Report Overview:
Total Clips (20)
Art, School of; KSU Museum (1)
Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (4)
College of the Arts (CotA); Theatre and Dance (1)
Dining Services (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Financial Aid; Tuition (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
KSU at Stark (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
KSU Esplanade (1)
LaunchPad; Liquid Crystal Institute; Students (1)
Police Services (1)
Students (1)
University Press (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of; KSU Museum (1)
Art Best Bets 12/12/2013 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Graduate Student Exhibition: Kent State University School of Art — Through today at the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation Gallery, 10 E. Streetsboro St.,...


Coll. of Education, Health and Human Svcs. (EHHS) (4)
Study: Frequent Cellphone Use Boosts Anxiety 12/11/2013 Charisma - Online Text Attachment Email

...use by college students not only lowers their grades, but also boosts their anxiety. The findings are based on a survey of more than 500 students by Kent State University researchers. Daily cellphone use was recorded, along with clinical measures of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction...

Smartphone Use Lowers Student GPAs 12/11/2013 Tax Prof Text Attachment Email

Andrew Lepp, Jacob Barkley & Aryn Karpinski (all of Kent State University, College of Education, Health and Human Services), The Relationship Between Cell Phone Use, Academic Performance, Anxiety, and...

Study Links Excessive Cellphone use to Lower Grades and Happiness at College 12/12/2013 U.S. News University Connection Text Attachment Email

When they're older, many individuals look back on the time they spent pursuing a bachelor's degree as some of their best years. While the four or more...

Smartphone use linked to unhappiness, anxiety and lower grades 12/11/2013 Yahoo! 7 Lifestyle Text Attachment Email

...college students is tied to poorer academic performance, anxiety and unhappiness. Researchers from the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University in Ohio, recently surveyed more than 500 college students about their mobile phone use. The results were compared to the participants'...


College of the Arts (CotA); Theatre and Dance (1)
Stage notes: Limon Dance 12/11/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Limón enthralling Limón Dance Company performed to a full house at Kent State University Friday, quite possibly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for local audiences to see the pioneering modern dance choreographer...


Dining Services (1)
Susan Diersing 12/11/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Chocolate Cinnamon Cookies made by chef . Diersing is pastry chef for Kent State University Dining Services. (Phil Masturzo/Akron Beacon Journal)


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Bright Spots: Dec. 5, 2013 12/11/2013 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

Bright Spots is a periodic feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community: Kent State University said its Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising took home a total of seven design awards...


Financial Aid; Tuition (1)
Study says University of Akron students accumulate lowest debt upon graduation (Evans) 12/11/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

When it comes to student debt at Ohio's public research universities, University of Akron students had the least and Kent State students the most, according to a new report. The Institute on College Access and Success says 2012 UA graduates earning bachelor's...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, MASS COMMUNICATION KSU introduces Promising Scholar Awards (Wasbotten, Wearden) 12/12/2013 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

KENT To attract and retain the strongest journalism and mass communication students in the nation, Kent State University's School of Journalism and...


KSU at Stark (1)
HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS 12/12/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

The Lyric Theatre Ensemble presents An Old-Fashioned Christmas — 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Kent State University at Stark Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Employment Source, KSU offers industrial maintence program 12/11/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

An industrial maintenance training program is being offered through the Employment Source and the Kent State University Tuscarawas campus. The Employment Source is recruiting students for a six-week industrial maintenance course in automation...

Employment Source recruiting for Industrial Maintenance course 12/11/2013 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...Maintenance course in Automation Control Systems, beginning Jan. 27-March 28. Classes will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Kent State University, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia. The course will provide training needed to maintain, troubleshoot and repair high...

Employment Source, KSU offers industrial maintence program 12/11/2013 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

An industrial maintenance training program is being offered through the Employment Source and the Kent State University Tuscarawas campus. The Employment Source is recruiting students for a six-week industrial maintenance course in automation...


KSU Esplanade (1)
Bob Dyer: Big story is a retread 12/12/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Stories come and stories go, and sometimes they're the same story. Way back in May, a Seattle marketing company unveiled a study claiming Ohioans swear...


LaunchPad; Liquid Crystal Institute; Students (1)
KSU student gets $25,000 grant for social media site 12/12/2013 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

An inventive new social media platform geared toward global communication and designed at Kent State University is a step closer to reaching the...


Police Services (1)
Kent State Police Services receives prestigious CALEA award (Peach) 12/11/2013 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Police Services received the Advanced Accreditation with Excellence Award from CALEA, marking the seventh time that the department has...


