Report Overview:
Total Clips (32)
Aeronautics; Coll. of Appl. Eng., Sustain. and Tech (CAEST) (2)
Alumni (1)
Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Art, School of (2)
Athletics (1)
Board of Trustees (1)
Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (11)
College of Communication and Information (CCI); Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
College of the Arts (CotA); Fashion Design and Merchandising; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Pan-African Studies (2)
Pan-African Studies; Students (1)
Psychology (1)
Research (1)
University Registrar (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; Coll. of Appl. Eng., Sustain. and Tech (CAEST) (2)
Bowling Green State University faculty protest cuts: Higher Education Roundup (McFarland) 12/09/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio - More than 100 protesters sat mostly in silence at a Bowling Green State University board of trustees meeting Friday, hands holding...

Drones about to take off at Kent State (Duncan, Wentz) 12/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...recently by news of Amazon's testing of drones to deliver its wares. Embracing the future is the idea behind the new minor program approved recently for Kent State University's College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology. The Unmanned Aircraft Systems minor will give students...


Alumni (1)
Comic relief 12/09/2013 Mansfield News-Journal Text Attachment Email

'Funky Winkerbean' creator will tackle a serious issue in Friday visit to Mansfield MANSFIELD — Tom Batiuk, an Ohio native and the creator of the “Funky...


Architecture and Environmental Design (1)
Architecture students envision new Hercules site (Hawk) 12/09/2013 Repository, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State students asked to design new building and redesign an old one as part of senior project Over the years, visions of the long-shuttered Hercules...


Art, School of (2)
Art review: 'Multiplicity' shows vast scale and range of prints at Akron Art Museum 12/06/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...American printmaking. • 7:30 p.m. Dec. 12 — Open Portfolio Printmaking College Mixer, with prints created by students at the University of Akron, Kent State University, Youngstown State University and the Cleveland Institute of Art, as well as local printmakers. • Printmaking demos and talks,...

Transitions: People in Academe 12/09/2013 Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The Text Attachment Email

IN MEMORIAM Kirk Mangus, head of the ceramics program at the Kent State University School of Art, died on November 24 of a brain aneurysm. He was 60. Mr. Mangus, whose ceramics and drawings have been widely...


Athletics (1)
Tayala sets record in Kent State track and field season opener (Lawson, Andrassy, Haynes) 12/09/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Although it was the opening event of the 2013-14 track and field season, Kent State showed up in mid-season form at the Golden Flash Gala last weekend....


Board of Trustees (1)
KSU Capital Plan Targets Regional Campus Upgrade 12/09/2013 Business Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- A six-year capital plan approved Thursday by the Kent State University Board of Trustees requests state funding for key building and renovation...


Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (11)
Those who spend hours on their cell phones are more anxious and less happy, college researchers say (Lepp) 12/09/2013 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - College students who spend hours each day online, texting or talking on their cell phones are more anxious, less happy and get lower grades,...

KSU Study: More Phone Use, Less Happiness 12/09/2013 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — If you've ever ignored a text or a phone call, don't think of it as being rude, think of it as controlling your stress level. A Kent State University study found that people who are constantly connected to their cell phone are less happy than those who can detach. Intense cell...

Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grade, reduced happiness in students 12/06/2013 ScienceDaily Text Attachment Email

Kent State University researchers Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Aryn Karpinski, Ph.D., all faculty members in the university's College...

Student's frequent cellphone use linked to anxiety, lowered grades 12/09/2013 UPI.com Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio, Dec. 6 (UPI) -- Frequent cellphone use by students is linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness, a study at Kent State University...

Kent State study: cell phone use, low grades, anxiety all linked 12/09/2013 ConsumerAffairs.com Text Attachment Email

Though multiple interpretations might be possible In all the history of humanity, we are the first generation of people to take complete 24/7 connectivity...

Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students 12/09/2013 EurekAlert! Text Attachment Email

Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones...

Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students 12/06/2013 MedicalXpress.com Text Attachment Email

...considering whether use of the device is related to measurable outcomes important for student success, such as academic performance, anxiety and happiness. Kent State University researchers Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Aryn Karpinski, Ph.D., all faculty members in the university's College...

Frequent Cell Phone Use Linked to Lower Grades and Reduced Happiness in Students 12/09/2013 cellular-news.com Text Attachment Email

Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones...

Cell Phone Usage Linked To Reduced Happiness, Poorer Grades and Anxiety Among Students 12/09/2013 hngn.com Text Attachment Email

Frequent use of cell phones can lead to reduced happiness, poorer grades and anxiety among students, a new study finds. On surveying more than 500 university...

Kent State study: cell phone use, low grades, anxiety all linked 12/09/2013 robinspost.com Text Attachment Email

Though multiple interpretations might be possible In all the history of humanity, we are the first generation of people to take complete 24/7 connectivity...

Do You Use Your Cell Phone a Lot? It Might Be Making You More Anxious 12/09/2013 healthland.time.com Text Attachment Email

Too much time spent on your cell phone doesn't mean you're more connected and happier. New research from scientists at Kent State University in Kent,...


College of Communication and Information (CCI); Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, MASS COMMUNICATION KSU introduces Promising Scholar Awards (Wasbotten, Wearden) 12/08/2013 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

To attract and retain the strongest journalism and mass communication students in the nation, Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication is introducing a financial award program specifically designed for first-time...


College of the Arts (CotA); Fashion Design and Merchandising; Student Involvement, Center for (1)
KSU fashion show to benefit Habitat for Humanity Saturday 12/06/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Habitat for Humanity campus chapter, in conjunction with the Fashion Show Productions course at KSU, is putting on the 5th annual...


Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Kent State Journalism Professor Receives University's 2013 Diversity Trailblazer Award (Brown, Shelton) 12/09/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Gene Shelton, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University, has been awarded the university's 2013 Diversity...


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Students (1)
KSU students, faculty receive awards at International Textile and Apparel Association conference 12/08/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Three Kent State faculty and three students received awards at the 2013 conference of the International Textile and Apparel Association. They were senior...


KSU at Salem (1)
Community college advocates push to reinstate grant (Williams) 12/06/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...low-income, Johnson said, and given that the available resources are only 50 percent of what they should be, "we think that's a reasonable prioritization."Kent State University at Stark students also no longer have access to the grant, as the cuts took it away from students at regional campuses. But...


KSU at Stark (1)
Kent State's longest-serving staff member reflects on 47 dedicated years (Harsh, Southards, Williams) 12/09/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

LINDA HARSH, WHO WORKS AT STARK CAMPUS, IS LONGEST-SERVING WORKER ACROSS 8 CAMPUSES From the construction of an entire regional campus to the shockwaves...


Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Day Ketterer rolls out new slogan (Grimm) 12/07/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...history or tradition are often attached to prestige or high-cost goods, said Pamela Grimm, chair of the Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship at Kent State University's College of Business Administration. For example, Parker Pens is touting its 125th anniversary this year, and luxury watchmaker...


Pan-African Studies (2)
Students Talk About Mandela's Legacy And Death (Gooden) 12/06/2013 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

...rights leader who died this week. And technology is helping them connect. Dr. Amoaba Gooden is chair of the Pan-African Studies department at Kent State University. She says social media and technology are helping American students connect with the story of Nelson Mandela...and other...

African-American students celebrate Kwanzaa (Okantah) 12/06/2013 Daily Athenaeum - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...and a child lights one of the candles on the Kinara, or the candle holder,” Fuller said. The celebration featured Mwatabu Okantah, a professor from Kent State University, as its speaker. Okantah presented the Libation Statement and spoke of the history and cultural value of Kwanzaa. “It...


Pan-African Studies; Students (1)
South African Student Wishes She Were Home After Mandela Death (Williams) 12/06/2013 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...Nelson Mandela, many South Africans feel the loss in deep and personal ways. “I'm very sad,” said Nhlalala Mavundza, a South African who is studying at Kent State. “And I wish I were home. I'm very, very sad, heartbroken.” Mavundza, whose friends call her “Lala,” grew up in a free South Africa, thanks...


Psychology (1)
Kent State University research finds meditation effective in reducing blood pressure (Fresco, Hughes) 12/08/2013 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

Two researchers at Kent State University have found that mindfulness-based stress reduction can reduce high blood pressure, which affects nearly 60 million adults in...


Research (1)
Ohio takes another swing at severance tax legislation 12/06/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...by a single well and also because shale drillers are larger, more sophisticated and more closely monitored. It also has been found, by researchers at Kent State University, that horizontal shale gas wells use less water for every mcf of gas that they produce than do conventional wells. Why, then,...


University Registrar (1)
Kent State asking for recall of diplomas with typo 12/08/2013 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

They're asking more than 1,000 graduates to return their diplomas if the word "privileges" is misspelled. The university's registrar says at least some...


News Headline: Bowling Green State University faculty protest cuts: Higher Education Roundup (McFarland) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: BOWLING GREEN, Ohio - More than 100 protesters sat mostly in silence at a Bowling Green State University board of trustees meeting Friday, hands holding aloft signs lamenting cuts to university faculty, the Toledo Blade reported.

Some signs said the cuts would create larger class sizes, hurt the value of a BGSU degree, and cause students to take longer to graduate. Others had silhouettes representing the faculty who will lose their jobs.

One sign read, “This instructor taught 8 courses in 2012-2013.”

The protesters attended the meeting in opposition to planned faculty cuts BGSU announced late last month, the paper said.

Blaming budget shortfalls, the university said it would not renew 30 full-time faculty members' contracts. Union officials said 40 actually will lose their jobs, once 10 others on one-year contracts that won't be renewed are included.

“We want to force the administration to recognize the impact of the cuts,” said David Jackson, BGSU Faculty Association president.

The union plans to meet with administration officials next week to try to discuss alternatives,. Jackson said. If the union remains unsatisfied after the meeting, it plans to file a grievance.

But for now, the union is focusing on public pressure. Students, staff, alumni, and supporters joined the crowd.

