Report Overview:
Total Clips (26)
Alumni; Commencement (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (2)
Board of Trustees (4)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Coll. of Appl. Eng., Sustain. and Tech (CAEST) (3)
College of the Arts (CotA); Roe Green Center (1)
Commencement (1)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Physics (1)
Political Science (1)
Psychology (1)
Students (2)
Theatre and Dance (1)
Town-Gown; University Libraries (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Commencement (1)
Former astronaut among KSU speakers for commencement 12/05/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University will hold its fall 2013 commencement ceremonies for the Kent Campus on Dec. 13 and Dec. 14, at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation...


Art, School of (1)
Local news briefs -- Dec. 5 12/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT Memorial service KENT: A reception and memorial service for Kent State University associate professor Kirk Mangus will be held Saturday at the School of Art Gallery and auditorium. Mr. Mangus, head of the...


Athletics (2)
Kent State Flashes Nix leads five Flashes named to All-MAC team 12/05/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State senior defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix became the first player in program history and fifth player in Mid-American Conference history to earn...

Roosevelt Nix's rare feat headlines Kent State football's All-MAC selections (Haynes) 12/05/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The career of Kent State senior defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix is now like none other the school has ever seen. On Wednesday, Nix became the first player...


Board of Trustees (4)
Kent State University unveils See You@College to encourage first-generation high school students to attend college 12/04/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...students they can obtain a college education. ?See You @College ? Northeast Ohio Pathways to Success? will launch Feb. 13, with a website and conference at Kent State that will include national speakers and hundreds of representatives from area organizations, President Lester Lefton told trustees. ?In...

Kent State looks to recruit first-generation students (Lefton, Harvey, Jarvie) 12/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State will launch a new initiative in February to recruit low-income, first-generation students to college — any college. KSU President Lester...

KSU trustees approve new policy that lets students move off campus sooner (Jarvie, Lefton, Harvey) 12/05/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Some Kent State University students will be able to ditch their dorms earlier than years past. KSU has required that students enrolled at the Kent...

AUDIO: Kent State's trustees want $22 million from the state for construction (Lefton, Jarvie, Euclide) 12/05/2013 WKSU-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's trustees decided today to ask the state for $22 million for construction projects, a big jump from the $16 million the school asked...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Register Now for the 2014 ULI Urban Design Competition @ksuCUDC 12/05/2013 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

Hey, grad students: The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) is looking for interested participants for the Urban Land Institute's (ULI) Gerald...


Coll. of Appl. Eng., Sustain. and Tech (CAEST) (3)
Kent State University students will learn how to build and fly drones: Higher Education Roundup 12/05/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Drones are in the news following the announcement by Amazon.com that it may soon deliver packages using unmanned aerial systems. And drones...

KSU To Teach Students How To Fly Drones (Weber) 12/04/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...to introduce drones as a new way to ship packages to customers within minutes. It's a concept that has a lot of people talking, including those at Kent State University. The university recently announced it will soon be teaching students how to fly the unmanned aircrafts. KSU Professor Ray...

Kent State students will learn how to build and fly drones 12/04/2013 University Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...announcement by Amazon.com that it may soon deliver packages using unmanned aerial systems. And drones are a hot academic field. Beginning next fall Kent State University will teach college students how to build and fly them. Its College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology will...


College of the Arts (CotA); Roe Green Center (1)
Limón Dance Co. performs for free at Kent State University (Crawford) 12/04/2013 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist Series presents a concert by one of the country's foremost modern dance performance groups,...


Commencement (1)
Kent State Holds Fall Commencement Ceremonies on Dec. 13 & 14 12/04/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University will hold its fall 2013 commencement ceremonies for the Kent Campus on Dec. 13 and Dec. 14, at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation...


Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Frequent cell phone use linked to unhappiness, anxiety and lower grades in students, study shows (Lepp) 12/05/2013 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - Online Text Attachment Email

...students who use their cell phones frequently are more likely to suffer from anxiety and get lower grades, according to a new study. Researchers at Kent State University surveyed more than 500 college students about their cell phone use and texting and compared it to their grade point average...


KSU at Stark (2)
Longest-serving KSU staff member to retire this month (Southards, Speck) 12/05/2013 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

Linda Harsh was honored Tuesday with a celebration at the Stark campus, where she worked as a clerical specialist for the admissions and student services...

Longest-serving KSU staff member to retire this month (Southards, Speck) 12/05/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

Linda Harsh was honored Tuesday with a celebration at the Stark campus, where she worked as a clerical specialist for the admissions and student services...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Live on Lakeside 12/04/2013 Live on Lakeside - WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

...that created christopher. Bogey boards also. This is the coolest thing ever. >> Let me hold it up. >> It is a bogue why board designed by professors at kent state university. >> Then what do I press? >> Just press this button, the flower on top. You can erase. >> Look at that, that is gone. That is...


Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Day Ketterer rolls out new slogan (Grimm) 12/04/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...history or tradition are often attached to prestige or high-cost goods, said Pamela Grimm, chair of the Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship at Kent State University's College of Business Administration. For example, Parker Pens is touting its 125th anniversary this year, and luxury watchmaker...


Physics (1)
Explore winter skies while staying warm in @KentState's Planetarium 12/05/2013 Cool Cleveland Text Attachment Email

Thu 12/5 @ 8pm Fri 12/6 @ 8pm Sat 12/7 @ 8pm Kent State University's Planetarium is celebrating the holidays this weekend with their annual holiday...


Political Science (1)
The Center Cannot Hold (Ensley) 12/04/2013 New York Times, The Text Email

...argument made at a conference last month at the University of Akron by the political scientists Edward Carmines of Indiana University, Michael Ensley of Kent State University and Michael Wagner of the University of Wisconsin lies in the graphic representation in Figure 1, which shows the distribution...


Psychology (1)
Men also victims of false body image 12/05/2013 Calgary Herald, The Text Email

...their bodies are just not good enough. Evidence that college-age males are susceptible to media images comes from a study of 111 male undergraduates at Kent State University. Researchers showed them ads for products, some of them featuring shirtless males. "Results indicated that exposure to both...


Students (2)
Kappa Sigma fraternity at Kent State is hosting teddy bear drive 12/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Record Courier reports that a Kent State University fraternity is working to comfort sick children this holiday season. Kappa Sigma, on behalf of the Hunter's Helping Hands charity,...

FOUR STUDENTS AWARDED HENRY COUNTY CHAMBER SCHOLARSHIPS 12/04/2013 WZOM-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...University. Travis Roehrig is in the business administration and accounting program at BGSU. Janelle Hesterman is enrolled in Library and information science at Kent State University. And Sara Weaver is studying veterinary medicine at Ohio State University.


Theatre and Dance (1)
Stage notes: Venerable Limon Dance Company to perform at KSU (Tsengas) 12/04/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...potpourri,'' she said. Northeast Ohio audiences will get a rare chance to see the Limón Dance Company perform for free in a single concert Friday at Kent State University's E. Turner Stump Theatre. The concert, which required reservations, has sold out, which communications and marketing director...


Town-Gown; University Libraries (1)
Santa's coming to Kent Saturday 12/05/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS STARTS AT 5:30 PM SATURDAY Santa Claus returns to Kent this Saturday for the annual Festival of Lights gathering in downtown at...


