Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Aeronautics; Students (1)
Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (1)
Economics (2)
Fashion Design and Merchandising; Global Education; Journalism and Mass Communications; Modern and Classical Language (MCLS); Political Science; Scholarships; Students (1)
Higher Education (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
Psychology (1)
Psychology; Students (12)


Headline Date Outlet

Aeronautics; Students (1)
Higher Education Roundup: Kent State signs agreement with CommutAir: 12/09/2013 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has signed an agreement with CommutAir, a regional airline that operates as United Express in the Northeast and Midwest to provide...


Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (1)
Reporters' Notebook: Too much smart phone use isn't too smart (Lepp; Barkley) 12/10/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

Reporters' Notebook: Dec. 9, 2013 4:30 am, December 8, 2013 Too much smart phone use isn't too smart Smart phones make life easier in so many...


Economics (2)
2013 National Senior Games produce $36 million boost for Northeast Ohio 12/10/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

he 2013 National Senior Games provided a $36 million boost to the Northeast Ohio economy, about $1 million more than originally forecast, according to...

When it's better to rent a home in retirement 12/09/2013 MarketWatch Text Attachment Email

...modifying their spaces if they acquire any physical ailments as they age, he added. Gary V. Engelhardt of Syracuse University and Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley of Kent State University also co-wrote the study. That said, there are situations where signing a lease beats a mortgage — even during retirement....


Fashion Design and Merchandising; Global Education; Journalism and Mass Communications; Modern and Classical Language (MCLS); Political Science; Scholarships; Students (1)
Celebrations - Education 12/10/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State student Meghan Caprez receieved the $1,000 David A. Meeker Scholarship from the Akron-area chapter of the Public Relations Society of America....


Higher Education (1)
The Ten Most Popular Majors for Millionaires: Login and Learn at CollegeWeekLive December 12th 12/09/2013 Newsday - Online Text Attachment Email

...Institute of Technology Indiana Tech James Cook University John Cabot University Johnson C. Smith University Keiser University (FL) Kent State University Lawrence Technological University Leeds Metropolitan University Lenoir-Rhyne University LIM College Malone University...


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Area news briefs: Kent names Dinh scholar of the month 12/09/2013 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

WARREN - A mathematical science professor at Kent State University at Trumbull has been named Kent State's scholar of the month for December. Associate professor Hai Dinh has been teaching...


Psychology (1)
5 Dangerous Ways Your Cell Phone Can Hurt You 12/10/2013 TheLoop21.com Text Attachment Email

Using your cell phone too much can make you more anxious, a study says. Researchers from Kent State University found that college students glued to their phones all day were more anxious and received poorer grades. For the study, 500 students...


Psychology; Students (12)
High cellphone use linked to lower grades (Lepp, Barkley, Karpinski) 12/09/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

High cellphone usage can lead to lower grades and other problems for college students, according to a new study by Kent State University researchers. In a recent study of college students, the researchers found the highest frequency cellphone users tended to...

KSU Study: More Phone Use, Less Happiness 12/10/2013 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — If you've ever ignored a text or a phone call, don't think of it as being rude, think of it as controlling your stress level. A Kent State...

Too much texting makes students less happy, poorer grades, study shows 12/10/2013 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

A new study shows that spending too much time texting, web surfing, and even talking on a cell phone makes people more anxious and less happy. Researchers...

Happiness-resisting-answering-mobile-People-ignore-texts-calls-likely-contented.(Lepp) 12/10/2013 Daily Mail - New York Bureau Text Attachment Email

New study revealed phone addicts are less likely to be happy Those who can't resist a ring are also more likely to suffer anxiety Social network sites...

Feeling anxious? You may want to turn off your smart phone 12/09/2013 Globe and Mail - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Computers in Human Behaviour journal states it has confirmed what most of us already know: Smart phones are bad for our mental health. Researchers at Kent State University in Ohio tracked how much time a group of 500 university student spent on their phones. According to Time magazine, the study...

Cell Phone Use Linked To Anxiety, Lower Grades, And Reduced Happiness, Kent State University Study 12/09/2013 BioSpace.com Text Attachment Email

Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones...

Body image problems don't just afflict women 12/09/2013 Vancouver Sun - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...their bodies are just not good enough. Evidence that college-age males are susceptible to media images comes from a study of 111 male undergraduates at Kent State University. Researchers showed them ads for products, some of them featuring shirtless males. “Results indicated that exposure to both...

Cellphone use linked to anxiety unhappiness 12/10/2013 Big News Network Text Attachment Email

...side-effect may be the propensity of the prolific devices to reduce academic performance and endorphins, while increasing cholesterol. A recent study by Kent State University, involving a survey of over 5

Body image problems don't just afflict women 12/09/2013 Province - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...their bodies are just not good enough. Evidence that college-age males are susceptible to media images comes from a study of 111 male undergraduates at Kent State University. Researchers showed them ads for products, some of them featuring shirtless males. “Results indicated that exposure to both...