Well-known black journalist welcomed back at Youngstown State: Simeon Booker, an award-winning journalist who was the first black staff member at the Washington Post, will give the fall commencement speech at Youngstown State University – which he left in the 1930s because black students at that time were not allowed activity cards.

Born in Baltimore in 1918, Booker moved to Youngstown at the age of seven, the university said. His father, S.S. Booker, was secretary of the black branch of the Youngstown YMCA and later pastor of Third Baptist Church.

As a youth, Booker submitted articles to the Youngstown Vindicator. After high school, he enrolled in Youngstown College, but refused to continue there after learning that black students at the YMCA-sponsored school were not allowed activity cards. He transferred to Virginia Union University in Richmond, from which he graduated in 1942.

Booker's first job was in the city room of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper. Two years later, he joined the Cleveland Call and Post, where he won a Newspaper Guild award for a series on exploitation of slum housing, and a Willkie award for his reporting on racial inequality in Cleveland public schools.

After a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University, he joined The Washington Post, becoming its first black staff reporter. He later worked for Jet magazine, where he covered the Mississippi kidnapping and murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, marches, sit-ins and freedom rides.

In the 1970s reached a nationwide audience as a commentator for Westinghouse radio. He retired in 2007.

Booker will speak at Sunday's commencement. On Saturday night, at a dinner and reception to honor Booker at YSU, he will be presented a symbolic student activity card.

Kent State signs agreement with CommutAir: Kent State University has signed an agreement with CommutAir, a regional airline that operates as United Express in the Northeast and Midwest to provide programs for graduates of the university's aeronautics program.

The agreement outlines a professional development program for Kent State graduates, providing job shadowing, flight training and expedited hiring options, the university said.

"Approximately 10 percent of CommutAir's current pilots are Kent State graduates. The new agreement means expanded training and job opportunities for students."

“When a company such as CommutAir that has hired our graduates comes to us and says ‘We want more Kent State students,' that is incredibly exciting,” said Maureen McFarland, academic program director of aeronautics at Kent State, in a news release.

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News Headline: Drones about to take off at Kent State (Duncan, Wentz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Phil Trexler
News OCR Text: More and more, we're all living the Jetson life.

From Smartphones on our wrists to Skyping across the globe, life today is not far off from the pictures painted in the futuristic cartoon of the 60s.

Heck, someday we might even have our groceries delivered by aircraft. Certainly, the technology is here, as evidenced recently by news of Amazon's testing of drones to deliver its wares.

Embracing the future is the idea behind the new minor program approved recently for Kent State University's College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology.

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems minor will give students “an introduction to the design, technology, performance and operational aspects” of the small aircraft, better known as drones.

The university is betting that drone technology will only continue to grow in the public as well as the private sector. The 16-credit hour minor will be offered for the first time in the fall of 2014.

John Duncan, an assistant professor of aeronautics, said the course is part of a plan envisioned by KSU President Lester Lefton to see the university's aeronautics department grow into one of the “premier” departments in the U.S.

Duncan said the U.S. Congress is pushing the Federal Aviation Administration to open up the national airspace to commercial drone use by 2015.

That move would open up development of unmanned aircraft beyond military and law enforcement use and into the hands of the public.

“There's a lot of pent up commercial” [interest] in the technology, Duncan said. “This is the future. All kinds of opportunities, all kinds of jobs are forecast. There are all kinds of uses.”

Adjunct professor Charlie Wentz said Kent State will join about a half-dozen U.S. universities embracing the unmanned spacecraft technology. He said KSU students will learn about drone system structures, its components and concepts.

Wentz said the university is intent on being at the forefront of the emerging technology that is growing in popularity and whose uses in the future are almost limitless.

“The popularity, the fact that they're being used extensively in place of the human beings, not just in the civilian world but in the military world as well,” Wentz said. “I think these courses will bring extensive interest. Students are already talking about it.”

While drones have been used for military purposes, flying over places where human life might be in jeopardy, these drones are expected to take on greater uses in the future from delivering packages to the suburbs to delivering medicine to areas impacted by natural disasters.

They can go places man can't or go places faster. As for Amazon one day sending its goods via unmanned aircraft, it's not impossible.

“Technically, they could do it now,” Duncan said. “As far as sending one package one place. But putting together a whole network and delivering millions of packages of day, that's down the road.

“The vehicles are there. The technology is there.”

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News Headline: Comic relief | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: 'Funky Winkerbean' creator will tackle a serious issue in Friday visit to Mansfield

MANSFIELD — Tom Batiuk, an Ohio native and the creator of the “Funky Winkerbean” and “Crankshaft” comic strips, will visit Main Street Books from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday to discuss his book “Lisa's Story” and Lisa's Legacy Fund, which he created to raise money for cancer research and treatment.

Last year, Batiuk came to town to discuss the first volume of the “Funky Winkerbean” compilation. This year, the second volume was released. Batiuk plans to release a volume every year, leading up to a complete set.

“The book that came out this year is volume two of the complete “Funky Winkerbean.” The Kent State University Press is bringing out the complete series. Each book contains three years, so this is the book that contains years four, five and six,” Batiuk said.

However, Batiuk wants to focus on a special part of “Funky fandom” this time around — a part that has grown into a movement.

That one part is about Lisa Moore, one of the strip's most poignant characters. “Lisa's Story” is a collection of the comic's pieces that deal with Lisa as she battles breast cancer.

“Lisa (her story) initially started in high school. She became pregnant and had a baby she gave up for adoption,” Batiuk said. “And then, the character kind of disappeared off the radar for awhile, but comes back as a young adult, meets Les, and they end up getting married.”

It sounds incredibly cheery, but once her story develops, it becomes a tragedy that touches many readers personally.

“She is diagnosed with cancer,” Batiuk said. “She goes into remission, but then it returns, and Lisa passes away. It allowed me to explore some very powerful work inside as I worked through it.”

Batiuk, a cancer survivor himself, finds particular blessings in the success of his character, a character that has influenced more than just a fan base.

“Well, when ‘Lisa's Story' came out, there was a lot of talk about it, a lot of impact, and the Plain Dealer ran her obituary on the front page,” Batiuk said. “The people at University Hospitals went to work and suggested a Lisa's Legacy Fund for Cancer Research and Education, and some of the royalties from ‘Lisa's Story' go to Lisa's Legacy Fund.”

Lisa Legacy Fund sponsors a 5K walk/run annually to raise money.

“They've held a race three years running — no pun intended — to earn money,” Batiuk said. “That's how that all came about. It's amazing to think to even create a character that might possibly step off the comic page and maybe contribute to do some real good in real life.”

Batiuk has been doing just that for a long time. His characters often deal with topics that are personal, relevant and real. Batiuk would not have it any other way.

“It's been gratifying in a number of ways,” he said. “It is gratifying to tell stories that people can relate to on a deeper level than just a gag-a-day type of thing.

“‘Lisa's Story' probably had more impact than any work I've ever done and there's some expanded stuff that may be coming out in regard to that. So I am hoping that will be appearing down the road a little bit — but not too far down the road.”

Batiuk is very excited about his visit to Main Street Books, 104 N. Main St., which is known for its warm and inviting atmosphere.

“It's terrific. I love just wandering through bookstores. I miss the fact some stores disappear, but it is nice to see a store like that thriving,” Batiuk said. “It was a great time last year, a nice group. It's a joy walking through an atmosphere like that.”

The talk and book signing will give fans and readers a chance to discuss Batiuk's work and learn more about the characters and how they have evolved.

“I look forward to meeting some of Funky's readers and chatting with them,” he said. “I had a good time last year. It was a lot of fun, and I look forward to talking with people on Friday.”

Where: Main Street Books, 104 N. Main St., Mansfield
• When: 6 to 8 p.m. Friday
• Why: To discuss his book, “Lisa's Story,” and Lisa's Legacy Fund, which he created to raise money for cancer research and education.

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News Headline: Architecture students envision new Hercules site (Hawk) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Repository, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State students asked to design new building and redesign an old one as part of senior project

Over the years, visions of the long-shuttered Hercules Engine Co. site becoming downtown's version of Belden Village or the next home of the Pro Football Hall of Fame have come and gone.

But during the last 16 weeks, a class of fourth-year design studio students at Kent State's College of Architecture & Environmental Design came up with new ideas for the historic industrial site.

Instructor Jack Hawk, an architect with the North Canton-based Wilson Architectural Group, asked his 14 seniors to dream up what a brewery, hospital or pharmaceutical company would look like at the site at 11th Street and Market Avenue S.

"Four or five of these are excellent projects," Hawk said Friday as students presented their projects to local developers and architects at the Canton Club. "There are some students that pushed the limits and really thought outside the box."

Students had to design a new building and find ways to rehabilitate the existing ice house, built in 1870, on seven of the 26 acres. They were required to incorporate vertical farming, a community garden and a civic structure.

Taylor Cooper designed the "Bulldog Brewery," a community center, culinary school and a library. He positioned the buildings to enhance pedestrian access.

"There seemed to be no connection to the southern part of the city," said Cooper, a 22-year-old Columbus native. "I wanted to do something to give it life."

Students were evaluated on their concept, whether they created a "sense of place," execution of their design and their strategies for sustainability.

They faced numerous challenges, including finding appropriate vegetation for the soils of a brown field, harnessing solar and wind power and rehabilitating a historic structure but being limited to only 20 percent of it.

"It allowed for a lot of creativity," said student Hayley Estes, who designed a hospital, apartments, a restaurant and bar.

Another student, BoSheng Liu, designed pretension structures — he used a 3D printer to make a model of them — to house a vertical farm and winery, complete with fermentation vats.

"I'm really impressed," said Robert Timken of Cormony Development, which owns the property. "These guys have put a lot of thought into this and done so at a disadvantage. They've not been on the site and they've not been in the buildings. There are elements here I would absolutely love to incorporate."