News Headline: Former astronaut among KSU speakers for commencement | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University
will hold its fall 2013
commencement ceremonies
for the Kent
Campus on Dec. 13 and
Dec. 14, at the Memorial
Athletic and Convocation
Center.
Kent State will confer
1,984 degrees, including
1,544 bachelor's degrees,
390 master's degrees, 47
doctoral degrees and
three educational specialist
degrees.
Speaker for the 6 p.m.
Dec. 13 ceremony is Dr.
Melody Tankersley, Kent
State's associate provost
for academic affairs and
a professor in the College
of Education, Health and
Human Services.
Former NASA astronaut
and Kent State
alumnus Carl E. Walz
will speak at the 9:30
a.m. ceremony Dec. 14.
Walz had four space
flights logging a total of
231 days in space.
Walz received a Bachelor
of Science degree in
physics from Kent State
in 1977 and a Master of
Science in solid state
physics from John Carroll
University in 1979.
Speaker for Saturday's
1:30 p.m. ceremony
is Kent City Manager
Dave Ruller.

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News Headline: Local news briefs -- Dec. 5 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Memorial service

KENT: A reception and memorial service for Kent State University associate professor Kirk Mangus will be held Saturday at the School of Art Gallery and auditorium.

Mr. Mangus, head of the ceramics program at the School of Art since 1985, died Nov. 24 from a brain aneurysm. His ceramics and drawings have been exhibited and collected for more than 35 years, and his awards included two National Endowment for the Arts grants and four Ohio Arts Council fellowships.

He is survived by his wife, Eva Kwong, a part-time faculty member in ceramics at Kent State, his son Jasper and daughter Una.

The reception will begin at noon with the sharing of poems and artwork; the memorial service will begin at 2. Call 330-672-1369 for more information on the service.

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News Headline: Kent State Flashes Nix leads five Flashes named to All-MAC team | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State senior defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix became the first player in program history and fifth player in Mid-American Conference history to earn first team all-conference honors in four consecutive seasons.

Seniors Darius Polk, Dri Archer and Luke Wollet along with sophomore Anthony Melchiori were also named to the All-MAC Team Wednesday as announced by the conference office.

Nix led the Golden Flashes in tackles for loss (13.0), sacks (3.5) and quarterback hurries (six), despite playing through injuries during much of the season. He also forced two fumbles, made 41 tackles, broke up five passes and blocked a kick.

Nix (2010-13) joins defensive back Davonte Shannon, Buffalo (2007-10), defensive back Barry Church, Toledo (2006-09), punter Dave Zastudil, Ohio (1998-2001) and quarterback Brian McClure, Bowling Green (1982-85) on the prestigious list of four-year, first team honorees.

Archer also joined elite company, earning all-conference honors at two different positions for the second straight season. Earning third team honors this season at both wide receiver and kick returner, he owns the rare distinction of claiming All-MAC accolades at three different positions.

In 2012, Archer was a first team member at both kick returner and running back. Despite missing the better part of four games this season, he led the Flashes with 11 total touchdowns and 982 all-purpose yards.

Wollet, a third team choice at defensive back this season, becomes just Kent State's third three-time All-MAC selection since 1999 (Nix, Lainhart). Wollet led the Flashes with 78 tackles this season, adding two interceptions and five pass breakups.

Polk claimed All-MAC Second Team honors at defensive back. The team's top cover corner, Polk was matched up against outstanding receivers throughout the year, including three of the 10 Biletnikoff Award semifinalists. He led the Flashes with seven pass breakups and was fourth on the team with 60 tackles.

Melchiori earned second team honors as a punter, despite punting in just the first six games. After his injury in Week 7 at Ball State, Kent State ranked third in the nation in net punting at 42.5 yards per game. Opponents had just 13 yards in punt returns, while Melchiori had 14 kicks inside the 20.

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News Headline: Roosevelt Nix's rare feat headlines Kent State football's All-MAC selections (Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The career of Kent State senior defensive tackle Roosevelt Nix is now like none other the school has ever seen.

On Wednesday, Nix became the first player in program history -- and only the fifth-ever in the Mid-American Conference -- to earn First Team All-MAC honors in four consecutive seasons.

Nix led the Golden Flashes in tackles for a loss (13), sacks (31⁄2) and quarterback hurries (6), despite playing through injuries for the majority of the season. He also forced two fumbles, had 41 tackles, broke up five passes and blocked a kick.

Nix joins Buffalo DB Davnonte Shannon (2007-10), Toledo DB Barry Church (2006-09), Ohio punter Dave Zastudil (1998-2001) and Bowling Green QB Brian McClure (1982-85) -- a Rootstown High School graduate -- as the only MAC players to be named First Team for four years.

"Rosie didn't play a lot of snaps in a lot of our games, but when he was in there, he was very effective," Kent State head coach Paul Haynes said. "And to get voted First Team, this shows you the respect he gets around the league."

For Kent State, senior DB Darius Polk, senior RB Dri Archer, senior safety Luke Wollet and sophomore kicker Anthony Melchiori also were named All-MAC.

Archer also joined elite company, earning all-conference honors at two different positions for the second straight season. Earning Third Team honors this season at both wide receiver and kick returner, he owns the rare distinction of claiming All-MAC accolades at three different positions. In 2012, Archer was a First Team member at both kick returner and running back. Despite missing the better part of four games this season, he led the Flashes with 11 total touchdowns and 982 all-purpose yards.

"Dri can do a lot of different things," Haynes said. "And it's going to be fun to watch him in the future wherever he ends up. Everyone knew he had a chance to go the distance every time he touched the ball and he's done it at three different positions."

Wollet (78 tackles, 2 interceptions) was named to the Third Team, Polk (60 tackles, 7 pass breakups) to the Second Team and Melchiori (42.5 yards per punt, 14 punts inside the 20 and only 13 return yards by opponents on the season) was named to the Second Team.

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News Headline: Kent State University unveils See You@College to encourage first-generation high school students to attend college | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU's innovative program, unveiled today, involves training a network of informal advisers ? including pastors, youth group leaders and members of community organizations - to convince students they can obtain a college education. ?See You @College ? Northeast Ohio Pathways to Success? will launch Feb. 13, with a website and conference at Kent State that will include national speakers and hundreds of representatives from area organizations, President Lester Lefton told trustees. ?In Ohio 30 percent of incoming freshmen are first-generation students and 24 percent (of freshmen) are first generation and low-income,? he said. ?This is a long-term college access initiative. Kids and their families don?t know (about the process) and we want to provide services to increase the likelihood they will be successful.? The university wants to train local leaders in Northeast Ohio to work with high school students and their families to explain why students should go to college, the range of college choices, how they can afford it and what college is like.

In addition, once a student enrolls, colleges would provide a road map to graduation and services to help them adapt, Lefton said. ?We want to get them to college and while ideally we would like it to be at Kent State it can be anywhere,? he said. ?The goal is to get more kids in the pipeline. We are trying to do the right thing.? The university has been working on the program for about a year, said Iris Harvey, vice president of university relations, after the meeting.

About 40 percent of students on Kent?s main campus and 54 percent of students at its regional campuses are the first in their family to attend college, she said. ?What makes this program different than any other is that we will network with trusted people in the community who come in contact with these youth,? she said. ?We want to give people the range of resources they need to encourage students to think about college.? She said officials from public and private universities will be invited to the February conference as well as organizations that work to get first-generation, low-income students to college, including College Now Greater Cleveland and the Higher Education Compact of Greater Cleveland, of which Kent State is a member. ?Higher education and school systems can?t do this alone,? she said. ?It takes a village.?