Good Morning America - Cell Phone Over-Use 12/09/2013 KTKA-TV Text Attachment Email

And finally, if you want to bo happy, just put the cell phone down. That is the result of a study from kent state university. It found that college student who is constantly text and talk on the phone are not as happy as the peers who don't. A study,...

Channel 3 News at 11 12/09/2013 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

>>> Is your cell phone stressing you out? A new study at kent state found that most students today who spend time texting and looking at their cell phone are more expansion less happy. Researchers say that...

Constantly checking your phone makes you stressed, finds report 12/09/2013 Recombu Mobile Phones Text Attachment Email

... Poor college grades and higher stress levels are common among smartphone users who constantly check their phones, a study by researchers at Ohio's Kent State University has found. The study cross-referenced the GPA (grade point average) of 500 freshman, sophomore, junior and senior students at...


News Headline: Higher Education Roundup: Kent State signs agreement with CommutAir: | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has signed an agreement with CommutAir, a regional airline that operates as United Express in the Northeast and Midwest to provide programs for graduates of the university?s aeronautics program.

The agreement outlines a professional development program for Kent State graduates, providing job shadowing, flight training and expedited hiring options, the university said. ����Approximately 10 percent of CommutAir?s current pilots are Kent State graduates. The new agreement means expanded training and job opportunities for students.�� ��?When a company such as CommutAir that has hired our graduates comes to us and says ?We want more Kent State students,? that is incredibly exciting,? said Maureen McFarland, academic program director of aeronautics at Kent State, in a news release.

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News Headline: Reporters' Notebook: Too much smart phone use isn't too smart (Lepp; Barkley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Reporters' Notebook: Dec. 9, 2013

4:30 am, December 8, 2013

Too much smart phone use isn't too smart

Smart phones make life easier in so many ways. But they're also linked to anxiety, lower grades and reduced happiness in students, according to research from Kent State University.

Andrew Lepp, Jacob Barkley and Aryn Karpinski, all faculty members in the university's College of Education, Health and Human Services, recorded daily smart phone use for 500 students, along with a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life. All participants allowed the researchers to access their cumulative college grade point average.

Kent State said results of the analysis showed that smart phone use “was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety.” For the population studied, high frequency smart phone users “tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often,” according to Kent State.

Earlier this year, a team led by Drs. Lepp and Barkley also identified a negative relationship between smart phone use and cardiorespiratory fitness. Taken as a whole, the results “suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness,” Kent State said.

The researchers' study was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior. You can find it at tinyurl.com/pof7xqj. — Scott Suttell

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News Headline: 2013 National Senior Games produce $36 million boost for Northeast Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: he 2013 National Senior Games provided a $36 million boost to the Northeast Ohio economy, about $1 million more than originally forecast, according to a study from the Greater Cleveland Sports Commission and Kent State University's Department of Economics.

Most of the economic impact was felt in the hotel and restaurant sectors, with spending per participant of $681.69 and $407.52, respectively, the study found. Participants also spent significantly on local retail ($120.47 per person) and entertainment ($113.29).

The report also showed that the event, which took place in late July and early August, “provided an increase in local wage earnings of over $14 million,” according to a news release from the sports commission.

The study evaluated participants' pre- and post-event impressions of Cleveland and found 80% of those who traveled to Cleveland for the event left with a more positive perception of the city.

“The 2013 National Senior Games was a tremendous success on every level,” said David Gilbert, president and CEO of the sports commission, in a statement.

The study was led by Dr. Shawn Rohlin and Jack Lorenzetti of the Department of Economics at Kent State.

The 2013 National Senior Games saw 10,888 athletes age 50 or older compete in 19 sports at venues across Northeast Ohio. The sports commission said an estimated 18,000 family members and friends also traveled to the region for the event.

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News Headline: When it's better to rent a home in retirement | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: MarketWatch
Contact Name: Hoak, Amy
News OCR Text: Many argue it's best to own a home in retirement instead of renting one. But there are exceptions.

Owning is more predictable — even if you don't own your home free and clear. There's no landlord to increase your rent or tell you to move; with a fixed-rate mortgage, your monthly payments are set.

“With a fixed-rate mortgage, you can control the principal and interest components of the mortgage. You can also control when that gets paid off,” said Greg McBride, senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com. Owning a home also opens up the possibility of getting a reverse mortgage to help with cash flow, he said.

A recent analysis from the Mortgage Bankers Association's Research Institute for Housing America concluded that retirees generally come out ahead when they're homeowners.

“The study found older Americans who own their homes are more financially secure and generally experience fewer impediments to good health than their peers who rent,” said Michael D. Eriksen, a professor at Texas Tech University and an author of “A Profile of Housing and Health Among Older Americans.” Moreover, renters often have difficulty modifying their spaces if they acquire any physical ailments as they age, he added. Gary V. Engelhardt of Syracuse University and Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley of Kent State University also co-wrote the study.

That said, there are situations where signing a lease beats a mortgage — even during retirement. Slide show: 10 best cities for snowbirds and retirees.