Cormony Development plans to transform one building into 95 market-rate apartments. The first phase of the project has been at a standstill in recent months as tax-credit investors await guidance from the Internal Revenue Service following a recent court ruling on the use of historic tax credits that has slowed historic projects across the country. Other phases could include a convention center, hotel, retail and office space.

Timken said sustainable technologies aren't as easily integrated into historic reuse projects as buildings that are designed and built from scratch. The students came up with unique ways to incorporate solar power, natural light and air flow into their projects, he said.

"It's one of the things that jumps out at me immediately," he said, "because we're always trying to have historic preservationists and sustainability advocates learn the same language."

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News Headline: Art review: 'Multiplicity' shows vast scale and range of prints at Akron Art Museum | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Dorothy Shinn
News OCR Text: An exhibition of contemporary prints the scale and scope of the one on view at the Akron Art Museum has rarely been attempted, and we can thank the museum and the Smithsonian American Art Museum for this one.

This impressive and inclusive exhibit, curated by Joann Moser, senior curator, from the Smithsonian's highly touted collection, offers insights into print mediums and processes rarely assembled on such a scale. More than 80 prints are featured in Multiplicity: Contemporary Prints from the Smithsonian American Art Museum , on view through March 16.

They include several outstanding examples by leading artists whose work is already in the Akron museum's collection. Visitors will thus have the opportunity not only to compare works by these artists — Chuck Close, Jim Dine, Helen Frankenthaler, Sol LeWitt and Kiki Smith, for example — but also see how they handle different media.

The selection presents an overview of American art of the past three decades. Many styles and ideas are represented, with an emphasis on what Moser considers to be some of the most “interesting, intriguing, and visually stimulating prints that serve as a touchstone for the vitality of American art.”

“There are people whose impression of prints is that they are small and made with a limited range of processes,” said Janice Driesbach, AAM chief curator. “They'll have another impression coming away from this exhibition because these are prints that are monumental in size and ambition, as well as scale. And there are just some glorious ones in this exhibit.”

“Multiplicity” not only implies the multiple reproductions made possible by the printmaking process, but also refers to how prints are created from a matrix that's been manipulated to produce multiple images.

Moreover, these works are the result of collaborations between artists and professional printers who help realize the artist's vision.

The show's title also refers to works done in series or made up of multiple sections, including John Baldessari's nine-part Black Dice , based on a still from a British gangster film; the seven woodcuts Martin Puryear created for a luxury edition of Jean Toomer's Cane , a masterpiece of Harlem Renaissance literature; and the seven screenprints of the days of creation that were the result of a collaboration between artist Tim Rollins and a group of at-risk kids in Maryland, whom he asked to respond to Franz Josef Haydn's The Creation oratorio.

“Virtually all of these prints are realized with the concept of artists working with printers,” Driesbach noted. “That means working with multiple hands or working in a series, as in the Kiki Smith, Banshee Pearls from 1991, a 12-print series of lithographs with aluminum leaf additions on handmade Japanese paper.

“The work's title comes from the fact that Kiki's father, the renowned sculptor Tony Smith, used to call her ‘my little banshee.'

“This is a big exhibition,” said Driesbach. “I installed it by theme, in general. There were a couple of pieces that didn't care for their thematic neighbors, so they had to be moved.

“But in general it works. The first group here is figurative, and even though they are in general large-scale works, they reward close looking.”

There's only one digital print in this exhibit and that's because Moser, according to Driesbach, “said she's found that digital prints don't have the sumptuousness of other prints.”

But Enough , from the New Orleans Series (2006) by Michael Platt, overcomes that by adding layers of imagery to create a huge, dense work.

Many of these prints push the envelope on what's possible in the medium, not only in the size, but also in the scale of the achievement.

In Chuck Close's 58½-by-48¼-inch screenprint on paper, Self-Portrait (2000), for example, he created the final image by the successive printing of more than 100 screens. From a distance the image looks almost like a photograph, but as you approach the print, it breaks up into a diagonal grid of small, colorful abstractions that together create the final image.

“One of the things that has characterized printmaking, starting about 1960, was the advent of these lithography shops and studios, often in connection with a college or university,” Driesbach explained. “What they would do would be to invite these renowned artists whose field was painting or sculpture to come out for a residency or a workshop, and while there create prints in these new facilities.

“Some amazing images were the result of that collaboration, and it pushed everyone involved toward more expressive ends,” she said.

Two works for the exhibit weren't installed because they were just too large, Driesbach said. And “there are two instances where the Smithsonian didn't send the entire series, but it's online, and one of those is Kara Walker's portfolio, Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated) .”

There are four Walker images on view: 76) Alabama Loyalists Greeting the Federal Gun-Boats; 77) An Army Train; 78) Pack-Mules in the Mountains; and 79) Signal Station, Summit of Maryland Heights .

Walker enlarged the original images and superimposed silhouettes that suggest alternate narratives, scourging the North and the South equally.

Jim Dine's Singing and Printing I (2001) is a large monoprint, a woodcut that was painted after it was printed. Each print has the same woodcut image of the Venus de Milo, but is painted individually, making each one unique.

“Dine talks about his admiration of printers, and he really gets into the vigor of the woodcut,” Driesbach noted, pointing out the size of the tool marks. “To be able to print something this size is really challenging the size of the paper.”

David Hockney's color lithograph View of Hotel Well III is from the series Moving Focus (1984-1985), which he did in Mexico. This is one of a group of images of the Hotel Romano Angeles in the little town of Acatlan, where Hockney stayed when his car broke down.

When he returned to Los Angeles, Hockney told printer Ken Tyler about his experience. Tyler encouraged him to return to the hotel and make images on Mylar, which were then transferred to a photosensitive plate at Tyler's workshop.

The image is one of the most riveting in the exhibit. Printed in the three primary colors, plus green, brown and black, the composition has two vanishing points and is oddly reminiscent, if only in its structure, of Piero della Francesca's The Flagellation of Christ .

There are two education stations, one opposite the Hockney in the center of the large Arnstein Gallery, and the other in the center of the Isroff Gallery.

The station in the Arnstein Gallery contains tools and equipment used in making relief lithography and intaglio. The one in the Isroff Gallery displays the things needed to create etchings and silkscreens. Both stations feature iPad minis that can play video demonstrations.

In conjunction with this exhibit, the museum is holding a series of talks and workshops including:

• 6:30 p.m. Dec. 12 — Talk by Driesbach on contemporary American printmaking.

• 7:30 p.m. Dec. 12 — Open Portfolio Printmaking College Mixer, with prints created by students at the University of Akron, Kent State University, Youngstown State University and the Cleveland Institute of Art, as well as local printmakers.

• Printmaking demos and talks, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. — Dec. 19, Emily Sullivan, Sickle and Sullivan Printmakers; Jan. 2, Nicole Schneider, Black Balloon Editions; Jan. 16, Charlie Wagers, Three Bears Design; Feb. 6, Liz Maugans, Zygote Press; and Feb. 20, Veronica Ceci, Kent State University.

• Noon to 4 p.m. Jan. 26 — Family drop-in program, Printmakingpalooza.

Dorothy Shinn writes about art and architecture for the Akron Beacon Journal. Send information to her at the Akron Beacon Journal, P.O. Box 640, Akron, OH 44309-0640 or dtgshinn@att.net .

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News Headline: Transitions: People in Academe | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Chronicle of Higher Education - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: IN MEMORIAM

Kirk Mangus, head of the ceramics program at the Kent State University School of Art, died on November 24 of a brain aneurysm. He was 60. Mr. Mangus, whose ceramics and drawings have been widely exhibited, had led the ceramics program since 1985.

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News Headline: Tayala sets record in Kent State track and field season opener (Lawson, Andrassy, Haynes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Although it was the opening event of the 2013-14 track and field season, Kent State showed up in mid-season form at the Golden Flash Gala last weekend.

On his second weight throw of the night on Friday, Matthias Tayala broke the 40-year old indoor school record, then topped that on his final throw with a heave of 72-2.5. Olympic athlete Jacques Accambray set the previous record of 71-10.75 in 1973.

"It was nice. I didn't really expect that," Tayala said. "But it's good to get it out of the way. I'm excited."

The effort impressed KSU head coach Bill Lawson.

"Just a fantastic effort," Lawson said. "More importantly, with the series he threw with three or four throws over 70 feet, that far surpasses his lifetime personal record. That most likely punched his ticket to the national championship. Unbelievable effort by him."

For the women, Jackie Leppelmeier also capped a first-place finish in the weight throw with a personal-best 67-1.25, just seven inches off the current Kent State indoor record.

"Fantastic effort by her," said Lawson. "I just think it shows the strength of our throws program. I'm really proud of Jackie."

Also on Friday, Dylan Shirley took first place in the men's long jump and Andrew Goodwin won the 5,000-meter run with a time of 14:58.09.

On Saturday Wayne Gordon was a double winner, capturing both the 60-meter dash (6.85) and the 200-meter dash (21.39).

William Barnes set a personal best early in the meet when he posted a winning time of 7.98 in the 60-meter hurdles. Also in the men's sprints, Matthew Tobin led the field with a 400-meter dash time of 48.86, an indoor personal best for the true freshman.

Donovan Tolbert placed first in the triple jump with a 47-8 performance. Kent State also went one-two in the men's pole vault, as Jesse Oxley took top honors with a 16-0.75 followed by Cory Miller.

Also on the track, Marteze Roper won the 1,000-meter run with a time of 2:31.40.

On the women's side, Lynnese Beyan took top honors in the 400 meters with a time of 57.71.

"I thought and predicted we'd have some good performances and we did," said Lawson. "We have a lot of work to do in some areas, but overall it was a solid performance. I think our men's team is much improved from one year ago at this time. I think it's going to be interesting to see where we are in a month from right now."

.

Michael Schober has been named an assistant track & field coach at Kent State.

Schober, who will oversee men's/women's high jump, women's combined event, men's/women's hurdles, and serve as the assistant in the men's decathlon for the Flashes, comes back to Kent State after spending a year with the track and field and cross country programs at Mount Union.

