Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (2)
Board of Trustees (2)
Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (1)
Commencement (1)
Enrollment; KSU at Stark (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Financial Aid (1)
Geography (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas; Music (1)
KSU Museum; Physics (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
Music; Pan-African Studies; Theatre and Dance (1)
Music; Physics (1)
Psychology; Research (2)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of (1)
CHRISTMAS OPENINGS ACCOMPANY AKRON ARTWALK: DOWNTOWN TROLLEY WILL DELIVER VISITORS TO VENUES FOR ART, SHOPPING, DINING 12/05/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Email

...information, go to www.downtownakron.com/enjoy/artwalk. No Artwalk will be held in January. The next is set for Feb. 1. THURSDAY Reception - Kent State University School of Art Gallery holds a 5-7 p.m. reception for the Foundations Faculty Show, featuring the works of Julie Friedman, Charles...


Athletics (2)
Kent State AD Joel Nielsen reacts to Haynes' first season at Kent State (Nielsen) 12/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen recently took a few minutes to discuss football scheduling and the performance of first-year head coach Paul...

Paul Haynes reflects on his first season coaching Kent State football (Haynes) 12/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Email

Paul Haynes' first season as head coach at his alma mater proved to be quite an experience. After Kent State defeated Liberty in the season opener,...


Board of Trustees (2)
State funds sought by Kent State would support significant construction projects 12/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

More than $80 million in state funding sought by Kent State University would help fund a bevy of construction and renovation projects throughout the college's...

Kent State looks to recruit first-generation students 12/05/2013 University Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Tweet Akron Beacon Journal Kent State will launch a new initiative in February to recruit low-income, first-generation students to college — any college. KSU President Lester...


Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (1)
Frequent cell phone use linked to unhappiness, anxiety and lower grades in students, study shows (Lepp) 12/06/2013 Journal Sentinel Text Attachment Email

College students who use their cell phones frequently are more likely to suffer from anxiety and get lower grades, according to a new study. Researchers...


Commencement (1)
Campus News: Kent State summer graduates 12/05/2013 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

Kent State University recently conferred degrees to summer graduates during commencement exercises Aug. 17, in the Memorial Athletic and Convocation...


Enrollment; KSU at Stark (1)
Universities working to reduce dropout rate (Southards) 12/05/2013 Universities News Text Attachment Email

Kent State University It's a startling number. As many as 40 percent of students drop out during their freshman year at local universities....


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Bright Spots: Dec. 5, 2013 12/05/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...SBIEC marks a significant achievement as an emerging leader within various competitors and is setting benchmarks that the industry should follow.” Kent State University said its Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising took home a total of seven design awards...


Financial Aid (1)
Community college advocates push to reinstate grant (Williams) 12/05/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...low-income, Johnson said, and given that the available resources are only 50 percent of what they should be, "we think that's a reasonable prioritization."Kent State University at Stark students also no longer have access to the grant, as the cuts took it away from students at regional campuses. But...


Geography (1)
Wintry blast taking aim at Portage (Schmidlin) 12/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

CINCINNATI -- An icy blast of wintry weather was bearing down on Ohio even as much of the state was unseasonably warm Thursday. Temperatures in the...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
'Nutcracker Ballet' opens run Dec. 5 - News - Times Reporter - New Philadelphia, OH 12/05/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center will present its 21st annual production “The Nutcracker Ballet” on Dec. 5-8 at the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas. NEW PHILADELPHIA Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center will present its 21st annual production "The Nutcracker Ballet"...


KSU at Tuscarawas; Music (1)
American Big Band brightens our home for the holidays at the PAC 12/05/2013 Bargain Hunter - Tuscarawas Edition - Online, The Text Attachment Email

American Big Band: Home for the Holidays ushered in the Christmas spirit Nov. 30 at The Performing Arts Center at Kent State, Tuscarawas with two acts of jazz versions of popular Christmas tunes. The stage props and costumes matched the jazz feel. Each of the...


KSU Museum; Physics (1)
2DO Listings for Dec. 6 - Dec. 12 12/06/2013 Cleveland.com Text Attachment Email

HOLIDAY Applebee's. 17771 Southpark Center, Strongsville. 440-572-5292. Sun-Thurs 11:00am-mid; Fri-Sat 11:00am-1:00am. Breakfast with Santa. 8-9:30...


Liquid Crystal Institute (1)
WIPO PUBLISHES PATENT OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "FUMED METAL-OXIDE GEL-DISPERSED BLUE-PHASE LIQUID CRYSTALS AND DEVICES THEREOF" (AMERICAN... 12/06/2013 Federal News Service Text Email

WIPO PUBLISHES PATENT OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "FUMED METAL-OXIDE GEL-DISPERSED BLUE-PHASE LIQUID CRYSTALS AND DEVICES THEREOF" (AMERICAN INVENTORS) GENEVA, Dec.6 --...


Music; Pan-African Studies; Theatre and Dance (1)
Cleveland Arts listings for Dec. 6-12: Moscow Ballet's "The Great Russian Nutcracker" & More 12/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Browsing the Arts calendar for Friday, Dec 6 ART -- MUSEUMS Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday...


Music; Physics (1)
MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend--Dec. 6 12/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...100 local performers will take to the stage along Market Square. The event is free. For more information, go to www.lightupdowntown.com. ; Kent Kent State University Planetarium presents The Skies of Winter — 8 Friday and Saturday in room 108 of Smith Hall, Kent State. It will explore...


Psychology; Research (2)
New Body Image Research Study Results from Kent State University Described 12/06/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...mediator and a moderator of the relation between societal influences and body dissatisfaction." The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In this paper, a primer on mediation and moderation is followed by a review of literature and discussion of the extent to...

Studies from Kent State University Yield New Data on Body Image Research 12/06/2013 NewsRx.com Text Email

...images of either muscular or slender men in advertisements or product-only advertisements." Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Results indicated that exposure to both muscular and slender images was associated with an increase in body dissatisfaction,...


University Press (1)
Authors sign books in Kent on Saturday 12/06/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Eight local history au - thors will be signing their books for holiday gift giv - ing during the Kent His - torical Society Museum's annual Victorian...


News Headline: CHRISTMAS OPENINGS ACCOMPANY AKRON ARTWALK: DOWNTOWN TROLLEY WILL DELIVER VISITORS TO VENUES FOR ART, SHOPPING, DINING | Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name: Shinn, Dorothy
News OCR Text: All Akron Artwalks are special, but this Saturday marks the opening of Christmas exhibits and displays, making for an extra-festive occasion.

In case you're new to the experience, the Downtown Akron Artwalk is held on the first Saturday of each month, and features nearly two dozen destinations for art, shopping, dining and entertainment. Hand-blown glass, pottery, ceramic, paintings, textiles, jewelry and eclectic housewares will be featured. Participating spaces change every month, as do exhibitions, food and entertainment.

The city of Akron's free trolley service runs the entire route. Destinations open between 5 and 6 p.m. Trolley service runs 5-10 p.m. with a wait time of about 20 minutes between each trolley.

For a map of the route and a link to more information, go to www.downtownakron.com/enjoy/artwalk.

No Artwalk will be held in January. The next is set for Feb. 1.
THURSDAY

Reception - Kent State University School of Art Gallery holds a 5-7 p.m. reception for the Foundations Faculty Show, featuring the works of Julie Friedman, Charles Basham, Kortney Niewierski, Jennifer Omaitz-Collier, Sarah Jane, Kelly Dietrick, Emily Sullivan, Don King, Taryn McMahon and Mark Schatz. Contact Anderson Turner, director of galleries, School of Art, at haturner@kent.edu, or call 330-672-1369.
FRIDAY

MIX: Miniatures - The Cleveland Museum of Art, 11150 East Blvd., Cleveland, focuses its 5 to 9 p.m. "First Friday" cocktails and entertainment event on its exhibit of miniatures, Disembodied: Portrait Miniatures and Their Contemporary Relatives. Try your hand at live life drawing with Dr. Sketchy's Anti-Art School or create your own miniature silhouette portrait pin or an art trading card to keep or swap. The exhibit examines portrait miniatures spanning six centuries, exchanged by friends, lovers, and family members as tokens of affection. Newgrass band Honeybucket provides the music. $8 advance, $10 day of event, members free. Reservations recommended. https://tickets.clevelandart.org/public/default.asp.
SATURDAY

Ceramics Classes - Bring the kids (age 5 and up) to a family holiday ceramic class, 10 a.m. to noon at the Quirk Cultural Center, 1201 Grant Ave, Cuyahoga Falls. Bisque, stains and instruction included. Other day and evening classes are available. Fees are $20 per parent/child pair ($15 resident), additional children extra. Each person finishes a project. 330-971-8425.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY

Arts, Crafts Show - The Butler Institute of American Art, 524 Wick Ave., Youngstown, presents the 43rd Annual American Holiday Arts & Crafts Show and Sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults, children under 12 free. Nearly 100 vendors in painting, photography, jewelry, paper, ceramics, fragrances, wood, leather, fiber, food, horticulture and decorative arts. 330-743-1107, ext. 123.
DEADLINE

Jan. 5 - The Valley Art Center, 155 Bell St., Chagrin Falls, issues a call to artists for its series on the primary colors. This segment of the series is "Mellow Yellow" and includes works in all mediums. Entry fee is $10 per piece, up to 3 pieces per artist. Enter online at www.valleyartcenter.org. Artwork delivery dates will be Jan. 9-12.

Copyright © 2013 Akron Beacon Journal

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State AD Joel Nielsen reacts to Haynes' first season at Kent State (Nielsen) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen recently took a few minutes to discuss football scheduling and the performance of first-year head coach Paul Haynes:
---

The Flashes finished 4-8 in 2013 after going 11-3 the previous season, and schedule difficulty played a key role in the team's struggles. Can you discuss last year's schedule, and how things will or will not change in the future?

"There are a couple things that we look at every year with our schedule, and No. 1 is the number of home games we schedule. We got into a sequence where this year we only had five home games, but next year we have six so right off the get-go that really helps us. Outside of that we have just limited windows where we can 'make our own schedule.' The way it appears next year should be better from the standpoint of how we mix in our guarantee games, which are Ohio State and Virginia, and a bye date. We're anticipating having an open date in September, which will be in the area of those guarantee games. That will also take some pressure off the team. This year we had 12 games and a bye week at the end of the year, which doesn't help anything."

---

Playing at LSU and Penn State back-to-back was particularly challenging for the '13 Flashes. Will you attempt to avoid playing your 'guarantee games' back-to-back in the future?

"I think we would try to avoid any two non-conference games back-to-back, there's no question, but sometimes it's just an element of when those games are available and when we can get them. Often times TV gets involved and moves games around as well.

"Sometimes there are two or three competing issues that are working there that we're kind of navigating our way through. It's obviously not ideal, and we won't experience it next year as it stands right now. I certainly hope to not experience it in the future, but it could happen."

---

How did you feel about Haynes' performance during his first season as a head coach?

"I was extremely impressed with Paul and his staff this year. When things were difficult Paul never wavered. He never changed his demeanor, never changed the way he approached the team or the season throughout the year. That's the truest measure of how I evaluate a coach, especially when we struggled through the middle of the year. I've very comfortable with Paul and what he was able to accomplish this year. It wasn't the year we hoped for from a win-loss standpoint, but going out with two wins, one being on the road at a tough pace to play in Ohio, that's definitely something to build upon. We've got a lot coming back, a lot of building blocks."

Return to Top



News Headline: Paul Haynes reflects on his first season coaching Kent State football (Haynes) | Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Paul Haynes' first season as head coach at his alma mater proved to be quite an experience.

After Kent State defeated Liberty in the season opener, a rugged early schedule and a rash of key injuries dashed any dreams of repeating last year's incredible run to the Mid-American Conference East Division title and a school-record 11 wins.

After suffering a heart-breaking 27-24 Week 7 loss at Ball State, which would go on to earn 10 wins during the regular season, the Golden Flashes bottomed out when a five-game losing streak was capped by an ugly 16-7 setback at arch-rival Akron.

But Kent State picked itself off the floor and won two straight to close the season, including a 44-13 dismantling of host Ohio - the MAC East Division preseason favorite - in a nationally televised season finale. Those two wins made Flashes backers wonder what might have been had their squad faced a softer schedule and stayed healthy, but more importantly restored hope heading into the offseason.

Haynes recently took time out of a busy recruiting schedule to discuss the 2013 season, and what lies ahead for his football program:

---

How important was it to end such a trying season on a positive note?

"It was good that we ended the way we did, it was good that we started to get everyone healthy. If that was maybe some other teams you wouldn't have been so successful (at the end of the year). I think the thing the guys are encouraged about is the things we talked about (started happening). Why couldn't we be that way all the time, though? That's the challenge. If we were, we would have been in more games at the end."

---

The 2013 schedule included back-to-back road games at LSU and Penn State, a stretch of five road games in six weeks, and no bye-week among other things. Looking back, how difficult did the schedule make it to succeed this year?

"The schedule was tough in itself just with the teams we were playing, and in a row. I think the other thing that played a factor is the times of the game. I go back to LSU (7 p.m. start), Penn State (3:30) and Western Michigan (7) in a row (on the road), our guys didn't get back (to Kent) until four, one and four in the morning three weeks in a row. Then you've gotta keep going, there was no break. Then right after that you had Northern (Illinois) and Ball State, two of the better teams in the conference, right after you got back home at four o'clock in the morning. That to me was the tough part - besides the teams you were playing, the times you were getting back (to Kent). When I look back that was hard. In the Big Ten you played at noon or 3:30 almost every week, we had just one or two night games and that was it. Plus you're flying everywhere. Our Western Michigan game was over at 11, the you've got a five-hour bus ride back. Those things take tolls, and I didn't take those things into account. You don't think about those things until afterward. Nobody takes into account the athlete. It's about TV, getting people to the games cause people want night games, and this and that, but they don't take into account the student-athlete, in my opinion. You ask anybody who was on that bus who was non-football and it took a toll on them, my wife for one. She was like 'I don't know how you guys do it', cause it takes me two days to recover. These guys have to go to class on Monday."