Ask Sally Gavin, a recently retired teacher who, with her husband, sold a house in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest to move into a rental apartment building in downtown Chicago.

“We don't need a five-bedroom house anymore, and we weren't ready to make a commitment for a condo,” she said. And they're not sure when, but the couple will likely eventually relocate to Austin, where their son lives. In the interim, they decided to live in a “fun” place, where they could walk everywhere and have easy access to all the cultural attractions downtown Chicago has to offer.

For Gavin and her husband, renting affords them flexibility. And that flexibility is a big reason retirees turn into renters — at least for a while. Retirees may rent to try out living in a new location. Or they can rent to see if they like being snowbirds, spending the colder months where the weather is warm.

Flexibility is also helpful when financial or health situations change, requiring a move to a less expensive place, to a place closer to family, or to a care facility, said Tammy Kotula, spokeswoman for Apartments.com. Renters don't have the burden of selling a home should those issues arise.

Plus, apartment living comes without some of the hassles of homeownership, said Lauren Boston, staff writer for the National Apartment Association, in an email interview.

“Many retirees are looking for the same experience as that of their Millennial children or grandchildren — they want to live in an all-inclusive place where they don't have to worry about maintaining a home,” she said. What's more, renting an apartment might be best for those who want to be within walking distance of cultural activities, stores and restaurants, Boston added.

For those with insufficient retirement savings, renting could also be a good option, said Kevin R. Worthley, a financial planner in Rhode Island and vice president of Wealth Management Resources. Instead of tying up money in a house, an asset that typically appreciates at a slow pace, some might be better off renting in retirement and considering other alternatives for their money, he said.

But for those planning on living in a place for an extended period — and for people who can afford to own — many argue the perks of renting in retirement are often not worth it. Of the more than 47 million households of people 55 and older, 80% are homeowners, according to the MBA study.

With homeownership, there may be surprises like a broken washing machine or air conditioner that needs replacing, and there are regular maintenance costs. But don't think those costs and taxes aren't baked into a rent payment as well, said Bankrate's McBride.

Forty-four percent of renters 65 and older spend more than 30% of their annual gross income on rent, according to the MBA study. Meanwhile, median housing equity for homeowners of that age is $125,000, and half of the typical homeowner's portfolio is made up of housing wealth. For those with mortgage payments, they typically pay a monthly amount equal to 16% of their annual gross income.

“Renting for a short period of occupancy makes all the sense in the world,” McBride said. But for those planning to stay in a home for the foreseeable future — and especially for those on a fixed income — homeownership often wins out.

Slide show: Best cities for snowbirds and retirees.

Amy Hoak is a MarketWatch editor and columnist based in Chicago. Follow her on Twitter @amyhoak.

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News Headline: Celebrations - Education | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State student Meghan Caprez receieved the $1,000 David A. Meeker Scholarship from the Akron-area chapter of the Public Relations Society of America. She is a junior majoring in public relations. Cindy Deng, also a junior in public relations, was the first runner-up. Both will receive one year's free membership to PRSA.

Three Kent State faculty and three students received awards at the 2013 conference of the International Textile and Apparel Association. They were senior Madison Palen-Michel, who received a $5,000 cash prize and two-week internship at Zandra Rhodes in London, and associate professors of fashion merchandising, Kim Hahn and Jihyun Kim, who collaborated on two garments. One faculty member and two students also won awards from a related organization, Educators for Socially Responsible Apparel Business: Linda Öhrn-McDaniel, an associate professor of fashion design; graduate student Lisa Arenstein of Canton and undergraduate Jasmine Kornel of Kent, who since has graduated.

Kent State junior Robert McGuire of Strongsville received the $1,500 Donald N. Nelson Scholarship for Study Abroad from the Ohio International Consortium in spring 2014. He is majoring in French and international relations and minoring in Chinese, and will study at the Universidad de Palermo in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

James M. King, son of James and Celeste King, received a scholarship to pursue a master's degree in political management at George Washington University. He will graduate from Kent State this month with a bachelor's degree in political science. He graduated from Woodridge High in 2011.

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News Headline: The Ten Most Popular Majors for Millionaires: Login and Learn at CollegeWeekLive December 12th | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Newsday - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: With Most College Applications Due January 1st, Connecting with Colleges Online at http://www.CollegeWeekLive.com is a Savvy Way to Show Interest in Schools on Your Hit List

Do you ever wonder what moves the richest people in our population make on the way to becoming millionaires? Most agree that a college education is a logical first step, and by logging into a virtual college admissions event at CollegeWeekLive on Thursday December 12th, you can learn what the ten most popular majors are for today's millionaires. That live video presentation by Oliver Williams, a consultant with Wealth Insight, takes place at 11:00 a.m. EST.