Students (1)
FEF College Industry Conference Awards Scholarships 12/11/2013 Modern Casting - Online Text Attachment Email

...Giove, Western Michigan, ? Clifford Chier-Badger Mining Corp., Joseph Kaminski, Trine University? Wm. E. Conway Schol.-Fairmount Minerals, Laura McGee, Kent State? Tony & Elda Dorfmueller Scholarship, Tadeo Gonzalez, Inst. Tecnologico de Saltillo? Richard Frazier Scholarship, Derek Denlinger, Missouri...


University Press (2)
About Books: Book looks at Amish farming in Geauga County 12/11/2013 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...dialogue and true stories" lend authenticity to the book "Why Cows Need Names and More Secrets of Amish Farms" by Randy James, according to the publisher, Kent State University Press.James is a professor emeritus with Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences....

About Books: Book looks at Amish farming in Geauga County 12/12/2013 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

"Gentle dialogue and true stories" lend authenticity to the book "Why Cows Need Names and More Secrets of Amish Farms" by Randy James, according to the...


News Headline: Art Best Bets | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Graduate Student Exhibition: Kent State University School of Art — Through today at the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation Gallery, 10 E. Streetsboro St., Hudson.

Fashion Timeline — Through June 28, 2015, Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive. Also, Glass: Selections From the Kent State University Museum Collection through June 28, 2015, Rainment for Liturgy: Vestments in the Kent State University Collection through Feb. 9, 2014. Arthur Koby Jewelry: The Creative Eye through Oct. 5, 2014. 330-672-3450.

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News Headline: Study: Frequent Cellphone Use Boosts Anxiety | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Charisma - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Feeling anxious? Try turning off that cellphone. New research has found cellphone use by college students not only lowers their grades, but also boosts their anxiety.

The findings are based on a survey of more than 500 students by Kent State University researchers. Daily cellphone use was recorded, along with clinical measures of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction in life. Participants also allowed the researchers to access their official university records in order to retrieve their actual cumulative college grade point average (GPA).

All students surveyed were undergraduate students and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior).

The results showed that students who used their cellphones a lot had lower GPAs and higher levels of anxiety—and reported lower general happiness in their lives—than those who used their mobile devices less frequently.

The study follows earlier research by the same team of medical experts that tied frequent cellphone use to lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness.

“Taken as a whole, these results suggest that students should be encouraged to monitor their cellphone use and reflect upon it critically so that it is not detrimental to their academic performance, mental and physical health, and overall well-being or happiness,” say the researchers, who reported their findings in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.

© 2013 NewsmaxHealth. Reprinted with permission.

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News Headline: Smartphone Use Lowers Student GPAs | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Tax Prof
Contact Name: Caron, Paul
News OCR Text: Andrew Lepp, Jacob Barkley & Aryn Karpinski (all of Kent State University, College of Education, Health and Human Services), The Relationship Between Cell Phone Use, Academic Performance, Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Life in College Students, 31 Computers in Human Behavior 343 (2013):

Kent State University researchers ... surveyed more than 500 university students. Daily cell phone use was recorded along with a clinical measure of anxiety and each student's level of satisfaction with their own life, or in other words happiness. Finally, all participants allowed the researchers to access their official university records in order to retrieve their actual, cumulative college grade point average (GPA). All students surveyed were undergraduate students and were equally distributed by class (freshman, sophomore, junior and senior). In addition, 82 different, self-reported majors were represented.

Results of the analysis showed that cell phone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety. Following this, GPA was positively related to happiness while anxiety was negatively related to happiness. Thus, for the population studied, high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who used the cell phone less often. The statistical model illustrating these relationships was highly significant.

(Hat Tip: Inside Higher Ed.)

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2013/12/smartphone-use.html

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News Headline: Study Links Excessive Cellphone use to Lower Grades and Happiness at College | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: U.S. News University Connection
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When they're older, many individuals look back on the time they spent pursuing a bachelor's degree as some of their best years. While the four or more years students spend enrolled in college can be challenging, they can also be loads of fun and provide a variety of new experiences, opportunities and friends.

However, based on the results of a recent study from Kent State University, students may want to use their mobile phones a little less if they want to have a positive college experience.

The Problem with Mobile Phones

In the study, faculty members at Kent State's College of Education, Health and Human Services surveyed more than 500 students enrolled at the university, according to a Kent press release. These study participants provided information that allowed researchers to get a sense of their daily cellphone use and levels of anxiety and happiness. The faculty members were also allowed to access the students' GPAs.

Based on students' responses, the researchers found that frequent use of mobile phones was linked to lower grades, higher anxiety and lower levels of happiness compared to peers who didn't use their cellphones as often.

With these results in mind, the researchers behind the study suggest students consider how much they use their mobile phones. By monitoring their actions, they may be able to prevent harm to their overall college experience.

Not the First Study

In August, Kent State released the results of a separate study that looked at the effects mobile phone use had on students' fitness. According to a release, the researchers found a connection between cellphone use and poor fitness.