---

Is there anything you can do about it?

"I think no (he chuckles). I think you address it - here's the schedule, here's the times, you've gotta push through. You've gotta talk about it. I look back on everything from fall camp through the season that we talked about, things we had to do, and there's nothing I look back and say we didn't cover except that. It's the one thing I think about afterward that we didn't address."

---

The back-to-back road games at LSU and Penn State seemed particularly challenging. Is playing your two 'money games' back-to-back something you'd like to avoid in the future?

"I wouldn't want to do it unless we have to. I know we're gonna play two big teams each year, which is fine, it's what we have to do, but again I look at the times of those games and what's happening after those games or even before those games, and how can we help ourselves out the most. But I don't make those decisions. A lot of it has to do with the MAC. It is what it is."

---

Looking back, what else did you learn during your first season as a head coach?

"I knew from playing and coaching (in the MAC) that this was a very competitive league, but I think when you look at it from top to bottom a lot of the talent level is about the same. This is a league that it just comes down to the little things. It comes down to streaks, believing, doing the little things right. To be successful in this league, that's what it really comes down to."

---

Since your season ended so soon, you had a chance to get a jump on recruiting. How's that going so far?

"Recruiting is going really well. We're almost ahead of schedule a little bit, but with these mid-majors you've gotta do a good job of staying on guys and being ready when guys fall off (de-commit from other teams). You've gotta continue to recruit."

What are your positions of emphasis while recruiting this season? "We'll always start inside out and up front to back. We always will recruit offensive linemen and defensive linemen first, then the next positions that are important are your linebacker/defensive back/wide receiver-type guys, cause those are your special teams guys too. Those are positions that we'll always be heavy on. We're kind of heavy on our defensive ends and light on our inside guys, so we'll try to find inside guys a little bit more this year. Then we lose two guys on the offensive line and were a little thin there already, so we'll recruit guys at that position. When you look at the roster the talent is there, we've just gotta fill some holes."

---

What needs to improve for the program to become a consistent MAC title contender?

"Our issue to me moving forward is just what we believe and our attitude - not that we had a bad attitude this year, but it just needs to improve. Our motto for 2014 I told them already is be the best team we can possibly be, and that's it. There's no 'the rest of it.' If I can be the best on Monday that means I've gotta practice the best, lift the best, do everything I can possibly do to be the best. Then how many games we win will depend on how good we are. That's it. A championship program to me it about a culture, the culture of the place. There's the saying 'the law of the price tag,' the No. 1 thing is everyone has to be willing to pay the price. And that's every single person, from the head coach to the trainer to the equipment manager to our secretary, administration, everyone. Every single person has to pay the price to be part of a championship program. It doesn't happen overnight. When you look at the programs that do it on a consistent basis it has taken time. You take (two-time defending MAC champion) Northern Illinois, they've had three coaches and things don't change there. That ain't just because of the coaches and players, it's everyone. You talk about the culture within the locker room, within studying film, within being competitive, with great leadership, the team polices itself. When you have those things you have a championship program, and right now we don't have those things on a consistent basis. I've said this from the beginning, as an alumnus here I don't care who sits in this (head coach) chair, I want the best for Kent State football. For us to have that we're gonna have to have that culture here. There's a lot of places in the country that have it, and I know the head coach is important but it doesn't matter who is sitting in that chair (in those places). The standard is there, it's set."

---

Continuity always helps when you're trying to build a winning culture. Do you believe your coaching staff will remain in tact?

"That's always an issue with mid-majors. I told these guys down this hallway I can't stop you and will not stop you and won't be upset if you can help your family out (by accepting another job). If you have another opportunity to better your family's situation, then by all means I'll help you however I can. And I'll do whatever I can here to try to help, because continuity is important. That's a thing that you battle at the so-called mid-major programs all the time. But I think our guys are happy here. I think our guys all like it here. It's a great environment to work in, a great location. But we'll see if they get other opportunities. We'll play that by ear and take it as it comes, but hopefully we can keep everyone in tact and keep the continuity."

---

You held over coordinators Brian Rock (offense) and Brian George (defense) from the previous staff. How did that pan out?

"That was good. First of all, it was the best thing for our players. It takes time for a staff to gel. It's the first time that we've been through it together, and I told them now our honeymoon's over too. We've gotten to know each other, so now all that stuff is over. Let's continue to gel, continue to figure out what's best for the team. That's the No. 1 thing, what's best for the team, not individuals or anything else. Who are our best 22 guys offensively and defensively, and let's find a way to get them on the field regardless of position. That's our challenge right now, finding our best 22."

---

What are the primary goals for the offseason?

"The No. 1 thing for our team is we've gotta get stronger. That's first and foremost. You watch the film all year and we're on blocks or trying to get off blocks and we're just not strong enough to do it. There's also a couple special things we're gonna do to improve leadership qualities, cause I think that's the No. 1 thing you have to have for a championship program, great leadership. We're gonna identify guys, put them in leadership roles and also teach them what we want from leaders. It starts with me and what I think a leader is, what type of leadership I want. When the guys get back in January I'm gonna identify 17-18 guys that we'll sit down with and have weekly leadership meetings."

Return to Top



News Headline: State funds sought by Kent State would support significant construction projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More than $80 million in state funding sought by Kent State University would help fund a bevy of construction and renovation projects throughout the college's eight-campus system over the next several years.

The KSU Board of Trustees approved a six-year capital plan Wednesday that asks for $86 million in Ohio capital appropriations between 2015 and 2020.

The money would offset costs for various significant construction projects, including an estimated $100 million project to enhance the Kent campus' science corridor with a new, interdisciplinary research facility eyed for the state's coming biennium allocations, explained Tom Euclide, associate vice president for facilities planning and operations.

The science corridor on the southern end of the Kent campus comprises Cunningham, Williams and Smith halls, all of which will see significant renovations. The 45,000-square-foot addition for the integrated research building will be built onto Williams Hall.

Euclide said that effort is a top priority for the university with more than double the investment going into it any other capital project at the university.

Besides the addition, deferred-maintenance projects at the 1960s-era buildings will create better wheelchair accessibility, safety improvements and structural improvements including new roofs and windows.

"We hope the state blesses us with that (funding) because the need is so great," Euclide said.

The bulk of the money for the project has already been set aside through KSU's "Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future" initiative, which is using $170 million in bond funding to revitalize the university with new buildings and renovated facilities throughout the next four years.

Those projects will be carried out regardless of state support, Euclide said. The state appropriations would simply enable more work to be done sooner.

Some of the work could begin by next summer. The bulk of significant construction is projected to begin in 2015.

The state funding would also help fund the design phase of a project to relocate the School of Visual Communication Design, now located in the Art Building, to Taylor Hall so it can be housed with the School of Communication Studies.

The School of Art occupies six buildings on campus including Van Deusen Hall and the nearby Art Annex that are adjacent to the existing Art Building. Renovations are underway to combine art courses into just those two buildings -- some work permitting the consolidation was completed at the annex in 2007.

Before the design school can be moved to Taylor Hall, the new, $40 million College of Architecture and Environmental Design will need completed near South Willow Street -- where the extension for the newly name Lester A. Lefton Esplanade has been finished -- so architecture students occupying Taylor's upper three floors have a new home.

What will then happen to the shell of the Art Building is not yet finalized, Euclide said. It could either be demolished or repurposed for other uses.

Other projects the state funding would support include improvements at each of KSU's seven regional campuses such as renovations for Founder's Hall at the Kent State Tuscarawas location and the Fine Arts Building at Kent State Stark, among various others.

Contact this reporter at 330-298-1126 or jnobile@recordpub.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent State looks to recruit first-generation students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: University Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Tweet

Akron Beacon Journal

Kent State will launch a new initiative in February to recruit low-income, first-generation students to college — any college.

KSU President Lester Lefton told trustees on Wednesday that See You@College will collaborate with community groups, nonprofits and national foundations to reach students who may not have college on their to-do list.

“We're just trying to do the right thing,” Lefton said. “We'll get our fair share [of students].”

The university will hold a conference on Feb. 13 at the Kent campus to train “ambassadors.” Greg Darnieder, a senior adviser with the U.S. Department of Education, and John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, will be keynote speakers. About 300 community leaders who mentor young people in churches, clubs and the like have been invited to learn how they can shepherd them into higher education.

Return to Top



News Headline: Frequent cell phone use linked to unhappiness, anxiety and lower grades in students, study shows (Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Journal Sentinel
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: College students who use their cell phones frequently are more likely to suffer from anxiety and get lower grades, according to a new study.

Researchers at Kent State University surveyed more than 500 college students about their cell phone use and texting and compared it to their grade point average and assessment of how happy they were.

"The students in our study who used the cell phone more had lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life relative to their peers who used the cell phone less," lead researcher Andrew Lepp said in an email.

Many high-frequency cell phone users described their experience with cell phones as stressful -- a description many non-student cell phone users will probably recognize, especially those of us who get email notifications on our phones.

"The social network sometimes just makes me feel a little bit tied to my phone. It makes me feel like I have another obligation in my life that I have to stick to," one survey participant told researchers. "Sometimes the cell phone just makes me feel like it is a whole new world of obligation that I have because anybody can get a hold of me any time by just thinking about me. If my mom wanted to give me a call right now and just talk for a second, she could. And if I did not call her back by the end of the day, she would get worried. It creates a bit of anxiety and it is kind of annoying sometimes."

Many students said cell phones created an obligation and pressure to be constantly connected to a network of peers and family.

"That obligation was perceived as stressful by many students (especially those getting 100s of texts a day)," Lepp said.

The resulting cell phone use often distracts students from paying attention in class and from studying, he said.

"There is no 'me time' or solitude left in some of these students' lives and I think mental health requires a bit of personal alone time to reflect, look inward, process life's events, and just recover from daily stressors," Lepp told me. "Also, a few of the students we interviewed reported sending texts constantly throughout the day from morning to night – that in itself might be stressful. Furthermore, interviews with some students suggested that communicating primarily by text message can create tension because meaning or intent is not always perfectly clear in brief, rapidly composed texts."

Lepp stressed that while the study, which is published in a 2014 issue of Computers in Human Behavior, links cell phone use to unhappiness, it does not establish causation between the two.

But results do suggests that parents should teach their kids to put the phone away while studying, just like they are asked to turn off the TV, he said.

"Students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness," the researchers said.

The study follows up on an earlier survey by the same researchers that showed people who spent a lot of time on their cell phones doing sedentary activities get less exercise and are less physically fit than low cell phone users. We reported on that in July.

Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/news/234456211.html#ixzz2mhl0nYsO
Follow us: @JournalSentinel on Twitter

Return to Top



News Headline: Campus News: Kent State summer graduates | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University recently conferred degrees to summer graduates during commencement exercises Aug. 17, in the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center on the Kent Campus. The following area students were among those who graduated:

Dessaree Dillon, Stephanie Edge, Diedre Fleming, Laura Hake, Alena Hefner, Mary Holloway, Joshua Hornbeck, Thomas Lang, Robert Lundi, Crystal Severino, Marsha Hayes, Joseph Krauss, Nicholas Fox, Mary Mingle-Freeman, Kara Bindus, Daniel Bursic, Tiffany Desatnik, Kathryn Knapp, Thomas Reisinger, Andrew Ruminas, Erich von Boeselager, Kaitlyn White, Beth Avram, Kayli Bellissimo, Kelsey Bozeglav, Caitlin English, Cassandra Griffin, Andrew Helber, Jacklyn Lamison, Monika Marcotte, Matthew Murphy, Cathrine Schupp, Carol Tuttle, Ryan Weber, Matthew Wilmot, Edward Duffy, Brayden Fratantonio, Natalie Oberstar, Pete Araps, Mary Ann Donovan, Darryl Lewis, Sarah Sadeghi, Michael Stover, Tabitha Taylor, Shane Flanigan, Nicholas Lintala, Constance Aponte, Christopher Brown, Nicholas Schulte, Katie Todd, Stephanie Green, Trishina Lewis, Meagan Urban, Nicole Farrar, Michael Braun, Elissa Ebbert, Melissa Johnson, Kaylee Cellitti, Loretta Justice, Elizabeth Oeffner, Michelle Tisdale, Tracy Sprague, Robert Kelemen, Michael Anderson, Michael Kosareo, Elizabeth Ahlman, Mary Edmonds, Deborah Mackey, Ronald Maslanik, Corey Repko, Danielle Tomko, Jessica Adams, Deborah Horowitz, Tiffany Hu, Jacob Klein, Angela Almasy, Manuella Crawley, Mark Davidson, Adam Giannini, Lisa Hautala, Christopher Kowalski, Ryan Kramer, Kendra Mance, Breanna Mona, Hannah Ritchie, April Rock, Katherine Smith, Samuel Spittler, Patricia Stokes, Mary Alice Tayerle, Michael Varga, Brenda Alexander, Elizabeth Caldwell, Danielle Palla, James Bond, Caitlin Jefferson, Stephen Manyo, Hayley Terlizzi, Aubrey Shaner, Ian Grogan, Daniel Hoye, David Oltmanns, Stephanie Renner, Emily Rigo, Marlo Sams, Deana Logan, Todd Nelson, Barbara Nolan, Angelia Mendak, Carol Hall-Pace, Jenifer Mitchell, Anna ModicBradley, Nicole Pontius, Cory Rolph, Maria Iafelice, Brenda Rusnak, Jessica Yanesh, Laura Ault, Jamie Rozanski, Jessica Thomas, Holly Kollman, Jonas Allooh, Kelsey Derrick

Return to Top



News Headline: Universities working to reduce dropout rate (Southards) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Universities News
Contact Name: Universities News
News OCR Text: Kent State University

It's a startling number. As many as 40 percent of students drop out during their freshman year at local universities.

To combat this drop, administrators have enlisted the help of faculty, counselors, tutors, campus ministers and fellow students to identify at-risk students as early as possible.

“It can happen right from the onset of the semester,” said Mary Southards, assistant dean for enrollment management at Kent State University ‘s Stark Campus.