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News Headline: Kent State looks to recruit first-generation students (Lefton, Harvey, Jarvie) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: Kent State will launch a new initiative in February to recruit low-income, first-generation students to college — any college.

KSU President Lester Lefton told trustees on Wednesday that See You @ College will collaborate with community groups, nonprofits and national foundations to reach students who may not have college on their to-do list.

“We're just trying to do the right thing,” Lefton said. “We'll get our fair share [of students].”

The university will hold a conference on Feb. 13 at the Kent campus to train “ambassadors.” Greg Darnieder, a senior adviser with the U.S. Department of Education, and John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, will be keynote speakers. About 300 community leaders who mentor young people in churches, clubs and the like have been invited to learn how they can shepherd them into higher education.

“By training the trainers, you reach a much broader range of individuals,” Lefton said.

Iris Harvey, KSU vice president of university relations, spearheaded the initiative, which will focus on middle school students.

“[The KSU ambassadors] are trusted and respected in the marketplace,” she said.

Ambassadors could provide information on the free federal financial aid application and what courses to take to prepare for college.

The leader of a Sunday school class, for example, could ask high school freshmen how many are taking Algebra 1 as a foundation for college.

According to Lefton, 30 percent of Ohioans who go to college right after high school are first-generation students and 24 percent are both first-generation and low-income. Lefton sees See You @ College as a model project that could blossom into a national initiative.

In other business, trustees agreed to allow some students to live off campus earlier than expected.

Starting this spring, students who have 60 credit hours or are at least 20 will no longer be required to live in one of KSU's 27 residence halls. That will free about 250 students to move off campus if they choose to take advantage of the change, said Greg Jarvie, vice president of enrollment management and student affairs.

The university had required students with less than 64 credit hours or who were under 21 to live on campus. That was an “old, even archaic,” policy that dated from decades past, Jarvie said.

The new policy will not hurt the residence halls, he said, as they were filled at the start of the fall semester and are close to capacity in the spring semester.

Students who live within 50 miles of the Kent campus, who live in a university-recognized fraternity or sorority house or who take part in a KSU program with an off-campus living site remain exempt from the policy.

About 6,200 students, primarily freshmen and sophomores, live in residence halls.

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News Headline: KSU trustees approve new policy that lets students move off campus sooner (Jarvie, Lefton, Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Some Kent State University
students will be
able to ditch their dorms
earlier than years past.
KSU has required that
students enrolled at the
Kent campus live in oncampus
housing for their
first two academic years.
After students complete
64 credit hours or turn
21, they're eligible to
move off campus.
Students living with
a parent or guardian
within a 50-mile radius
of campus are exempt
from the on-campus requirement.
On Wednesday, KSU's
Board of Trustees updated
those policies —
described as “archaic”
by Greg Jarvie, vice president
of enrollment management
and student
affairs — to reduce student
eligibility thresholds
to live off campus
to 60 credit hours and 20
years of age.
The changes take effect
in the spring semester,
starting in January.
Jarvie said the changes
more accurately reflect
actual student statuses.
Sixty credit hours
mark the threshold for a
student reaching junior
status, for example.
About 250 students
potentially could benefit
from the change, Jarvie
said, about 4 percent
of the roughly 6,200 students
filling the campus'
27 residence halls.
Jarvie noted residence
halls have been at capacity
at the start of the past
couple fall semesters, requiring
some to live in
transitional housing for
three to four weeks.
The change in eligibility
requirements to live
off campus could free up
some beds, he said.
“We think this is good
for our students,” Jarvie
said. “It gives them more
options.”
In other business:
nnTrustees approved a
six-year capital plan requesting
about $86 million
in state funding for
construction projects
and infrastructure upgrades
throughout Kent
State's eight-campus
system for 2015-2020.
nnPresident Lester Lefton
reported on the new,
ongoing Kent State initiative
“See You @ College,”
a program designed
to encourage
high-school students
to attend college with a
heavy focus on first generation,
low-income students
who may have not
considered college as a
viable option. Iris Harvey,
Kent State's vice
president for university
relations, said the program
will kick off Feb. 13
with a conference at the
Kent campus.
nnTrus tee Richard
Marsh, chair of the committee
to find Kent State
University's new president,
said there are no
updates on the presidential
search beyond noting
the effort is a work
in progress.

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News Headline: AUDIO: Kent State's trustees want $22 million from the state for construction (Lefton, Jarvie, Euclide) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's trustees decided today to ask the state for $22 million for construction projects, a big jump from the $16 million the school asked for two years ago.

Click here to listen: http://www.wksu.org/news/story/37591

The bulk of the $22 million will go toward improvements and additions to Kent's science labs. The associate vice president of facilities planning and operations, Tom Euclide, says the governor's office expects the state will see an increase in what public universities ask for construction by 10 percent over 2012.

“It'll be mixed with all three sciences: physics, biology and chemistry. But also interdisciplinary sciences [so] there will be research spaces and teaching spaces that will be used by all the sciences including nursing, public health and liquid crystal.

“We were given some optimism by the committee that was reviewing that we were on-target for an area that the governor feels is important.”

The board also passed a resolution naming Kent State's new esplanade after retiring President Lester Lefton. The trustees noted that the search committee for Lefton's replacement is slated to meet again next week.

Living off campus gets easier
And students will now have a shorter wait before they can move out of the school's dorms.

The board moved to drop the residence hall requirements from age 21 or 64 credits to age 20 or 60 credits.

Vice-President of Enrollment and Student Affairs Greg Jarvie says the old rules were more in line with quarters than semesters. But the new requirements will not affect commuter students.

“You must live on campus for the first two academic years. Unless you're residing at the principle residence, with a parent or guardian, within a 50 mile radius. That has not changed.”

Jarvie says about four percent of the 6,200 students in Kent's 27 residence halls will be affected when the rules take effect next fall.

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News Headline: Register Now for the 2014 ULI Urban Design Competition @ksuCUDC | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Hey, grad students: The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) is looking for interested participants for the Urban Land Institute's (ULI) Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition, a “two-week interdisciplinary finance, planning, and design competition for currently enrolled graduate students.” It's basically an idea competition that asks students to create viable development schemes. Winners get a $50,000 grand prize.

Last year's Cleveland team, composed of Case Western, Cleveland State, and Kent State students, received honorable for their mixed use/transit-oriented design promoting an active lifestyle.

Register by Mon 12/9. Competition takes place 1/13 – 1/27/14.

http://cudc.kent.edu

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News Headline: Kent State University students will learn how to build and fly drones: Higher Education Roundup | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Drones are in the news following the announcement by Amazon.com that it may soon deliver packages using unmanned aerial systems.

And drones are a hot academic field. Beginning next fall Kent State University will teach college students how to build and fly them. Its College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology will offer a minor in unmanned aircraft systems. It will be an option for students enrolled in any of the five aeronautics degree concentrations.

The university cited studies that indicated more than 23,000 jobs in unmanned aircraft systems jobs could be created over the next 15 years. In addition to military operations drones could be used for geologic research, weather monitoring, surveying, wildfire surveillance, security and aerial photography.