Additional informative video presentations at the online college admissions event, which runs from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., feature live Q&A and cover topics such as secrets for achieving a perfect 2400 score on the SAT and advice for homeschooled students heading to college. Video chats with such schools as SUNY Alfred State University, Indiana Institute of Technology and the University of Nebraska are also available and prospective students can browse information or chat live with admissions representatives from more than 150 colleges, including:

Alderson Broaddus University

Alliant International University

American University of Rome

Anglia Ruskin University

Armstrong Atlantic State University

Ave Maria University

Boston Architectural College

Bournemouth University

Bowling Green State University

Bucknell University

California State University - Channel Islands

California State University - Long Beach

Castleton State College

Central State University

Clayton State University

College of DuPage

CUNY, College of Staten Island

Dakota College at Bottineau

Drake University

East Tennessee State University

Edison State College

EDMC-the Art Institutes

Ferris State University

Fisher College

Florida Atlantic University

Florida Gulf Coast University

Florida International University

Frostburg State University

Gardner Webb University

Georgia Southern University

Grand View University

Grove City College

Hellenic American University

Holy Names University

Illinois Institute of Technology

Indiana Tech

James Cook University

John Cabot University

Johnson C. Smith University

Keiser University (FL)

Kent State University

Lawrence Technological University

Leeds Metropolitan University

Lenoir-Rhyne University

LIM College

Malone University

Manhattan College

Manhattanville College

Mercy College

Meredith College

Miami Dade College

Michigan Technological University

Middle Georgia State College

Mills College

Mississippi State University

Moravian College

Mount Marty College

Mount Saint Mary College

Mount St. Mary's University

Northeastern University - College of Professional Studies

Northumbria University

Norwich University

Nova Southeastern University

Oklahoma State University

Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology

Palm Beach State College

Palmer College of Chiropractic

Park University

Penn State Greater Allegheny

Philadelphia University

Platt College San Diego Digital Media Design

Post University

Purdue University

Regis College

Richmond-The American University in London

Roger Williams University

Rowan University

Rutgers University, Newark

Saint Joseph's College (Brooklyn)

Saint Joseph's College of Maine

Saint Louis University

Sam Houston State University

Santa Fe College

Schenectady County Community College

Sheridan College

St. Cloud State University

Suffolk University

SUNY, Alfred State College

SUNY, College at Brockport

SUNY, College at Cortland

SUNY, College at Old Westbury

SUNY, College at Potsdam

Syracuse University

Temple School of Pharmacy

Texas A&M University, Central Texas

Texas Tech University

The American College of Greece

The College of Saint Rose

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Union University

United States Air Force Academy

United States Coast Guard Academy

United States Merchant Marine Academy

University at Albany

University of Advancing Technology

University of Alberta

University of Arizona

University of Bridgeport

University of British Columbia

University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Davis

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USMA West Point

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Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Youngstown State University

To at no cost, visit CollegeWeekLive. If you have questions, please contact Support(at)CollegeWeekLive(dot)com. To learn how your college or university can join CollegeWeekLive, call 800.828.8222 or email colleges(at)collegeweeklive(dot)com.

ABOUT COLLEGEWEEKLIVE

CollegeWeekLive is the leading channel where students and colleges meet online. More than 1,500,000 students from 192 countries rely on CollegeWeekLive to help navigate college admission. This live channel provides unprecedented access to expert presentations and enables students to have unscripted conversations with hundreds of colleges.

Students turn to CollegeWeekLive to gain insights from current students, admission representatives, and leading experts, whether they are narrowing their choice of schools or making post admission decisions. Through live text and video chats, students, parents and counselors engage directly with colleges at every stage of the enrollment process with CollegeWeekLive.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11403005.htm

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News Headline: Area news briefs: Kent names Dinh scholar of the month | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: Tribune Chronicle
News OCR Text: WARREN -
A mathematical science professor at Kent State University at Trumbull has been named Kent State's scholar of the month for December.

Associate professor Hai Dinh has been teaching at the college since 2004. His research interests include Ring and Module Theory and Algebraic Coding Theory.

Dinh completed his bachelor and master of science degrees and Ph.D. in mathematics at Ohio University. He also has worked as a visiting professor at North Dakota State University and is the author of more than 25 papers that have been published in peer-reviewed research journals.

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News Headline: 5 Dangerous Ways Your Cell Phone Can Hurt You | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: TheLoop21.com
Contact Name: Lorraine Chow
News OCR Text: Using your cell phone too much can make you more anxious, a study says.

Researchers from Kent State University found that college students glued to their phones all day were more anxious and received poorer grades. For the study, 500 students were surveyed about their cell phone use. Based on the findings, it appears that frequent cell phone users felt anxious and obligated to keep in constant contact with their friends. Even more worrisome, after weighing in the participants' cumulative GPAs, the researchers found that greater cell phone use was linked to lower grades, possibly because the students were so anxious about keeping in touch with their friends they couldn't concentrate on studying.

“[The higher users] need to unplug and find some personal time where they can disconnect from the network," advised Andrew Lepp, an associate professor who led the study. "You need time to be alone with your thoughts, recover from the daily stressors in a way that doesn't involve electronic media."