“People might go through the first couple of weeks and decide, ‘This is not for me.' But we probably see the most activity after the first four weeks when they hit their first major exam, then again at midterms. Some see their mid-term grades and it's a real eye-opener for the student and the parents.”

Francie Morrow, director of counseling at Walsh University, agrees that the first semester is a critical time.

“That's when we're trying to engage those new freshmen. This might be their first time away from home, which can be difficult with homesickness and adjustment,” Morrow said. “With our commuter students, they may be balancing work and school, or school and family obligations.”

However, research shows that for students who make it through freshman year and return as sophomores, the dropout rate plummets.

Universities speak in terms of retention — the number who stay — rather than the number who drop out. Officials take retention seriously, creating programs and even departments to tackle it, much of it targeted at freshmen.

“We have an early-alert system — most campuses do — so faculty can let us know if they are concerned about a student,” said Patty Little, director of the Center for Student Success at Malone University.

While Little served as director of financial aid, she noticed a pattern when students were asked why they were dropping out.

“They'd always tell you ‘financial reasons' because they knew nobody would ask anything more if they said that,” she said. “But I knew that wasn't the reason. I'd say, ‘Let's talk about what's really going on.' “

Those conversations led Little to create her current position, shepherding students through the “transition to collegial life.”

Morrow said Walsh established CARE (Campus Assistance Response Team) and a retention team, because with early intervention, many problems are solvable.

“We want to be able to reach out with specific support — financial, social, academic. If it's a financial problem, maybe there's an additional scholarship available. Or maybe they're having a roommate problem and thinking of leaving,” Morrow said. “That happens more often than you think. To us, that's very fixable.”

Return to Top



News Headline: Bright Spots: Dec. 5, 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bright Spots is a periodic feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community:

Taffy Miltz has an alternative for dog owners whose experience with a kennel, pet sitters or friends and family members caring for their canine friends has been less than ideal — or who just need the promise of a more personal touch so they can relax on vacation knowing Fido is in good hands.

Ms. Miltz and her husband,

Jack, are partners in FlipFlop Dogs, a canine hosting franchise that has opened locations east of Cleveland and near Atlanta. They're also planning a franchise in Cleveland's western suburbs for the company, which uses a network of “companion families” to care for dogs when owners are away.

FlipFlop Dogs screens, interviews and conducts background checks on all its companion families, says Ms. Miltz, who with her husband formerly ran an Invisible Fencing franchise. It also matches dogs with companion families' interests; for instance, if you have a 6-year-old Australian Shepherd who is accustomed to a couple walks and a run each day, he's placed with an active family under FlipFlop Dogs' oversight.

Ms. Miltz sees FlipFlop Dogs as an alternative to kenneling that places a dog in a loving home while the human customers are away, and that doesn't impose on a friend or family member to watch the dog.

FlipFlip Dogs provides transportation to and from customers' homes in a van. (Dogs “get really excited when it pulls up,” Ms. Miltz said.)

The concept is imported from England, she said, and tailored to her experiences with her own dogs, Chloe, a miniature poodle, and Charlie, a mastiff/Great Dane mix.

“They really prefer to be in a home when we're away,” she said.

Cleveland law firm Buckley King said it received the 2013 Ohio Excellence Award by the Small Business Institute for Excellence in Commerce, or SBIEC.

The institute conducts annual business surveys and industry research to identify companies that have achieved “demonstrable success” in their local business environment and industry category. They are recognized for their service to their customers and community.

In a statement, Buckley King attorney Brent Buckley said the firm “has consistently demonstrated a high regard for upholding business ethics and company values. This recognition by SBIEC marks a significant achievement as an emerging leader within various competitors and is setting benchmarks that the industry should follow.”

Kent State University said its Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising took home a total of seven design awards at the 2013 conference of the International Textile and Apparel Association.

Three faculty members and three students picked up awards at the conference, which took place in New Orleans. The association is a global organization of textile and apparel scholars; Sherry Schofield, associate director of Kent State's fashion school, currently serves as association president, while fellow faculty member Harriet McLeod is its secretary

Kim Hahn and Jihyun Kim, both associate professors of fashion merchandising at Kent State, collaborated on two separate award-winning garments. One, titled “Celestial Symphony,” was designed as an updated cocktail ensemble for professional women.

Their other garment, “Amber Refraction,” drew inspiration from the traditional Korean style of Hanbok, while also incorporating an image manipulated in Adobe Photoshop.

Kent State senior Madison Palen-Michel's dress design netted a $5,000 cash prize and a prestigious internship with Zandra Rhodes in London.

The fashion school also was honored with all three awards presented on behalf of Educators for Socially Responsible Apparel Business (ESRAB) in the faculty, graduate and undergraduate categories. The faculty winner was Linda Öhrn-McDaniel, associate professor of fashion design at Kent State, who created a striped knit dress from up-cycled men's business shirts.

Kent State graduate student Lisa Arenstein used discarded metal and rubber tubing to create the intricate woven sculpture “Green Lantern.”

Jasmine Kornel won the undergraduate ESRAB award for her “Peace” ensemble — a title that reflects both the aesthetics qualities of the design and its “utilization of sustainable techniques such as natural dyes, natural and organic fibers, and zero-waste patternmaking,” according to ESRAB.

Juventas Therapeutics of Cleveland, a clinical-stage company developing therapies for treatment of cardiovascular disease, said it completed enrollment of the STOP-HF trial, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial of its non-viral DNA plasmid therapy JVS-100 for patients with symptomatic heart failure.

A total of 93 patients have been enrolled in this trial at 16 academic and community hospitals throughout the United States, Juventas said.

Patients enrolled in STOP-HF had a prior history of a heart attack and years later developed symptomatic heart failure. They were randomized to placebo or treatment with two different doses of JVS-100, according to the company.

Therapy was delivered directly to the heart via endoventricular injection using the BioCardia Helical Infusion Catheter.

"The patients studied in this trial, on average, have experienced their most recent heart attack nearly a decade prior to treatment and their heart failure symptoms have progressed to a point that their health and ability to perform the activities of daily living are significantly deteriorating despite receiving optimal medical management," said Dr. Marc Penn, chief medical officer for Juventas and director of research for the Summa Cardiovascular Institute at Summa Health System.

He added, "The goal of STOP-HF is to further define the safety and clinical benefits of JVS-100 in heart failure patients who are already receiving the current standard of care."

Send items for Bright Spots to managing editor Scott Suttell at ssuttell@crain.com.

Return to Top



News Headline: Community college advocates push to reinstate grant (Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Community college advocates push to reinstate grant

Stark State College students previously received a collective $2.7 million from the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, President Para Jones said. She sees more students working full time as a result of losing the aid.

When the president of Stark State College sat in on classes, she would ask how many of the students were working while attending school. But Para Jones has tweaked her question. Now, when she goes to observe a lecture, she asks how many students are working full time. "Almost every hand goes up," she said.Jones maintains the increase in the number of hours students are working is a direct result of the fact that the state has taken some need-based aid away from community college students. She and other community college advocates are pushing to reinstate the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, the state's primary low-income financial-aid program, to community college students, whom they argue are among the poorest of those attending college in the state. Stark State College students previously received a collective $2.7 million from the grant, Jones said. Now, they get nothing."Our students really struggle," she said. CHANGES IN AIDThe state halved funding for need-based aid in 2009 as a result of plummeting revenue. Students at community colleges, regional campuses and for-profit schools subsequently were denied access to the grant. Students at for-profit schools have since regained grant funding.The state now requires students to lean first on the federal Pell Grant — money that can be used to cover a variety of college-related costs — before getting funding from the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, which may be used only to cover the cost of tuition. The amount full-time students can receive from the state grant ranges from $224 to more than $2,000 per year, depending on where they attend school. Before, students at schools with cheaper tuition were able to use the state grant to cover tuition and had the federal money left over to pay remaining tuition and other living expenses, such as transportation and food. The most a student can receive in Pell Grant funds for the 2013-14 school year is $5,645."Most of our students don't get that," said Karen Rafinski, interim president of the Ohio Association of Community Colleges.'A REASONABLE PRIORITIZATION'Those who argue for the new funding system, however, say it's the best compromise, since aid is down for students across the board. Bruce Johnson, president of the Inter-University Council of Ohio, said members of his organization ultimately were opposed to the General Assembly's slashing funding for the grant in half and pulling money away from the lowest-income students in the state. To qualify for the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, a student must have a maximum household income of $75,000 and have a low estimated family contribution based on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, according to the Ohio Board of Regents website.When the cuts were made, Johnson said, it was the correct decision to give extra tuition assistance to students attending more expensive schools.

Page 2 of 3 - Since all students eligible for the grant are considered low-income, Johnson said, and given that the available resources are only 50 percent of what they should be, "we think that's a reasonable prioritization."Kent State University at Stark students also no longer have access to the grant, as the cuts took it away from students at regional campuses. But the branch campus isn't fighting the change, said spokeswoman Cynthia Williams, because its tuition is lower than at the main campus and at private institutions in the county.OTHER EXPENSESBut even though their tuition might be covered, students are struggling to pay for groceries, transportation, housing, child care and books, community college officials said.Stark State College student Hollie Bandy, 22, works between 25 and 30 hours a week as a server at Gervasi Vineyard to help finance her education. She is preparing to graduate this month with an associate degree in psychology and plans to earn a four-year degree. Bandy said she and her husband have to pay for school, a mortgage and all their living expenses, but because there are two of them, it's easier to manage."That's why I go to Stark State, though, is because it's so darn cheap compared with any other school around," Bandy said.A study conducted by Community Research Partners, a Columbus-based nonprofit that collects and analyzes data, found Pell Grant aid to Ohio students hasn't increased with the cost of living and cost of tuition. It determined the unmet need for community college students ranged from $3,000 to $5,400.Jones argues community college students usually are the poorest and seldom have financial or housing support from their families.She sees the cuts as de-incentivizing community college, which she said contradicts the state's goal of educating students more quickly at a lower expense. Rafinski said public policy is mixed up "in a big way" because it's focused on the price tag at each school, not on the neediest students."Just because they chose an institution of less cost shouldn't mean they're denied this," she said.WHAT'S NEXTThe Ohio Association of Community Colleges is advocating for a budget correction bill in January that would give the grant back to community college students, spokesman Jeff Ortega said. The organization has collected letters of support from the Ohio Student Association and state legislators. Rep. Kirk Schuring, R-Jackson Township, wrote to the chairman of the Ohio Higher Education Study Committee, asking him to reconsider."The fact that students at Ohio's community colleges can't access state needs-based aid is incredible," his letter reads.In August and September, committee chairman Rep. Cliff Rosenberger, R-Clarksville, and Rep. Christina Hagan, R-Alliance, held public hearings across the state to gather information to use in higher education reform. Presidents of both public and private colleges lobbied the legislators to increase funding for need-based aid.

Page 3 of 3 - Rafinski said she just wants to see money returned to community college students."I truly believe (the grant) needs total reform," she said.Reach Alison at 330-580-8312 or alison.matas@cantonrep.com.On Twitter: @amatasREP

Return to Top



News Headline: Wintry blast taking aim at Portage (Schmidlin) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CINCINNATI -- An icy blast of wintry weather was bearing down on Ohio even as much of the state was unseasonably warm Thursday.

Temperatures in the 50s and 60s were expected to plunge by the weekend, some by more than 40 degrees.

A mix of freezing rain, sleet and snow was expected late Thursday or early Friday for most of Ohio, with significant snowfall later Friday in the southwest and central regions, in some cases during peak afternoon commutes.

And Portage County is not expected to dodge the bullet, said Thomas Schmidlin, a meteorologist from Kent.

Schmidlin said temperatures were 62 degrees Thursday morning at his weather station in Kent, but a cold front is moving east, and all of Ohio, as well as many southern states, will feel some of the impact.

"It was 15 below in Denver, and as low as 30 below in other areas," he said. "That's coming our way."

While it's not expected to be that cold in Ohio, Schmidlin said Portage County can expect to wake up to about two to three inches of snow on Friday, enough to shovel and scrape off of cars. Snowfall is expected to be about two to three inches.

The National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory for several Ohio counties, including Portage, Summit, Stark, Trumbull and Mahoning counties until 10 p.m. Friday.

Temperatures were expected to drop steadily and remain consistent through Friday, and the weather service predicted that visibility could be limited to less than a quarter of a mile at times.

"As a cold front moves through, that's going to bring rain, changing to a wintry mix, changing to all snow tomorrow," said Mike Kurz, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Wilmington, in southwest Ohio.

Kurz said a swath of Ohio in the Interstate 70 and 71 corridors from Cincinnati through Columbus is likely to see the most snow. Most counties there are expected to get 2 to 6 inches by Friday night, with much colder temperatures falling into the teens in some places.

Schmidlin said residents shouldn't cancel their weekend plans, but should be careful.

"They need to pay attention," he said. "They should feel free to visit and enjoy the weather, they just need to pay attention."

Ohio's AAA travel club expects a busy Friday, with calls for help from thousands of stranded motorists likely.

"We're ready for the storm," spokeswoman Kimberly Schwind said. "We're calling in extra crews because we're anticipating skyrocketing numbers of calls."

She said besides slick and icy conditions, sharp temperature drops can cause low tire pressure, leading to spinouts and flat tires, and dead batteries are also a problem in sudden cold. AAA recommends that motorists gas up in case they get stranded.

Meanwhile, flood watches were issued across southeast Ohio, with rain and sleet expected.

Kurz said it's difficult to make an overall prediction on what kind of winter Ohioans can expect, since there are no strong global weather factors such as an El Nino that can have an impact.

He said there likely will be a lot of "short-term variability" in the weeks ahead.

"You kind of wait and see what it brings," Kurz said.