Schober was named the Men's Great Lakes Division III Assistant Coach of the Year after coaching 12 national qualifiers and four All-Americans last year for the Purple Raiders.

"I am extremely pleased to have Michael (Schober) back in the program," said Lawson. "He was an outstanding track & field athlete for us and was a great team leader. Michael helped lead a very successful program at Mount Union, and I feel that he will bring that same winning attitude to Kent State as a coach. He is the final piece of the puzzle on my staff as we move forward into another exciting year."

A graduate of Kent State University, where he earned his Bachelor's of Science degree in physical education-human movement studies in 2012, Schober earned All-MAC honors five times. His score of 5,358 in the heptathlon ranks third all-time in the Kent State record books. He also spent the 2011-12 season as a volunteer assistant on Lawson's track & field staff, where he worked closely with the high jump and combined events.

WRESTLING

Three consecutive pins from Tyler Small, Michael DePalma and Ian Miller fueled a 38-3 Kent State victory over Buffalo Saturday at the M.A.C. Center.

Mack McGuire's 5-0 victory at 133 pounds began a string of nine straight wins for the Flashes (4-3, 1-0 Mid-American Conference).

"It was a great way to start out MAC competition," said KSU coach Jim Andrassy. "I thought we controlled the pace. We worked through hand-fighting, controlled ties and scored points when we attempted."

With the team score tied 3-3 heading into the 141-pound match, Small began a turn of events in his second period that put the Flashes on cruise control. Trailing 3-2 from the bottom position, Small took a non-traditional route from reversal to cradle, pinning Nick Flannery with 15 seconds left in the second.

"I feel comfortable in a lot of those sticky situations," Small said. "I know where to put pressure and take away pressure."

DePalma was the second of five Flashes competing at the M.A.C. Center for the first time in their career. The sophomore came storming out of the gate with a takedown and a pair of three-point tilts before sticking Ryan Todora 2:10 into the first period.

Miller rattled off three takedowns before planting John Northrup at the 2:24 mark. Miller's seventh pin of the season ties him for fifth place among Kent State's career leaders with 27.

Sophomore Tyler Buckwalter made his first appearance of the season a promising one with an 8-2 win over Wally Maziarz. A reversal and two-point near fall in the final seconds of the second period by Buckwalter was too much for Maziarz to overcome.

Junior Caleb Marsh turned Jarred Lux four different times with the same move on his way to a 16-0 tech fall. The fourth three-point turn ended the match at 4:16.

Sophomore Sam Wheeler's explosive shots led to a pair of takedowns in each of the first two periods, and he went on to earn an 11-7 victory.

Sophomore Cole Baxter gave Kent State its eighth straight win with a 6-3 decision over Angelo Malvestuto. Baxter earned takedowns in the first and third periods and got a momentum boost with an escape in the second as time expired.

Redshirt freshman Mimmo Lytle came out aggressively in a 10-5 victory over James Benjamin. Lytle worked an underhook to convert three takedowns in the opening period.

Kent State's focus moves to the classroom for finals week before hosting Old Dominion on Monday, Dec. 16.

FOOTBALL

Kent State sophomore defensive back Jordan Italiano has been named to the Capital One Academic All-America Second Team.

A chemistry/pre-med major, Italiano carries a 3.94 cumulative grade-point average.

"Jordan's one of those guys who you only have to tell him to do something once," said KSU coach Paul Haynes. "You don't find too many guys with that type of discipline, so it doesn't surprise me that he carries that same type of discipline with his studies. The amount of time he puts into football, that's how much time he puts into academics. He's such a good player and he's one of our leaders."

Playing primarily at the star position, Italiano started in all 12 games this season. He led the Flashes with 41 solo tackles and finished third on the team with 76 total tackles. He also forced two fumbles and had a pair of tackles for loss.

Italiano is only the program's second player to earn the honor as a sophomore, joining Jacquise Terry.

GOLF

Former Kent State star John Hahn finished in a tie for 47th at the European Tour's Hong Kong Open, which concluded on Sunday. Hahn fired rounds of 70-68-73-68 to finish at 1-under 279.

Miguel Angel Jimenez shot 12-under and won the event in a playoff.

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News Headline: KSU Capital Plan Targets Regional Campus Upgrade | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Business Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- A six-year capital plan approved Thursday by the Kent State University Board of Trustees requests state funding for key building and renovation projects for the university's eight campuses for the period 2015 to 2020. The plan includes projects across Kent State's seven regional campuses that include Trumbull, Salem and East Liverpool.

Also at the meeting, Kent State President Lester Lefton discussed a new Kent State initiative called “See You @College” designed to encourage high-school students -- especially first-generation, low-income, high-achieving students who may not consider college an option -- to begin thinking about and preparing to attend college.

All public colleges and universities in Ohio are required to submit such long-range plans every two years to the Ohio Board of Regents and all plans are contingent upon the levels of capital appropriations made by the Ohio General Assembly.

Kent State's six-year capital plan, which requests about $86 million in state capital appropriations over six years, reflects academic priorities, infrastructure-upgrade needs and a backlog of deferred-maintenance projects. It supports the goals of the university's “Foundations of Excellence: Building the Future” initiative. This initiative uses $170 million in bond funding to transform the university with new buildings and revitalized classroom, laboratory, studio, performance, living and studying spaces in the next four years.

At the regional campuses, the plan targets classroom modernization, deferred maintenance and modest building expansions to address growing programs in areas such as nursing, allied health and STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields. Among the projects are the continuation of classroom renovations at Kent State University at East Liverpool, completion of renovations to the original gymnasium at Kent State University at Salem to provide science laboratories and improvements to the Classroom Building Library/Theatre Building at Kent State University at Trumbull in Champion Township.

The "See You @College" initiative is intended to provide information and advice about the steps high school students must take to pursue postsecondary education and share with them Kent State's many resources such as Web-based information and community mentors. The initiative will be launched with a conference on the Kent Campus on Feb. 13, 2014.

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News Headline: Those who spend hours on their cell phones are more anxious and less happy, college researchers say (Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - College students who spend hours each day online, texting or talking on their cell phones are more anxious, less happy and get lower grades, according to a new study by Kent State University researchers.

While studies have shown a correlation between high cell phone use and academics this appears to be the first to show that it is related to anxiety and happiness, said Andrew Lepp, an associate professor who conducted the research with fe‎llow faculty members Jacob Barkley and Aryn Karpinski in the university's College of Education, Health and Human Services.

“The lower frequency users use their phone to keep in touch, check the web and update Facebook but they can put it away and get on with other tasks,” Lepp said. “The higher users are not able to control it and are glued to the cell phone. They need to unplug and find some personal time where they can disconnect from the network. You need time to be alone with your thoughts, recover from the daily stressors in a way that doesn't involve electronic media.”

Lepp said he and his colleagues purposely have chosen college students for their studies because they are the first generation to grow up immersed in the technology.

The current research grew out of a study published last summer by Lepp and Barkley on the relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness. Those results showed that students who had higher cell phone use were less fit.

“As part of that study we interviewed students and some said that after a day of 100 texts they felt stressed out,” Lepp said. “They said they felt a sense of obligation to remain constantly connected to the social network.”

For the current student the researchers interviewed 536 students, who represented a wide demographic, including enrolled in 82 different majors, Lepp said.

The students recorded daily cell phone use and each took validated social science tests that measure anxiety and satisfaction with their life, or happiness, he said.

All participants allowed the researchers to retrieve their cumulative grade point average.

The researchers measured texts and calls sent and received and overall use. They found a wide range of use, Lepp said.

The students results were divided into three equal groups, from using cell phones 60 to 90 minutes a day to using them four to five hours a day.

“What we found was a strong relationship that high cell phone use anxiety measured significantly higher than low cell phone use,” he said.

The same result occurred with the measure of happiness, he said.

The average GPA of those with high cell phone use was 2.8, compared to 3.2 with low cell phone use, he said, showing how students who must always check their cell phones are distracted during studying and class.

“That's a huge difference – the difference between being on the honor roll or not,” he said.

He said that result validates what he has seen as a professor.

“In class students look you right in the eye while texting under the table,” he said. “I have been informally tracking those students for a couple of years and they do not do as well as those that put the phone in the backpack.”

The study is published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.

More studies are planned regarding the effect cell phones have on the lives of students, he said.

“We now are looking at cell phone use and insomnia and sleep difficulties,” he said. “So many students go to sleep with these things.”

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News Headline: KSU Study: More Phone Use, Less Happiness | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Jessica Dabrowski
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — If you've ever ignored a text or a phone call, don't think of it as being rude, think of it as controlling your stress level. A Kent State University study found that people who are constantly connected to their cell phone are less happy than those who can detach. Intense cell phone use is also linked to heightened anxiety and a feeling of obligation to keep in touch. KSU researchers surveyed more than 500 students and recorded their daily cell phone use, then measured anxiety and satisfaction levels. “High frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often,” the university wrote on its website. The study was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior. Click here to read more.  Filed in: Morning Show, nineam, Technology Topics: cell phones, talker

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News Headline: Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grade, reduced happiness in students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: ScienceDaily
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University researchers Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Aryn Karpinski, Ph.D., all faculty members in the university's College of Education, Health and Human Services, surveyed more than 500 university students. Daily cell phone use was recorded along with a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life, or in other words happiness. Finally, all participants allowed the researchers to access their official university records in order to retrieve their actual, cumulative college grade point average (GPA). All students surveyed were undergraduate students and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior). In addition, 82 different, self-reported majors were represented.

Results of the analysis showed that cell phone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety. Following this, GPA was positively related to happiness while anxiety was negatively related to happiness. Thus, for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.

Earlier this year, a team led by Lepp and Barkley also identified a negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness.