“Failure to implement this proposal will place the aeronautics program behind leading institutions that already have UAS curriculum in place or are moving to implement curcciula to address the needs for this area,” said a proposal to the university's Faculty Senate, which approved the program in February.

Dozens of colleges with aviation programs now offer courses in unmanned aerial systems, the New York Times has reported.

The University of North Dakota was first, in 2009, and has about 120 students in the field. Other universities with programs include Kansas State University Salina, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Indiana State University.

Today, the biggest use of drones is by the military and the Central Intelligence Agency, which operate hundreds of them around the world.

The Federal Aviation Administration is under instructions from Congress to fully integrate them by 2015. Regulations for lightweight craft are being rolled out as the FAA works through new technologies to secure radio communications and avoid collisions, the newspaper reported.

The agency predicts that 10,000 remote-piloted planes will be operating in American airspace within five years.

Students blame colleges for debt: A majority of young Americans say student debt is a major issue facing the nation, a new poll finds, and many blame colleges for the problem.

Fifty-eight percent of adults ages 18 to 24 consider rising student debt levels in the United States a "major problem," according to survey results released to The Huffington Post on Tuesday by the Harvard University Institute of Politics.

Only three percent said it's not an issue at all, while 22 percent called it a "minor problem." Yet even among people who weren't enrolled in college, 54 percent still considered student debt a major issue.

A plurality -- 39 percent -- blame colleges and universities for the rising amount of student debt, compared with just 10 percent who think students are at fault. Those who responded to the survey were more likely to blame colleges for rising student debt if they were currently enrolled in school.

The cost of a college degree has increased 12-fold in the last 30 years, which has led to more than $1.2 trillion in student debt.

Ohio ranks seventh in a list of the top 15 states with the most student debt. The average debt for a college graduate in Ohio is $28,683 and 68 percent of graduates have debt.

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News Headline: KSU To Teach Students How To Fly Drones (Weber) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Amani Abraham
News OCR Text: You've probably already heard about Amazon's future plan to introduce drones as a new way to ship packages to customers within minutes.

It's a concept that has a lot of people talking, including those at Kent State University. The university recently announced it will soon be teaching students how to fly the unmanned aircrafts.

KSU Professor Ray Weber says drones have been around for a while, but now it's gaining some momentum in the commercial field.

"There's a huge amount of commercial operations that would benefit from this technology," said Weber.

Many associate drones with the military, but Weber says there's many more ways it can used.

"It allows farmers and different companies and corporations to keep track of crops and to apply pesticides more precisely to prevent contamination of the environment around it."

The KSU Faculty Senate recently took the next step to keep up with technology by moving forward with plans to offer a minor in Unmanned Aircraft Systems, which is set to begin next fall. The minor is already listed on the university's website.

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News Headline: Kent State students will learn how to build and fly drones | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: University Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Drones are in the news following the announcement by Amazon.com that it may soon deliver packages using unmanned aerial systems.

And drones are a hot academic field. Beginning next fall Kent State University will teach college students how to build and fly them. Its College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology will offer a minor in unmanned aircraft systems. It will be an option for students enrolled in any of the five aeronautics degree concentrations.

The university cited studies that indicated more than 23,000 jobs in unmanned aircraft systems jobs could be created over the next 15 years. In addition to military operations drones could be used for geologic research, weather monitoring, surveying, wildfire surveillance, security and aerial photography.

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News Headline: Limón Dance Co. performs for free at Kent State University (Crawford) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist Series presents a concert by one of the country's foremost modern dance performance groups, the Limón Dance Company of New York City on Dec. 6 at 7:30 p.m.

The performance will take place in E. Turner Stump Theatre in the newly named Center for the Performing Arts, 1325 Theatre Drive in Kent. The event is free and open to the public. Tickets must be reserved by calling 330-672-ARTS (2787) or online at www.kent.edu/artscollege. A complimentary dessert reception will immediately follow the concert in the Roe Green Center lobby, adjacent to E. Turner Stump Theatre.

Under the artistic direction of Carla Maxwell, the Limón Dance Company is renowned for its technical mastery and dramatic expression, and demonstrates both the timelessness of José Limón's works and the humanistic vision that guides the repertory choices.

" I am most especially thrilled that Kent State is able to present a free performance to the public by the Limón Dance Company," said John R. Crawford, dean of the College of the Arts and dancer by trade. "Years ago I studied the José Limón technique, later performed, and then eventually taught the Limón principles of style. The company has such a rich dance history and impressive reputation, I encourage everyone to attend the concert to experience firsthand this expressive and passionate form of dance."

In its first half-century, the company achieved many important milestones: it was the first group to tour under the auspices of the American Cultural Exchange Program (1954), the first dance troupe to perform at Lincoln Center (1963), and has had the honor of appearing twice at The White House (1967 and 1995). More recently, the José Limón Dance Foundation was awarded a 2008 National Medal of Arts, the nation's highest honor for artistic excellence.

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News Headline: Kent State Holds Fall Commencement Ceremonies on Dec. 13 & 14 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will hold its fall 2013 commencement ceremonies for the Kent Campus on Dec. 13 and Dec. 14, at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

Kent State will confer 1,984 degrees, including 1,544 bachelor's degrees, 390 master's degrees, 47 doctoral degrees and three educational specialist degrees.

Speaker for the 6 p.m. Dec. 13 ceremony is Dr. Melody Tankersley, Kent State's associate provost for academic affairs and a professor in the College of Education, Health and Human Services.

Former NASA astronaut and Kent State alumnus Carl E. Walz will speak at the 9:30 a.m. ceremony Dec. 14.

Walz had four space flights logging a total of 231 days in space.

Walz received a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from Kent State in 1977 and a Master of Science in solid state physics from John Carroll University in 1979.

Speaker for Saturday's 1:30 p.m. ceremony is Kent City Manager Dave Ruller.

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News Headline: Frequent cell phone use linked to unhappiness, anxiety and lower grades in students, study shows (Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College students who use their cell phones frequently are more likely to suffer from anxiety and get lower grades, according to a new study.

Researchers at Kent State University surveyed more than 500 college students about their cell phone use and texting and compared it to their grade point average and assessment of how happy they were.

"The students in our study who used the cell phone more had lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life relative to their peers who used the cell phone less," lead researcher Andrew Lepp said in an email.

Many high-frequency cell phone users described their experience with cell phones as stressful -- a description many non-student cell phone users will probably recognize, especially those of us who get email notifications on our phones.

"The social network sometimes just makes me feel a little bit tied to my phone. It makes me feel like I have another obligation in my life that I have to stick to," one survey participant told researchers. "Sometimes the cell phone just makes me feel like it is a whole new world of obligation that I have because anybody can get a hold of me any time by just thinking about me. If my mom wanted to give me a call right now and just talk for a second, she could. And if I did not call her back by the end of the day, she would get worried. It creates a bit of anxiety and it is kind of annoying sometimes."

Many students said cell phones created an obligation and pressure to be constantly connected to a network of peers and family.

"That obligation was perceived as stressful by many students (especially those getting 100s of texts a day)," Lepp said.

The resulting cell phone use often distracts students from paying attention in class and from studying, he said.