Return to Top



News Headline: 'Nutcracker Ballet' opens run Dec. 5 - News - Times Reporter - New Philadelphia, OH | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 'Nutcracker Ballet' opens run Dec. 5

NEW PHILADELPHIA Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center will present its 21st annual production “The Nutcracker Ballet” on Dec. 5-8 at the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

NEW PHILADELPHIA Tuscarawas Dance Arts Center will present its 21st annual production "The Nutcracker Ballet" on Dec. 5-8 at the Performing Arts Center on the campus of Kent State University at Tuscarawas.The ballet will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5-7, and at 2 p.m. Dec. 8. The campus is at 330 University Drive NW.Tessa Price and Lindsey Ames will dance the role of the Sugar Plum Fairy. Sarah White and Rachael Litty will share the role of the Dew Drop. The lead role of Clara will be danced by Josie Finnell and Sydney Banks.Zach Nutter will return as the Prince and Adam White will return as the Cavalier.This year's Snow Queen will be danced by Kellie Pleshinger and Julia Strawn. Amanda Karl, Aviana Cline and Ashley Glazer will be featured as the Arabian. Brooke Kobel and Madison McKibben will share the flute solo.Live music will be performed before each performance. Dec. 5 will feature Sarah Fouts on the harp. The Dec. 6 and 7 performances will feature Bob Ventre on guitar with Jack Steward on bass. Pianist Rick Michel will perform before the Dec. 8 matinee.Tickets are $12 and are available online at www.tuscarawasdance artscenter.com or at the Performing Arts Center website at www.kent.edu. Go to the Performing Arts Center link.

Return to Top



News Headline: American Big Band brightens our home for the holidays at the PAC | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/05/2013
Outlet Full Name: Bargain Hunter - Tuscarawas Edition - Online, The
Contact Name: Leah Brown
News OCR Text: American Big Band: Home for the Holidays ushered in the Christmas spirit Nov. 30 at The Performing Arts Center at Kent State, Tuscarawas with two acts of jazz versions of popular Christmas tunes.

The stage props and costumes matched the jazz feel. Each of the seven different costumes worn by the cast were decked in sequins and glitter. The props – giant Christmas presents that surrounded a pine bow wreath and candy canes – were studded with LEDs that made them brighter than the stage lights.

The show began with a full cast rendition of Bing Crosby’s “Happy Holiday,” which was quickly followed by a flurry of classics like “Winter Wonderland,” “Jingle Bells” and “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year” to “make the audience feel at home,” said Kyle Henry, the emcee for the evening.

The cast didn’t stop at singing. Each number was also choreographed down to the last head turn and toe-tap. As the show progressed, Michael “Beetle” and Brandy Bailey, the featured dancers, performed more and more intricate choreography. Styles performed included the Waltz, the Quickstep and the Lindy Hop.

There were some missteps, missed ques and fumbled lyrics during “The Grinch.” But every other song spread more and more Christmas cheer through the audience. Each singer participated in multiple solos as well as many group numbers. And each one was on pitch and had a phenomenal range. They were all enjoyable to listen to, and by the end of the night many in the audience were singing along to their favorite Christmas songs.

The band also performed intricate and exciting jazz tunes. Through the course of the show many instrumentalists played solos. Despite the precision of the whole band, the standout player of the night was the saxophonist. During complicated syncopations and lightning fast runs, he never missed a note.

All in all, the band and cast had exceptional talent and the evening was enjoyable. The singing was as brilliant as the costumes and the music made me wish I had learned to play in a jazz ensemble. American Big Band did just what they set out to do, make me feel at home for the holiday.

Return to Top



News Headline: 2DO Listings for Dec. 6 - Dec. 12 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Cleveland.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HOLIDAY

Applebee's. 17771 Southpark Center, Strongsville. 440-572-5292. Sun-Thurs 11:00am-mid; Fri-Sat 11:00am-1:00am. Breakfast with Santa. 8-9:30 a.m. Saturday.

Avon Lake Public Library. 32649 Electric Blvd. 440-933-8128 or alpl.org. 1-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. No Bake Holiday Treats. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Bohemian National Hall. 4939 Broadway, Cleveland. 216-361-3262. Holiday event. 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Cahoon Memorial Park. Cahoon Road between Lake and Wolf roads, Bay Village. 440-871-6755. Cahoon Community Christmas. 2 p.m. Sunday.

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. Main Stage, 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Annual Holiday Show and Gingerbread Tea for Children. 1 and 3:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $8, add $2 for tea available a half-hour before and after each show. Tea seating is limited to 60 per tea-time. Call 440-247-8955 (1-6 p.m. today for reservation)).

Cleveland Play House. Allen Theatre, 1407 Euclid Ave. 216-241-6000 or clevelandplayhouse.com. Festival of Trees. Today-Thursday.

Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad's Rockside Station. Old Rockside Road, one block north of Rockside Road, Independence. 216-524-1497 or 1-800-445-9667 or cvsr.com. The Polar Express. Through Friday, Dec. 20.

Downtown Lakewood. 14701 Detroit Avenue. 216-521-0655 or downtownlakewood.org. Light Up Lakewood. 4 p.m. Saturday.

Dunham Tavern Museum. 6709 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-431-1060 or dunhamtavern.org. Stagecoach stop built in 1824, with artifacts from 1820 to 1860. Grounds feature barn, log cabin, heritage trail and gardens. Tours by appointment only (for 15 or more). Hours: 1-4 p.m. Wednesday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $3, adults; $2, children under 12; free, members. Holiday Tour. Take a step back to Cleveland’s earliest days. The halls of this former stagecoach stop will be filled with fresh, natural greenery and the sounds of live music. Hot cider and cookies available in the barn. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Free.

E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall. 198 Hill St., Akron. 330-972-7570 or ejthomashall.com. Christmas Arts and Crafts Show. Featuring 110 professional artists and craftspeople, entertainment, refreshments, door prizes. General admission $4.50, senior citizens $4, children age 12 and younger are free. Noon-7 p.m. today; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday.

FirstEnergy Stadium. 1085 West Third St., Cleveland. 440-891-5050 or clevelandbrowns.com. Deck the House. This is an auction benefiting the children at Providence House. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Legacy Village. 25333 Cedar Road, Lyndhurst. 216-382-3871 or legacy-village.com. Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis. 8:30 a.m. Sunday.

Medina County District Library. Main Library, 210 S. Broadway St. 330-725-0588 or mcdl.info. Medina Holiday Spectacular. 3-4:30 p.m. Saturday.

Pleasant Hills United Methodist Church. 13200 E. Bagley Road, Middleburg Heights. 440-845-1244 or pleasanthills.org. An Evening in December. 6 p.m. Saturday.

Pop Up Shaker. Van Aken District, 20100 Chagrin Blvd.-20341 Chagrin Blvd. , Shaker Heights. 216-491-1412 or tackk.com/popupshaker. "Local Flavor, Local Made, Close to Home." Crafts and goods by local makers, plus demonstrations by Clevleand Craft Connection. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday; 5-9 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, Dec. 15.

Skyview Lodge. 336 Pearl Road, Brunswick Hills. 330-225-8345 or skyviewlodge.net. Christmas Craft Show/ Holiday Wine Tasting and Open House. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.

Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens. 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. 330-836-5533 or stanhywet.org. Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens is the former home of Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company founder F.A. Seiberling and his family. Completed in 1915, it is an important example of an American country estate built by wealth created during the Industrial Age. Stan Hywet includes a 65-room Manor House and 70 acres of landscaped grounds. It is Akron's only National Historic Landmark and is accredited by the American Association of Museums. Guided and specialty tours available. Hours: 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, April through December. Closed Mondays except Memorial Day and Labor Day when regular hours are in effect. Closed January through March, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas and New Year's Eve. Admission for a self-guided Manor House tour: $14, adults; $6, ages 6-17; free, ages 5 and under. Gardens only: $10, adults; $4, ages 6-17. Annual Celebration of the Holidays: "Deck the Hall." Theme this year: "Heaven and Nature Sing" and features 750,000 lights. Nightly 5-8 p.m. through Monday, Dec. 30 (closed Dec. 9, 16, 24 and 25). $17, adults; $$7, youth ages 6-17 and college students with ID; children 5 and under free with an adult. Include tour of the Manor House.

Strongsville Historical Society. 13305 Pearl Road. 440-572-0057‎ or strongsville.org/content/historical_society.asp. Christmas in the Village. 2-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

The Hickories Museum. 509 Washington Ave., Elyria. 440-322-3341 or www.lchs.org. 1-4 Tuesday-Friday,1-3 p.m. Saturday. Other times by appointment. . Admission: adults, $5, ages 13-18, $3, 6-12, $2, under 6 and LCHS members, free. Holiday Gala. 5-8 p.m. today.

University Circle. Wade Oval, East Boulevard and Wade Oval Drive, Cleveland. 216-707-5033 or universitycircle.org. Holday CircleFest. Activities at the institutions will be from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 1-7 p.m. Sunday. Holiday Circlefest. 1-7 p.m. Sunday.

Wagner's of Westlake. 30855 Center Ridge Road. 440-871-8800 or wagnersofwestlake.com. Breakfast with Santa. 10 a.m. Sunday.

Wildwood Cultural Center. 7645 Little Mountain Road, Mentor. 440-974-5735. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Holiday Display and Craft Show. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday.

PARKS/OUTDOORS

Geauga Park District. West Woods Nature Center, 9465 Kinsman Road, Russell Township. 440-286-9516 or geaugaparkdistrict.org. Something's Afoot: Nature Just Can't Stay Put. Today-Thursday.

MUSEUMS

Cleveland Hungarian Heritage Society. Galleria at Erieview, 1301 East Ninth St. 216-523-3900 or jcu.edu/language/hunghemu. On the second floor of the Galleria. The museum's mission is preserving Hungarian culture and the experiences of Hungarians in Northeast Ohio. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. By appointment only Monday and Saturday. Free.

Cleveland Museum of Natural History. One Wade Oval Drive. 216-231-4600 or cmnh.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday (until 10 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Closed holidays. $12; $10, seniors 60 and up, ages 3-18, college students with ID; free, ages 2 and younger. Exhibit: "Nature’s Mating Games: Beyond the Birds & the Bees." A provocative exhibition created by The Natural History Museum, London, that explores the wild science of seduction in the animal kingdom, featuring unusual, odd and sometimes dangerous behaviors used to attract a mate. Recommended for visitors 13 and older. Through Sunday, April 27. $5, plus museum admission. Ice Age 2013: A Winter Event of Prehistoric Proportions. Today-Thursday.

Croatian Heritage Museum and Library. 34900 Lake Shore Blvd., Eastlake. 440-946-2044 or croatianmuseum.com. Museum and library hours: 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays, 3-8 p.m. Fridays and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays. Group tours can be arranged.

Czech Cultural Center Museum and Library of Sokol Greater Cleveland. Bohemian National Hall, 4939 Broadway. 216-641-9777; 216-883-1970 (Saturday only) or sokolgreatercleveland.com. 10 a.m.- 1 p.m. Saturdays. Free. Authentic Czech Artifacts on Display. Czech costumes, marionettes and historical artifacts. Czech garnets and costume jewelry, crystal, pottery, books on sale in museum gift shop. Building tours available by appointment. Call 216-524-7722 or 216-561-7029. Exhibit runs through Dec. 27.

Dennison Railroad Depot Museum. 400 Center St. 740-922-6776 or dennisondepot.org. Museum and Whistle Stop Gift Shop, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. today; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday.

Dunham Tavern Museum. 6709 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-431-1060 or dunhamtavern.org. Stagecoach stop built in 1824, with artifacts from 1820 to 1860. Grounds feature barn, log cabin, heritage trail and gardens. Tours by appointment only (for 15 or more). Hours: 1-4 p.m. Wednesday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $3, adults; $2, children under 12; free, members.

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Learning Center and Money Museum. 1455 East Sixth St. 216-579-3188 or clevelandfed.org. Learn what gives money value while exploring 25 interactive exhibits in the main lobby. Free admission. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Closed holidays. Exhibit: "Propaganda and Patriotism: The Art of Financing America's War." Vintage War Bond posters designed by prominent American Artists. Through Thursday, Jan. 30.

Great Lakes Science Center. 601 Erieside Ave., Cleveland. 216-694-2000 or greatscience.com. Admission: Great Lakes Science, $12-$14; Omnimax Theater, $9-$11; Great Lakes Science and Omnimax combo, $17-$19. Steamship William G. Mather Museum is open for the season. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily (closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day). Featuring hundreds of hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibitions, daily demonstrations and the Omnimax Theater. The Steamship William G. Mather is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in May, September and October; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday in June, July and August; and closed November through April. Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition. Features more than 250 artifacts conserved from the ship's debris, including the bell that was rung the night of the sinking. Visuals of the ship's construction that guests can walk through include the first and third-class cabins, boiler room, captain's bridge and more. Guests will encounter historical re-enactors. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. Hours: 10:15 a.m.-6 p.m. daily (till 6:30 p.m. the first Saturday of the month and holidays). Other exhibits close at 5 p.m. Admission is $24 for adults, $22 for ages 2-12 for nonmembers; $10 for members. Includes admission to the entire science center. Tickets for "Titanic" are timed; advance tickets may be purchased.

Holden Arboretum. 9500 Sperry Road, Kirtland. 440-946-4400 or holdenarb.org. The Holden Arboretum is an outdoor living museum that promotes the beauty and importance of trees and other woody plants to create sustainable and healthy communities in the Great Lakes region and beyond. Dogs at Holden: Dogs on a leash are welcome at the arboretum but not in the Myrtle S. Holden Wildflower Garden. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day . $6, ages 13 and older; $5, seniors 60 and over; $3, ages 6-12; free, members and ages 5 and under. Tram tours: $2. Reservations required.

Indian Museum of Lake County. Technical Center, Building B, 25 Public Square, Willoughby. 440-951-3813 or indianmuseumoflakecounty.org. Tour programs: home schools, schools and groups by reservation only. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday; 1-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Closed major holiday weekends. $2; $1.50, seniors; $1, students (K-12); free, preschoolers.

International Women's Air and Space Museum. Burke Lakefront Airport terminal lobby, 1501 N. Marginal Road, Cleveland. 216-623-1111 or iwasm.org. Self-guided tours 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. Guided tours 1 p.m. each Saturday. Research center and gift shop with original documents, photos and books. Center and gift shop: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Free.