How cell phones can harm your health

Besides anxiety, there's mounting evidence that cell phones can affect our health negatively if we use them in excess, as Huffington Post illustrated in their info-graphic. As the list below shows, there are good reasons to switch off your phones once in awhile.

Addiction: One survey showed that the majority of us -- 66 percent -- are actually afraid to lose or be separated from our cell phones.

Hearing: For those who crank up the volume on their playlists, you risk damaging the cells in your ear, which can lead to hearing loss.

Text claw: Too much texting and Candy Crush can lead to a strange phenomenon called "text claw," which can lead to tendinitis and forearm and wrist pain.

Text neck: Yup, same applies for your neck. Craning your head forward to stare at phones exerts extra pressure on your spine.

Radiation: The World Health Organization considers the levels of radiation to be "possibly carcinogenic to humans."

Poor sleep quality: Three quarters of surveyed Stanford students sleep with their iPhone in bed. This is bad, as Nature reports, because a phone's LED lights disrupt melatonin production, making it harder for us to feel sleepy.

Germs: A study from the Wall Street Journal found that phones test high in chloroform bacteria -- or possible fecal contamination.

Do you find it difficult to separate yourself from your phone?

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News Headline: High cellphone use linked to lower grades (Lepp, Barkley, Karpinski) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Powell, Cheryl
News OCR Text: High cellphone usage can lead to lower grades and other problems for college students, according to a new study by Kent State University researchers.

In a recent study of college students, the researchers found the highest frequency cellphone users tended to have lower grade point averages, higher levels of anxiety and less happiness with their life compared to peers who used their devices less often.

Andrew Lepp, Jacob Barkley and Aryn Karpinski, all faculty members in Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services, surveyed more than 500 university students about their daily cellphone use and measures of anxiety and satisfaction with life.

The participants also allowed the researchers to access official university records to compare cumulative GPAs.

“These findings add to the debate about student cellphone use, and how increased use may negatively impact academic performance, mental health, and subjective well-being or happiness,” the authors concluded in the study, published in the professional journal Computers in Human Behavior.

In another report released earlier this year, a team led by Lepp and Barkley found college students who reported the highest cellphone use — averaging 14 hours a day — were less fit than those who used the devices less often.

Prevent customer falls

The Ohio Council of Retail Merchants and Golden Buckeye Program have teamed up to launch STEADY U Ohio, an initiative to help retailers make their businesses safer, “fall-free zones” for customers.

According to a news release from the organizations, falls are the No. 1 cause of injury-related emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths among people 65 and older.

The STEADY U Ohio website — www.steadyu.ohio.gov — includes tips and resources to help retailers prevent falls among customers during the busy holiday shopping season.

Among the tips:

• Create a falls prevention policy and make sure employees know and understand it.

• Look for issues with flooring, stairs, lighting and cleaning that could cause accidents.

• Providing seating around the business, especially in areas where customers have to wait.

• Extend sales or offer other options to older customers when it's snowy and icy.

• Watch for slippery floors, spills, loose rugs, unsafe sidewalks or stairs and ramps, items blocking aisles or displays that block views.

Top symptom searches

When it comes to health symptoms, diabetes is on the minds of Internet users.

Diabetes was the most commonly searched health symptom this year among Yahoo users, according to a news release from the search engine.

Others in the top 10, in order, were: lung cancer symptoms, gall bladder symptoms, shingles symptoms, lupus symptoms, bone cancer symptoms, bipolar symptoms, gout symptoms, thyroid symptoms and Lyme disease symptoms.

Cheryl Powell can be reached at 330-996-3902 or cpowell@thebeaconjournal.com . Follow Powell on Twitter at twitter.com/abjcherylpowell.

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News Headline: KSU Study: More Phone Use, Less Happiness | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — If you've ever ignored a text or a phone call, don't think of it as being rude, think of it as controlling your stress level.

A Kent State University study found that people who are constantly connected to their cell phone are less happy than those who can detach.

Intense cell phone use is also linked to heightened anxiety and a feeling of obligation to keep in touch.

KSU researchers surveyed more than 500 students and recorded their daily cell phone use, then measured anxiety and satisfaction levels.

“High frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often,” the university wrote on its website.

The study was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.

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News Headline: Too much texting makes students less happy, poorer grades, study shows | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study shows that spending too much time texting, web surfing, and even talking on a cell phone makes people more anxious and less happy.

Researchers at Kent State University found that college students who spend the most time on their cell phones also had the worst grades.

The study compared the amount of cell phone use against measurements of anxiety and life satisfaction.

Researchers say they're looking at college students because they are the first generation to grow up immersed in the technology.

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News Headline: Happiness-resisting-answering-mobile-People-ignore-texts-calls-likely-contented.(Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Daily Mail - New York Bureau
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: New study revealed phone addicts are less likely to be happy
Those who can't resist a ring are also more likely to suffer anxiety
Social network sites also listed as sources of stress

If you are constantly on your mobile phone, most onlookers might think you have lots of friends and a busy social life.
However, those attached to the phone are likely to be less happy than those who can resist a ring or a message alert, says a study.Avid mobile phone users also suffer from higher anxiety while students see their class work suffer with lower marks than those who are able to switch off.

