Report Overview:
Total Clips (15)
Alumni; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Bowman Breakfast; Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (2)
College of Podiatric Medicine (CPM) (1)
Higher Education; Partnerships (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem; KSU at Stark; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at Geauga; KSU at Salem; Music; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at Salem; Music; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at Salem; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Trumbull; Renovation at KSU (1)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
Pan-African Studies (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
(VIDEO) Stylist and blogger Jasmine Woolfork turns vintage treasures into modern looks: Fashion Flash 03/19/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Jasmine Woolfork, 24, Lorain Wardrobe stylist, blogger and sales associate at Nordstrom Rack Tell me about your life in fashion so far. I'm a...


Bowman Breakfast; Hotel and Conference Center; Town-Gown (2)
Kent business leaders focus on impact 03/19/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

HEADS OF COMPANIES TALK ABOUT LOCAL, GLOBAL REACH AT BOWMAN BREAKFAST AT KSU A panel of business leaders of Kent-based corporations focused on their...

OUR VIEW Businesses in anchor role in Kent revitalization 03/19/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

INVESTMENT IN DOWNTOWN AREA IMPORTANT IN SUSTAINING PROGRESS The revitalization of downtown Kent has brought added entertainment venues, shopping opportunities...


College of Podiatric Medicine (CPM) (1)
Shawniece Boss of Parma snags contestant spot on Let's Ask America 03/19/2014 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Watch Boss tonight at 7:30 p.m. on NewsChannel 5 PARMA, Ohio - Shawniece Boss of Parma will compete on "Let's Ask America" tonight at 7:30 p.m. for...


Higher Education; Partnerships (1)
University of Dayton shines in academic March Madness brackets: Higher Education Roundup 03/19/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Note: An earlier story said the University of Dayton would win the men's tournament but Inside Higher Ed posted a correction Tuesday afternoon - saying...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem; KSU at Stark; Renovation at KSU (1)
Ohio unveils nearly $2.4 billion in building projects in new budget 03/19/2014 Review - Online, The Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS -- Gov. John Kasich and Republican lawmakers unveiled nearly $2.4 billion in planned building projects Tuesday, outlined as part of a new biennial...


KSU at Geauga; KSU at Salem; Music; Renovation at KSU (1)
Here's the list: Nearly $135 million in capital improvement projects for seven counties 03/19/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Gov. John Kasich has proposed a capital improvements budget that contains nearly $2.4 billion in spending over the next two years. Of...


KSU at Salem; Music; Renovation at KSU (1)
Portage gets $21M in state budget for construction 03/19/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

KSU, NEOMED, HIRAM COLLEGE ALL SLATED TO RECEIVE FUNDING IN BILL COLUMBUS — Gov. John Kasich and Republican lawmakers unveiled nearly $2.4 billion in...


KSU at Salem; Renovation at KSU (1)
Kasich proposes $2.38 billion capital budget; Akron-area projects on list 03/19/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

State leaders are proposing a $2.38 billion construction budget for the next two years, including $10 million for the Pro Football Hall of Fame to rebuild...


KSU at Stark (2)
Tickets gone for Robert Edsel event 03/18/2014 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

No tickets remain for Kent State University at Stark's Featured Speakers Series lecture “Monuments Men” with art historian and author Robert Edsel, according to a news...

Tickets gone for Robert Edsel event 03/18/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

No tickets remain for Kent State University at Stark's Featured Speakers Series lecture “Monuments Men” with art historian and author Robert Edsel, according to a news...


KSU at Trumbull; Renovation at KSU (1)
$17M for proposed Valley improvements in state budget 03/19/2014 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

Incubator, YSU and Stambaugh among those that would benefit from $2.4B capital budget COLUMBUS The Youngstown Business Incubator, Youngstown State...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Researchers Develop Living Liquid Crystal 03/19/2014 Design News Text Attachment Email

Researchers from Ohio's Kent State University and Illinois' Argonne National Laboratory have developed a type of liquid crystal that has the properties...


Modern and Classical Language (MCLS) (1)
KSU gets grant for language academy 03/19/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University professors Brian James Baer and Theresa Minick, from the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies, have been awarded $225,000...


