done when it comes to the number of women in positions of power or pay inequality in the workforce.

"Woman are still so far behind," she said.

The best way to change that, King said, is to encourage dialogue. Only then might groups, be it government body or athletic team, reflect society.

She said every person has the ability to make a positive difference in the world.

"I think people should really think about themselves," King said. "And think about that each one of them's an influence."

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News Headline: Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Charita Goshay
News OCR Text: Fifty years after his tragic death, President John F. Kennedy has been elevated from a man to a myth. The 50th anniversary of his assassination Nov. 22, 1963, has spurred a slew of books, magazines, documentaries, feature films and television specials.

Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy?

"There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even with all the focus and all the studies that have been done. It still seems like there's no definitive answer. People happen to be fascinated by that idea.

"Everyone has their theories about what happened."

Heaphy said that interest in Kennedy's assassination is comparable with that of President Abraham Lincoln, though there's less uncertainty regarding Lincoln's death at the hands of John Wilkes Booth.

"The added element is Kennedy himself and his age when he died," she said. "There's a lot of emphasis on his family life, and the fact he had young children. And there's the whole mystique, not just around him but the Kennedy family as a whole. And there's the whole 'Camelot' myth that was put in place when he died.

"It's something we'd never really seen before and haven't since."

A GOOD PHRASE

"Certainly, he came along at a time when media fascination with a popular culture figure was high," said William Cunion, an associate academic dean and associate professor of political science and American history at the University of Mount Union in Alliance. "He was a young, attractive man with an attractive family. He was following the Eisenhower years; Eisenhower was quite a bit older. Kennedy had a lot of qualities that played very well into an emerging media age.

"Plus, he could turn a phrase. A good phrase will make a president hard to forget."

"He was a young, handsome man with a storybook-type family who changed the way we look at our president," said Randy Gonzalez, chairman of the Stark County Democratic Party and fiscal officer for Jackson Township.

AGE OF CAMELOT

Gonzalez said that the photogenic Kennedy was aided by the advent of television and a media protective of his indiscretions.

"His life was painted as 'Camelot,' and the people were happy to perceive it that way," he said. "So began the love affair with JFK, and it has only increased over the years."

Gonzalez added that Kennedy's 1960 campaign changed how people ran for office.

"It was the most 'grass-roots' campaign of its time," he said. "Labor organizations played a huge part in getting 'boots on the street,' right down to precincts and wards, which resulted in votes for JFK. He and his family were crisscrossing the states, and Hollywood was taking an active role in his support."

Page 2 of 3 - Gonzalez noted that Kennedy's televised debate with Vice President Richard Nixon set a new standard for future TV debates. "Millions of people could see Nixon sweating and looking intimidated, while JFK looked calm and a lot like the movie stars supporting him, which made a huge swing in the outcome," he said. "Television, from then on, became the largest and most influential part of every campaign."

Cunion said that Kennedy's presidency should be measured by his response to various crises rather than by his agenda.

"Kennedy's impact on the presidency was probably not enormous," he said. "He was reluctant to get drawn into some conflicts he rather would have avoided, both domestic, like the civil rights movement, and international events, like Cuba in 1962. I would not consider him a pivotal figure, in terms of the development of the office of the presidency. Certainly, he was a pivotal historical figure."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's legacy must be viewed in perspective.

"There's this whole mythology and legend, and we've lost sight of the human side of it, to a degree," she said. "It's important to remember that history is about people in all their greatness and in all their mistakes. You have to see it as a whole. I think Kennedy's entire presidency captures all of that."

Heaphy was born after 1963 but said she grew up hearing about "Camelot."

"There was always emphasis on the tragedy of a life cut short," she said. "It's fascinating to wonder what would have been different if Kennedy had lived. You can argue that about lots of people, but given the times in which Kennedy lived, you have to ask that seriously. What would have happened with Vietnam? That's such a big part of the recent past and colors so many things we do or don't do. The question is, would it have been different if Kennedy had lived?"

Gonzalez agrees. Since the assassination, "many personal stories have surfaced, and nearly every one brings a new chapter. All the assassination theories, rumors, books and movies have also added to the intrigue. Now, combine all that with the legacy of his family, the awful horrors they have suffered, and it all adds up to a great human-interest story that has grown for decades. Although I often ask myself, if he was not assassinated, what would or could have happened?"