The researchers, who were faculty members in the university's College of Education, were curious about this topic, as cellphones' mobile nature allows individuals to use them while engaged in other activities, such as exercise. Despite students' ability to use these devices while on the move, the study showed the technology actually contributes to individuals' decision to stay in place.

Of the students who participated in the study, those who used mobile phones a lot also showed signs of low cardiorespiratory fitness. Individuals who were in the best shape tended to use their mobile phones for the least amount of time, which was around 90 minutes a day.

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News Headline: Smartphone use linked to unhappiness, anxiety and lower grades | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! 7 Lifestyle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thinkstock Images

Most of us can't get through the day without our mobile phoneWhether we use them only for calling or texting friends or for their myriad uses - banking, entertainment, fitness, music - mobile phones are seemingly as essential to our day as breakfast. But a recent study published in Computers in Human Behavior suggests that while we view them as must-have items of convenience, frequent use of smartphones by college students is tied to poorer academic performance, anxiety and unhappiness.

Researchers from the College of Education, Health and Human Services at Kent State University in Ohio, recently surveyed more than 500 college students about their mobile phone use. The results were compared to the participants' academic grades and clinical test results on anxiety and life satisfaction or happiness.

The results showed those who used their mobile phones the most had the lowest grade point averages (GPAs) and the highest anxiety levels. In other words, “[mobile] phone use was negatively related to GPA and positively related to anxiety,” according to a press release from Kent University. Furthermore, a high GPA was positively related to happiness while anxiety was related to lower reported happiness.

The researchers said, “For the population studied, high frequency [mobile] phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety, and lower satisfaction with life (happiness) relative to their peers who use the cell phone less often.” They called the relationships statistically “highly significant.”

Furthermore, earlier this year researchers found a negative relationship between cell phone use and cardio-respiratory fitness, showing that those who used their phone the most had lower fitness levels.

While not disparaging the usefulness of the smartphones, which allow students to stay in touch with family and friends and easily browse the Internet, the researchers suggest there is merit in considering what potential harms they may pose.

Although the exact relationship and reasoning between high mobile phone use and lower grades is still uncertain, this study and the gathering weight of similar evidence has lead researchers to suggest students to review how they are using their smartphones, and think about whether it is interfering with their performance, mental and physical health, overall well-being and happiness.

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News Headline: Stage notes: Limon Dance | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Clawson, Kerry
News OCR Text: Limón enthralling

Limón Dance Company performed to a full house at Kent State University Friday, quite possibly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for local audiences to see the pioneering modern dance choreographer José Limón's work performed by the company he founded.

It was a treat to see the free performance, made possible by the Thomas Schroth Visiting Artist Series. College of the Arts Dean John Crawford, who studied the Limón technique while a student at Temple University in Philadelphia, was instrumental in bringing the company in. His mentor at Temple, Ann Vashon, was a Limón dancer for 20 years and continues to teach with the Limón Institute. Crawford danced with her company, Dance Conduit, in Philadelphia while he was a student.

Vashon traveled to Kent for last weekend's performance. The event had special meaning for Crawford, who was thrilled to see Vashon as well as the New York troupe's performance. Crawford studied much of Limón's work at Temple as well as at intensive workshops in New York.

The program's most fascinating and accessible dance was the 1967 Psalm , which delves into one man's experience bearing the pain of the world. He is one of 36 Just Men in Jewish tradition whose duty is to shoulder the world's sorrows.

As the Just Man, Raphael Boumaila put his hands up to either side of his head, as if covering his ears to block out the noise and the pain. He was a tortured being crossing his arms at the wrists, as if he were bound to his duty.

Precise, grappling arm movements are a hallmark of this dance as it gains in dramatic intensity until the Just Man crumples but finally overcomes death. Once the transformation occurs, the Just Man's same movements have a peacefulness and fluidity as he embraces his destiny, leaving the others huddled together center stage as they reach for the light.

Also of note was a very early Limón solo, the 1942 Chaconne , which was a study in strength and ultra-slow control by Roxane D'Orleans Juste, associate artistic director and dancer for the company.

The Limón Foundation continues to keep his legacy alive through both the company and the Limón Institute, which teaches and disseminates his repertory. According to new Executive Director Juan José Escalante, the Limón Dance Company was the first to demonstrate that a company could survive the death of its founder: Limón died in 1972 and the company has continued for more than 40 years.

Escalante said the institute has set Limón's famous The Moor's Pavane on six companies around the world just this year. The foundation has begun to talk about a succession plan for Artistic Director Carla Maxwell, who began dancing with the company in 1965 and has worked at the artistic helm since 1978.