"There is no 'me time' or solitude left in some of these students' lives and I think mental health requires a bit of personal alone time to reflect, look inward, process life's events, and just recover from daily stressors," Lepp told me. "Also, a few of the students we interviewed reported sending texts constantly throughout the day from morning to night – that in itself might be stressful. Furthermore, interviews with some students suggested that communicating primarily by text message can create tension because meaning or intent is not always perfectly clear in brief, rapidly composed texts."

Lepp stressed that while the study, which is published in a 2014 issue of Computers in Human Behavior, links cell phone use to unhappiness, it does not establish causation between the two.

But results do suggests that parents should teach their kids to put the phone away while studying, just like they are asked to turn off the TV, he said.

"Students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness," the researchers said.

The study follows up on an earlier survey by the same researchers that showed people who spent a lot of time on their cell phones doing sedentary activities get less exercise and are less physically fit than low cell phone users. We reported on that in July.

For more viral stories, consumer stories and the occasional freebie, follow Gitte Laasby on Twitter @GitteLaasbyMJS or get news straight to your Facebook page by liking her page.

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News Headline: Longest-serving KSU staff member to retire this month (Southards, Speck) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Linda Harsh was honored Tuesday with a celebration at the Stark campus, where she worked as a clerical specialist for the admissions and student services departments for more than four decades.

Linda Harsh will retire in a few weeks with 47.4 years of service to Kent State University, the longest-serving employee across all eight Kent State campuses.

JACKSON TWP.
Linda Harsh started working for Kent State University as a junior in high school, alphabetizing admissions packets on Saturdays in an office in the basement of her school.

Now more than 47 years later, the 65-year-old is preparing to retire, after earning the distinction of being the longest-serving staff member in the history of the Kent State University system.

"I never thought I'd be here all this time," she said.

Harsh was honored Tuesday with a celebration at the Stark campus, where she worked as a clerical specialist for the admissions and student services departments for more than four decades.

She was hired full-time following her graduation from high school in 1966 and saw the university transition from relying on carbon paper to keeping records electronically.

When Harsh started working, students used to register for classes by writing their names and addresses on a sign-up sheet, and their ID numbers were calculated by hand. Harsh learned to use a computer on the job and said the office now couldn't function without one.

Mary Southards, assistant dean of enrollment management, said after the office got computers and switched to using a new word processing program, Harsh used her own money to buy a manual, figured out how to use the software, and then taught her coworkers.

"She kept us going," Southards said.

Beyond technological changes, Harsh also witnessed major physical changes to the Stark campus. A timeline displayed Tuesday that highlighted major events during her tenure included the addition of a fine arts facility and a library resource center.

Harsh said she remembered leaving the office at the American Legion and transitioning to the Main Hall, which she described as a beautiful and clean facility.

"I was proud to work for Kent State University," she said.

Deborah Speck, director of admissions, said during the celebration Tuesday that Harsh demonstrated a genuine concern for the students at the university, strong work ethic and immense attention to detail.

She also highlighted Harsh's passion for knitting.

For Tuesday's event, Harsh's coworkers brought in the stuffed animals Harsh had crafted for them over the years, showing off a hippo wearing a diaper and brightly colored fish with wiggly eyes.

Speck said Harsh spent her career giving to other people.

"It truly has been a delight working with you all these years," she said.

Harsh's plans for retirement include continuing her participation with the knitting club that meets at the branch library in Jackson Township and with the book club that meets on campus, along with tending to her home.

She said what she would miss most about her job was the people.

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News Headline: Longest-serving KSU staff member to retire this month (Southards, Speck) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Linda Harsh was honored Tuesday with a celebration at the Stark campus, where she worked as a clerical specialist for the admissions and student services departments for more than four decades.

Linda Harsh will retire in a few weeks with 47.4 years of service to Kent State University, the longest-serving employee across all eight Kent State campuses.

JACKSON TWP.
Linda Harsh started working for Kent State University as a junior in high school, alphabetizing admissions packets on Saturdays in an office in the basement of her school.

Now more than 47 years later, the 65-year-old is preparing to retire, after earning the distinction of being the longest-serving staff member in the history of the Kent State University system.

"I never thought I'd be here all this time," she said.

Harsh was honored Tuesday with a celebration at the Stark campus, where she worked as a clerical specialist for the admissions and student services departments for more than four decades.

She was hired full-time following her graduation from high school in 1966 and saw the university transition from relying on carbon paper to keeping records electronically.

When Harsh started working, students used to register for classes by writing their names and addresses on a sign-up sheet, and their ID numbers were calculated by hand. Harsh learned to use a computer on the job and said the office now couldn't function without one.

Mary Southards, assistant dean of enrollment management, said after the office got computers and switched to using a new word processing program, Harsh used her own money to buy a manual, figured out how to use the software, and then taught her coworkers.

"She kept us going," Southards said.

Beyond technological changes, Harsh also witnessed major physical changes to the Stark campus. A timeline displayed Tuesday that highlighted major events during her tenure included the addition of a fine arts facility and a library resource center.

Harsh said she remembered leaving the office at the American Legion and transitioning to the Main Hall, which she described as a beautiful and clean facility.

"I was proud to work for Kent State University," she said.

Deborah Speck, director of admissions, said during the celebration Tuesday that Harsh demonstrated a genuine concern for the students at the university, strong work ethic and immense attention to detail.

She also highlighted Harsh's passion for knitting.

For Tuesday's event, Harsh's coworkers brought in the stuffed animals Harsh had crafted for them over the years, showing off a hippo wearing a diaper and brightly colored fish with wiggly eyes.

Speck said Harsh spent her career giving to other people.

"It truly has been a delight working with you all these years," she said.

Harsh's plans for retirement include continuing her participation with the knitting club that meets at the branch library in Jackson Township and with the book club that meets on campus, along with tending to her home.

She said what she would miss most about her job was the people.

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News Headline: Live on Lakeside | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Live on Lakeside - WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >>> What is new, what is happening, what is fun. It's hollie strano and michael cardamone with live on lakeside. >> And welcome to live on lakeside. It is wednesday, december 4th, I am hollie strano, michael cardamone is off today, maureen kyle will be joining me here shortly. We are starting off the show with keeping everything in the community, keeping it local. South park mall is here and andy, the marketing director, we are holiday shopping and in the mode and there is nothing better than everything staying right where it should. Right? >> Right, the other day somebody asked me why should I go to the mall to keep it local? Well first of all if you spend it there you are keeping it here. >> Yeah. >> Well, then someone said I like to shop local businesses and I started looking through this mall and I could not believe the 20 or 30 businesses, even though they might be a national chain but they are local. >> You might be surprised. >> Yeah, our first one, our green mannikin is popping paisley, and another brand out there more national. Heidi, who lives in norwalk, ohio, decided I want to do it different. I want to do it cheaper, so these memory charm bracelets or necklaces go for under $40 each. Other places they are over 100, and they have a kiosk there and will be there during the holidays, a kiosk. >> You can personalize that. >> You can do whatever you want and change out your charms. >> That is awesome. >> Duct tape, national brand, located in avon, ohio, they have a kiosk at south park mall. >> Look at all those. >> Yeah, kind of fun, so they have a kiosk. Snow globe. How many have bought these they member. >> This is what we were talking about earlier. >> You live around the corner from highland heights. >> Oh, my gosh. >> Yeah, so it is a national chain but with local ties so you are supporting the people who work here. >> You mean like our weather this weekend. Exactly. Lip smackers, we have a full lip smacker cart, everything cute. >> Yes. >> Princess. >> Oh, that is amazing stocking stuffers. >> Yes, the lip smackers are at the mall, these crosses right here, we have a cart called nature's beauty, they made these out of local church pews so those are actually made from a church in cleveland. >> That is neat. >> Then I will talk about learning express toys, a local franchise brand but they sell this brand, did you know this was written in ohio and they are from alliance? So christopher came out a local company that created christopher. Bogey boards also. This is the coolest thing ever. >> Let me hold it up. >> It is a bogue why board designed by professors at kent state university. >> Then what do I press? >> Just press this button, the flower on top. You can erase. >> Look at that, that is gone. That is cool. >> Lots of fun stuff, lots of ohio stuff, steel stretch, a local company and last but not least nestle, only in ohio. >> I love it. >> The only brand in ohio is located in south park and they are local owners. >> Can you guys see that? It is really adorable, thank you andy. Again go to shop in south park mall.com for information. They are on facebook and twitter. >> And we will post these things. >> Social media today, what are our favorite local northeast ohio businesses? Let's brag about it. Let's tell each other about it and we will read your responses.