Kennedy's election also broke other ground. Today, Catholics are 22 percent of the American population; however, in the 1960s, his faith triggered reticence among some voters. He remains the only Catholic ever elected to the presidency.

Cunion said America's diversity has increased markedly since 1960. Issues such as a candidate's religion have become less of a factor for most voters.

Page 3 of 3 - "In the last election, we had an African-American incumbent running against a conservative Mormon," he noted.

'BARE-KNUCKLE POLITICS'

The political atmosphere in the weeks leading up to Kennedy's death grew increasingly vitriolic. Just prior to Nov. 22, a Dallas newspaper published an anti-Kennedy ad that looked like a "wanted" poster.

"I hope this will cause people to take a moment and and think about the consequences of our actions," Heaphy said. "This is clearly a case where we can be reminded of that."

But Cunion said Kennedy wouldn't be surprised by the current state of politics.

"I think he would recognize the bare-knuckle politics," he said. "He came out of the political tradition where politics is winner-take-all. For him, the key opponents were people in his own party: The Southern Democrats were a thorn in his side, which is why he wanted to avoid the whole civil rights issue.

"Sometimes we romanticize the past, but it's not quite as collegial as we remember it to be. Kennedy knew what politics was: a game of winners and losers."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's death is a chapter of history that fascinates and repels us.

"History is not a comfortable thing," she said. "Human beings do great things and terrible things. That's why we're fascinated and appalled by these things. With the Kennedy assassination, we can't look elsewhere. It happened here, in our country. To our president."

Return to Top



News Headline: Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name: Charita Goshay
News OCR Text: Fifty years after his tragic death, President John F. Kennedy has been elevated from a man to a myth. The 50th anniversary of his assassination Nov. 22, 1963, has spurred a slew of books, magazines, documentaries, feature films and television specials.

Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy?

"There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even with all the focus and all the studies that have been done. It still seems like there's no definitive answer. People happen to be fascinated by that idea.

"Everyone has their theories about what happened."

Heaphy said that interest in Kennedy's assassination is comparable with that of President Abraham Lincoln, though there's less uncertainty regarding Lincoln's death at the hands of John Wilkes Booth.

"The added element is Kennedy himself and his age when he died," she said. "There's a lot of emphasis on his family life, and the fact he had young children. And there's the whole mystique, not just around him but the Kennedy family as a whole. And there's the whole 'Camelot' myth that was put in place when he died.

"It's something we'd never really seen before and haven't since."

A GOOD PHRASE

"Certainly, he came along at a time when media fascination with a popular culture figure was high," said William Cunion, an associate academic dean and associate professor of political science and American history at the University of Mount Union in Alliance. "He was a young, attractive man with an attractive family. He was following the Eisenhower years; Eisenhower was quite a bit older. Kennedy had a lot of qualities that played very well into an emerging media age.

"Plus, he could turn a phrase. A good phrase will make a president hard to forget."

"He was a young, handsome man with a storybook-type family who changed the way we look at our president," said Randy Gonzalez, chairman of the Stark County Democratic Party and fiscal officer for Jackson Township.

AGE OF CAMELOT

Gonzalez said that the photogenic Kennedy was aided by the advent of television and a media protective of his indiscretions.

"His life was painted as 'Camelot,' and the people were happy to perceive it that way," he said. "So began the love affair with JFK, and it has only increased over the years."

Gonzalez added that Kennedy's 1960 campaign changed how people ran for office.

"It was the most 'grass-roots' campaign of its time," he said. "Labor organizations played a huge part in getting 'boots on the street,' right down to precincts and wards, which resulted in votes for JFK. He and his family were crisscrossing the states, and Hollywood was taking an active role in his support."

Page 2 of 3 - Gonzalez noted that Kennedy's televised debate with Vice President Richard Nixon set a new standard for future TV debates. "Millions of people could see Nixon sweating and looking intimidated, while JFK looked calm and a lot like the movie stars supporting him, which made a huge swing in the outcome," he said. "Television, from then on, became the largest and most influential part of every campaign."

Cunion said that Kennedy's presidency should be measured by his response to various crises rather than by his agenda.

"Kennedy's impact on the presidency was probably not enormous," he said. "He was reluctant to get drawn into some conflicts he rather would have avoided, both domestic, like the civil rights movement, and international events, like Cuba in 1962. I would not consider him a pivotal figure, in terms of the development of the office of the presidency. Certainly, he was a pivotal historical figure."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's legacy must be viewed in perspective.