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News Headline: Student's frequent cellphone use linked to anxiety, lowered grades | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: UPI.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, Dec. 6 (UPI) -- Frequent cellphone use by students is linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness, a study at Kent State University in Ohio has found.
University researchers surveyed more than 500 Kent State students who recorded their daily cellphone use while the researchers made clinical measurements of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life, a Kent State release reported Friday.

Undergraduate students were surveyed and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior.)

The study participants allowed the researchers to access their official university records to retrieve their cumulative college grade point average (GPA).

An analysis of the study's findings showed cellphone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety, the researchers said.

As cellphone use by students increases, it is worth considering whether use of the device is related to measurable outcomes important for student success, they said.

The study by Kent State faculty members in the university's College of Education, Health and Human Services has been published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.

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News Headline: Kent State study: cell phone use, low grades, anxiety all linked | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: ConsumerAffairs.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Though multiple interpretations might be possible

In all the history of humanity, we are the first generation of people to take complete 24/7 connectivity for granted, and while there's undeniably wonderful benefits to constant communication, there's also concern that maybe, just maybe, 24/7 connectivity might have a downside as well.

Researchers from Kent State University have published a study suggesting just that: “Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students.” A study of 500 university students showed that “for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.”

Yet the study actually appears to show two different (though closely related) things: students with lower GPAs tended to have more anxiety than those with higher GPAs, and students who frequently used their phones tended to have lower GPAs.

Intriguing, but it's uncertain exactly where correlation and causation lie: presumably, would heavy cell phone use not cause anxiety if the student still managed an A average? What about heavy phone use during semester breaks, when grades are not an issue? Is the problem simply “time spent on the phone,” or “time spent doing anything other than study or schoolwork?”

Semi-related anecdote: In 1953, science fiction writer Ray Bradbury published a short story called The Murderer, about a man considered insane by his futuristic society because he hates the constant communication devices people are expected to carry with them, to the point where he actually “murders” (destroys) some of these devices, including his “wrist radio.” The man's science-fictional complaints include children who can call him via wrist radio at any time of day, no matter where he is, to remind him to pay their allowance, and a wife who got “hysterical” because “she had been completely out of touch with me for half a day.”

Bradbury intended his 1950s audience to be utterly appalled by the thought of a future where you could never, ever be out of reach of anyone desiring your attention. Yet only sixty years later, that's pretty much the status quo.

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News Headline: Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: EurekAlert!
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones are rarely out of reach whether the setting is a college classroom, library, recreational center, cafeteria or dorm room. As cell phone use continues to increase, it is worth considering whether use of the device is related to measurable outcomes important for student success, such as academic performance, anxiety and happiness.

Kent State University researchers Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Aryn Karpinski, Ph.D., all faculty members in the university's College of Education, Health and Human Services, surveyed more than 500 university students. Daily cell phone use was recorded along with a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life, or in other words happiness. Finally, all participants allowed the researchers to access their official university records in order to retrieve their actual, cumulative college grade point average (GPA). All students surveyed were undergraduate students and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior). In addition, 82 different, self-reported majors were represented.

Results of the analysis showed that cell phone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety. Following this, GPA was positively related to happiness while anxiety was negatively related to happiness. Thus, for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.

Earlier this year, a team led by Lepp and Barkley also identified a negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness.

###
The study reported upon here is published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior (2014), pages 343-350, DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2013.10.049 and can be accessed at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563213003993.

For more information about Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, visit http://www.kent.edu/ehhs.

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News Headline: Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: MedicalXpress.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones are rarely out of reach whether the setting is a college classroom, library, recreational center, cafeteria or dorm room. As cell phone use continues to increase, it is worth considering whether use of the device is related to measurable outcomes important for student success, such as academic performance, anxiety and happiness.

Kent State University researchers Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Aryn Karpinski, Ph.D., all faculty members in the university's College of Education, Health and Human Services, surveyed more than 500 university students. Daily cell phone use was recorded along with a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life, or in other words happiness. Finally, all participants allowed the researchers to access their official university records in order to retrieve their actual, cumulative college grade point average (GPA). All students surveyed were undergraduate students and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior). In addition, 82 different, self-reported majors were represented.

Results of the analysis showed that cell phone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety. Following this, GPA was positively related to happiness while anxiety was negatively related to happiness. Thus, for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.

Earlier this year, a team led by Lepp and Barkley also identified a negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness.

More information: The study reported upon here is published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior (2014), pages 343-350, DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2013.10.049 and can be accessed at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563213003993

Provided by Kent State University

[

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News Headline: Frequent Cell Phone Use Linked to Lower Grades and Reduced Happiness in Students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: cellular-news.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones are rarely out of reach whether the setting is a college classroom, library, recreational center, cafeteria or dorm room. As cell phone use continues to increase, it is worth considering whether use of the device is related to measurable outcomes important for student success, such as academic performance, anxiety and happiness.

­Kent State University researchers surveyed more than 500 university students. Daily cell phone use was recorded along with a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life, or in other words happiness. Finally, all participants allowed the researchers to access their official university records in order to retrieve their actual, cumulative college grade point average (GPA). All students surveyed were undergraduate students and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior). In addition, 82 different, self-reported majors were represented.

Results of the analysis showed that cell phone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety. Following this, GPA was positively related to happiness while anxiety was negatively related to happiness. Thus, for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.

Earlier this year, a team led by Lepp and Barkley also identified a negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness.

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News Headline: Cell Phone Usage Linked To Reduced Happiness, Poorer Grades and Anxiety Among Students | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: hngn.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Frequent use of cell phones can lead to reduced happiness, poorer grades and anxiety among students, a new study finds.

On surveying more than 500 university students, Kent State University researchers found that students, who used cell phones frequently performed poorer in academies, were less happy and experienced a lot of anxiety compared to their peers, according to a press release. Owing to the growing use of mobile phones by teens, researchers conducted this study to see whether the usage had any impact on the students' general academic performance and physiological state of mind.

Researcher recorded information regarding daily cell phone usage among these college students and compared the data to that of self-reported anxiety, life satisfactions and level of happiness. The authors of the study even got permission to access the participants' academic records to retrieve their actual, cumulative college grade point average (GPA). All participants were undergraduates ranging from freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Results of the study showed that frequent usage of cell phones had a negative impact on the student's GPA, leading to anxiety and a reduction in happiness levels.

An earlier study conducted in July this year found a link between extensive cell phone usage and poor fitness. While the device facilitated "on the go" communication, it also led to more sedentary lives, according to a NY Daily News report.

"The possibility that cell phone use may encourage physical activity among some low-frequency users while disrupting physical activity and encouraging sedentary activity among high-frequency users helps explain the significant negative relationship between cell phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness identified in this study," the report quoted the authors as saying.

These days it's impossible to get teens off their phones. They use it to text, send pictures, chat and browse the Internet. The launch of new instant chat messaging services has made this craze of cell phones even bigger. According to statistics, 90 percent of Whatsapp users check their messenger every 10 to 15 minutes. In fact, the usage is so high that a study conducted on the same reported that it can actually destroy relationships.

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News Headline: Kent State study: cell phone use, low grades, anxiety all linked | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: robinspost.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Though multiple interpretations might be possible

In all the history of humanity, we are the first generation of people to take complete 24/7 connectivity for granted, and while there's undeniably wonderful benefits to constant communication, there's also concern that maybe, just maybe, 24/7 connectivity might have a downside as well.

Researchers from Kent State University have published a study suggesting just that: “Frequent cell phone use linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students.” A study of 500 university students showed that “for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.”

Yet the study actually appears to show two different (though closely related) things: students with lower GPAs tended to have more anxiety than those with higher GPAs, and students who frequently used their phones tended to have lower GPAs.

Intriguing, but it's uncertain exactly where correlation and causation lie: presumably, would heavy cell phone use not cause anxiety if the student still managed an A average? What about heavy phone use during semester breaks, when grades are not an issue? Is the problem simply “time spent on the phone,” or “time spent doing anything other than study or schoolwork?”

Semi-related anecdote: In 1953, science fiction writer Ray Bradbury published a short story called The Murderer, about a man considered insane by his futuristic society because he hates the constant communication devices people are expected to carry with them, to the point where he actually “murders” (destroys) some of these devices, including his “wrist radio.” The man's science-fictional complaints include children who can call him via wrist radio at any time of day, no matter where he is, to remind him to pay their allowance, and a wife who got “hysterical” because “she had been completely out of touch with me for half a day.”

Bradbury intended his 1950s audience to be utterly appalled by the thought of a future where you could never, ever be out of reach of anyone desiring your attention. Yet only sixty years later, that's pretty much the status quo.

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News Headline: Do You Use Your Cell Phone a Lot? It Might Be Making You More Anxious | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: healthland.time.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Too much time spent on your cell phone doesn't mean you're more connected and happier.

New research from scientists at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio shows that the more time college students spend on their cellphones, the more anxious they were and the more their academic performance suffered.

Jacob Barkley, Aryn Karpinski and Andrew Lepp studied 500 Kent State University students, each of whom reported their daily cell phone use for the year as well as their level of anxiety and satisfaction with their life.

At the end of the year, the students also permitted the researchers to see their official school records for their cumulative grade point average (GPA). Not only was greater cell phone use negatively correlated with satisfaction and happiness indicators, it was also associated with lower GPAs — presumably because the students were more anxious and unable to concentrate on their studies.

While previous research found that cell phones can improve social interactions and reduce feelings of isolation, the latest findings, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, suggest that constant access to information and people may be a double edged-sword. The researchers speculate, for example, that students may feel anxious if they feel obligated to be in constant touch with their friends. Some may have difficulty disconnecting, which only feeds into the stress linked to their phones. Occasional episodes of solitude can be important for well being, but students who are tied to their phones aren't getting these respites.

But since the convenience of mobile phone technology only makes cell phones more ubiquitous and indispensable, the research team says it's worth exploring some of the less obvious as well as the more transparent ways that the devices might be influencing how we act and even — if you're a college student — the grades you get.