Kent State University Museum. Rockwell Hall, Main and Lincoln streets. 330-672-3450 or kent.edu/museum. 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday (until 8:45 p.m. Thursday), noon-4:45 p.m. Sunday. . $5, adults; $4, senior citizens; $3, ages 18 and under. Free with Kent State ID and to the public on Sunday. "Arthur Koby Jewelry: The Creative Eye." Through Sunday, Oct. 5.

Lakewood Historical Society. Oldest Stone House Museum, 14710 Lake Ave. 216-221-7343. Home built in 1838; displays memorabilia from pioneer past. 2-5 p.m. Sunday; 1-4 p.m. Wednesday. Closed December-January and major holidays.

Lorain County History Center. 284 Washington Ave., Elyria. 440-322-3341 or lchs.org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturday. $5, adults; $3, ages 13-18; $2 for 6-12; free, members and children under 6. Lorain County Historical Society: Sacred Landmarks Exhibition. This exhibition includes 14 posters of color and black-and-white photographs featuring the architecture of Lorain County churches that were built before 1900 and continue in operation today. Several artifacts are also on view. The exhibition is included with the price of admission. Exhibit runs through December. Free with admission.

Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. 2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood. 216-593-0575 or maltzmuseum.org. Features a rich selection from the Temple Museum of Religious Art's collection of art and artifacts that includes ritual objects, sacred books and scrolls, and fine art from around the world. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday); noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Closed all holiday Mondays unless noted on the website. "Traitor-Spies, Lie and Justice Denied: The Dreyfus Affair." This famous case altered media, politics and society for the 20th century and beyond. Today-Thursday. Free with museum admission.

Mill Creek Falls History Center. 8404 Webb Terrace, Cleveland. 216-271-9300 or slavicvillagehistory.org. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Monday through Friday by appointment. Learn about the history of the Slavic Village and Mill Creek neighborhoods.

National Cleveland-Style Polka Hall of Fame. 605 East 222nd St., Euclid. 216-261-3263 or clevelandstyle.com. Polka history and memorabilia. Free. Noon-5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday, Monday, Thursday and holidays. Exhibit: "All-Star Accordions: Clebrity Squeezeboxes and the Stories Behind Them." Through Friday, Jan. 31.

Shaker Historical Society. 16740 South Park Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-921-1201 or shakerhistory.com. Hours: 2-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday. Closed holidays. $5, nonmembers; $2, children 6-18; free, members and children under 6. Exhibits: Pat Zinsmeister Parker's "Parker's Playground" and "Miniature Wonderlands." Through Sunday, Jan. 19.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES
Just for fun

Avon Lake Public Library. 32649 Electric Blvd. 440-933-8128 or alpl.org. 1-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. No Bake Holiday Treats. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Just for fun

Cleveland Metroparks Hinckley Reservation. Hinckley Lake Boathouse, off West Drive between Bellus and State roads, Hinckley Township. 440-526-1012. Chickadee Nest. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Parma-Snow branch, 2121 Snow Road, Parma. 216-661-4240 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Grand Re-opening. Ceremonial Ribbon Cutting, followed by performances by Inlet Dance Theatre, Cleveland Youth Orchestra, Cleveland Music Settlement, and a special Polar Express children's storytime. 5:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday.

Foluke Cultural Arts Center. 4600 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland. folukeculturalarts.org. Open House. 1-5 p.m. Saturday.

John Adams High School. 3817 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Cleveland. 216-491-5700. African Dance Classes. Workout while learning traditional dance and drumming for beginners and advanced dancers. 6-7:30 p.m. today-Thursday.

Kent State University Planetarium. Smith Hall, Room 108, E. Summit St. 330-672-2246 or planetarium.kent.edu/users/planet. The Skies of Winter: Holidays in the Planetarium. 8 p.m. today-Saturday.

University of Akron. E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall, 198 Hill St. 330-972-7570 or ejthomashall.com. A Holiday Arts and Crafts Show. Noon today. 10 a.m. Sunday.

Theater

Beachwood Community Theater. Beachwood Middle School, 2860 Richmond Road. 216-292-1970 or beachwoodohio.com/theater.html. Disney's "The Little Mermaid Jr." 8 p.m. today; 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $8, adults; $7, senior citizens and students. Through Sunday, Dec. 15.

Heights Youth Theatre. Wiley Middle School Auditorium, 2181 Miramar Blvd., University Heights. 216-923-1583 or heightsyouththeatre.com. "Peter Pan." 7 p.m. today; 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $10, general admission; $9, senior citizens and children under 6. Through Saturday, Dec. 21. No performances Friday, Dec. 13.

Mercury Summer Stock. Notre Dame College's Regina Hall, 4545 College Road, South Euclid. 216-771-5862 or mercurysummerstock.com. "Yes, Virginia!, the Musical." 6:30 p.m. Sunday. $5.

North Canton Playhouse. Main Stage, 525 Seventh St. 330-494-1613 or northcantonplayhouse.com. Flip Kobler and Cindy Marcus "A Fairy-Tale Christmas Carol" (an adaptation of Charles Dicken's "A Christmas Carol"). 7:30 p.m. today; 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $10. Through Sunday, Dec. 15.

Olde Towne Hall Youth Theatre. 36119 Center Ridge Road, North Ridgeville. 440-327-2909 or oldetownehalltheatre.com. "Scrooge, the Musical." Based on Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $10, adults; $8, senior citizens and youth. Through Saturday, Dec. 14.

Solon Center for the Arts' Youth Theater. 6315 SOM Center Road. 440-337-1400 or solonarts.org. "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $7-$8.

Talespinner Children's Theatre. At West Side Ecumenical Ministry/Julia De Burgos Cultural Arts Center's Reinberger Auditorium, 5209 Detroit Ave., Cleveland. 216-264-9680 or talespinnerchildrenstheatre.org. David Hansen's "Adventures in Slumberland." 1 p.m. today; 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $15, adults; $12, senior citizens and students; $10, children 12 and under. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Friday evening performances begin 7 p.m. Dec. 13.

Zoos

Greater Cleveland Aquarium. 2000 Sycamore St. 216-862-8803 or greaterclevelandaquarium.com. Features more than 40 exhibits, including a walk-through shark exhibit. Strollers and wheelchair accessible. Wheelchairs available on a first come, first serve basis; pass holders, free and non-pass holders, $5. Parking: $3, Monday-Friday; $5, Saturday, Sunday. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily with last admission at 4 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. $19.95; $17.95, seniors 60 and up; $13.95, children 2-12. Annual pass: $50, adults; $90, couple; $130, family (two adults and two children) with each additional child $25; seniors, $45; senior couple, $80. Military rate available at GCA ticket counter. The Greater Cleveland Aquarium Live Coral Exhibit. The new live coral exhibit emphasizes the importance of coral and why they need our protection. The GCA has been growing coral from fragments acquired from other institutions. This allows display of live coral without harming natural reefs. Exhibit shows a dozen species of corals. Ongoing exhibit. Free with admission.

ETC.

5th Street Arcades. 530 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. Downtown Farmers Market at 5th Street Arcades. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. today.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church. One Mount Zion Circle, Oakwood. 440-232-2645 or mtzionoakwood.org. The Krystal Klear Small Business Showcase. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.

North Union Farmers Market. Crocker Park, Crocker and Detroit roads, Westlake. 440-250-9268 or crockerpark.com. Farmers Market. Locally grown fresh produce for sale. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays through Dec. 21. Shaker Square Market, Shaker and Moreland boulevards, Cleveland. 216-751-7656. 8 a.m.-noon Saturdays through Dec. 21.

Ohio Nets Sports Complex. 12665 Corporate Dr., Parma. 216-676-4574 or www.ohio-nets.com. Roller Derby. 6 p.m. Saturday.

Return to Top



News Headline: WIPO PUBLISHES PATENT OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "FUMED METAL-OXIDE GEL-DISPERSED BLUE-PHASE LIQUID CRYSTALS AND DEVICES THEREOF" (AMERICAN... | Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: WIPO PUBLISHES PATENT OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOR "FUMED METAL-OXIDE GEL-DISPERSED BLUE-PHASE LIQUID CRYSTALS AND DEVICES THEREOF" (AMERICAN INVENTORS)

GENEVA, Dec.6 -- Publication No.WO/2013/181401 was published on Dec.5.

Title of the invention: "FUMED METAL-OXIDE GEL-DISPERSED BLUE-PHASE LIQUID CRYSTALS AND DEVICES THEREOF."

Applicants: KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (US).

Inventors: Liang-Chy Chien (US) and Jeoung-Yeon Hwang (US).

According to the abstract* posted by the World Intellectual Property Organization: "The present invention comprises a fumed metal-oxide gel, such as fumed silica gel, that is dispersed into a blue-phase liquid crystal.Adding the fumed silica nanoparticles in blue-phase media leads to the broadening of the blue-phase temperature range and reduces the switching voltage.Additionally, the polarity-controlled nanoparticles of the fumed silica enable the stabilization of thermal-sensitive Bragg reflection property of the blue-phase liquid crystals, which allows their use in active optical elements and fast-switching LCDs."

The patent was filed on May 30 under Application No.PCT/US2013/043376.

*For further information, including images, charts and tables, please visit: http://www.wipo.int/patentscope/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2013181401

For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Copyright (c) 2013 US Fed News (HT Syndication)

Return to Top



News Headline: Cleveland Arts listings for Dec. 6-12: Moscow Ballet's "The Great Russian Nutcracker" & More | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Browsing the Arts calendar for Friday, Dec 6

ART -- MUSEUMS

Akron Art Museum. 1 S. High St. 330-376-9185 or akronartmuseum.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday). Closes all major holidays. $7; $5, those 65 and older and students with ID; free for youth ages 17 and younger. Free admission every Thursday. Exhibit: "With a Trace: Photographs of Absence." Collection from the museum with additions from Northeast Ohio collectors Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell, featuring works by Christopher Bucklow, Margaret De Patta, Adam Fuss, Alison Rossiter, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Minor White from 1939-2010. Through Sunday, Jan. 26. Exhibit: Diana Al-Hadid's sculpture "Nolli's Orders." Through Sunday, March 16. Event: "Free Thursday." Free all-day gallery admission, plus special programming throughout the day that includes art talks, films, classes, concerts and other special events. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday.

Allen Memorial Art Museum. 87 N. Main St., Oberlin. 440-775-8665 or oberlin.edu/allenart. A strong permanent collection makes the Allen well worth a trip to Lorain County. The Weltzheimer/Johnson House (a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian House, 1948-50), 534 Morgan St., is open the first and third Sundays of the month, from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Free. Exhibit: "Regarding Realism," realists depicted the world aroud them, from landscapes and rural scenes to the grittiness of urban life. Through Sunday, June 22. Exhibit: "Modern and Contemporary Realisms," featuring works from colorful expressionist paintings of the early 20th century to highly detailed photo-realist works by Chuck Close and Audrey Flack. Through Sunday, June 22. Exhibit: "The Human Comedy: Chonicles of 19th-Century France," featuring 150 works -- primarily lithographs reproduced in the French popular press. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Exhibit: "Harold E. Edgerton, Seeking Facts," works by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor, who pioneered flash photography techniques. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Tuesday Tea Talk: Jeffrey Pence, associate professor of English and cinema studies, on new ways of looking at art history as the history of media development. 2:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday). Closed major holidays. Free admission to the permanent collection. Admission may apply to touring exhibitions. Exhibit (Atrium): "Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads." Installation of 12 bronze sculptures representing the animals of the Chinese zodiac. Through Sunday, Jan. 26. Exhibit: "Praxiteles: The Cleveland Apollo." The museum's ancient bronze sculpture "Apollo Sauaroktonos" from about 350-275 BC is the subject of a focus exhibition. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. Traveling Exhibit: "Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome." Featuring over 150 objects, this exhibition celebrates Sicilian culture of the fifth to third centuries BC, when its art, architecture, theater, poetry, philosophy, and science left a stamp on both mainland Greece and Rome. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. $15; $13, senior citizens and students; $7, children ages 6-17. Free for CMA members and children ages 5 and under.

Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. 11400 Euclid Ave. 216-421-8671 or mocacleveland.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday (until 9 p.m. Thursday). $8; $6, senior citizens; $5, students with valid ID. Free admission on the first Saturday of the month. Exhibit: Michelle Grabner's "I Work frojm Home" and Simon Evans' "Only Words Eaten by Experience." Through Sunday, Feb. 16. Event: "Free First Saturday." MOCA Cleveland is free the first Saturday of the month. Sponsored by Medical Mutual. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday.

ART -- GALLERIES

Artcraft Building. 2570 Superior Ave., Cleveland. 216-407-3685 or artcraftstudio.wordpress.com. Features 20 downtown artists and 30 regional artists with studios on the 2nd, 4th, 5th and 6th floors. Elevator access. Not all artists can accept credit cards; cash and checks are preferred. Event: Open Studio Holiday Sale. Meet the Artists: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

Bonfoey Gallery. 1710 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-621-0178 or bonfoey.com. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit: "120 Years of Art in Cleveland." Features Cleveland artists represented by the Bonfoey Gallery from the Cleveland School to the Cleveland Arts Prize winners. The selection of Cleveland School works from the John and Susan Horseman collection. Opening reception: 4-8 p.m. today. Through Saturday, Jan. 4.

Little Italy Art Walk. Mayfield and Murrary Hill roads, Cleveland. clevelandlittleitaly.com. More than 30 galleries, studios and boutiques present handmade works by regional, national, and internationally known artists. Holiday Art Walk. Walk: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. today-Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday.

Loren Naji Studio/Gallery. 2138 West 25th St., Cleveland. 216-621-6644 or lorennaji.com. 3-6 p.m. Friday, Tuesday; or by appointment. Exhibit: "Cleveland Kids Create," featuring works by children with cancer. Curated by 10-year-old Brielle Naji. Artists' reception: 6 p.m.-midnight today.