"There's this whole mythology and legend, and we've lost sight of the human side of it, to a degree," she said. "It's important to remember that history is about people in all their greatness and in all their mistakes. You have to see it as a whole. I think Kennedy's entire presidency captures all of that."

Heaphy was born after 1963 but said she grew up hearing about "Camelot."

"There was always emphasis on the tragedy of a life cut short," she said. "It's fascinating to wonder what would have been different if Kennedy had lived. You can argue that about lots of people, but given the times in which Kennedy lived, you have to ask that seriously. What would have happened with Vietnam? That's such a big part of the recent past and colors so many things we do or don't do. The question is, would it have been different if Kennedy had lived?"

Gonzalez agrees. Since the assassination, "many personal stories have surfaced, and nearly every one brings a new chapter. All the assassination theories, rumors, books and movies have also added to the intrigue. Now, combine all that with the legacy of his family, the awful horrors they have suffered, and it all adds up to a great human-interest story that has grown for decades. Although I often ask myself, if he was not assassinated, what would or could have happened?"

Kennedy's election also broke other ground. Today, Catholics are 22 percent of the American population; however, in the 1960s, his faith triggered reticence among some voters. He remains the only Catholic ever elected to the presidency.

Cunion said America's diversity has increased markedly since 1960. Issues such as a candidate's religion have become less of a factor for most voters.

Page 3 of 3 - "In the last election, we had an African-American incumbent running against a conservative Mormon," he noted.

'BARE-KNUCKLE POLITICS'

The political atmosphere in the weeks leading up to Kennedy's death grew increasingly vitriolic. Just prior to Nov. 22, a Dallas newspaper published an anti-Kennedy ad that looked like a "wanted" poster.

"I hope this will cause people to take a moment and and think about the consequences of our actions," Heaphy said. "This is clearly a case where we can be reminded of that."

But Cunion said Kennedy wouldn't be surprised by the current state of politics.

"I think he would recognize the bare-knuckle politics," he said. "He came out of the political tradition where politics is winner-take-all. For him, the key opponents were people in his own party: The Southern Democrats were a thorn in his side, which is why he wanted to avoid the whole civil rights issue.

"Sometimes we romanticize the past, but it's not quite as collegial as we remember it to be. Kennedy knew what politics was: a game of winners and losers."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's death is a chapter of history that fascinates and repels us.

"History is not a comfortable thing," she said. "Human beings do great things and terrible things. That's why we're fascinated and appalled by these things. With the Kennedy assassination, we can't look elsewhere. It happened here, in our country. To our president."

Return to Top



News Headline: Fifty years later, fascination with JFK still strong (Heaphy) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fifty years after his tragic death, President John F. Kennedy has been elevated from a man to a myth. The 50th anniversary of his assassination Nov. 22, 1963, has spurred a slew of books, magazines, documentaries, feature films and television specials.

Why are Americans still so fascinated with this tragedy?

"There are a variety of reasons," said Leslie Heaphy, a professor of history at Kent State University's Stark campus in Jackson Township. "One of them certainly stems from a lack of certainty around it, which still exists even with all the focus and all the studies that have been done. It still seems like there's no definitive answer. People happen to be fascinated by that idea.

"Everyone has their theories about what happened."

Heaphy said that interest in Kennedy's assassination is comparable with that of President Abraham Lincoln, though there's less uncertainty regarding Lincoln's death at the hands of John Wilkes Booth.

"The added element is Kennedy himself and his age when he died," she said. "There's a lot of emphasis on his family life, and the fact he had young children. And there's the whole mystique, not just around him but the Kennedy family as a whole. And there's the whole 'Camelot' myth that was put in place when he died.

"It's something we'd never really seen before and haven't since."

"Certainly, he came along at a time when media fascination with a popular culture figure was high," said William Cunion, an associate academic dean and associate professor of political science and American history at the University of Mount Union in Alliance. "He was a young, attractive man with an attractive family. He was following the Eisenhower years; Eisenhower was quite a bit older. Kennedy had a lot of qualities that played very well into an emerging media age.

"Plus, he could turn a phrase. A good phrase will make a president hard to forget."

"He was a young, handsome man with a storybook-type family who changed the way we look at our president," said Randy Gonzalez, chairman of the Stark County Democratic Party and fiscal officer for Jackson Township.

Gonzalez said that the photogenic Kennedy was aided by the advent of television and a media protective of his indiscretions.