Researchers studied more than 500 students to look at their daily phone usage and gauge how it affected their outlook on life.
They found that far from making people feel more connected to friends the phone only heightened their anxiety as many felt obligated to keep in constant touch.
They found users suffered heightened anxiety as many felt obligated to keep in constant touch.
Others had trouble disconnecting from social media sites such as Facebook.
The study by scientists Jacob Barkley, Aryn Karpinski and Andrew Lepp is in stark contrast to previous research that found mobile phones improve social interaction and help reduce feelings of isolation.
Previous research has claimed that mobile phones improve social interaction and help reduce feelings of isolation.

More...Giving up technology is as 'stressful as getting married' - and Thursday is the hardest day to go without gadgets
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But the latest study by Kent University in Ohio found constant phone use was linked to greater stress.
One student said: ‘The social network sometimes just makes me feel a little bit tied to my phone.
‘It makes me feel like I have another obligation in my life.'
Another complained that having a mobile phone meant that he could always be contacted at any time.

The researchers used a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life in the analysis.
Researcher Andrew Lepp added: ‘There is no me time or solitude left in some of these students' lives and I think mental health requires a bit of personal alone time to reflect, look inward, process life's events, and just recover from daily stressors.'

Those taking part, aged from 18 to 22, allowed the study team to access their exam results, known in the US as a grade point average (GPA), from university records.
'Also, a few of the students we interviewed reported sending texts constantly throughout the day from morning to night that in itself might be stressful.'
There are now more mobile phones in the UK than people with the latest figures showing 80.2 million subscription.

The popularity in recent years of smart phones, such as the iPhone, has meant that 94 per cent of all adults own a mobile.

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News Headline: Feeling anxious? You may want to turn off your smart phone | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Globe and Mail - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new study published in the Computers in Human Behaviour journal states it has confirmed what most of us already know: Smart phones are bad for our mental health.

Researchers at Kent State University in Ohio tracked how much time a group of 500 university student spent on their phones. According to Time magazine, the study determined greater cellphone use “negatively correlated with satisfaction and happiness” – in other words, students who used their phones more were also found to be more anxious. These results differed from previous studies that found being more connected has made us better friends and family members, built wider social circles, and reduced loneliness. Since students agreed to share their grades with the Kent researchers, the new study also reports a connection with lower grade-point averages, “presumably,” the authors concluded, “because the students were more anxious and unable to concentrate on their studies.” (Or maybe they just couldn't resist answering their phone when they should have been studying, hence the lower grades.)

So even as cellphones have become smaller and lighter, the burden they impose has only gotten heavier. Researchers speculated that students might have felt anxious because they were expected to always keep in touch with their friends – whether they wanted to, in that moment, or not. Or they didn't get any alone time, a respite from a busy world.

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News Headline: Cell Phone Use Linked To Anxiety, Lower Grades, And Reduced Happiness, Kent State University Study | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: BioSpace.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Today, smartphones are central to college students' lives, keeping them constantly connected with friends, family and the Internet. Students' cell phones are rarely out of reach whether the setting is a college classroom, library, recreational center, cafeteria or dorm room. As cell phone use continues to increase, it is worth considering whether use of the device is related to measurable outcomes important for student success, such as academic performance, anxiety and happiness.

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News Headline: Body image problems don't just afflict women | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vancouver Sun - Online, The
Contact Name: Tom Keenan
News OCR Text: Pursuing the perfect six-pack abs as portrayed in the media is an unrealistic dream for many and may actually lead to harmful habits, such as steroid use, among adolescents and young men.

Photograph by: Mark Kolbe , Getty Images

There have been a number of brilliant campaigns to alert young women to the rampant retouching of photos used in fashion advertising. Basically, 100 per cent of the models shown in magazines are digitally altered, often beyond recognition. My personal favourite is a video called “Time Lapse Video Photoshop Transformation Shows Model's Extreme Change.” It went viral in October 2013 and is available at http://goo.gl/Vf9AEA.

In this short video clip, a fairly ordinary looking woman is digitally transformed into a glamorous supermodel. Her torso shrinks two sizes, her legs are lengthened, and she receives “a digitally sculpted backside.” It provides a great lesson in fashion fakery. As one commentator put it, the models in those ads also wish they had the bodies they are showing off.

Another shocker was the admission by retail chain H&M that some of its perfect-bodied models don't even exist in real life. The company uses computer generated mannequins, both female and male, electronically pasting on the heads of real people and tinting the skin colour appropriately.

Somebody needs to perform a similar awareness service for guys. It turns out that males, especially young ones, are falling prey to various types of body dysmorphic disorder — the feeling that their bodies are just not good enough.