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News Headline: Day Ketterer rolls out new slogan (Grimm) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Day Ketterer rolls out new slogan

Banking on history while looking to the future, Day Ketterer "Modern Law Since 1872"

When the lawyers at Day Ketterer were looking for a new slogan to define their firm in the years ahead, they made sure to take a cue from the past.

The downtown fixture rolled out its new tag line — "Modern Law Since 1872" — late last month alongside a display of framed documents, some dating back to the firm's founding. The marketing update is the culmination of a process that began in March.

"We were coming off of our 140th (year), we're going into the next decade and we felt that this was a good time to go ahead and reconvey our brand," explained Jennifer Novotny, the firm's director of client services and development.

Day Ketterer's leadership wants the new slogan to convey the image of longevity sustainability and progressiveness.

"We are grounded by our perspective of our past, but defined by our aspirations for the future," said Robert E. Roland, the firm's managing partner.

THE FIRM

When it comes to history, Day Ketterer can show more than decades. One of the founders, William R. Day, was a close ally of William McKinley and served as the president's secretary of state. Day capped his career by spending 19 years on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The law firm he founded with William A. Lynch did all right, too.

Day Ketterer now has about 40 attorneys and offices in Canton, Hudson and Cleveland. Its specialties include litigation law, business law, labor and employment law, and recently, education law.

For much of its history the firm has focused on Stark County, but in recent years it's been growing, and is looking to expand to surrounding counties as a regional practice, Roland said.

The law firm arrived at the new tag line through a months-long process that started with focus groups of attorneys and staff and included input from downtown-based Jab Advertising.

The slogan replaces the 2006 tag line, "Redefining the power suit since 1872," which was shown next to a suit of armor wearing a tie.

"It serves to tell the public and ourselves what makes us stand out from our competition," Novotny said.

HISTORIC BRANDS

In marketing, themes of history or tradition are often attached to prestige or high-cost goods, said Pamela Grimm, chair of the Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship at Kent State University's College of Business Administration.

For example, Parker Pens is touting its 125th anniversary this year, and luxury watchmaker TAG Heurer bills itself as "Swiss avant-garde since 1860."

Highlighting heritage also can be a way for businesses that provide a service, such as law firms, to draw concrete distinctions between themselves and competitors, Grimm said.

Page 2 of 2 - Longevity conveys the idea, 'If they're around for a long time, they're doing something right," she said.

The risk is that potential customers will see an historic brand, not as a classic, but as stodgy and behind the times.

The Day Ketterer slogan carries an inherent tension between the modern and the historical, Grimm said. "How their target market will see it, I don't know."

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News Headline: Explore winter skies while staying warm in @KentState's Planetarium | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cool Cleveland
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thu 12/5 @ 8pm
Fri 12/6 @ 8pm
Sat 12/7 @ 8pm

Kent State University's Planetarium is celebrating the holidays this weekend with their annual holiday presentation, The Skies of Winter: Holidays in the Planetarium. This event will explore the astronomical connection to cultural and religious holidays around the world. You're invited to discover how the heavens not only impact but structure our lives.

This event is not appropriate for children under 6 years old. Seating is limited, reservations are recommended.

http://Planetarium.Kent.edu

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News Headline: The Center Cannot Hold (Ensley) | Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: New York Times, The
Contact Name: EDSALL, THOMAS B.
News OCR Text: If you ask them, Americans will tell you that they want constructive compromise and a more conciliatory political regime, even though they are reluctant to reach agreement when it comes to the specific issues that they actually care about.

In "Why American Political Parties Can't Get Beyond the Left-Right Divide," three experts on voting behavior argue that proponents of a revival of a less divisive politics should keep their hopes down.

The core of the argument made at a conference last month at the University of Akron by the political scientists Edward Carmines of Indiana University, Michael Ensley of Kent State University and Michael Wagner of the University of Wisconsin lies in the graphic representation in Figure 1, which shows the distribution of political orientations in the United States.

According to their analysis of American National Election Studies poll data from the last 40 years, the electorate is divided into five ideological categories: liberals, who make up 19 percent of voters; conservatives, 27 percent; libertarians, 22 percent; populists, 11 percent; and, in the lighter gray center, moderates, at 21 percent.

Carmines's five-group analysis produces more finely grained results than traditional analyses of political identification that focus on just three variables: conservative, liberal or moderate. These traditional surveys show a much larger bloc in the moderate center, generally 35 percent or more. This tripartite conservative-moderate-liberal approach results in what Carmine and his collaborators contend is far too large a group in the middle. Their method reveals a much weaker moderate core.

This finding undermines the prospect of basing campaign strategy or a third political party on an imaginary centrist coalition:

"Many of those self-identifying as ideologically moderate are actually polarized from each other -- making a centrist third-party's rise very difficult."

Carmines expanded on this point by email:

"Analysts have been misled by the number of respondents in surveys who claim to be moderates or place themselves toward the middle of the ANES seven-point ideological self-identification scale question. These measures indicate that moderates are the largest ideological grouping in the U.S. But these estimates are misleading because the group of individuals who are moderates by this definition are actually not moderate according to their positions on economic and social issues. By this latter operational definition only 21 percent of the public were moderates in 2012 and only 13 percent in 2008. Moreover, many of those who self-identify as moderates are actually libertarians or populists -- groups who have diametrically opposite sets of issue positions. Attempting to build a winning electoral coalition from such a diverse set of voters is unlikely to work. Having said this, if Democrats were to follow the recent behavior of the Republican Party and move leftward as much as the G.O.P. has moved rightward, then there would be a greater opening for a successful centrist third party."

In a separate email to The Times, Wagner, one of Carmines's co-authors, writes that most "moderates" are "not pure centrists, but a healthy mix of libertarians, populists and centrists." Attempting to unite populists and libertarians under one new banner is virtually impossible because they are "just as different from each other as liberals are different from conservatives, making it hard for a centrist to appeal to them."

In a follow-up email, Ensley -- Carmines's other co-author -- provided an anecdotal example of the challenges faced by advocates of a centrist approach.