Besides teaching and setting Limón dances, another way Maxwell keeps Limón's technique alive is by incorporating it into new works, as she did in her 2002 Etude , a solo performed in Kent by Kristen Foote to the Schubert lieder Gretchen am Spinnrad . In this piece — part of The Repertory Etudes Project created to study the principles of a master — Maxwell used movements from three Limón works: Dances for Isadora, Psalm and A Choreographic Offering .

The Limón Dance Company has a busy winter ahead: It will do 28 performances in 25 cities on a five-week European tour beginning in late January as well as perform in Turkey in March.

A big hit on its current touring program is the 2012 Come With Me , which the company commissioned from Rodrigo Pederneiras. It's set to delightful jazz music by Paquito D'Rivera that was composed for this highly aerobic dance, which features 12 members of the company. The entertaining, humorous piece has such extreme musicality, it seems that each beat has a different dance move, including when one couple dances like marionettes.

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News Headline: Susan Diersing | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: System Administrator
News OCR Text: Chocolate Cinnamon Cookies made by chef . Diersing is pastry chef for Kent State University Dining Services. (Phil Masturzo/Akron Beacon Journal)

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News Headline: Bright Spots: Dec. 5, 2013 | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Bright Spots is a periodic feature that highlights positive developments in the Northeast Ohio business community:

Kent State University said its Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising took home a total of seven design awards at the 2013 conference of the International Textile and Apparel Association.

Three faculty members and three students picked up awards at the conference, which took place in New Orleans. The association is a global organization of textile and apparel scholars; Sherry Schofield, associate director of Kent State's fashion school, currently serves as association president, while fellow faculty member Harriet McLeod is its secretary

Kim Hahn and Jihyun Kim, both associate professors of fashion merchandising at Kent State, collaborated on two separate award-winning garments. One, titled “Celestial Symphony,” was designed as an updated cocktail ensemble for professional women.

Their other garment, “Amber Refraction,” drew inspiration from the traditional Korean style of Hanbok, while also incorporating an image manipulated in Adobe Photoshop.

Kent State senior Madison Palen-Michel's dress design netted a $5,000 cash prize and a prestigious internship with Zandra Rhodes in London.

The fashion school also was honored with all three awards presented on behalf of Educators for Socially Responsible Apparel Business (ESRAB) in the faculty, graduate and undergraduate categories. The faculty winner was Linda Öhrn-McDaniel, associate professor of fashion design at Kent State, who created a striped knit dress from up-cycled men's business shirts.

Kent State graduate student Lisa Arenstein used discarded metal and rubber tubing to create the intricate woven sculpture “Green Lantern.”

Jasmine Kornel won the undergraduate ESRAB award for her “Peace” ensemble — a title that reflects both the aesthetics qualities of the design and its “utilization of sustainable techniques such as natural dyes, natural and organic fibers, and zero-waste patternmaking,” according to ESRAB.

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News Headline: Study says University of Akron students accumulate lowest debt upon graduation (Evans) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Biliczky, Carol
News OCR Text: When it comes to student debt at Ohio's public research universities, University of Akron students had the least and Kent State students the most, according to a new report.

The Institute on College Access and Success says 2012 UA graduates earning bachelor's degrees owed about $23,300 compared with Kent State graduates' $31,900, which was almost $3,000 more than both the state average of $29,000 and national one of $29,400.

Michelle Ellis, executive director of financial aid at UA, said she was not surprised that Akron's main campus did so well this year. She pointed out that UA often has been near the bottom in student debt, possibly in part because it does not have a large residence hall population.

“We're making a multifaceted effort to inform students about debt, and it's working,” Ellis said.

That includes talking to students more about debt and encouraging them to take the full-time load of 16 credit hours per semester to finish school as quickly as possible.

Nationwide, seven in 10 students owed money for their educations last year, according to the nonprofit organization that tracks students' rising debt.

The 2012 debt was up about 10 percent from the previous year's national estimate of $26,600. Debt rose about 6 percent every year from 2008 to 2012, according to the report.

The Institute on College Access and Success, or Ticas, arrived at those numbers by using data that colleges and universities provided to Peterson's, which develops college guides.

The numbers represent the federal and private debt accumulated by students who received bachelor's degrees from public and private colleges — with some caveats.

The debt figures might understate actual borrowing because they do not include transfer students nor private loans that the college or university didn't know about.

In addition, some colleges and universities, stung by being named a “high-debt” college by Ticas in the past, might not report their student debt.

That leaves “those who do report stuck on an unequal playing field,” Matthew Reed, the report's primary author, said in a news release.

None of Ohio's public or private colleges made either the high-debt or low-debt national lists in 2012.

At Kent State, graduates' 7 percent rise in student debt from $29,800 to $31,900 might reflect the high proportion of residence hall students on the main campus, financial aid director Mark Evans suggested.