"His life was painted as 'Camelot,' and the people were happy to perceive it that way," he said. "So began the love affair with JFK, and it has only increased over the years."

Gonzalez added that Kennedy's 1960 campaign changed how people ran for office.

"It was the most 'grass-roots' campaign of its time," he said. "Labor organizations played a huge part in getting 'boots on the street,' right down to precincts and wards, which resulted in votes for JFK. He and his family were crisscrossing the states, and Hollywood was taking an active role in his support."

Page 2 of 3 - Gonzalez noted that Kennedy's televised debate with Vice President Richard Nixon set a new standard for future TV debates. "Millions of people could see Nixon sweating and looking intimidated, while JFK looked calm and a lot like the movie stars supporting him, which made a huge swing in the outcome," he said. "Television, from then on, became the largest and most influential part of every campaign."

Cunion said that Kennedy's presidency should be measured by his response to various crises rather than by his agenda.

"Kennedy's impact on the presidency was probably not enormous," he said. "He was reluctant to get drawn into some conflicts he rather would have avoided, both domestic, like the civil rights movement, and international events, like Cuba in 1962. I would not consider him a pivotal figure, in terms of the development of the office of the presidency. Certainly, he was a pivotal historical figure."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's legacy must be viewed in perspective.

"There's this whole mythology and legend, and we've lost sight of the human side of it, to a degree," she said. "It's important to remember that history is about people in all their greatness and in all their mistakes. You have to see it as a whole. I think Kennedy's entire presidency captures all of that."

Heaphy was born after 1963 but said she grew up hearing about "Camelot."

"There was always emphasis on the tragedy of a life cut short," she said. "It's fascinating to wonder what would have been different if Kennedy had lived. You can argue that about lots of people, but given the times in which Kennedy lived, you have to ask that seriously. What would have happened with Vietnam? That's such a big part of the recent past and colors so many things we do or don't do. The question is, would it have been different if Kennedy had lived?"

Gonzalez agrees. Since the assassination, "many personal stories have surfaced, and nearly every one brings a new chapter. All the assassination theories, rumors, books and movies have also added to the intrigue. Now, combine all that with the legacy of his family, the awful horrors they have suffered, and it all adds up to a great human-interest story that has grown for decades. Although I often ask myself, if he was not assassinated, what would or could have happened?"

Kennedy's election also broke other ground. Today, Catholics are 22 percent of the American population; however, in the 1960s, his faith triggered reticence among some voters. He remains the only Catholic ever elected to the presidency.

Cunion said America's diversity has increased markedly since 1960. Issues such as a candidate's religion have become less of a factor for most voters.

Page 3 of 3 - "In the last election, we had an African-American incumbent running against a conservative Mormon," he noted.

'BARE-KNUCKLE POLITICS'

The political atmosphere in the weeks leading up to Kennedy's death grew increasingly vitriolic. Just prior to Nov. 22, a Dallas newspaper published an anti-Kennedy ad that looked like a "wanted" poster.

"I hope this will cause people to take a moment and and think about the consequences of our actions," Heaphy said. "This is clearly a case where we can be reminded of that."

But Cunion said Kennedy wouldn't be surprised by the current state of politics.

"I think he would recognize the bare-knuckle politics," he said. "He came out of the political tradition where politics is winner-take-all. For him, the key opponents were people in his own party: The Southern Democrats were a thorn in his side, which is why he wanted to avoid the whole civil rights issue.

"Sometimes we romanticize the past, but it's not quite as collegial as we remember it to be. Kennedy knew what politics was: a game of winners and losers."

Heaphy said that Kennedy's death is a chapter of history that fascinates and repels us.

"History is not a comfortable thing," she said. "Human beings do great things and terrible things. That's why we're fascinated and appalled by these things. With the Kennedy assassination, we can't look elsewhere. It happened here, in our country. To our president."

Return to Top



News Headline: Blackstone LaunchPad program available Kent (Schillig) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Blackstone LaunchPad is now available at the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. It is a free program to help new and existing entrepreneurs develop their business ideas into actual ventures.

“I am very excited that our campus is able to offer this very unique program,” Steve Schillig, director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State-Tuscarawas, said in a press release. “It is perfectly designed to assist students, faculty, staff and alumni at Kent State-Tuscarawas pursue their dream of entrepreneurship. I believe that it will complement the services that are already being offered by our Small Business Development Center.”