O Gallery. La Place, 2101 Richmond Road, Beachwood. 330-921-1234 or theogallery.net. Noon-6 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Exhibit: Works by Rebecca Schmidt. Meet the Artist: 6-9 p.m. today.

Rachel Davis Fine Arts. 1301 West 79th St., Cleveland. 216-939-1190 or www.racheldavisfinearts.com. Event: Fine & Decorative Arts at Auction. Sale: 9:30 a.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. Sunday.

Waterloo Arts District's Art Walk. Waterloo Road and East 156th Street, Cleveland. waterlooartsdistrict.com. Galleries and boutiques offer works by local and professional artists, and entertainment the first weekend of the month north to Lake Shore Boulevard. Event: Holiday Art Sale. Meet the Artists: 11 a.m.-11 p.m. today-Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

William Busta Gallery. 2731 Prospect Ave., Cleveland. 216-298-9071 or williambustagallery.com. 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; or by appointment. Exhibits: Mark Howard's "Nothing Sacred" and Jerry Birchfield's "Exercie N/or Exocise." Meet the Artist (Mark Howard): 2-4 p.m. Saturday. Through Saturday, Dec. 28.

BOOKS -- AUTHORS

Avon Lake Public Library. 32649 Electric Blvd. 440-933-8128 or alpl.org. 1-5 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, Saturday. Used Book Sale. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. today; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

Cuyahoga County Public Library. Chagrin Falls branch, 100 E. Orange St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-3556 or cuyahogalibrary.org. Meet the Author: Andrew Thomas, "The Final Journey of the Saturn V." 2 p.m. Saturday. Free, but registration requested. Meet the Author: Theater critic Bob Ableman, "Refereeing the Muses: A Theater Criticism/Arts Journalism Primer." 7 p.m. Tuesday. Free, but registration requested.

Lakewood Public Library. 15425 Detroit Ave 216-226-8275 or lkwdpl.org. Book Sale. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Meet the Author: Sakeenah and Anika Francis, "Love's All That Makes Sense: A Mother Daughter Memoir." 7 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Learned Owl Book Shop. 204 N. Main St., Hudson. 330-653-2252 or learnedowl.com. Meet the Author: Bev Shaffer, "Chocolate Desserts to Die For." 1-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Meet the Author: D.A. Quigley, "Santa's Magic." 1-3 p.m. Sunday.

Learned Owl Book Shop. Laurel Lake Retirement Center, 200 Laurel Lake Drive, Hudson. 330-653-2252 or learnedowl.com. Program: Dr. Thomas Daniel, "Times and Tides of Tuberculois," discusses the lives and literary works of 15 writers affected by tuberculois. 3 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library. Willowick branch, 263 East 305th St., Willowick. 440-943-4151 or wepl.lib.oh.us. Used Book/AV Sale. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. today-Saturday and Monday; 1-4:30 p.m. Sunday.

DANCE

Ballet Theatre Ashtabula. Ashtabula Arts Center, 2928 West 13th St. 440-964-3396 or ashartscenter.org. Performances: "The Nutcracker." 7:30 p.m. today; 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Saturday evening performances begin 7:30 p.m. Dec. 14. One Thursday performance: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19. $13; $12, senior citizens and students; $11, children 12 and under.

Ballet Theatre of Ohio. Akron Civic Theatre, 182 S. Main St., Akron. 330-253-2488 or ballettheatreohio.org. Performance: "The Nutty Nutcracker." 7 p.m. today. $22-$46. Performances: "The Nutcracker." 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $22-$46.

City Ballet of Cleveland. Cuyahoga Community College's Eastern Campus Performing Arts Center, 4250 Richmond Road, Highland Heights. 216-295-2222 or cityballetofcleveland.com. Performances: The fourth annual "Uniquely Cleveland Nutcracker." 7 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Advance (online): $25; $10, senior citizens and children 12 and under. At the door: $30. Cash and checks only.

Cleveland Museum of Art. 11150 East Blvd. 216-421-7340 or clevelandart.org. Performance for Holiday CircleFest: Cleveland Inner City Ballet's "Mini Nutcracker." 3:20 p.m. Sunday.

Cleveland Public Theatre. Parish Hall, 6415 Detroit Ave. 216-631-2727 or cptonline.org. Performance: The Movement Project's "Dusty .. a swift fall from grandeur," choreographers Megan Lee Gargano and Rebecca J. Nicklos. 8 p.m. Saturday. $10.

Czech Cultural Center Museum and Library of Sokol Greater Cleveland. Bohemian National Hall, 4939 Broadway 216-641-9777; 216-883-1970 (Saturday only) or sokolgreatercleveland.com. 10 a.m.- 1 p.m. Saturdays. Free. Performance: Ballet and Concert, featuring the Cleveland Women's Orchestra and the Ohio Dance Theater. Selections from the Nutcracker Ballet and other seasonal favorites. 3:30 p.m. Sunday. $10; $5, students. Pre-concert schnitzel dinner available 1-3 p.m. for $13. Reservation required. Call 216-447-0264.

Kent State University. Music & Speech Building's E. Turner Stump Theatre, 1325 Theatre Drive 330-672-2172 or kent.edu/music. Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist series: The Limon Dancre Company of New York City. 7:30 p.m. today. Free.

Moscow Ballet. Public Auditorium's Music Hall, East Sixth Street and St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. 1-800-745-3000 or nutcracker.com. Performance: "The Great Russian Nutcracker." 3 p.m. Saturday. $27.50-$102.

MUSIC -- ORCHESTRAL, OPERA

Apollo's Fire, The Cleveland Baroque Orchestra. "Sacrum Mysterium (Sacred Mystery): A Celtic Christmas" at various locations through Sunday, Dec. 8. Pre-concert talk one hour before each concert. Tickets: $26-$70, adults; $10, full-time students with ID. Details: Call 216-320-0012 or 1-800-314-2535. For complete schedule, go to apollosfire.org. Concert: Apollo's Fire: "Sacrum Mysterium." First Baptist Church of Greater Cleveland. 3630 Fairmount Blvd., Shaker Heights. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. St. Noel Church. 35200 Chardon Road, Willoughby Hills. 4 p.m. Sunday.

CityMusic Cleveland Chamber Orchestra. "Music from the Viennese Waltz Kings," featuring the overture to Die Fledermaus, the Blue Danube Waltz, and songs from The Merry Widow and other great operettas; plus Hummel’s Trumpet Concerto. Stefan Willich, conductor; Stacey Mastrian, soprano; and Jack Sutte, trumpet. At various locations through Sunday, Dec. 8. Free. For complete details, go to citymusiccleveland.org or call 216-321-8273. Concert: CityMusic Cleveland's "Music from the Viennese Waltz Kings." St. Mary Church. 320 Middle Ave., Elyria. 2:30 p.m. Sunday. St. Noel Church. 35200 Chardon Road, Willoughby Hills. 7:30 p.m. today. St. Stanislaus Church. 3649 East 65th St., Cleveland. 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Cleveland Jazz Orchestra. PlayhouseSquare's Hanna Theatre, East 14th Street 216-241-6000 or clevelandjazz.org. Concert: "A Not So Silent Night" with Helen Welch. 8 p.m. Saturday. $25-$45. Concert: "Jingle Bell Jazz." 2 p.m. Sunday. $10.

Cleveland Orchestra. Severance Hall, 11001 Euclid Ave. 216-231-1111 or clevelandorchestra.com. PNC Holiday Musical Rainbows series: Christmas Brass Quintet. Featuring Michael Miller, trumpet; Jack Sutte, trumpet; Hans Clebsch, horn; Richard Stout, trombone; Kenneth Heinlein, tuba; and Maryann Nagel, host. 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 13 and 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 14. Young people under 18 attend free with one full-price adult ticket purchased. Concert: "Beethoven, Uchida and Fleisher." Leon Fleischer, conductor, and Mitsuko Uchida, piano. Works by Mendelssohn and Beethoven. 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $49-$162. Celebrity series: Natalie Cole. 8 p.m. Wednesday. $40-$110.

Cleveland Pops Orchestra. Avon Lake High School's Performing Arts Center, 175 Avon-Belden Road, Avon Lake. 216-765-7677 or clevelandpops.com. Concert: Holiday Pops Concert with the Avon Lake High School Chorale. Carl Topilow, music director. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. $30-$35; $15, children 13 and under. To purchase tickets, call Tom Brock at 440-933-2800.

Parma Symphony Orchestra. Valley Forge High School, 9999 Independence Blvd. 440-882-2912 or parmasymphony.org. Concert: Randolph P. Laycock, music director; Alex Wasserman, piano. Works by Tchaikovsky, Vaughn William and Leroy Anderson. 3 p.m. Sunday. $10; $5, senior citizens and students.

Suburban Symphony Orchestra. University School's Shaker Campus' Conway Hall, 20701 Brantley Road, Shaker Heights. 216-751-2224 or suburbansymphony.org. Concert: "An All-German Concert Marking the Bicentennial of Richard Wagner's Birth." Martin Kessler, music director. Works by Weber and Wagner. 3:30 p.m. Sunday. Free.

West Shore Chorale and Orchestra. Magnificat Center for the Performing Arts, 20770 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River. 216-373-7773 or westshorechorale.org. Concert: "Carols & Choruses of Christmas." John Drotleff, conductor; and 60 student singers from the Oberlin Choristers' Cantate Musica directed by Lisa Van Scyoc. Works by Pachelbel, Conte, Billings, Lovelace, Vaughan Williams, Holst and others. 7:30 p.m. Sunday. $15; students free.

MUSIC -- RECITALS, COMMUNITY CONCERTS

Brown Street Academy. 1035 Clay St., Akron. Concert: Ohio Distance and Electronic Learning Adademy Chorus' "4 Tickets to Christmas" (Broadway-style musical). 2 p.m. Saturday. Free, but seating is limited. Email Diana Newlon at diana.newlon@ohdela.com.

Cleveland Composers Guild. West Shore Unitarian Universalist Church, 20401 Hilliard Boulevard, Rocky River. clevelandcomposers.com. Concert: "Panoramicos," featuring Mary Kay Robinson, flutes; Sandra Simon, soprano; Jeffrey Irvine, viola; Kent Collier, cello; and Javier Gonzales, piano. Works by William Rayer, Loris Chobanian, Ty Alan Emerson, Stephen T. Griebling, Robert Rollin and Jeffrey Quick. 3 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Cleveland Institute of Music. Mixon Hall, 11021 East Blvd. 216-795-3211 or cim.edu. Most events free unless indicated. Seating passes will be distributed in lobby 30 minutes before the concert and may be reserved one week in advance. Holiday Circlefest Concert (Mixon Hall): CIM Harp Ensemble perform excerpts from Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker Suite" and the CIM Orchestra perform "Peter and the Wolf." 1 p.m. Sunday. Winter Chamber Music Festival (Mixon Hall): Intensive String Quartet Seminar Gala Concert. Works by Mozart and Haydn. 6 p.m. Sunday. Winter Chamber Music Festival (Kulas Hall): "Influences and Inspirations II," featuring the Cavani String Quartet. Works by Haydn, Bartok and Brahms. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

Fine Arts Association. 38660 Mentor Ave., Willoughby. 440-951-7500 or fineartsassociation.org. Concert: "I'm Dreaming of a Broadway Christmas," song and dance extravaganza with Brian Marshall, Pierre-Jacques Brault, Kelvette Beacham, Kelly Monaghan, Jennifer Myor and Eddie Carney. 1 p.m. Wednesday. $15.

First Baptist Church of Greater Cleveland. 3630 Fairmount Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-932-7480 or firstbaptistcleveland.org. Concert: Burning River Brass Christmas Concert. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. $12; $10, senior citizens and students; $8, children.

First Unitarian Church of Cleveland. 21600 Shaker Blvd., Shaker Heights. 216-751-2320 or firstunitariancleveland.org. Concert: The Almeda Trio. Works by Haydn, Jennifer Higdon, Arvo Part and Smetana. 4 p.m. Sunday. Offering.

Kent State University. Cartwright Hall's University Auditorium, 650 Hilltop Drive 330-672-2787 or kent.edu. Free parking available off of Terrace Drive. Concert: KSU's Gospel Choir. 7:30 p.m. today. Free. Concert: KSU Chorale's "Carols & Confections." 3 p.m. Saturday. $15; $13, senior citizens; $8, non-Kent State students; $5, children. Concert: KSU's Kent Chorus, Men's and Women's choruses and the Revere High School Symphonic Choir. Program includes John Rutter's "Gloria." 7:30 p.m. Sunday. $15; $13, senior citizens; $8, non-Kent State students; $5, children.

Lake Erie College. Morley Music Hall, 391 W. Washington St., Painesville. 440-375-7030 or lec.edu. Christmas Vespers: The Life and Memory of Professor Pauyl Gothard III. Works by Adam, Bach, Mathias, Rutter, Paul Gothard III, and others. 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Lakeland Community College. Performing Arts Center, Interstate 90 and Ohio 306, Kirtland. 440-525-7526 (information) or 440-525-7134 (tickets) or lakelandcc.edu/arts. Concert: "Holiday Salaute to British and American Composers." The Lakeland Civic Band; Charles Frank, director. 4 p.m. Sunday. $7; $6, senior citizens; $2, students.

Legacy Singers. Strongsville United Methodist Church, 13500 Royalton Road, Strongsville. 440-846-0973 or legacyineducation.org. Concert: "Merry and Bright" featuring the Elders of Jazz, Tri-C West Chorale, and the Reserve Chorus of the Singing Angels. 7:30 p.m. today. Offering.

Medina County District Library. Highland branch, 4160 Ridge Road 330-239-2674 or mcdl.info. Concert: Medina United Methodist Church Adult Handbell Choir. Sacred and traditional Christmas music. 6:30 p.m. Monday. Free.

Medina Presbyterian Church. 5020 Burgundy Bay Blvd. off Route 18 216-529-1683. May 19, 2009 7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Free to the public. Concert: The Medina Chorus' "The 79th Winter Concert." 3 p.m. Sunday. $10; $7, senior citizens and children.