“We do have a flight program that will add $60,000 in tuition to a student's cost,” he said. “We are promoting the study-abroad experience and recruiting heavily outside of Ohio.”

Out-of-state students often pay higher tuition rates than in-state students.

Kent State displaced Bowling Green State University as Ohio's highest-debt public college in 2012.

Bowling Green's average student debt dropped from $33,000 in 2011 to $31,300 in 2012, according to Ticas.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.

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News Headline: SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM, MASS COMMUNICATION KSU introduces Promising Scholar Awards (Wasbotten, Wearden) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

To attract and retain the strongest journalism and mass communication students in the nation, Kent State University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication is introducing a financial award program specifically designed for first-time freshmen in fall 2014.

The Promising Scholar Awards will provide $2,000 a year, renewable for up to four years, to the 10 highest-achieving incoming freshmen in each of JMC's undergraduate degree programs: advertising, electronic/digital media, journalism and public relations. The top two incoming freshmen will be awarded $3,000 a year, renewable for up to four years, as Ralph C. Darrow Promising Scholars. Darrow was a founding figure in JMC's public relations program.

“Our school has made a commitment to provide scholarships to the highest-achieving incoming freshmen who are committed to an education in JMC,” said Thor Wasbotten, director of Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication. “This scholarship is intended to help throughout their four years in our school. Attracting top students has become more competitive than ever and the Promising Scholar program will help us and our students tremendously.”

With the Promising Scholar Award and other university financial assistance programs, Kent State's School of Journalism and Mass Communication has become one of the most affordable schools in the nation. It is also one of the strongest. The undergraduate program at JMC has been accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication for nearly 50 years. Kent State's JMC is one of only 111 accredited journalism schools in the world and the only accredited school of journalism and mass communication in Northeast Ohio.

In 2013, JMC ranked in the top 10 of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation's Journalism Awards Program; ranked second in the nation in the Public Relations Student Society of America 2013 Bateman Case Study Competition; and won gold, silver and bronze medals in the international College Photographer of the Year competition. For the past two years, Kent State's TV2, part of JMC's independent student media program, has been named “TV Station of the Year” by the College Media Association.

The first Promising Scholar Award winners will be announced in spring 2014. The award is renewable if students remain in good standing in JMC with a 3.0 GPA overall and a 3.3 GPA in their JMC courses.

Kent State's Promising Scholar Awards are being funded through the generosity of private donors, including alumni, media and communication industry leaders and members of JMC's Professional Advisory Board. Matching gifts from the university's College of Communication and Information also help fund the program.

“I am tremendously grateful for the generous support of our alumni and friends in creating these scholarships,” said Stan Wearden, dean of the College of Communication and Information at Kent State. “These are gifts that make an enormous and immediate difference. They are life-changing. I want to offer a huge thank you on behalf of the students, the faculty and the leadership of this college to those who have made a financial sacrifice to improve the lives and the education of our students.”

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News Headline: HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Lyric Theatre Ensemble presents An Old-Fashioned Christmas — 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Kent State University at Stark Main Hall Auditorium, 6000 Frank Ave. NW, Jackson Township. The concert will feature a full program of holiday favorites from the '40s, '50s and '60s. The concert is free, but tickets are required. For tickets, call 330-244-3348.

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News Headline: Employment Source, KSU offers industrial maintence program | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An industrial maintenance training program is being offered through the Employment Source and the Kent State University Tuscarawas campus.

The Employment Source is recruiting students for a six-week industrial maintenance course in automation controls.Classes are offered through the Business and Community Services Division of Kent State University Tuscarawas and funded by a grant from American Electric Power. Applicants for the course must have a high school diploma or equivalent and be a resident of Stark or Tuscarawas counties. No previous experience in industrial maintenance is required.A limited number of applicants will be accepted.Students will received training needed to troubleshoot and repair high tech equipment used in a variety of industries. The training could lead to a job in a high demand occupation, the Employment Source stated.Classes are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Kent State Tuscarawas campus beginning Jan. 27.For more information, contact Melissa in Stark County at 330-491-2622 or Linda in Tuscarawas County at 330-602-2853.

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News Headline: Employment Source recruiting for Industrial Maintenance course | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Employment Source is recruiting eligible individuals for a six-week Industrial Maintenance course in Automation Control Systems, beginning Jan. 27-March 28.

Classes will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Kent State University, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia. The course will provide training needed to maintain, troubleshoot and repair high tech equipment used in most industries, and could possibly lead to employment in a high demand occupation.

This course does not require any previous experience in industrial maintenance. It order to be considered individuals must meet income guidelines, have a high school diploma or GED and be a resident of Stark or Tuscarawas counties.

For more information: (330) 491-2622.