Pan-African Studies (1)
(VIDEO) This Week on Kaleidoscope - March 9, 2014 (Spivey, Okantah) 03/19/2014 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

Artistic Director at Karamu and Theatre Director-in-Residence at Kent State University African Community Theatre Terrence Spivey along with Director of...


News Headline: (VIDEO) Stylist and blogger Jasmine Woolfork turns vintage treasures into modern looks: Fashion Flash | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jasmine Woolfork, 24, Lorain

Wardrobe stylist, blogger and sales associate at Nordstrom Rack

Tell me about your life in fashion so far.

I'm a 2010 graduate of The Fashion School at Kent State University. I did a semester of study through Kent in New York City and I've interned for several years at New York's Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. After graduation, I got a job here as a buyer for Dots. I wasn't in love with the buying world; I'm into high-end fashion. So, I started my own company as a stylist and blogger. It's called Style by Jas Nicole and I have dreams of owning an online vintage store.

Whom did you meet at Fashion Week and who's the biggest diva?

I worked with a production company for several seasons. We worked on big shows like Jason Wu, Lacoste, Michael Kors, Diane von Furstenberg and Derek Lam. I'd have to say the biggest diva was probably Michael Kors.

And that's why we love him! What did you do this year at Fashion Week?

I went with the intention to work for the same company, but I met a philanthropist and socialite. She wanted someone to help her with public relations. So I did that and ended up attending many big shows with her and we sat in the front row.

That's wild. How did you meet her?

She posted an online ad and I went for it. She wants me to come back next season. I brought lots of vintage things and I made them trendy and fitted. Luckily, I had brought some good clothes; it was great. The photographers all knew her and I saw tons of celebrities. I also reached out to other PR people on my own, as a blogger, and got into some shows on my own. I'll go back in September -- it's great networking.

What is it about fashion that drives you?

Everything! I love color and texture; I'm creative and artsy and I've always loved fashion. I used to wear suits as a five-year-old. Red lipstick has always been my favorite thing. I have pictures of me at three with red lipstick and little dresses.

How do you describe your style?

I don't follow a set trend. I'm fashion forward. I take vintage pieces and turn them into how it should look today. I'm classic and simple, modern, hipster and Boho. I like artsy. I mix low-end and high-end fashions together. I like vintage because I'm an old soul. I've always hung around older people. My great-grandmother was, and my grandmother and my mother are still very fashionable.

Where do you like to shop?

Nordstrom and The Rack, of course. I love the company. They promote growth from within; I would love to grow with them. It's the best retail experience. I also love to shop at vintage and consignment stores. I find loads of things at Volunteers of America in North Olmsted. I like traditional thrift stores like Goodwill. I try to stay with what's happening in the industry. Plaid is in and I found some great plaid blazers for $3 each.

Which online shops do you prefer?

I shop Zara online; we don't have a store here. I look at eBay often. I'm in search of a vintage Chanel bag ... and so is everyone else. I like Gilt, Net-A-Porter and Poshmark.

How do you follow what's going on in fashion?

I'm always surrounded by trends at work. There are on-trend brands and styles specifically for The Rack and the clearance items are from the main stores. When I'm not working, I focus on my blog and my website, stylebyjasnicole.com. I'm always looking for things to write about. I read magazines and other blogs to stay up to date.

Where do you get your sense of style?

Definitely from my mother and grandmother. They took me shopping when I was little. I like to interpret the trends in my own way. I might take one piece and discover my own way to wear it. It might be super casual or super dressy. I like to try different things.

Which designers do you like?

I like old Yves Saint Laurent and Chanel. I do love Saint Laurent today, what they transformed into; it's edgy and cool. They were stagnant for a while. Everyone's wearing Saint Laurent now. I look at European fashion a lot, too. I will invest in good bags and good shoes. I have a couple of vintage Louis Vuitton bags from the 1970's.

What kind of store do you want to open?

I'm getting it ready to launch. I've been buying cool vintage things and getting things in order. I just bought a lot of classic Coach bags, from when they used a higher-quality leather. The store will be online only. It's called De. Louise Vintage. Louise was my great-grandmother. I hope to launch by June. Most likely I'll start with an eBay store. I have tons of stuff to sell.

What do people know you for?