Oberlin College. Finney Chapel, 90 N. Professor St. Central ticket service: 1-800-371-0178 or oberlin.edu. Concert: Friday Night Organ Pump, featuring conservatory organ majors. midnight today. Free. Concert: Oberlin Jazz Ensemble. Dennis Reynolds, conductor. 8 p.m. Saturday. Free. Concert: "A Wagner and Verdi Celebration Concert," featuring Oberlin Orchestra, Musical Union and College Choir. 8 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Oberlin College. Warner Concert Hall, 77 W. College St. 440-775-8044 or oberlin.edu. Concert: Oberlin Sinfonietta. Timothy Weiss, conductor; with guest soloist George Sakakeeny, bassoon. Works by Hartmann, Platt and Stravinksy. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Free.

Oberlin College. Finney Chapel, 90 N. Professor St. Central ticket service: 1-800-371-0178 or oberlin.edu. Concert: The Oberlin Arts & Sciences Orchestra. Philip Highfill, conductor. 8 p.m. Wednesday. Free. Concert: Oberlin Chamber Orchestra. Raphael Jimenez, conductor. Works by Reynaldo Hahn and Maurice Ravel. 8 p.m. Thursday. Free.

Oberlin Public Library. 65 S. Main St. 440-775-4790 or oberlinpl.lib.oh.us. Chamber Concert: Students from the Oberlin Community Music School. 4-5:30 p.m. Saturday. Free.

Rocky River Chamber Music Society. West Shore Unitarian Universalist Church, 20401 Hilliard Blvd. 440-331-9565 or rrcms.org. Concert: Richard King, Principal Horn of the Cleveland Orchestra. Works by Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms and Schuller. 7:30 p.m. Monday. Free.

St. John Cathedral. East Ninth Street and Superior Avenue, Cleveland. 216-771-6666, ext. 5510, or saintjohncathedral.com. Helen D. Schubert Concert series: Daughters of St. Paul Choir (Boston, Mass.) Sr. Bridget Charles Ellis ESP, director. 7 p.m. today. Offering.

St. Paul Lutheran Church. 27993 Detroit Road, Westlake. 440-835-3050 or stpaulwestlake.org. Concert: Annual Christmas Music Festival. 7 p.m. Saturday. $1 or free with a non-perishable food item or small child's toy.

St. Peter's Episcopal Church. 4901 Main Ave., Ashtabula. 440-992-8100 or stpetersashtabula.org. Concert: The Kyodai Brass Ensemble's "Christmas in Brass." 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Trinity Cathedral. 2230 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-771-3630 or trinitycleveland.org. Mass: Beatles Mass, featuring Gateway Band (featuring four Greater Cleveland jazz musicans: George Lee, bass; John Perrine, sax; L.R. Smith, piano; and Chris Vandall, percussion). 9 a.m. Sunday. Offering. Concert: TubaChristmas. Keith Wilkinson, conductor. 5:30 p.m. Sunday. Offering. Musicians must pay a $10 registration fee. Go to tubachristmas-cleveland.org or call Jim Jim McIntyre at 330-969-9676. Brownbag concert: Benjamin Britten's "A Ceremony of Carols," featuring the sopranos and altos of the Trinity Cathedr Choir with harpist Jody Guinn. 12:10 p.m. Wednesday. Offering. Bring a lunch or purchase one for $5.

Trinity Lutheran Church. 2031 West 30th St., Cleveland. 216-751-7574 or clevelandbeckerath.org. Brownbag Concert: "From Heaven Above: Advent and Christmas music, Baroque and Romantic music." Florence Mustric, organ. 12:15 p.m. Wednesday. Free.

University of Akron. Guzzetta Recital Hall, 157 University Ave. 330-972-8301 or uakron.edu/music. Most events free, unless indicated. Concert: UA Concert Choir/Chamber Choir. 3 p.m. Sunday. Free. Concert: UA Men's Chorus. 5:30 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Voices of Canton Inc. Central Presbyterian Church, 47 Second St., Massillon. 330-455-1000 or voicesofcanton.org. Concert: "2013 Holiday Festival Concert." 7:30 p.m. Monday. Free.

Voices of Canton Inc. St. Stephen Martyr Lutheran Church, 4600 Fulton Dr. 330-455-1000 or voicesofcanton.org. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Free.

Waterloo Arts. 15601 Waterloo Road, Cleveland. 216-692-9500 or artscollinwood.org. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; or by appointment. Enter the gallery through the Callaloo Cafe. M4M (Music for Miles) Chamber series: "Carols, Bach and Beethoven" with pianist Stuart Raleight (director of choral music at Baldwin Wallace University). 4 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Western Reserve Chorale. Grace Lutheran Church, 13001 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-791-0061 or westernreservechorale.org. Concert: "Tis the Season: Songs of Thanksgiving and Praise." David Gilson, music director. 7 p.m. Sunday. Offering.

THEATER -- PROFESSIONAL

Actors' Summit Theater. Greystone Hall, 6th Floor, 103 S. High St., Akron. 330-374-7568 or actorssummit.org. David McGillivray and Walter Zerlin, Jr.'s "The Farnadale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen's Guide Dramatic Society Presents A Christmas Carol." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. $33; $28, senior citizens; $10, full time students under 30 with ID.

Beck Center for the Arts. Mackey Main Stage, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. 216-521-2540 or beckcenter.org. "Annie." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. Saturday matinees: 2:30 p.m. Dec. 14, 28 and Jan. 4. One Thursday performance: Dec. 19. $29; $26, senior citizens (ages 65 and up); $12, students with valid ID; $10 ages 12 and under. An additional $3 service fee per ticket.

Blank Canvas Theatre. 78th Street Studio, 1305 West 78th St., Suite 211, Cleveland. 440-941-0458 or blankcanvastheatre.com. John Michael Tebelak and Stephen Schwartz's "Godspell." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday. Through Saturday, Dec. 21. $15.

Cleveland Play House. 1407 Euclid Ave 216-241-6000 or clevelandplayhouse.com. Allen Theatre: "A Christmas Story." 7:30 p.m. today and Wednesday; 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. $15-$69.

Cleveland Public Theatre. 6415 Detroit Ave. 216-631-2727 or cptonline.org. Gordon Square Theatre: Liz Conway, Michael Seevers, Jr. and Beth Wood's "The Loush Sisters Do the Nutcracker." 7:30 p.m. today-Monday and Thursday. Through Saturday, Dec. 21. After Friday performances, audiences invited to mingle with the artists and enjoy free beer. $18-$36. Storefront Studio: Renee Schilling's "Doug Is a D-Bag." 7 p.m. today, Sunday-Monday and Thursday; 7 and 10:30 p.m. Saturday. Through Saturday, Dec. 14. Audiences are invited to turn on their cell phones and interact with characters (and each other) during the performance. $12-$28.

Convergence-Continuum. The Liminis. 2438 Scranton Road, Cleveland. 216-687-0074 or convergence-continuum.org. Sam Shepard's "Fool for Love." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday. Through Saturday, Dec. 21. $15; $12, senior citizens; $10, students.

Dobama Theatre. 2340 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-932-3396 or dobama.org. Dan LeFranc's "The Big Meal." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 7:30 p.m. Sunday and Thursday. Preshow conversation with Doug Katz, chef/proprietor at the Katz Club Diner: 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Sunday matinees begin 2:30 p.m. Dec. 15. Through Sunday, Jan. 5. $19-$26. Sunday performance is a "Pay-as-you-can." $10, full-time students under 25 with ID. $5 rush tickets available to ages 21 and under five minutes before curtain.

Ensemble Theatre. 2843 Washington Ave., Cleveland Heights. 216-321-2930 or ensemble-theatre.org. Craig Lucas' "Prelude to a Kiss." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 15. $22; $20, senior citizens; $12, students with ID.

Great Lakes Theater. PlayhouseSquare's Ohio Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or greatlakestheater.org. The 25th Anniversary of "A Christmas Carol." 7:30 p.m. today and Thursday; 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Though Sunday, Dec. 22. $28-$60.

Karamu Performing Arts Theatre. Jelliffe Theatre, 2355 East 89th St., Cleveland. 216-795-7070 or karamuhouse.org. Philip Rose, Peter Udell and Garry Sherman's "Christmas Is Comin' Uptown." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 29. $15-$40.

Magical Theatre Company. 565 W. Tuscarawas Ave., Barberton. 330-848-3708 or magicaltheatre.org. "Miracle on 34th Street." 7:30 p.m. today; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Opening Night (tonight): $13-$15. All other performances through Saturday, Dec. 21: $11-$13.

NCM Fathom: Theater on Film. NCM Fathom Events, CinemaLive and Digital Theatre presents London's West End Theatre series of Noel Coward's "Private Lives" at various locations at 7 p.m. Wednesday. This production was directed by Jonathan Kent and stars Toby Stephens and Anna Chancellor. Tickets: $13-$15. Details: go to fathomevents.com. Cinemark Strongsville. Westfield SouthPark, Ohio 82 and Howe RoadNoel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Cinemark Tinseltown USA. 4720 Mega St., North Canton. Noel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Cinemark Valley View. 6001 Canal Road.Noel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Crocker Park Stadium 16. 30147 Detroit Road, Westlake. Noel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Hudson Cinemas 10. 5339 Darrow RoadNoel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Montrose Movies Stadium 12. 4020 Medina Road, Akron. Noel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday. Regal Severance Town Center Stadium 14. 3492 Mayfield Road, Cleveland Heights. Noel Coward's "Private Lives." 7 p.m. Wednesday.

None Too Fragile Theatre. 1835 Merriman Road, Akron. 330-671-4563 or nonetoofragile.com. Entrance and box office is through Pub Bricco. Eric Bogosian's "Pounding Nails in the Floor With My Forehead: 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 7:30 p.m. Sunday. $20; or "Pay-As-You-Can" at the door.

Theater at the Cleveland Cinemas. The Royal Shakespeare Company in collaboration with Picturehouse Entertainment presents Gregory Doran's production of William Shakespeare's "Richard II" with David Tenant at the following locations at 11 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. The production opened the RSC's Stratford-upon-Avon this past October and was filmed Nov. 13. Tickets: $20. Details: go to clevelandcinemas.com. Cleveland Cinemas' Capitol Theatre. 1390 West 65th St.William Shakespeare's "Richard II." 11 a.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednesday. Cleveland Cinemas' Cedar Lee Theatre. 2163 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights. William Shakespeare's "Richard II." 11 a.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednesday.

THEATER -- COMMUNITY

82nd Street Theatre. Abundant Life Community Church, 10143 Royalton Road Suites N and O, North Royalton. 440-877-1202 or alcc.cc. "The Best Christmas Pageant Ever." 7 p.m. today; 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday. Through Saturday, Dec. 14. $8; $6, senior citizens and students.$1 off with a canned good or baoxed food donation for the North Royalton Food Bank.

Academy for the Performing Arts. Chagrin Falls High School's Performing Arts Center, 400 E. Washington St., Chagrin Falls. 440-715-4004 or chagrinacademy.org. William Inge's "Picnic." 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Through Sunday, Dec. 15. $12; $7, senior citizens and students.

Broadway Street Hall. 144 N. Broadway St., Medina. 330-635-8691. Rick and Jim's Big "Christmas Show." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday. $10. Tickets available at the door or online at rickandjim.com.

Cassidy Theatre. 6200 Pearl Road, Parma Heights. 440-842-4600 or cassidytheatre.com. John Kander and Fred Ebb's "The World Goes Round." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $20; $15, senior citizens and students.

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. Main Stage, 40 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. Alan Menken, Lynn Ahrens and Mike Ockrent's "A Christmas Carol, the Musical." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. Through Sunday, Dec. 15. $20; $16, senior citizens and students.

Chagrin Valley Little Theatre. River Street Playhouse, 56 River St., Chagrin Falls. 440-247-8955 or cvlt.org. David Sedaris's "The Santaland Diaries" and "Season's Greetings." 8 p.m. today-Saturday. $12.

Clague Playhouse. 1371 Clague Road, Westlake. 440-331-0403 or clagueplayhouse.org. Kathy Feininger's "A Broadway Christmas Carol." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $16; $15, senior citizens ages 60 and up; $10, students with valid ID.

Coach House Theatre. 732 W. Exchange St., Akron. 330-434-7741 or coachhousetheatre.org. Ernest Thompson's "On Golden Pond." 8 p.m. today-Saturday and Thursday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 15. $20; $15, Thursday performances; $12, students.

Dark Room. The Church at Cleveland Public Theatre, 6407 Detroit Ave., Cleveland. 216-631-2727 or cptonline.org. Every second Tuesday of the month audience members, writers, actors and other theater artists come together to try out scenes of new plays. Open Mike Readings. Tuesday: sign-up for writers and actors at 7:15 p.m.; open mike session readings begin at 7:30 p.m. Suggested donation: $5. Writers can bring up to 10 pages of work to be read; actors will be cast on the spot.

Dover Players. Old Town Hall, 5186 Dover Center Road, North Olmsted. 440-779-1284 or doverplayers.com. "Santa.org." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Free, but reserved seatings available for $5.

Fine Arts Association. Corning Auditorium, 38660 Mentor Ave., Willoughby. 440-951-7500 or fineartsassociation.org. "Shrek, the Musical." 7:30 p.m. today; 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 15. Sign-interpreted performance: Sunday, Dec. 15. $25; $23, senior citizens and students 11 and up; $15, children 10 and under.

Kent State University. African Community Theatre in Oscar Ritchie Building, 230 Terrace St. (off East Main Street or Summit Street) 330-672-2300 or theatre.kent.edu. John Henry Redwood's "No (the N word), No Jews, No Dogs." 6:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 1:30 p.m. Sunday. $10.

Lakeland Community College. Rodehorst Performing Arts Center's Building D, First Floor, 7700 Clocktower Drive (off Ohio 306), Kirtland. 440-525-7029 or lakelandcc.edu. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Friday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday. Bert V. Royal's "Dog Sees God .. Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead." 7 p.m. today; 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday. Donations, 20% of all profits will be given to a local charity to be selected. Details: cal 440-953-7000.