Ensley describes a "stereotype of a populist, an older, white male voter, who is probably of union family. He is worried about Social Security and Medicare being there for him. However, he is also probably uncomfortable with issues like gay marriage. He is probably uncomfortable with abortion on demand. He is probably a church-going fellow." Ensley argues that if this hypothetical voter is given a chance to cast a presidential ballot for Michael Bloomberg (sometimes mentioned as a possible third party candidate), he "is probably indifferent between Bloomberg and the Democratic and Republicans options. They are all equally unappealing."

Conversely, Ensley suggests, "a typical libertarian, Ron-Paul type voter looks at Bloomberg and celebrates the social liberalism (pro-gay marriage, pro-choice), which is the exact thing that the populist does not like about Bloomberg." At the same time, however, the libertarian sees in Bloomberg "a nanny-state, pro-regulation, soda-taxing machine that repels" him.

What then, Ensley asks, is the poor hypothetical third party candidate to do? Any move to appease the populist side is likely to repel the libertarian side and vice versa. As soon as a centrist candidate starts to "take sides, then the grand coalition of populists, moderates and libertarians crumbles."

The Carmines-Ensley-Wagner analysis helps explain the roiling nature of contemporary politics, what they call "the deep-seated ideological heterogeneity" of the American electorate. The heterogeneity lying just under the surface polarization has led to two seemingly divergent developments.

The relatively narrow voting groups that fit the traditional definition of liberal and conservative are entrenched in the two-party system -- conservatives strongly sharing the policy preferences of the Republican Party and liberals strongly sharing the policy preferences of the Democratic Party -- and the very depth of this belief creates the gap that defines political polarization. But there is another world of disaffection aswirl here too: Populists and libertarians are disconnected from both parties, often cross-pressured issue by issue, with libertarians gravitating toward the Republican Party on economics and to the Democrats on social issues, while populists are propelled in the opposite direction.

Voters clearly have issue positions that do not fall neatly into well-defined left-right categories. There are dozens of economic and social issues (as the tables in their paper show) on which a voter can fall into any one of Carmines's five ideological categories. Complexity and seeming contradiction is the rule, not the exception.

Democrats and Republicans each have two alternative strategies available as they seek to build a majority coalition, according to Carmines and his collaborators.

On the one hand, the parties can focus on turning out core supporters. This would lead to more polarization and weaken the appeal to voters falling in the populist, libertarian and moderate camps.

On the other hand, the parties can try to boost support among libertarians, populists and those moderates who do actually exist. For libertarians, Democrats would have to move to the right on economic issues, and Republicans to the left on social issues. For populists, the opposite would be true. For moderates, both parties would have to move to the center on economic and social issues, weakening their core support among liberals for Democrats and among conservatives for Republicans.

In each case there is a tradeoff, further bolstering the argument that a successful centrist movement is unlikely to materialize.

At the same time, a separate trend appears to strengthen the Carmines thesis that centrism, as a free standing movement, is in trouble: the decline in the percentage of the electorate composed of swing voters.

As John Sides, a political scientist at Georgetown, told The Times's Rebecca Berg: "There is so much pop psychology surrounding swing voters, but there is very little evidence that there are key demographics in the population that are inherently swing voters."

It's possible, Sides argues, to "drill down, down, down, down and identify a group of swing voters. But how big is that group really, and is that group a swing group in a chronic sense? Probably not."

Carmines and his collaborators aside, populists and libertarians are now further subdivided into left and right populists, and left and right libertarians.

There are at least two scenarios that could result in a reduction of polarization. The first is that if presidential losses pile up, the business wing of the Republican Party will try harder to marginalize the Tea Party wing and move the party back toward the middle.

The other, and far less likely, scenario is that the economically disadvantaged wing of the Democratic Party -- the downstairs in the Democrats' upstairs-downstairs coalition -- gains ascendance, forcing relatively affluent social liberals, fearful of higher taxes, into the arms of Republicans and shifting the balance of power back toward the historic center.

The lack of real moderates means that the most likely course of events is a continuation of partisan confrontation, with Republicans holding their own in off-year elections and Democrats maintaining a fragile edge in presidential contests. The vestigial idea of a center up for grabs will continue to play a marginal role in legislative calculations and campaign strategies, but the dream of a moderate revolt against the parties will remain out of reach, exposed as an illusion.

Copyright (c) 2013 The New York Times Company

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News Headline: Men also victims of false body image | Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Calgary Herald, The
Contact Name: Keenan, Tom
News OCR Text: There have been a number of brilliant campaigns to alert young women to the rampant retouching of photos used in fashion advertising. Basically, 100 per cent of the models shown in magazines are digitally altered, often beyond recognition. My personal favourite is a video called "Time Lapse Video Photoshop Transformation Shows Model's Extreme Change." It went viral in October 2013 and is available at http://goo. gl/Vf9AEA.

In this short video clip, a fairly ordinary looking woman is digitally transformed into a glamorous supermodel. Her torso shrinks two sizes, her legs are lengthened, and she receives "a digitally sculpted backside." It provides a great lesson in fashion fakery. As one commentator put it, the models in those ads also wish they had the bodies they are showing off.

Another shocker was the admission by retail chain H&M that some of its perfect-bodied models don't even exist in real life. The company uses computer generated mannequins, both female and male, electronically pasting on the heads of real people and tinting the skin colour appropriately.

Somebody needs to perform a similar awareness service for guys. It turns out that males, especially young ones, are falling prey to various types of body dysmorphic disorder - the feeling that their bodies are just not good enough.

Evidence that college-age males are susceptible to media images comes from a study of 111 male undergraduates at Kent State University. Researchers showed them ads for products, some of them featuring shirtless males. "Results indicated that exposure to both muscular and slender images was associated with an increase in body dissatisfaction," they conclude.

Another study, by Magdala Labre at the University of Florida, found that "while women tend to be most dissatisfied with their middle and lower bodies and their breasts, men have been found to be most unhappy with their middle and upper bodies, particularly abdomens, chests, and upper arms - body parts that frequently are emphasized in the media."

There is some hope that we're not just mindless victims of hot body advertising. A study called "GI Joe or Average Joe?" from the University of Queensland found that "men and women rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as muscular models. For men, exposure to average-size models was associated with more positive body image in comparison to viewing no models, but no difference was found in comparison to muscular models."

A 12-year study from Boston Children's Hospital found that guys who tried to slim down or "beef up" had higher rates of other conditions such as depression, drug use, and binge drinking.

Researcher Alison Field and colleagues tracked 5,527 U.S. males aged 12 to 18 years, asking them periodically about how they perceive their bodies and if they were engaging in certain body modification behaviours. The first shocker was the percentage of late adolescent boys and young men, 7.6 per cent, who admitted taking dangerous substances to increase muscularity. "The frequency of use of products such as anabolic steroids to increase muscle size and enhance body size are at least as common among males as purging is among females," the researchers write. So while we're not seeing guys running to the bathroom to vomit up their latest meal, they are popping pills that can cause serious health problems. The researchers also singled out creatine supplements and growth hormone derivatives as a concern. Some muscle building substances that are widely available online haven't been fully tested in this age group.

As for body image, 17.9 per cent of adolescent boys and young men reported being extremely concerned with their weight or physique at some point during the study. The linkage to other problems such as depression seems to work as follows. Guys who seek to be thinner, which is the form of eating disorder usually seen in females, seemed to be more prone to bouts of depression. Those who were aiming for more muscularity were more likely than the peers to engage in binge drinking and taking illegal drugs.