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News Headline: SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, MASS COMMUNICATION KSU introduces Promising Scholar Awards (Wasbotten, Wearden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: To attract and retain the strongest journalism and mass communication students in the nation, Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication is introducing a financial award program specifically designed for first-time freshmen in fall 2014.

The Promising Scholar Awards will provide $2,000 a year, renewable for up to four years, to the 10 highest-achieving incoming freshmen in each of JMCs undergraduate degree programs: advertising, electronic/digital media, journalism and public relations. The top two incoming freshmen will be awarded $3,000 a year, renewable for up to four years, as Ralph C. Darrow Promising Scholars. Darrow was a founding figure in JMCs public relations program.

"Our school has made a commitment to provide scholarships to the highest-achieving incoming freshmen who are committed to an education in JMC," said Thor Wasbotten, director of Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication. "This scholarship is intended to help throughout their four years in our school. Attracting top students has become more competitive than ever and the Promising Scholar program will help us and our students tremendously."

With the Promising Scholar Award and other university financial assistance programs, Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has become one of the most affordable schools in the nation. It is also one of the strongest. The undergraduate program at JMC has been accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication for nearly 50 years. Kent State's JMC is one of only 111 accredited journalism schools in the world and the only accredited school of journalism and mass communication in Northeast Ohio.

In 2013, JMC ranked in the top 10 of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation's Journalism Awards Program; ranked second in the nation in the Public Relations Student Society of America 2013 Bateman Case Study Competition; and won gold, silver and bronze medals in the international College Photographer of the Year competition. For the past two years, Kent State's TV2, part of JMCs independent student media program, has been named "TV Station of the Year"by the College Media Association.

The first Promising Scholar Award winners will be announced in spring 2014. The award is renewable if students remain in good standing in JMC with a 3.0 GPA overall and a 3.3 GPA in their JMC courses.

Kent State's Promising Scholar Awards are being funded through the generosity of private donors, including alumni, media and communication industry leaders and members of JMCs Professional Advisory Board. Matching gifts from the university's College of Communication and Information also help fund the program.

"I am tremendously grateful for the generous support of our alumni and friends in creating these scholarships," said Stan Wearden, dean of the College of Communication and Information at Kent State. "These are gifts that make an enormous and immediate difference. They are life-changing. I want to offer a huge thank you on behalf of the students, the faculty and the leadership of this college to those who have made a financial sacrifice to improve the lives and the education of our students."

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News Headline: KSU fashion show to benefit Habitat for Humanity Saturday | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Habitat for Humanity campus chapter, in conjunction with the Fashion Show Productions course at KSU, is putting on the 5th annual Restore the Runway fashion show fundraiser today in the Student Center Ballroom.

Doors will open at 7 p.m. and the show will begin at 8 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the door.

For more information about Restore the Runway, Kent State University Habitat for Humanity Campus Chapter, email habitat@kent.edu or call 412-614-1334.

Restore the Runway showcases Kent State University College of the Arts Student's reconstructed designs.

Designs will include products sold at thrift stores and/or Habitat ReStore recreated into an original design. The Fashion Show Productions course students, Habitat for Humanity of Portage county, and KSU Habitat for Humanity campus chapter members have been working all semester to put on a show that challenges designers and wow's audience members.

KSU's Habitat for Humanity campus chapter is a student-run, student-led organization that performs three main functions: building houses in partnership with Habitat affiliates; educating the campus and local community about affordable housing issues and the work of Habitat for Humanity; and fundraising for the work of Habitat.

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News Headline: Kent State Journalism Professor Receives University's 2013 Diversity Trailblazer Award (Brown, Shelton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Gene Shelton, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University, has been awarded the university's 2013 Diversity Trailblazer Award. The award is a university-wide honor that recognizes faculty, staff or a departmental group for their significant contributions to enhance diversity and inclusive excellence at KSU.

KSU President Lester A. Lefton presented the award to Shelton prior to the Presidential Speaker Series event with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn.

"Gene Shelton is known as a champion of inclusive diversity and a strong advocate for diversity issues in faculty deliberations. His quiet, passionate but firm way of encouraging openness and helping others understand the challenges of diversity has had a lasting impact upon his colleagues," said Alfreda Brown, vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion at KSU.

Shelton, who also serves as co-chairman of the diversity and globalization committee for the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at KSU, said he was overwhelmed by the honor.

"I am so honored," he said. "Students, colleagues and everyone at Kent State have played a major role in my growth on this campus. This is the highlight of my entire career."

Shelton's career spans more than four decades. After graduating from KSU in 1972, he became a reporter for The Cleveland Press and host of a public affairs program on Cleveland's NBC affiliate WKYC-TV. While studying for his master's degree at the University of Wisconsin, he was hired to teach journalism at UW-West Bend and he served as the campus public information officer.

An assignment to interview acclaimed singer Roberta Flack for a Milwaukee Sentinel feature in 1975 influenced a career change and a move to Los Angeles. Shelton was hired as a writer and publicist for Motown Records. From Motown, he moved to CBS Records were he worked for Columbia and Epic Records. At Epic, he was Michael Jackson's press agent and wrote the bio for the multiplatinum album "Off The Wall."

Shelton joined KSU as an instructor in 2003.

Shelton worked as publicist and press agent for artists such as Jackson, Quincy Jones, Lionel Richie, Ray Charles, Curtis Mayfield, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson, Gladys Knight, the Four Tops, the Temptations, Prince, Al Jarreau, the Isley Brothers, Carl Wilson of the Beach Boys, George Clinton and countless others. He left the music business in 1996 as a vice president of media relations for Warner Bros. Records. "I just want to keep getting better," Shelton added.

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News Headline: KSU students, faculty receive awards at International Textile and Apparel Association conference | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Three Kent State faculty and three students received awards at the 2013 conference of the International Textile and Apparel Association.

They were senior Madison Palen-Michel, who received a $5,000 cash prize and two-week internship at Zandra Rhodes in London, and associate professors of fashion merchandising, Kim Hahn and Jihyun Kim, who collaborated on two garments.

One faculty member and two students also won awards from a related organization, Educators for Socially Responsible Apparel Business: Linda Öhrn-McDaniel, an associate professor of fashion design; graduate student Lisa Arenstein of Canton and undergraduate Jasmine Kornel of Kent, who since has graduated.

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News Headline: Community college advocates push to reinstate grant (Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stark State College students previously received a collective $2.7 million from the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, President Para Jones said. She sees more students working full time as a result of losing the aid.

When the president of Stark State College sat in on classes, she would ask how many of the students were working while attending school. But Para Jones has tweaked her question. Now, when she goes to observe a lecture, she asks how many students are working full time. "Almost every hand goes up," she said.Jones maintains the increase in the number of hours students are working is a direct result of the fact that the state has taken some need-based aid away from community college students. She and other community college advocates are pushing to reinstate the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, the state's primary low-income financial-aid program, to community college students, whom they argue are among the poorest of those attending college in the state. Stark State College students previously received a collective $2.7 million from the grant, Jones said. Now, they get nothing."Our students really struggle," she said.

CHANGES IN AID

The state halved funding for need-based aid in 2009 as a result of plummeting revenue. Students at community colleges, regional campuses and for-profit schools subsequently were denied access to the grant. Students at for-profit schools have since regained grant funding.The state now requires students to lean first on the federal Pell Grant — money that can be used to cover a variety of college-related costs — before getting funding from the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, which may be used only to cover the cost of tuition. The amount full-time students can receive from the state grant ranges from $224 to more than $2,000 per year, depending on where they attend school. Before, students at schools with cheaper tuition were able to use the state grant to cover tuition and had the federal money left over to pay remaining tuition and other living expenses, such as transportation and food. The most a student can receive in Pell Grant funds for the 2013-14 school year is $5,645."Most of our students don't get that," said Karen Rafinski, interim president of the Ohio Association of Community Colleges.

'A REASONABLE PRIORITIZATION'

Those who argue for the new funding system, however, say it's the best compromise, since aid is down for students across the board. Bruce Johnson, president of the Inter-University Council of Ohio, said members of his organization ultimately were opposed to the General Assembly's slashing funding for the grant in half and pulling money away from the lowest-income students in the state. To qualify for the Ohio College Opportunity Grant, a student must have a maximum household income of $75,000 and have a low estimated family contribution based on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, according to the Ohio Board of Regents website.When the cuts were made, Johnson said, it was the correct decision to give extra tuition assistance to students attending more expensive schools.

Since all students eligible for the grant are considered low-income, Johnson said, and given that the available resources are only 50 percent of what they should be, "we think that's a reasonable prioritization."Kent State University at Stark students also no longer have access to the grant, as the cuts took it away from students at regional campuses. But the branch campus isn't fighting the change, said spokeswoman Cynthia Williams, because its tuition is lower than at the main campus and at private institutions in the county.

OTHER EXPENSES

But even though their tuition might be covered, students are struggling to pay for groceries, transportation, housing, child care and books, community college officials said.Stark State College student Hollie Bandy, 22, works between 25 and 30 hours a week as a server at Gervasi Vineyard to help finance her education. She is preparing to graduate this month with an associate degree in psychology and plans to earn a four-year degree. Bandy said she and her husband have to pay for school, a mortgage and all their living expenses, but because there are two of them, it's easier to manage."That's why I go to Stark State, though, is because it's so darn cheap compared with any other school around," Bandy said.A study conducted by Community Research Partners, a Columbus-based nonprofit that collects and analyzes data, found Pell Grant aid to Ohio students hasn't increased with the cost of living and cost of tuition. It determined the unmet need for community college students ranged from $3,000 to $5,400.Jones argues community college students usually are the poorest and seldom have financial or housing support from their families.She sees the cuts as de-incentivizing community college, which she said contradicts the state's goal of educating students more quickly at a lower expense. Rafinski said public policy is mixed up "in a big way" because it's focused on the price tag at each school, not on the neediest students."Just because they chose an institution of less cost shouldn't mean they're denied this," she said.