Evidence that college-age males are susceptible to media images comes from a study of 111 male undergraduates at Kent State University. Researchers showed them ads for products, some of them featuring shirtless males. “Results indicated that exposure to both muscular and slender images was associated with an increase in body dissatisfaction,” they conclude.

Another study, by Magdala Labre at the University of Florida, found that “while women tend to be most dissatisfied with their middle and lower bodies and their breasts, men have been found to be most unhappy with their middle and upper bodies, particularly abdomens, chests, and upper arms — body parts that frequently are emphasized in the media.”

There is some hope that we're not just mindless victims of hot body advertising. A study called “GI Joe or Average Joe?” from the University of Queensland found that “men and women rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as muscular models. For men, exposure to average-size models was associated with more positive body image in comparison to viewing no models, but no difference was found in comparison to muscular models.”

A large, 12-year-long study from Boston Children's Hospital found that guys who tried to slim down or “beef up” had higher rates of other conditions such as depression, drug use, and binge drinking.

Researcher Alison Field and colleagues tracked 5,527 U.S. males aged 12 to 18 years, asking them periodically about how they perceive their bodies and if they were engaging in certain body modification behaviours. The first shocker was the percentage of late adolescent boys and young men, 7.6 per cent, who admitted taking dangerous substances to increase muscularity. “The frequency of use of products such as anabolic steroids to increase muscle size and enhance body size are at least as common among males as purging is among females,” the researchers write. So while we're not seeing guys running to the bathroom to vomit up their latest meal, they are popping pills that can cause serious health problems. The researchers also singled out creatine supplements and growth hormone derivatives as a concern. Some muscle building substances that are widely available online haven't been fully tested in this age group.

As for body image, 17.9 per cent of adolescent boys and young men reported being extremely concerned with their weight or physique at some point during the study. The linkage to other problems such as depression seems to work as follows. Guys who seek to be thinner, which is the form of eating disorder usually seen in females, seemed to be more prone to bouts of depression. Those who were aiming for more muscularity were more likely than the peers to engage in binge drinking and taking illegal drugs.

It's worth noting that how a person looks and develops is a combination of genetics, diet, and exercise habits. The same Internet that allows guys to order dodgy supplements will provide endless advice on “getting six pack abs.” The truth is that we all have them, the rectus abdominis muscle, hidden down there somewhere. However in many people they don't show up because they are covered in layers of fat. Genetics has a lot to do with how your body deposits fat. This doesn't mean you shouldn't try to slim down and work your muscles. Still, no matter how hard they try, some people are just never going to make the cover of a fitness magazine.

The important thing is to approach body image sensibly, and realize that many of the images we are exposed to in advertising are actually faked or freaks. You might also inject a sense of humour. One wag, Shane Sargent, writing on a discussion board about getting those elusive six pack abs, commented “I have a keg so you will find I trump your six pack at any party.”

Dr. Tom Keenan is an award winning journalist, public speaker, professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary, and author of the forthcoming book, Technocreep, www.orbooks.com/catalog/technocreep/

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News Headline: Cellphone use linked to anxiety unhappiness | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/10/2013
Outlet Full Name: Big News Network
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Frequent cellphone use has been linked to increased anxiety and unhappiness. Among the myriad of functionalities smartphones have enriched the youth's daily lives with, an unexpected side-effect may be the propensity of the prolific devices to reduce academic performance and endorphins, while increasing cholesterol. A recent study by Kent State University, involving a survey of over 5

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News Headline: Body image problems don't just afflict women | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Province - Online, The
Contact Name: Tom Keenan
News OCR Text: By Tom Keenan, For the Calgary Herald

Pursuing the perfect six-pack abs as portrayed in the media is an unrealistic dream for many and may actually lead to harmful habits, such as steroid use, among adolescents and young men.

Photograph by: Mark Kolbe , Getty Images

There have been a number of brilliant campaigns to alert young women to the rampant retouching of photos used in fashion advertising. Basically, 100 per cent of the models shown in magazines are digitally altered, often beyond recognition. My personal favourite is a video called “Time Lapse Video Photoshop Transformation Shows Model's Extreme Change.” It went viral in October 2013 and is available at http://goo.gl/Vf9AEA.

In this short video clip, a fairly ordinary looking woman is digitally transformed into a glamorous supermodel. Her torso shrinks two sizes, her legs are lengthened, and she receives “a digitally sculpted backside.” It provides a great lesson in fashion fakery. As one commentator put it, the models in those ads also wish they had the bodies they are showing off.

Another shocker was the admission by retail chain H&M that some of its perfect-bodied models don't even exist in real life. The company uses computer generated mannequins, both female and male, electronically pasting on the heads of real people and tinting the skin colour appropriately.

Somebody needs to perform a similar awareness service for guys. It turns out that males, especially young ones, are falling prey to various types of body dysmorphic disorder — the feeling that their bodies are just not good enough.

Evidence that college-age males are susceptible to media images comes from a study of 111 male undergraduates at Kent State University. Researchers showed them ads for products, some of them featuring shirtless males. “Results indicated that exposure to both muscular and slender images was associated with an increase in body dissatisfaction,” they conclude.