William Beisel, director of the Business and Community Services, said, “Blackstone LaunchPad's services include connecting current and aspiring entrepreneurs with mentors and resources that will enhance the success of new business ideas. The program is an excellent opportunity for aspiring entrepreneurs to gain exposure to, and experience with some of the brightest entrepreneurs in the country.”

Funding for the program comes from The Blackstone Charitable Foundation and The Burton D. Morgan Foundation.

To learn more about Blackstone LaunchPad, call Schillig at 330.308.7479 or visit www.kent.edu/blackstonelaunchpad/index.cfm

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News Headline: Blackstone LaunchPad program available Kent (Schillig) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Blackstone LaunchPad is now available at the Small Business Development Center at Kent State University at Tuscarawas in New Philadelphia. It is a free program to help new and existing entrepreneurs develop their business ideas into actual ventures.

“I am very excited that our campus is able to offer this very unique program,” Steve Schillig, director of the Small Business Development Center at Kent State-Tuscarawas, said in a press release. “It is perfectly designed to assist students, faculty, staff and alumni at Kent State-Tuscarawas pursue their dream of entrepreneurship. I believe that it will complement the services that are already being offered by our Small Business Development Center.”

William Beisel, director of the Business and Community Services, said, “Blackstone LaunchPad's services include connecting current and aspiring entrepreneurs with mentors and resources that will enhance the success of new business ideas. The program is an excellent opportunity for aspiring entrepreneurs to gain exposure to, and experience with some of the brightest entrepreneurs in the country.”

Funding for the program comes from The Blackstone Charitable Foundation and The Burton D. Morgan Foundation.

To learn more about Blackstone LaunchPad, call Schillig at 330.308.7479 or visit www.kent.edu/blackstonelaunchpad/index.cfm

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News Headline: U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in New York (Nov. 15) | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: TMCnet.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: ALEXANDRIA, Va., Nov. 15 -- The following federal patents were awarded to inventors in New York.

*** Kent State University Assigned Patent ALEXANDRIA, Va., Nov. 15 -- Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, has been assigned a patent (8,580,144) developed by Liang-Chy Chien, Hudson, Ohio, Jeoung Yeon Hwang, Dajeon, South Korea, and Jenny-Marie Wong, Tonawanda, N.Y., for a "blue phase liquid crystal nanocomposites and devices containing the same." The patent application was filed on April 6, 2012 (13/441,027). The full-text of the patent can be found at http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=48&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=20131112.PD.&s2=%28OH.ASST.%29&OS=ISD/11/12/2013+AND+AS/OH&RS=ISD/11/12/2013+AND+AS/OH Written by Kusum Sangma; edited by Jaya Anand.

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News Headline: Kent State presents Singing Outside the Box this Saturday and Sunday | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: November 16,2013 09:47 PM GMT

Kent State University will present Singing Outside the Box, the latest offering in its Fall Opera Scenes Program, at 7:30 p.m. this Saturday and Sunday.

Singing Outside the Box will focus on scenes from Mozart, Bizet, Handel, and more.

Shows will be held at the Wright-Curtis Theatre, Theatre Drive. Tickets cost $15, $13 for seniors and KSU faculty and staff, $8 for non-KSU students, and $5 for children. Full-time KSU undergraduate students are admitted for free.

To reserve a ticket or learn more about the event, call (330) 672-2787.

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News Headline: Kent State students work with Southeast band | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/18/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University jazz professor Bobby Selvaggio and a small KSU student combo worked with the Southeast High School band earlier this month. The session included improvisation techniques and ensemble techniques. The group began with the KSU combo playing tunes for the students, and then as the jazz professor worked with the high school students, the KSU students joined the group to play along with them.

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News Headline: Kent State University New Music Series with Guest Artists Yang Jin, Pipa | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Frank Wiley
News OCR Text: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NEW MUSIC SERIES

THE KENT STATE UNIVERSITY NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE

FRANK WILEY, DIRECTOR

GUEST ARTIST YANG JIN, PIPA

FACULTY GUEST ARTIST YU JIN, VIOLA

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2013, 8:00 P.M.

CARL F. W. LUDWIG RECITAL HALL, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

ADMISSION FREE

The second concert of the 2013-2014 Kent State

University New Music Series, with special guest artist Yang Jin, pipa, and� faculty guest artist Yu Jin, viola, will be presented on Saturday, November 23 at

8:00 P.M. in the Carl F. W. Ludwig Recital Hall on the KSU campus.� Admission will be free.� � Music by Larry Baker,� Krzysztof Penderecki, Anthony Donofrio, Frank Wiley, Chen Yi, Marilyn Shrude,� Morton Feldman, and Phillip Glass

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News Headline: Kent State student injured after being struck by car | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Kent State University student is recovering after being struck by a car while crossing Route 59 in Kent the evening of Nov. 12.