WHAT'S NEXT

The Ohio Association of Community Colleges is advocating for a budget correction bill in January that would give the grant back to community college students, spokesman Jeff Ortega said. The organization has collected letters of support from the Ohio Student Association and state legislators. Rep. Kirk Schuring, R-Jackson Township, wrote to the chairman of the Ohio Higher Education Study Committee, asking him to reconsider."The fact that students at Ohio's community colleges can't access state needs-based aid is incredible," his letter reads.In August and September, committee chairman Rep. Cliff Rosenberger, R-Clarksville, and Rep. Christina Hagan, R-Alliance, held public hearings across the state to gather information to use in higher education reform. Presidents of both public and private colleges lobbied the legislators to increase funding for need-based aid.

Rafinski said she just wants to see money returned to community college students."I truly believe (the grant) needs total reform," she said.

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News Headline: Kent State's longest-serving staff member reflects on 47 dedicated years (Harsh, Southards, Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LINDA HARSH, WHO WORKS AT STARK CAMPUS, IS LONGEST-SERVING WORKER ACROSS 8 CAMPUSES

From the construction of an entire regional campus to the shockwaves of the May 4, 1970 shootings, Linda Harsh has witnessed plenty of history from her office at Kent State University's Stark campus.

The clerical specialist and self-professed book lover could probably write her own historical account of the school. But after nearly five decades as a KSU staff member, Harsh is looking forward to beginning the next chapter in her own story -- retirement.

Harsh, 65, will retire at the end of 2013 with 47 years at the KSU Stark campus in North Canton, making her the longest-serving employee across the school's eight-campus system.

A Canton native, Harsh began working for the university part-time in 1965 as a junior at Lehman High School. Harsh originally worked with other staff and administrators in an American Legion hall where she earned about 60 cents per hour to file, create student admission packets and answer phones.

Harsh was hired full-time in 1967, just a little before Stark's first building, Main Hall, opened on what was formerly known as Frank Farm.

After moving offices to the Main Hall, Harsh watched the entire Stark campus transform from a dirt field to what is now KSU's largest regional campus sitting on 200 acres.

Harsh witnessed the advent of modern technology in the clerical system. She uses a computer for most jobs, but still prefers the electric typewriter at her desk for some tasks.

The events of May 4, 1970, would create some of her most vivid memories. Reflecting on that time more than 40 years later, Harsh tenses up slightly. Her palms become clammy.

Harsh was returning to work from lunch that afternoon with a friend when they first heard the news.

"On the radio, they were talking about these people being shot at Kent State, and we just didn't know what to do," she said. "We were terrified. We were terrified because we didn't know what was going to happen next. No one knew what to expect."

Harsh said they feared the unknown -- most wondered whether similar protests or violence would break out at the Stark campus.

Faculty manned rooftops with binoculars, Harsh said, looking out over the campus for signs of danger. Classes were cancelled, and offices were closed.

Harsh reported to work the next day though to take dictations for safety and emergency response plans. She said an eerie calmness hung over campus. Buildings were locked down, lights were off, and the usual bustle of the campus was absent.

Even when classes began that following fall, Harsh said many still felt a strange uneasiness.

"It took a long time before things went back to normal," she said. "It was just a really unsettling time."

Harsh's friends and colleagues say Harsh's dedication to her job is an inspiration.

"If we could bottle and sell Linda's work ethic, we would be wealthy people," said Mary Southards, assistant dean of enrollment at the Stark campus, who has worked in the same office as Harsh since 1981.

Southards said Harsh would often spend her time off continuing to stuff admission packets even on weekends, helping countless students she may never actually meet.

Harsh said a love of God has driven her work ethic.

"I've wanted to make sure God is pleased with me when it's all over because that's what really counts in life," she said.

Friends often refer to her as the "Harsh-meister" because she's "the keeper of all knowledge," Southards added.

"That's just something else we're going to miss about her," Southards said

Besides the free time retiring will offer, Harsh said she looks forward to spending more time at home with her husband, Rod, a disabled former Canton policeman who still drives Harsh to work in the mornings. What she'll miss the most is her friends, colleagues and mingling with the students.

"There's a lot of great people around here," Cynthia Williams, KSU Stark Public Relations Coordinator, said, "but nobody is ever going to be quite like Linda."

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News Headline: Day Ketterer rolls out new slogan (Grimm) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/07/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Banking on history while looking to the future, Day Ketterer "Modern Law Since 1872"

When the lawyers at Day Ketterer were looking for a new slogan to define their firm in the years ahead, they made sure to take a cue from the past.

The downtown fixture rolled out its new tag line — "Modern Law Since 1872" — late last month alongside a display of framed documents, some dating back to the firm's founding. The marketing update is the culmination of a process that began in March.

"We were coming off of our 140th (year), we're going into the next decade and we felt that this was a good time to go ahead and reconvey our brand," explained Jennifer Novotny, the firm's director of client services and development.

Day Ketterer's leadership wants the new slogan to convey the image of longevity sustainability and progressiveness.

"We are grounded by our perspective of our past, but defined by our aspirations for the future," said Robert E. Roland, the firm's managing partner.

THE FIRM

When it comes to history, Day Ketterer can show more than decades. One of the founders, William R. Day, was a close ally of William McKinley and served as the president's secretary of state. Day capped his career by spending 19 years on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The law firm he founded with William A. Lynch did all right, too.

Day Ketterer now has about 40 attorneys and offices in Canton, Hudson and Cleveland. Its specialties include litigation law, business law, labor and employment law, and recently, education law.

For much of its history the firm has focused on Stark County, but in recent years it's been growing, and is looking to expand to surrounding counties as a regional practice, Roland said.

The law firm arrived at the new tag line through a months-long process that started with focus groups of attorneys and staff and included input from downtown-based Jab Advertising.

The slogan replaces the 2006 tag line, "Redefining the power suit since 1872," which was shown next to a suit of armor wearing a tie.

"It serves to tell the public and ourselves what makes us stand out from our competition," Novotny said.

HISTORIC BRANDS

In marketing, themes of history or tradition are often attached to prestige or high-cost goods, said Pamela Grimm, chair of the Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship at Kent State University's College of Business Administration.

For example, Parker Pens is touting its 125th anniversary this year, and luxury watchmaker TAG Heurer bills itself as "Swiss avant-garde since 1860."

Highlighting heritage also can be a way for businesses that provide a service, such as law firms, to draw concrete distinctions between themselves and competitors, Grimm said.

Longevity conveys the idea, 'If they're around for a long time, they're doing something right," she said.

The risk is that potential customers will see an historic brand, not as a classic, but as stodgy and behind the times.

The Day Ketterer slogan carries an inherent tension between the modern and the historical, Grimm said. "How their target market will see it, I don't know."

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News Headline: Students Talk About Mandela's Legacy And Death (Gooden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name: Mike Ward
News OCR Text: Students at local universities are remembering the legacy of Nelson Mandela, the former South African president and civil rights leader who died this week.

And technology is helping them connect.

Dr. Amoaba Gooden is chair of the Pan-African Studies department at Kent State University.

She says social media and technology are helping American students connect with the story of Nelson Mandela...and other students in South Africa.

"The young people are connecting with each other across borders that way," Dr. Gooden tells AkronNewsNow.com, "and they're able to access historical information that certainly wasn't when I was in university, and kind of worked against apartheid."

Dr. Gooden says even despite the fact that many students may not remember Mandela's presidency and his activism, they understand his importance on the world stage...as a figure that transcends time.

"I think regardless of the era that the youth are born in, certainly they learn about the issues that he stood for in their historical classes, for example, classes in social justice, or various literature classes," Dr. Gooden says. "So they recognize him for the champion that he was."

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News Headline: African-American students celebrate Kwanzaa (Okantah) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily Athenaeum - Online, The
Contact Name: Alexis Randolph TheDAOnline.com
News OCR Text: The Paul Robeson Mahalia Jackson Gospel Choir performed during the annual Kwanzaa Celebration. The choir is named after two African-American gospel singers: Paul Robeson and Mahalia Jackson

The West Virginia University Center for Black Culture and Research held its annual Kwanzaa event Thursday in the Mountainlair Ballrooms.

The event is held the first Thursday of December each year to celebrate the traditional African-American holiday, which was started by Maulana Karenga in 1966.

Members of the African-American community celebrate Kwanzaa every year during the week spanning Dec. 26-Jan. 1.

The term Kwanzaa comes from the traditional Swahili phrase, “matunda ya kwanza.” The phrase is translated into English as “first fruits of the harvest.”

Marjorie Fuller, the director of the Center for Black Culture and Research, organized the event and said the celebration is based around the principles of the harvest.

Fuller expressed the openness of the on-campus celebration.

“The seven principles Dr. Karenga developed apply to all people, so we are here, and this is open to everyone,” Fuller said. “Everyone in the campus community is welcome, and the event is open to the wider Morgantown community to celebrate those very universal, very human principles.”

These principles include Umoja (unity), Nia (purpose) and Imani (faith). Each day of the celebration represents a different value, and the value for each day is discussed during candle lighting ceremonies.

Fuller addressed the many different ways people celebrate Kwanzaa.

“Many celebrations often include songs, drums, storytelling and poetry readings. On each night, families get together, and a child lights one of the candles on the Kinara, or the candle holder,” Fuller said.

The celebration featured Mwatabu Okantah, a professor from Kent State University, as its speaker.

Okantah presented the Libation Statement and spoke of the history and cultural value of Kwanzaa.

“It has had an impact on not only those of us who are African-American, but throughout the Caribbean,” Okantah said. “We did not exist as a people to be called African-American before the 18th century. We came to be as a result of the slave trade. Kwanzaa is not about the slave trade, Kwanzaa is about how we survived.”

Joshua Puller, a junior accounting student and president of the WVU collegiate chapter of the NAACP, said Kwanzaa was created to reconnect with African roots.