Another study, by Magdala Labre at the University of Florida, found that “while women tend to be most dissatisfied with their middle and lower bodies and their breasts, men have been found to be most unhappy with their middle and upper bodies, particularly abdomens, chests, and upper arms — body parts that frequently are emphasized in the media.”

There is some hope that we're not just mindless victims of hot body advertising. A study called “GI Joe or Average Joe?” from the University of Queensland found that “men and women rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as muscular models. For men, exposure to average-size models was associated with more positive body image in comparison to viewing no models, but no difference was found in comparison to muscular models.”

A large, 12-year-long study from Boston Children's Hospital found that guys who tried to slim down or “beef up” had higher rates of other conditions such as depression, drug use, and binge drinking.

Researcher Alison Field and colleagues tracked 5,527 U.S. males aged 12 to 18 years, asking them periodically about how they perceive their bodies and if they were engaging in certain body modification behaviours. The first shocker was the percentage of late adolescent boys and young men, 7.6 per cent, who admitted taking dangerous substances to increase muscularity. “The frequency of use of products such as anabolic steroids to increase muscle size and enhance body size are at least as common among males as purging is among females,” the researchers write. So while we're not seeing guys running to the bathroom to vomit up their latest meal, they are popping pills that can cause serious health problems. The researchers also singled out creatine supplements and growth hormone derivatives as a concern. Some muscle building substances that are widely available online haven't been fully tested in this age group.

As for body image, 17.9 per cent of adolescent boys and young men reported being extremely concerned with their weight or physique at some point during the study. The linkage to other problems such as depression seems to work as follows. Guys who seek to be thinner, which is the form of eating disorder usually seen in females, seemed to be more prone to bouts of depression. Those who were aiming for more muscularity were more likely than the peers to engage in binge drinking and taking illegal drugs.

It's worth noting that how a person looks and develops is a combination of genetics, diet, and exercise habits. The same Internet that allows guys to order dodgy supplements will provide endless advice on “getting six pack abs.” The truth is that we all have them, the rectus abdominis muscle, hidden down there somewhere. However in many people they don't show up because they are covered in layers of fat. Genetics has a lot to do with how your body deposits fat. This doesn't mean you shouldn't try to slim down and work your muscles. Still, no matter how hard they try, some people are just never going to make the cover of a fitness magazine.

The important thing is to approach body image sensibly, and realize that many of the images we are exposed to in advertising are actually faked or freaks. You might also inject a sense of humour. One wag, Shane Sargent, writing on a discussion board about getting those elusive six pack abs, commented “I have a keg so you will find I trump your six pack at any party.”

Dr. Tom Keenan is an award winning journalist, public speaker, professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary, and author of the forthcoming book, Technocreep, www.orbooks.com/catalog/technocreep/

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald

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News Headline: Good Morning America - Cell Phone Over-Use | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: KTKA-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: And finally, if you want to bo happy, just put the cell phone down. That is the result of a study from kent state university. It found that college student who is constantly text and talk on the phone are not as happy as the peers who don't. A study, in fact, found a link between excessive cell phone use and increased anxiety. I gotta say. Friday afternoon, I didn't have a charger. Best friday I've had in a long time. I stopped. I smelled roses. I watched grass grow. It was amazing. >> It is. >> You did that in december. >> For the last time for three months. >> That's it. >>

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News Headline: Channel 3 News at 11 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: >>> Is your cell phone stressing you out? A new study at kent state found that most students today who spend time texting and looking at their cell phone are more expansion less happy. Researchers say that they even had lower grades. Those who could unplug had an easier time completing other tasks. The study is published in the journey: computers and human behavior.

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News Headline: Constantly checking your phone makes you stressed, finds report | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/09/2013
Outlet Full Name: Recombu Mobile Phones
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Want higher grades and lower stress levels? Stop checking your phone every two minutes.

Poor college grades and higher stress levels are common among smartphone users who constantly check their phones, a study by researchers at Ohio's Kent State University has found. The study cross-referenced the GPA (grade point average) of 500 freshman, sophomore, junior and senior students at the university.

Researchers investigated the smartphone habits of equal numbers of students in each year of study and were given voluntary access to the GPA results of all participants in order to get a better understanding of how their grades were affected. Students were also tested for daily anxiety levels and quizzed about how happy they were and also had to divulge how much they'd used their phone each day.

The survey sought to find out whether there was a correlation between the amount a phone was used and the academic performance and anxiety levels of the user. The survey found that grades dropped and anxiety levels rose among students with above average mobile phone use. High-frequency phone users were significantly less happy than their peers.

The Kent State University researchers also found that students who used their phone a lot were likely to be less active and less fit than students who didn't use their phones as much. The study included cardiorespiratory fitness tests.

Publishing their findings in the journal Computers In Human Behaviour, the team said “Taken as a whole, these results suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cell phone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness”.

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