I'm a nice person. I like to help others and I care. I dress people every day and I have repeat customers who come to The Rack to work with me. I also do styling on the side. I've styled my boyfriend, he's hip-hop artist TKO. My mom was probably my first real client.

Do you have any Do's and Don'ts?

I would have to say: Don't be cliche or do what's popular. You can lose sight of your personal style because of all the social media. I try to stay true to my style. I want to be creative and think outside the box.

Any pet peeves?

I think that some people are so obsessed with a brand, and they think it's perfect because of the label. But, some of the brands aren't that stylish or might not fit right. Also, so many people think that used things are bad. One man's trash is my treasure! There is nothing wrong with passing something along if you don't want it anymore.

Has your style changed?

Oh yes, a lot over the last five to seven years. I've learned a lot from working at Nordstrom about styling and what's happening on the West Coast. Company-wide, we're taught a lot. Now I think I have a distinct style.

What's your best fashion advice?

I've been reminded by many friends in the industry to stay true to who I am and don't lose my values no matter where I am. Ohioans have a distinct thing about us. I think we're down-to-earth and relatable; I try to transition that into my fashion.

I can relate!

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.cleveland.com/style/index.ssf/2014/03/stylist_and_blogger_jasmine_wo.html

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News Headline: Kent business leaders focus on impact | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: HEADS OF COMPANIES TALK ABOUT LOCAL, GLOBAL REACH AT BOWMAN BREAKFAST AT KSU

A panel of business leaders of Kent-based corporations focused on their company's impacts at home and across the globe during the annual spring Bowman Breakfast in the Kent State Student Center Ballroom Tuesday.

Sitting on the panel were Matt French, vice president and general manager of Ametek's Precision Motion Control Division; Albert Green, chief executive officer of Kent Displays; Robin Kilbride, chief executive officer and president of Smithers Oasis Co.; and Nicholas Sucic, vice president and controller at the Davey Tree Expert Co.

“These leaders and their companies can be anywhere, but they chose Kent,” said City Manager Dave Ruller, introducing the panel.

French said Ametek's global impact touches the average person several times a day through the products it engineers, which range from small motors for 3D movie projectors, agricultural uses and solar energy to blower systems for U.S. Navy aircraft carrier septic tanks. Locally, its presence can be seen in the customers it brings
to the new KSU Hotel and Conference Center and sponsoring various events, French said.

“We travel the world, we have a lot of customers, but we definitely call Kent home and are proud to be here,”
he said.

Green, whose Kent Displays manufactures Boogie Board LCD writing tablets, said his firm's reach extends into more than 30 countries. Through his travels, Green said he's noticed that people in the liquid crystal display industry are very familiar with Kent.

“If you go to Asia, Korea in particular, folks there in the liquid crystal business have never heard of Cleveland, they've never heard of Ohio or Akron, but they know Kent,” he said. “A lot of people here don't realize that in their backyard is a worldclass liquid crystal institute that is really known around the globe.”

In 60 years, Smithers Oasis has grown from local floral foam manufacturer to a worldwide leader in the floral industry,
staying rooted in Kent throughout its growth, Kilbride said, noting that the company now has factories in 15 countries, employees in 32 countries and sells directly to customers in 140 countries.

Smithers Oasis recently relocated its corporate offices back into downtown Kent and plans a new manufacturing
facility at 627 Lake St., the former Ametek building.

“That all started in Kent, Ohio, so it's really something that we're proud to be a part of this and know that it's not only where it started but where so much continues to happen today,” Kilbride said. “It's been an easy and really fun move. We're booking people at the hotel, we're entertaining people in Kent, and I can tell you that we get amazing comments
from our visitors in terms of how much they enjoy the atmosphere.”

Sucic said since Davey Tree began in Kent in 1880, it has grown to one of the largest tree care companies in North America, working in 48 states and five Canadian provinces. Despite its large reach, he said the company has remained committed to its hometown by investing in facilities on North Mantua Street and downtown Kent, providing educational courses at Kent Theodore Roosevelt High School and KSU.