Near West Theatre. St. Patrick's Club Building, Third Floor, 3606 Bridge Ave., Cleveland. 216-961-6391 or nearwesttheatre.org. "A Christmas Story, the Musical." 7:30 p.m. today-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $10; $8, children 12 and under. Star Seats available for $20.

Nighttown. 12387 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights. 216-795-0550 or nighttowncleveland.com. Baldwin-Wallace University's Musical Theater Showcase. 7 p.m. Tuesday. $10.

Players Guild Theatre. 1001 Market Ave., Canton. 330-453-7617 or playersguildtheatre.com. Charles Dicken's "A Christmas Carol." 8 p.m. today-Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Through Sunday, Dec. 22. Saturday matinees begin 2 p.m. Dec. 14. $19-$25.

Theatre 8:15. 4740 Massillon Road, Green. 330-896-0339 or theatre815.com. "A Christmas Portrait." 8:15 p.m. today-Saturday. $15; $10, senior citizens and students.

Weathervane Playhouse. 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron. 330-836-2626 or weathervaneplayhouse.com. On Founders Theater Stage: "Christmas My Way: A Sinatra Holiday Bash." 7:30 p.m. today. Through Saturday, Dec. 21. $25.

AUDITIONS For the region's most comprehensive look at auditions at theaters and other arts organizations, go to cleveland.com/auditions.

Return to Top



News Headline: MyCommunities.Ohio.com things to do this weekend--Dec. 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: :15 PM GMT

The Ohio.com staff has once again compiled a list of local upcoming events for this weekend and beyond. Check out a few things going on in your community and nearby neighborhoods.

For more things to do, visit Enjoy.Ohio.com.

Barberton

Magical Theatre Company — (The Park Theatre, 565 W. Tuscarawas Ave., Barberton; 330-848-3708, www.magicaltheatre.org) Miracle on 34th Street opens Friday and continues through Dec. 21. 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. $13 and $15 opening night; $11 and $13 all other shows.

Annual K. Jack Greynolds Memorial Classic—11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at Barberton High School. 11 a.m. Orrville vs Northwest, 12:45 p.m. Manchester vs Northwestern, 2:30 p.m. Firestone vs Copley, 4:15 p.m. Jackson vs Hoban, 6 p.m. GlenOak vs Norton, 7:45 p.m. Barberton vs Louisville.

Bath

Holiday Lantern Tours at Hale Farm & Village — Saturday, Dec. 13-15 and 18-23 at Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath Township. Lantern-lit journey takes guests on a holiday history tour of Northeast Ohio during the Civil War. Tours depart every 20 minutes beginning at 6 p.m. $20, $15 members, $12 children. Reservation required, 330-666-3711.

Bethel Lutheran Church's 44th Annual Christmas Boutique and Café—9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Lunch and dinner will be served on Friday. For more information, call 330-659-9069.

Copley

Breakfast With Santa — 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday and Dec. 14 at Hudson's Restaurant, 3900 Medina Road, Akron. $12, $9 for children 10 and under. Reservations are available, call 330-666-7777.

Christmas in the Park—6 to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through Dec. 21 at the Akron Fossils & Science Center, 2080 South Cleveland-Massillon Road. The park will be lit with thousands of decorative lights and visitors can enjoy hot chocolate and popcorn and visit with Santa Claus and Levi the Dinosaur. Live reindeer on Dec. 14. For more information, click here or call 330-665-3466.

Cuyahoga Falls

Swim With Santa — 5:30 p.m. Friday at the Cuyahoga Falls Natatorium, 2345 Fourth St. Children ages 7 and under are invited to meet Santa and search the leisure pool for jingle bells and receive a gift from the tree. All participants are invited to stay for Open Swim until 9 p.m. Children ages 3-7 $5, 2 and under free. Reserve your spot at the Natatorium front desk by today. For information, go to www.cityofcf.com/parksandrec.

Family Ceramic Class — 10 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Quirk Cultural Center, 1201 Grant Ave., Cuyahoga Falls. Families are invited to create a holiday project together. $20 (parent and child), $6 additional child, $8 additional parent; $15 residents (parent and child), $5 additional child, $7 additional parent. 330-971-8425, 330-971-8225 or www.cityofcf.com/parksandrec.

Green

Theatre 8:15 — (4740 Massillon Road, Green; 330-896-0339, www.theatre815.com) A Christmas Portrait at 8:15 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $15, $10 seniors and students.

World War II Program — 10:30 a.m. Saturday at the Akron-Summit County Public Library, Green branch, 4046 Massillon Road. Presenters from the Military Aviation Preservation Society (MAPS) Air Museum will give the talk. Free.

Hudson

Author Visit — 1-3 p.m. Sunday at the Learned Owl Book Shop, 204 N. Main St., Hudson. Local author D.A. Quigley will share stories from his collection of Christmas stories titled Santa's Magic. 330-653-2252.

Hudson's Holiday Walk — Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday downtown. Experience the joy of the holidays. Santa and elves, horse and carriage rides, live reindeer, live Nativity on the Clocktower Green, Radio Disney and a free holiday concert at 4 p.m. For more information, go to www.merchantsofhudson.com.

Jackson

Christmas in Whoville—2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Stark Jackson Township Library. Families are invites to spend the afternoon in Whoville while enjoying stories, crafts and games. Registration requested. 330-833-1010.

Light Up Downtown — 5:30-8:30 tonight in downtown Canton. Kids and kids-at-heart are invited to watch as 16 city blocks come alive with attractions, entertainment and refreshments. Activities include a visit from Christopher Pop-in-Kins, every child's favorite elf, in a musical main stage show, musical acts, fireworks and a visit from Santa. More than 100 local performers will take to the stage along Market Square. The event is free. For more information, go to www.lightupdowntown.com. ;

Kent

Kent State University Planetarium presents The Skies of Winter — 8 Friday and Saturday in room 108 of Smith Hall, Kent State. It will explore the skies of winter and their connection to religious and cultural observances throughout the world. The hourlong program is free. Reservations are recommended, as seating is limited. Reservations can be made by calling 330-672-2246. For more information, go to http://planetarium.kent.edu. ;

Kent State University Chorale presents Carols & Confections — 3 p.m. Saturday in University Auditorium, Cartwrith Hall, Kent State University. Audience members will have the opportunity to participate in sing-alongs during the performance. The event is a fundraiser for the chorale. Tickets are $15, $13 seniors and Kent State faculty and staff, $8 non-Kent State students, $5 for children and full-time Kent campus under graduates. For ticket information, call 330-672-2909.

Stow

Fifth Annual Jonathan Bastock Christmas Luminaries—6:30 to 9 p.m. Saturday at the Stow Safety Center, 3800 Darrow Road. Ceremony to honor fallen police officers and firefighters will begin at 7 p.m.

Stow Symphony Orchestra Christmas Concert—7:30 to 10 p.m. Saturday in the Stow-Munroe Falls High School auditorium. For more information and a list of the arrangement, click here.

Wadsworth

Franklin Elementary Holiday Fun Fest and Dinner—5 to 8 p.m. Friday in the Franklin Elementary Gym. The annual Holiday Shop will be open and pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus will be available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 330-335-1470.

Wadsworth Community Band and Community Choir Holiday Concert—4 p.m. Sunday at the O.J. Work Auditorium. Pat Santelli and Linda McNamara will lead the band and choir in the free concert featuring holiday classics. Refreshments will be served after concert.

Return to Top



News Headline: New Body Image Research Study Results from Kent State University Described | Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 DEC 6 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Health and Medicine. According to news reporting originating in Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Internalization of societal standards of physical attractiveness (i.e., internalization of the thin ideal for women and internalization of the mesomorphic ideal for men) is a widely studied and robust risk factor for body dissatisfaction and maladaptive body change behaviors. Substantial empirical research supports internalization as both a mediator and a moderator of the relation between societal influences and body dissatisfaction."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "In this paper, a primer on mediation and moderation is followed by a review of literature and discussion of the extent to which internalization can theoretically fulfill the roles of both mediation and moderation. The literature review revealed a stark contrast in research design (experimental versus non-experimental design) when alternate conceptualizations of internalization are adopted. A meta-theoretical, moderated mediation model is presented."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This model integrates previous research and can inform future empirical and clinical endeavors."

For more information on this research see: Thinking meta-theoretically about the role of internalization in the development of body dissatisfaction and body change behaviors. Body Image, 2013;10(4):433-441. Body Image can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Body Image - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/672932)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting B.T. Karazsia, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States. Additional authors for this research include M.H.M. van Dulmen, K. Wong and J.H. Crowther.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Health and Medicine, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Studies from Kent State University Yield New Data on Body Image Research | Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: NewsRx.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 2013 DEC 6 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Research findings on Health and Medicine are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Kent, Ohio, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "This research examined the effects of appearance-based comparisons to muscular and slender idealized male bodies and the contribution of internalization and social comparison to change in body dissatisfaction. Participants were 111 male undergraduates who completed measures of body dissatisfaction, internalization, and social comparison and viewed images of either muscular or slender men in advertisements or product-only advertisements."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Kent State University, "Results indicated that exposure to both muscular and slender images was associated with an increase in body dissatisfaction, with no significant differences in the change in body dissatisfaction between the two image conditions. Internalization and trait social comparison were each associated with an increase in body dissatisfaction; however, upward social comparison was only a significant predictor of a change in body dissatisfaction for the males who viewed muscular images."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These results highlight the impact of slender models on young men's body dissatisfaction and support the examination of media literacy interventions with this population."

For more information on this research see: The effects of exposure to slender and muscular images on male body dissatisfaction. Body Image, 2013;10(4):566-573. Body Image can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Body Image - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/672932)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Galioto, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, United States.

Keywords for this news article include: Kent, Ohio, United States, Health and Medicine, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2013, NewsRx LLC

Copyright © 2013 Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com

Return to Top



News Headline: Authors sign books in Kent on Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Eight local history au
-
thors will be signing their
books for holiday gift giv
-
ing during the Kent His
-
torical Society Museum's
annual Victorian Holiday
Open House on Saturday.
The event — featuring
Victorian-style Christmas
decorations, a variety of
free holiday craft projects
for kids and complimen
-
tary seasonal treats for all
— will be held from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday at the
museum at 237 E. Main St.
Signing their books from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. will be au
-
thors Bruce Dzeda, Patrick O'Connor and
Charlie Thomas, Paul
Bauer and Mark Da
-
widziak, David Hassler
and Dr. John Jacobs,
while author Roger Di
Paolo will be in atten
-
dance throughout the
open house.
Books that can be
purchased and signed
during the event in
-
clude:
n
“Ravenna Record:
The People and Events
That Shaped a Com
-
munity” and “Rooted
in Kent: 101 Tales from
the Tree City,” both
by Roger J. Di Paolo.
“Ravenna Record” is
a just-published, 414-
page book featuring
tales of Ravenna histo
-
ry and residents from
the community's pio
-
neer era to the 1960s.
“Rooted in Kent” is a
278-page book pub
-
lished in 2009 by Kent
Historical Society
Press that features 101
stories and 130 photos
about Kent's early his
-
tory, business and in
-
dustry, crimes and the
growth of its educa
-
tional institutions.
n
“Railroad Town:
Kent and the Erie Rail
-
road” by Bruce Dzeda,
a fully illustrated 50-
page book published
in 2010 by Kent His
-
torical Society Press.
This book traces the
history of the Erie Rail
-
road from its inception
as the A&GW railroad
and the profound ef
-
fect it had on the econ
-
omy of the city of Kent.
n
“Meet Me at Ray's”
by Patrick J. O'Connor,
in collaboration with
longtime Ray's Place
owner Charlie Thom
-
as. The 100-page book,
published this year by
Black Squirrel Books,
is a celebration of the
first 75 years of Ray's
Place in Kent as told
by customers and em
-
ployees who lived it.
n
“Jim Tully: Ameri
-
can Writer, Irish Rov
-
er, Hollywood Brawl
-
er” by Paul Bauer
and Mark Dawidziak.
The 384-page book,
published in 2011 by
Kent State Universi
-
ty Press, is the first bi
-
ography ever written
about the vagabond,
hard-boiled writer who
rocked Hollywood dur
-
ing the Roaring Twen
-
ties. Bauer also will
have available copies
of the Frazier Robin
-
son autobiography he
co-authored, “Catch
-
ing Dreams: My Life
in the Negro Baseball
Leagues.” Dawidziak
will have copies of his
books, “The Barter
Theatre Story: Love
Made Visible,” “The
Columbo Phile: A
Casebook,” “Mark My
Words: Mark Twain on
Writing,” “The Night
Stalker Companion: A
25th Anniversary Trib
-
ute,” “Horton Foote's
The Shape of the Riv
-
er: The Lost Teleplay
about Mark Twain”
and “The Bedside,
Bathtub & Armchair
Companion to Drac
-
ula.”
n
“May 4th Voices,
Kent State, 1970: A
Play” by David Has
-
sler, also author of
“Red Kimono, Yellow
Barn” and “Growing
Season: The Life of a
Migrant Community.”
n
“Growing up in a
Davey Family: A Rem
-
iniscence” by Dr. John
Jacobs. In the booklet,
published in 2012 by
Kent Historical Society
Press, Jacobs shares
memories about the
Davey Tree Expert Co.,
where the importance
of family took root and
co-workers became ex
-
tended family for each
other.
Children attending
the open house can vis
-
it the children's room
to make free holiday
crafts, including a can
-
dy cane reindeer, bead
-
ed snowflake, button
wreath and Popsicle-
stick snowman. They
can also decorate a
gingerbread man cook
-
ie to eat.
Because of construc
-
tion, visitors are asked
to reserve the limited
parking spaces be
-
hind the museum for
those unable to walk
from Main Street park
-
ing spots or the near
-
by Kent Central Gate
-
way parking garage.
For more informa
-
tion, contact the mu
-
seum at 330-678-2712,
by email at khs@ken
-
tohiohistory.org or vis
-
it www.kentohiohisto
-
ry.org
-

Return to Top



Powered by Vocus