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News Headline: Employment Source, KSU offers industrial maintence program | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An industrial maintenance training program is being offered through the Employment Source and the Kent State University Tuscarawas campus.

The Employment Source is recruiting students for a six-week industrial maintenance course in automation controls.Classes are offered through the Business and Community Services Division of Kent State University Tuscarawas and funded by a grant from American Electric Power. Applicants for the course must have a high school diploma or equivalent and be a resident of Stark or Tuscarawas counties. No previous experience in industrial maintenance is required.A limited number of applicants will be accepted.Students will received training needed to troubleshoot and repair high tech equipment used in a variety of industries. The training could lead to a job in a high demand occupation, the Employment Source stated.Classes are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Kent State Tuscarawas campus beginning Jan. 27.For more information, contact Melissa in Stark County at 330-491-2622 or Linda in Tuscarawas County at 330-602-2853.

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News Headline: Bob Dyer: Big story is a retread | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stories come and stories go, and sometimes they're the same story.

Way back in May, a Seattle marketing company unveiled a study claiming Ohioans swear more than the residents of any other state.

I wrote about it then. A bunch of other publications did, too, including the New York Daily News.

Then, suddenly, on Dec. 4 — half a year later — the story was all the rage again, quoted on newscasts and websites and even turning up as a comedy skit on Jimmy Kimmel's show.

Why the delayed reaction? Apparently because The Atlantic trotted the study out, complete with fancy graphics, on Dec. 3. Everybody jumped on board, apparently not realizing it was old news.

Or maybe they just didn't give a [bleep].

And speaking of national studies … Ohio fared extremely well in another study that really did come out this month.

This story appears to have been broken by Time magazine, which did it the old-fashioned way: by rewriting a news release.

If anybody asks, our state ranks sixth in the entire nation in … penis size.

And how, exactly, did someone come to that conclusion? The rankings are based on sales data from a condom company, Condomania.com, that sells a variety of sizes.

OK, the study isn't particularly scientific. Neither was the swearing study. But whenever Ohio ranks in the top 10 — for anything — we're definitely buying in.

The top five penis states, in order: North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, the District of Columbia and Massachusetts.

Texas? Ha. Forty-first.

Although this study would seem to lend itself to almost unlimited double entendres, I shall grudgingly refrain.

But I will tell you that when the Huffington Post picked up the story and used illustrations for the top 10 cities, it chose for Ohio a photograph of the big, abandoned jackknife bridge in the Flats district in Cleveland, frozen for all time in the raised position.

Shameless

A mere one day after the death of Nelson Mandela — and four days before his memorial service — my favorite newspaper received a publicity release from a travel company:

“In light of Nelson Mandela passing away, I wanted to share this new trip by Great Safaris. …

“Great Safaris has crafted a truly remarkable 11-day journey through South Africa associated with focusing attention on the fascinating history of Nelson Mandela.”

Can't we at least wait until someone is buried before we try to cash in on his death?

Raising heck

Bob: Found it interesting that the hellbender salamanders [a Beacon Journal story last week] were being raised at the Marion Correctional Institution, which I am sure is filled with “hellbenders.”

Maybe the salamanders need mentors — and who better to teach a hellbender to raise a little hell than an inmate at MCI?

I really liked the statement that “the transfer of the hellbenders to MCI is a significant first step in increasing the numbers of hellbenders available for release.”

OK, which hellbenders are going to be released from MCI? Or is the state just trying to improve its recidivism rate by releasing amphibian hellbenders and counting them as former residents?

Greg Santos

Greg: You're just trying to raise a little hell, aren't you? People have been sentenced to MCI for a lot less than this.

Don't pick on those aesthetically challenged critters. As Hudson resident Casey Weinstein noted Monday in a letter to the editor, the hellbender “is so ugly that it crosses over to adorable.”

River of tears

Bob: I read the article about the new esplanade at the university in Kent and how it was named in honor of Mr. [Lester] Lefton.

Perhaps before he allowed his name to be placed on the boulevard, he should have looked up the definition and pronunciation of the word esplanade. I thought it pertained to a walkway beside a shore, usually a river.

Sallie Underwood

Sallie: During heavy rains, you can see puddles on state Route 59. Does that count?

Actually, multiple dictionaries say an esplanade is a level, open area that is usually located next to a body of water. So perhaps Mr. Lefton has simply chosen to be unusual. Either way, he has some 'splanading to do.

Phone needs a home

Bob: I ordered a phone system from Staples in Fairlawn. It wasn't available in the store, so UPS is supposed to bring it to my home in Fairlawn.

Check out the tracking: Oklahoma City to Wichita, Kan., back to Oklahoma City, then Kansas City, over to Maumee, Ohio, then to Hodgkins, Ill. — oops, now to Hodgkins, Ind., then back to Maumee, but not yet to my home.