Zhengliang Feng, 24, of Kent, was struck by an SUV driven by Richard Lebeau, 57, of Stow, around 6:20 p.m. as he reportedly stood in an eastbound left-turn lane near Holly Park Apartments and Acme Fresh Market in the 1700 block of East Main Street, according to a police report.

Kent Police Lt. Jim Prusha said no charges have been filed against the driver at this time. Feng was not in a crosswalk at the time of the accident.

Feng suffered unspecified, "incapacitating" injuries in the accident, according to police. Blood on the pavement was observed by officers.

Feng was initially transported to Robinson Memorial Hospital, according to police, and then transferred to Akron City Hospital.

Feng, a senior at Kent State, is a resident of one of the nearby apartment complexes.

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News Headline: 12 Hour Knit-A-Thon | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/15/2013
Outlet Full Name: Kent Patch
Contact Name: Julie Jimenez
News OCR Text: Sponsored by Knitting For Those in Need at Kent State University and Gina's Journey. In addition to knitting hats and scarves for those in need as we typically do, we will be knitting for 12 hours to also produce as many "chemo-hats" as possible to benefit local cancer patients. Come join us, and possibly pick up a new enjoyable hobby this holiday season! :)

Free Coffee, Free Treats

All materials provided, No experience necessary!

Check us out on Facebook!

https://www.facebook.com/GinasJourneyhttps://www.facebook.com/KnittingForThoseInNeedAtKentStateUniversity

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News Headline: Hudson High School Business Club introduces students to local businesses | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hudson -- The Hudson Business Club at Hudson High School offered students entertainment, food, prizes and a chance to find out more about local businesses Nov. 8 during a Day in Business.

Students planned the event from food for the vendors to setting up and creating a Bingo game called "Bizness," for students to participate in to win prizes. Students could sample food, pick up free handouts, enter raffles and talk with business representatives during the event.

Business teacher Betty Banks-Burke said students learned to take a leadership role, work on details, communicate with others and make everything run smoothly. Business Club members wore business attire of black and white for the event, sporting pink ties to make them stand out.

"They looked so professional," Banks-Burke said.

Junior Lydia Montgomery was in charge of lunch for the vendors.

Senior Elaine Arsham said she was in charge of planning the event to help students interact with business representatives.

"I hope they [students] learn they can start their own business and see what is in their area of interest," Arsham said.

Taylor Dukes, 2006 Hudson High School graduate, performed. She lives in Nashville, Tenn., where she is pursuing a singing/songwriting career. She performed Nov. 9 at the Blue Rock Cafe.

Business classes at Hudson High School include the business essentials, accounting and entrepreneurship, Banks-Burke said. The entrepreneurship project requires students to write a business plan for a product or service never on the market and compete against each other with the winner competing regionally for prize money.

The entrepreneurship class has a new unit called "Shark Tank," with the winner starting a micro business with donated funds.

Juniors Faith Voinovich and Annie O'Brien won the 2013 "Shark Tank" competition where they sold their business idea, Bra Fusion, and received funding for it through an anonymous donor. Both are members of the Hudson Business Club.

Bra Fusion creates bras that have interchangeable straps and sides that come in different colors and materials.

Former Hudson High School students also attended the Day in Business to share their experiences.

Samantha Sandone is a freshman at Kent State University majoring in fashion merchandising. She was vice president of business club last year.

"I'm hoping to tell students how business club helped in college and what KSU has to offer," Sandone said.

Sean Crowe is a senior at Miami University of Ohio majoring in entrepreneurship and minoring in interactive media studies. He was a 2010 graduate of Hudson High School when the business club was just taking off.

"I wanted to see how it's grown," Crowe said.

For those who think McDonalds is "just flipping hamburgers," Sal Baglieri, owner of three McDonalds in Hudson, Stow and Munroe Falls, wanted to give a deeper perspective. He told students McDonalds hire at 16 and allow growth in the company with classes in management, communication and personnel.

"There is ongoing training," Baglieri said.

McDonalds' manager Ian Derby handles technology for the businesses and said McDonalds offers scholarships and college textbook reimbursement.