It's worth noting that how a person looks and develops is a combination of genetics, diet, and exercise habits. The same Internet that allows guys to order dodgy supplements will provide endless advice on "getting six pack abs." The truth is that we all have them, the rectus abdominis muscle, hidden down there somewhere. However in many people they don't show up because they are covered in layers of fat. Genetics has a lot to do with how your body deposits fat. This doesn't mean you shouldn't try to slim down and work your muscles. Still, no matter how hard they try, some people are just never going to make the cover of a fitness magazine.

The important thing is to approach body image sensibly, and realize that many of the images we are exposed to in advertising are actually faked or freaks. You might also inject a sense of humour. One wag, Shane Sargent, writing on a discussion board about getting those elusive six pack abs, commented "I have a keg so you will find I trump your six pack at any party."

Dr. Tom Keenan is an award winning journalist, public speaker, professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary, and author of the forthcoming book, Technocreep, www.orbooks.com/catalog/technocreep/

Copyright © 2013 Calgary Herald

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News Headline: Kappa Sigma fraternity at Kent State is hosting teddy bear drive | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Record Courier reports that a Kent State University fraternity is working to comfort sick children this holiday season. Kappa Sigma, on behalf of the Hunter's Helping Hands charity, is holding a teddy bear drive in hopes to be able to donate a few thousand teddy bears to Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital in Cleveland for Christmas.

The Kappa Sigma brothers are reaching out to family members, the community, Kent State sororities, radio stations and even the Lake Erie Monsters to help them complete their goal. The Lake Erie Monsters are contributing with “Chuck-a-Bear” night at their home game on Dec. 21 when fans are invited to throw teddy bears onto the ice that will then be donated to the cause.

The fraternity will be accepting teddy bears at its house, 1375 W. Campus Center Drive. Kappa Sigma's service chair Luke Marzec is also willing to pick up contributions. He can be contacted at 330-968-9367 or lmarzec@kent.edu.

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News Headline: FOUR STUDENTS AWARDED HENRY COUNTY CHAMBER SCHOLARSHIPS | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: WZOM-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Henry County Chamber of Commerce has awarded scholarships to four current college students from the area. The 400-dollar grants were presented to Elizabeth Brubaker, Travis Roehrig, Janelle Hesterman, and Sara Weaver.

Elizabeth Brubaker is studying optometry at Ohio State University. Travis Roehrig is in the business administration and accounting program at BGSU. Janelle Hesterman is enrolled in Library and information science at Kent State University. And Sara Weaver is studying veterinary medicine at Ohio State University.

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News Headline: Stage notes: Venerable Limon Dance Company to perform at KSU (Tsengas) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/04/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Clawson, Kerry
News OCR Text: When American modern dance pioneer José Limón immigrated to the United States from Mexico as a 7-year-old boy in 1915, children made fun of him and his siblings because they couldn't speak English. Instead of hanging his head in shame, Limón did something about it.

“He vowed to speak better than any of them, and I can attest that … he spoke beautifully'' said Carla Maxwell, artistic director for the world-renowned Limón Dance Company, which carries on the late choreographer's legacy to this day.

Limón went on to become one of the most famous choreographers in the world. He formed the Limón Dance Company in 1946, after becoming an American citizen.

Maxwell, speaking by phone from the company's rehearsal location in Harlem, said the late Limón was a wonderful speaker and writer who was self-taught in many things. He also had the courage to overcome challenges through discipline and hard work.

“I think part of his life was always reconciling his Mexican roots with this American potpourri,'' she said.

Northeast Ohio audiences will get a rare chance to see the Limón Dance Company perform for free in a single concert Friday at Kent State University's E. Turner Stump Theatre. The concert, which required reservations, has sold out, which communications and marketing director Effie Tsengas said is testimony to the iconic company's strong following.

Today, the Limón Dance Company remains devoted to maintaining both Limón's technique and repertory. Maxwell has spent most of her career either dancing for Limón or working to further his legacy. She worked with him the last seven years of his life, touring with his company while she was still a Juilliard student.

Limón also was part of a dream team faculty that built the dance program at Juilliard under Martha Hill. Other teachers included the faculty of Martha Graham — another master of American modern dance — and luminary Anthony Tudor as head of the ballet faculty. Limón taught all day at Juilliard and then rehearsed all night with his company.

“People took a year to create new work, and it shows,'' Maxwell said.

She began working with the Limón Dance Company in 1965 while a dance student at Juilliard, and became artistic director in 1978, six years after Limón's death.

Limón didn't start dancing until he was 20, after he realized he would never be a great painter, which had been his first love. His life was changed when he saw German expressionist dancer/choreographer Harald Kreutzberg in 1929 and realized a man could dance with power and passion.

“It gave him the courage to do something'' with dance, Maxwell said of Limón, who studied with Americans Doris Humphrey and Charles Weidman in New York.

The young man from Mexico was a master of form, a musician and a painter, all of which can be seen in his work, said Maxwell.

“Limón was an anomaly in his own time,'' she said.

Musicality was of utmost importance in his dances: ‘‘He used to tell us, ‘If you're out in a field without a stage, scenery, set or costumes, or even music, people should understand what you're dancing about and they should feel the music coming out of your body,'' Maxwell said.

The dancemaker believed so passionately that all great composers are great choreographers and vice versa, he gave a convocation speech at Juilliard in 1966 called ‘‘Dancers Are Musicians Are Dancers.''

He also believed that dance must be passionate theater, even when there's no story line. Limón was known for purposefully setting limitations on his choreography, including not using props, to force himself to be more creative.

Friday's program in Kent will include two Limón pieces — the ensemble dance Psalm , restaged by Maxwell with a newly commissioned score by Jon Magnussen, and Chaconne , which was Limón's first major solo piece, set to the music of Bach.

The 13-member company also will perform Come With Me , its newest commission by Rodrigo Pederneiras of Brazil, with music by jazz musician Paquito D'Rivera. Finally, the solo piece Etude is a companion piece to Psalm choreographed by Maxwell and inspired by Limón's technique. It is set to music by Schubert.

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News Headline: Santa's coming to Kent Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS STARTS AT 5:30 PM SATURDAY

Santa Claus returns to Kent
this Saturday for the annual
Festival of Lights gathering in
downtown at Hometown Plaza
and the gazebo near Water
and Main streets.
Carolers, a letters to Santa
station, holiday movies,
snacks and hot cocoa and
more will all be present to help
kick start the holiday season
in Kent.
Beginning at 5:30 p.m., the
Dickens Carolers from The
Light Church on North Water
Street will sing holiday favorites,
while children can write
letters to Santa on the Main
Street Bridge, dubbed “Candy
Cane Lane” for the event. The
Kent Junior Mothers are providing
free snacks, Dunkin Donuts
will supply hot chocolate
and the Kent Theodore Roosevelt
High School cheerleading
squad will work as Santa's
helpers.
At 6 p.m., Santa is expected
to come riding into town
via his decorated locomotive
train. Upon his arrival, Kent
Mayor Jerry Fiala and Santa
will turn on Kent's downtown
holiday light decorations.
“It's a magical, family friendly
event,” said Lori Wemhoff,
executive director of the Kent
Area Chamber of Commerce,
which helps organize the yearly
holiday event.
This year, a partnership between
the Kent Free Library,
Kent State University Libraries
and the chamber will begin

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