No wonder they are having delivery delays. They zigzag when they aren't going in circles.

Don't call it Black Friday. If it's being delivered by UPS, call it a black hole.

Len Rose

Len: If you hadn't sent me a copy of the tracking report, I'm not sure I would have believed you.

Well, here's one way to look at it: This is probably more efficient than giving all of our packages to a fat guy with a white beard.

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News Headline: KSU student gets $25,000 grant for social media site | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An inventive new social
media platform
geared toward global
communication and
designed at Kent State
University is a step closer
to reaching the public.
The site, reMesh,
founded by Kent State
University graduate student
Andrew Konya, offers
a community, group,
nation or planet of people
the ability to speak
with one, singular voice
that represents the collective
thinking of all
people within the group.
A $25,000 Innovation
Fund grant to the project
will bring the platform
to the public.
The underlying technology,
prototyped at a
HacKSU “hackathon”
earlier this year, it has
been under development
into a public platform.
With the support of
Kent State's Blackstone
LaunchPad program,
reMesh has developed its
technology into a socially
responsible business.
“The Innovation Fund
grant is certainly an exciting
step toward realizing
our goals,” said
Konya, a chemical physics
doctoral candidate
in Kent State's Liquid
Crystal Institute. “But,
we will not be satisfied
until nations of people
can finally speak for
themselves.”
The Innovation Fund
is a regional fund focused
on supporting
technology-based entrepreneurial
endeavors
and emerging technology-
based businesses
in Northeast Ohio.
The Innovation Fund,
founded by the Lorain
County Community
Foundation, is financially
supported by the Ohio
Third Frontier Program.
“ReMesh is a promising
new technology with
a mathematical and analytical
approach to social
networking,” said
Dennis Cocco, co-director
of GLIDE, the incubator
that administers
the fund. “It's a platform
that has the potential to
revolutionize the way information
and opinions
are shared.”
Konya expects to have
reMesh available for public
use in early 2014, but
private testing of reMesh
is already under way.

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News Headline: Kent State Police Services receives prestigious CALEA award (Peach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Police Services received the Advanced Accreditation with Excellence Award from CALEA, marking the seventh time that the department has received law enforcement accreditation since 1991.

The KSU Police Services agency had to undergo a demanding Gold Standard Assessment format that focused on items such as outcomes associated with standard agency-specific policies.

Kent State Police Services is the only CALEA accredited agency to have received the highest possible award an unprecedented four times. The agency is also a Meritorious Agency because it has been accredited for more than 15 years.

In a press release on Kent State's website, John Peach, KSU's director of public safety and chief of police, said that accreditation through CALEA is the national gold standard for public safety in the United States.

Peach stated in the release that "the fact that Kent State Police Services was awarded the highest CALEA reaccreditation award four consecutive times, and most recently ‘Accreditation with Excellence Award,' makes us the ‘best of the best' of accredited law enforcement agencies in the country. No other local, county or state law enforcement agency has that distinction.

KSU Police Services is among only 648 CALEA-accredited police agencies in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Barbados. Agencies with the Excellence Award designation are considered to be among the elite law enforcement agencies in North America.

As described in their press release, Kent State Police Services was one of the first nationally accredited law enforcement agencies in Ohio and was the second university police department in the United States to be accredited by CALEA.

For more information about Kent State Police Services, visit www.kent.edu/police.

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News Headline: FEF College Industry Conference Awards Scholarships | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Modern Casting - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: More than 300 industry executives, student delegates, key professors and university administrators attended this year?s FEF College Industry Conference, held in November at the Westin Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

A Career Information Session gave 85 student delegates the opportunity to interact with representatives of 44 companies in the metalcasting industry. The 2014 conference will be held November 20-21 at the Westin Michigan Avenue in Chicago. FEF?s highest award, the E.J. Walsh Award, was presented to longtime FEF Board Member and FEF Past President (2010) Tom Cobett. The FEF/AFS Distinguished Professor Award was given to FEF Key Professor Darryl Webber, Trine Univ., in recognition of his demonstrated personal interest in his students and his interaction with the industry.

The Keith Millis scholarship recipients are Erica Hill, Univ. of Northern Iowa; Steve Miller, Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Connor Montgomery, Wisconsin-Platteville; and Matthew Wason, Univ. of Northern Iowa. The Ron Ruddle Scholarship went to Peter Kim, Virginia Tech.