“We remember who our ancestors were and celebrate who we are today,” Puller said.

Puller said his favorite Kwanzaa memory was the WVU Center for Black Culture and Research's celebration his freshman year and lighting a candle on the Kinara.

Kimelle Ash, a sophomore history student and president of the Black Student Union, said Kwanzaa is a cultural event.

“It brings back to us the African principles that may have been lost throughout the slave trade and African-American history,” Ash said. “So we connect with these principles such as faith and family.”

To learn more about black culture at WVU, visit http://cbc.wvu.edu.

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News Headline: South African Student Wishes She Were Home After Mandela Death (Williams) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Bill Sheil
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio– While the world mourns the passing of Nelson Mandela, many South Africans feel the loss in deep and personal ways. “I'm very sad,” said Nhlalala Mavundza, a South African who is studying at Kent State. “And I wish I were home. I'm very, very sad, heartbroken.” Mavundza, whose friends call her “Lala,” grew up in a free South Africa, thanks in large part to Mandela's achievements. She says she remembers how, as president, he always emphasized education as a pathway to success. Today, Lala a Fulbright scholar studying for her doctorate in neuroscience at Kent State. “He brought people together,” she says. “And he gave us hope. And he taught us how to forgive.” Mandela forgave those who imprisoned him for 27 years for opposing apartheid. One expert at Kent State said his nation followed Mandela's example. “He was able to hold the country together at a time when blacks might have sought revenge,” said Dr. Christopher Williams who teaches Pan-African studies. “They listened to him because he was a leader, a first-class leader,” Dr. Williams said. Mandela was an icon, but was also known as a man who enjoyed the small pleasures of life. “His love for children, his dance,” said Lala. “He was always happy in public, always.” And Mandela seemed to know his destiny at a young age. Dr. Williams said Mandela predicted he would be South Africa's first black president. And he made that prediction in 1952. Read much more on Nelson Mandela HERE. Filed in: News Topics: nelson mandela death

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News Headline: Kent State University research finds meditation effective in reducing blood pressure (Fresco, Hughes) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Two researchers at Kent State University have found that mindfulness-based stress reduction can reduce high blood pressure, which affects nearly 60 million adults in the United States.

MBSR, which involves the practice of meditation, body awareness and some gentle yoga, has been shown to be effective in preventing and treating depression and anxiety and alleviating stress, but scientific studies of its effects on blood pressure are rare.

In a paper published Oct. 15 in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, researchers Joel Hughes and David Fresco, both associate professors of psychology at KSU, reported that MBSR "may be an appropriate complementary treatment" for patients who prefer lifestyle changes and stress-management approaches to treating high blood pressure, or hypertension.

The study was funded by a $545,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Their two-year study involved 56 adults in Northeastern Ohio. Study participants who practiced mindfulness-based stress reduction had significant decreases in blood pressure measurements compared with participants who received another therapy, progressive muscle relaxation.

The adults who entered the study were "pre-hypertensive," meaning that they displayed higher levels of blood pressure but not quite high enough to take medication. One question left unanswered by the study, its authors said, is whether meditation can help individuals whose hypertension has crossed into the range commonly treated by medication or whether a combination of meditation and medication will work better than either treatment alone.

The mindfulness-based participants in the study used body scan exercises, sitting meditation and yoga. They practiced MBSR for eight weeks, attending sessions led by a skilled practitioner two and a half hours a week and practicing up to an hour a day on their own.

They lowered their clinic blood pressure measurements - the type of measurement commonly taken in a doctor's office - as much as other alternative treatments, such as modified diet and exercise, have been shown to do. The use of MBSR was only slightly less effective than blood pressure medication, said Hughes.

The reasons for seeking alternatives to medication can include a desire to avoid side effects. Adherence to medication for hypertension is often poor, Hughes noted, and some patients do not improve their blood pressure levels by taking pills.

Fresco likened the practice of MBSR to going to a gym for fitness. "It's all about training this attention muscle in the brain," he said. The goal is to reduce stress and strengthen the resolve to change behavior patterns.

This was the first scientific study in the U.S. to document that MBSR, an increasing popular practice, can have an effect on high blood pressure, he said.

Hughes and Fresco were co-principal investigators. They are preparing to follow up with a longer study involving 180 adults to find out whether the effects of MBSR practice on blood pressure are lasting.

One of Fresco's research interests is the use of mindfulness meditation in psychosocial treatments, and Hughes conducts research in cardiovascular behavioral medicine. They are frequent collaborators and have partnered with area medical facilities on their research.

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News Headline: Ohio takes another swing at severance tax legislation | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/06/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The oil and gas industry in Ohio finally appears to have found a piece of severance tax legislation it likes, though it might have had to write a fair amount of it itself to get there.

Now comes the real test — getting it through the Legislature and to the governor's desk if not intact, at least in a recognizable form with the same provisions that the industry now says it will support.

Not that Ohio Oil and Gas Association is not expecting some changes.

“There are 132 legislators who will have some thoughts on what should be incorporated into the proposal, so it's hard to say what will actually come out in the end,” said Penny Seipel, vice president of public affairs for the association.

The proposed package, as currently written, would revamp severance taxes on oil and gas production by horizontal shale drillers, while reducing taxes for the state's traditional home-grown drillers, who typically drill smaller vertical wells into sandstone formations.

Taxes on shale gas and oil would change from their current levels of 20 cents per barrel of oil and 3 cents per thousand cubic feet (mcf) of natural gas to a flat 1% tax on all gross receipts from the sale of gas, oil or natural gas liquids such as propane and butane. At current prices, that 1% tax would work out to be about $1 per barrel of oil and about the same 3 cents per mcf of gas.

Then, after a well is in production for five years, the tax would double, to 2% of gross receipts. That increase might be the sticking point for lawmakers, because such a scenario might amount to no tax increase at all for drillers, at least when it comes to natural gas. Judged by other shale plays, it would allow them to get most of the gas out of a well long before the tax rate doubled after five years.

Wells lose their fizz

That's because shale gas wells are sort of like pop bottles that have been shaken and then cracked open. The pressure is the greatest right after a well is opened, and that's when the production is highest as well. After the first year, production volumes already have dropped for many shale wells, and continue to drop as time passes.

Speaking at a shale gas conference held by his organization Dec. 5, OOGA vice president of operations and geologist Peter MacKenzie declined to speculate on how much production would decline over a five-year period for the typical Utica shale gas well.

“It's too soon to say,” Mr. MacKenzie said, when asked about the matter.

Other shale plays indicate the drop could be fast and steep.

A 2011 report by officials at the oilfield service giant Schlumberger found that wells in the Barnett, Fayetteville and Haynesville shale plays all saw their production drop by more than 50% after just one year of production. After five years, the wells' production had dropped by 80% or more in those plays, the Schlumberger report found.

Then there's the matter of favoring conventional drillers over horizontal drillers.

Since the Utica formation first came on the scene, drilling proponents have argued that shale gas drilling is cleaner and safer than conventional drilling — largely because more gas can be brought up by a single well and also because shale drillers are larger, more sophisticated and more closely monitored. It also has been found, by researchers at Kent State University, that horizontal shale gas wells use less water for every mcf of gas that they produce than do conventional wells.

Why, then, promote conventional drilling with an advantageous tax structure? Because OOGA was able to get consensus among its members with that setup, Ms. Seipel said.

“We were able to approach our members and ask their thoughts, both conventional producers and shale producers, and the members that were contacted were comfortable with the tax proposal as a package,” Ms. Seipel said.

Is part of a loaf better than none?

OOGA also appears to have gotten some backing from Gov. John Kasich and some cautious support from environmental groups; both had been pushing for higher taxes on oil and gas since the shale boom came to Ohio.

Gov. Kasich had wanted to raise oil and gas taxes to help fund a reduction in state income taxes. The new proposal backed by OOGA would bring in less money to do so — about $1.7 billion over 10 years, instead of the $2.8 billion the governor wanted — and would earmark some of the money for other purposes. Some of the revenue would pay for state geological services the oil and gas industry uses, some would be used to manage old abandoned wells, and there would be specific income tax credits for landowners and other royalty payment recipients who paid the severance tax.

Nonetheless, a smaller tax take is better than shelving the severance tax issue altogether in the eyes of some.

“Give the Ohio House Republicans credit for proposing a severance tax increase,” said Jack Shaner, senior director of legislative and public affairs for the Ohio Environmental Council. “Unlike the Kasich administration's proposal which only funded personal income tax relief, the House proposal is right to make regulatory oversight and orphan well plugging top priorities for resultant revenue.”

That said, Mr. Shaner isn't entirely satisfied, noting that the House's proposed tax rate “is about half as big as Kasich's.”

“Plus, the House proposal includes new tax breaks and tax credits for the industry,” Mr. Shaner said. “The bottom line question for Ohio is: How much revenue will result and will it be sufficient to fund adequate state oversight of this growing industry?"

Gov. Kasich might not have had much choice in the matter. One Statehouse source, who asked not to be identified, said the proposed legislation was written largely by OOGA before it was sponsored by Ohio House Speaker William Batchelder and Rep. Matt Huffman. Neither the Kasich administration nor the American Petroleum Institute, which typically represents larger drillers, had input into the new proposal, the source said.

Ms. Seipel said she did not know if the governor's office was involved in drafting the legislation and declined to say how much of it had been authored by OOGA or its attorneys.

“We definitely offered our perspectives and shared our insights,” Ms. Seipel said.

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News Headline: Kent State asking for recall of diplomas with typo | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/08/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: They're asking more than 1,000 graduates to return their diplomas if the word "privileges" is misspelled. The university's registrar says at least some diplomas were mailed to graduates with an extra "i" in the word. How the mistake was made hasn't been determined. But what is certain is that the university doesn't want a diploma hanging on someone's wall with a misspelling. The university is offering to exchange diplomas with misspellings for edited versions. It wants the originals back so that they can't be used fraudulently.

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