Sophomore Bella Marrali said she volunteered for the event to find out more about the businesses in the area and hopefully, get a job for the summer.

A local company, American Fireworks, 7041 Darrow Road, is a fifth generation company, which began in Hudson in 1902.

"Fireworks is definitely an art form," Roberto Sorgi said. "There's a lot of computer technology to script and design the fireworks before going to the job site."

They use college students for part-time help during the summer, John Sorgi said.

At the next table was Eric Treend, whose son, Reed is in the business club. Treend works for Britto Gallagher, a commercial insurance broker that insures fireworks industry worldwide.

"American Fireworks was my first customer," Treend said.

Michael Freedman of Hershey's, 50 W. Streetsboro St., was busy giving out ice cream samples.

Not all businesses were located in Hudson. Royal Chemical, which makes household and industrial cleaners, has its headquarters in Twinsburg and manufacturing plant in Macedonia. Gayle Mitalski told students about different career opportunities for those with interest in chemistry, lab, marketing, sales and customer service.

Junior Patrick Stepanek said the event helped him have a greater understanding of what business are like in Hudson.

Business Club members will review the event and look for ways to improve it, Banks-Burke said.

Email: lfreeman@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-541-9434

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News Headline: Documents: Frat Hazing Included Paddling and Caning | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/16/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Monica Volante
News OCR Text: Documents: Frat Hazing Included ‘Paddling’ and ‘Caning’ Posted on: 9:50 pm, November 15, 2013, by Monica Volante KENT, OH — New details are emerging about the allegations of hazing that may have taken place at the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Kent State University. According to documents released by a Kent State investigation sub-committee, there was circumstantial evidence of hazing through “physical violence (paddling/caning) and mental anguish†made available to the CSI investigation committee. According to the documents, the “Kappas have been investigated, sanctioned and given numerous opportunities to seek out resources that could improve their stand as an organization.†The documents say the fraternity did not seek assistance. Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity was suspended for three years following an investigation into the hazing complaint. The fraternity does not have a house on campus. Click here for continuing coverage on this story. Filed in: News Topics: fraternity suspended, hazing, kent state university news

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Kent should reach out to incubator tenants | Attachment Email

News Date: 11/17/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With the Martinel incubator closing up for lack of funds for its continuing operation, the city of Kent should reach out to the four tenants in the incubator, all of them promising up-and-comers, and finds them a home that will keep them in the Tree City to grow and prosper.

That certainly would seem part of the mission of economic development that city council and the administration have repeatedly emphasized, year after year.

Because of operational difficulties experienced by the Regional Economic Growth Corp., Martinel is in arrears in paying its rent. The city, it would seem, for a modest amount could rectify that, buy some time and enable the formation of a new private-public enterprise that could take over the functions that were once handled by REGC.

Martinel is reportedly a property up for sale. A 7,500-square-foot facility that has been a good spot to host small start-ups, it has rented for approximately $2,500 per month and has an asking price of approximately $280,000.

Neither Kent State University nor the city could construct a similar building for that price and one that is well located in Davey Industrial Park, but near the city and the university too.

Understandably, the owner of the building would like a lease at minimum and ideally a sale. Couldn't something be put together to buy a year's time and let community leaders come up with a longer term solution?

The companies being evicted with the closing of Martinel are good employers if currently small ones. Localingua provides translation services that fulfill a distinct need in the global economy. Graph SQI is a software company that specializes in graph analytics. Founded by Kent State University Computer Sciences Professor Rouming Jin, it now has a branch in California. It's a company with an extremely promising future.

Anderson Aerospace has a state-of-the-art, low-cost, low-weight aircraft antenna prototype for commercial and military use that could enable it to be a future manufacturer that could fuel Kent's economy.

Version 1 Creative is a two-year-old web and branding development firm that has grown steadily since it's launch.

For a modest investment, the city could keep all four companies going and buy the time that is needed to come up with a private-public partnership to fund an incubator.

We can understand city employees feeling understaffed and unable to do more. We cannot accept the city being held hostage by that attitude.

For the last six years, Kent has been the can-do community of northeast Ohio. The daring of Ron Burbick and the partnership of Kent, Kent State and PARTA have set the pace. The investment needed to keep the small companies going is so tiny compared to what has already taken place that it's difficult for us to understand and accept, a can't-do now.

It is going to take leadership to keep these employers in town. Surely Kent has what it takes to get this job done.

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