Student Delegate scholarships were presented to 21 students, who received a total of $46,000: ? AFS-Saginaw Valley Scholarship, Joseph Gray, Western Michigan? AFS Southwestern Ohio Scholarship, Scott Hartman, Penn State? Ron & Glenn Birtwistle Mem. Scholarship, Mary Cartier, Wisconsin-Platteville? Ron & Glenn Birtwistle Mem. Scholarship, Joshua McLennan, Pittsburg State? Donald Brunner Schol.-ThyssenKrupp Waupaca, Bill Wardon, Wisconsin-Platteville? Paul Carey Memorial Scholarship, Jon Giove, Western Michigan, ? Clifford Chier-Badger Mining Corp., Joseph Kaminski, Trine University? Wm. E. Conway Schol.-Fairmount Minerals, Laura McGee, Kent State? Tony & Elda Dorfmueller Scholarship, Tadeo Gonzalez, Inst. Tecnologico de Saltillo? Richard Frazier Scholarship, Derek Denlinger, Missouri Univ. of Science & Tech? Burleigh Jacobs Scholarship, David Fletcher, Univ. of Alabama? John Deere Scholarship, Elijah Roth, Univ. of Northern Iowa? James P. & Katherine Keating Mem. Scholarship, Gabriella Mirabelli, Virginia Tech? Loper Award, John Calhoun, Univ. of Alabama? MAGMA Schol.-John Svoboda, Ryan Breneman, Univ. of Michigan? Modern Casting Scholarship, Jacob Roland, Purdue-West Lafayette? Chester V. Nass Memorial Scholarship, Tyler Dietzschold, Pittsburg State? Robert W. Reesman Mem. Scholarship, Dimitrios Kotsakis, Mohawk College? Gary Thoe Schol.-ThyssenKrupp Waupaca, Steven Nygaard, Wisconsin-Platteville ? Ray Witt Memorial Scholarship, Mark Young, Trine University? Robert V. Wolf Mem. Scholarship, Jared Kerker, Missouri Univ. of Science & Tech For more information about FEF, see www.fefinc.org.

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News Headline: About Books: Book looks at Amish farming in Geauga County | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/11/2013
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Gentle dialogue and true stories" lend authenticity to the book "Why Cows Need Names and More Secrets of Amish Farms" by Randy James, according to the publisher, Kent State University Press.James is a professor emeritus with Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. He follows the startup of a farming operation by an Amish family from the time he was contacted for advice when he was country agricultural agent in Geauga County, the home of the fourth largest Amish settlement in the world."The stories in the book are true, though most of the names, farm locations, and some other details have been changed to preserve the anonymity of the Amish farm families," James writes. "Much of the dialogue is verbatim. However, the dialogue is reconstructed from notes since any recording device would be a major impediment to a free-flowing conversation with Amish people," continued James. "Some of the conversations and a few of the characters are composites of various conversations and individuals in the settlement."The farming practices and Amish customs discussed in the book are accurate, though they "are specific to the Geauga settlement and do not reflect all Amish settlements," the author writes."For example farmers in some settlements usetractors for fieldwork; in other settlements, tractors can only be used as stationary engines in the barnyard; and still other settlements forbid tractors all together."Readers of "Why Cows Need Names" get a look at what it's like to drive a team of draft horses in the field. The readers visit the barnyard with its farm animals and children. And they sit with the Amish over a noon meal and talk to friends and family.It isn't the author's only attempt to give his readers such insight. James, who now lives in South Carolina, also wrote "Why Cows Learn Dutch and Other Secrets of Amish Farms."

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News Headline: About Books: Book looks at Amish farming in Geauga County | Attachment Email

News Date: 12/12/2013
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: "Gentle dialogue and true stories" lend authenticity to the book "Why Cows Need Names and More Secrets of Amish Farms" by Randy James, according to the publisher, Kent State University Press.

James is a professor emeritus with Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. He follows the startup of a farming operation by an Amish family from the time he was contacted for advice when he was country agricultural agent in Geauga County, the home of the fourth largest Amish settlement in the world.

"The stories in the book are true, though most of the names, farm locations, and some other details have been changed to preserve the anonymity of the Amish farm families," James writes.

"Much of the dialogue is verbatim. However, the dialogue is reconstructed from notes since any recording device would be a major impediment to a free-flowing conversation with Amish people," continued James. "Some of the conversations and a few of the characters are composites of various conversations and individuals in the settlement."
The farming practices and Amish customs discussed in the book are accurate, though they "are specific to the Geauga settlement and do not reflect all Amish settlements," the author writes.

"For example farmers in some settlements use
tractors for fieldwork; in other settlements, tractors can only be used as stationary engines in the barnyard; and still other settlements forbid tractors all together."

Readers of "Why Cows Need Names" get a look at what it's like to drive a team of draft horses in the field. The readers visit the barnyard with its farm animals and children. And they sit with the Amish over a noon meal and talk to friends and family.
It isn't the author's only attempt to give his readers such insight. James, who now lives in South Carolina, also wrote "Why Cows Learn Dutch and Other Secrets of Amish Farms."

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