“The relationship between the university and the city has never been stronger. Davey Tree is proud to be a part of that partnership,” he said.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW Businesses in anchor role in Kent revitalization | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: INVESTMENT IN DOWNTOWN AREA IMPORTANT IN SUSTAINING PROGRESS

The revitalization of downtown Kent has brought added entertainment venues, shopping opportunities and other development that has attracted visitors to the Tree City. It's also been a key factor in drawing other important anchors there — businesses whose presence will do a great deal to ensure the sustainability of the “new” Kent.

Ametek, Davey Tree and Smithers Oasis, firms that have longstanding ties to Kent, all have invested in establishing
a presence in the redevelopment area. Kent Displays, a relatively new firm, with a global sales presence like the other three, also is capitalizing on the revitalized business district.

Representatives of the four firms shared how Kent's turnaround has had a positive impact on their companies Tuesday during the Bowman Breakfast gathering at KSU. All cited the revitalized downtown area as important in the growth of their businesses.

Ametek, Davey Tree and Smithers Oasis chose to become tenants in the redevelopment area, which provided
them with modern, centrally located office space that previously was not available. The downtown effort played a major
role in keeping Ametek in Kent, and enabled the other two firms, which both were founded in the city, to return elements
of their operations that had been located elsewhere. As downtown tenants, they add a stable presence to the area,
providing anchor tenants for the upper floors of the Fairmount Properties development sites.

The Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center, another key downtown anchor, has provided the firms with accommodations for the visitors they attract from around the globe. The amenities of the revitalized downtown area also have enabled Kent Displays to draw and retain talented, young employees in a highly competitive industry.

The four firms, which are proud to be headquartered in Kent, maintain an international profile. Ametek, which has
had a presence on Lake Street for nearly a century, does 60 percent of its business overseas. Davey Tree, founded in
Kent in 1880, has operations in Canada and draws international visitors. Smithers, founded 60 years ago in Kent, has locations and plants in 15 countries and markets its floral industry products in over 140 countries. Kent Displays, which
utilizes liquid crystal applications developed at KSU, does 25 percent of its consumer electronics business overseas, with sales in 30 countries.

The transformation that the city has experienced didn't happen overnight, and it would never have occurred without
the collaboration of individual investors and entities such as the city of Kent, which laid the groundwork for it a generation ago through landbanking, and Kent State University, which made a big investment when it decided to proceed with the downtown hotel. The result, in the words of City Manager Dave Ruller, is “360 degrees of wow” — an incredible change from how the area looked just three or four years ago.

The businesses that are benefiting from that effort are important to its long-term success. All are solid employers that generate tax revenues that benefit the city. All could have decided to locate anywhere, but they chose Kent. Their vote of confidence in Kent — underscored by their commitment to invest in its redevelopment — is important. The city is fortunate to have them.

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News Headline: Shawniece Boss of Parma snags contestant spot on Let's Ask America | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Watch Boss tonight at 7:30 p.m. on NewsChannel 5

PARMA, Ohio - Shawniece Boss of Parma will compete on "Let's Ask America" tonight at 7:30 p.m. for a chance to win up to $50,000.

"Let's Ask America" is the TV game show where contestants can win money from the comfort of their own homes. Four contestants are chosen to play the game via Skype, answering questions about fun and irreverent topics to find out what people are thinking.

Boss, 22, never expected to be chosen as a contestant for Let's Ask America. She just thought it would make for a good story for lunch breaks. But, her spontaneous impulse to apply helped her achieve her dream of being on a game show.

"I was home alone studying for a quiz and I got the call. I thought it was a joke until she reassured me a thousand times it was real! At that moment it was very surreal," Boss said. "I immediately called everyone and sent out a massive group text to all my friends sharing my excitement. Everyone I knew was shocked and excited!"

From that point on, Boss made it her mission to watch every episode of Let's Ask America that aired to prepare for her show.

Being a medical student at Kent State University's College of Podiatric Medicine, she wore her white lab coat and stethoscope during the taping of the show.

"My favorite moment would have to be filming the show with all my friends in the room," Boss said. "It will be a moment I never forget. They made the day very special for me. My friends are amazing. They support everything I do."

Tune in to NewsChannel 5 tonight at 7:30 p.m. to see Boss compete to win up to $50,000 on "Let's Ask America!"

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News Headline: University of Dayton shines in academic March Madness brackets: Higher Education Roundup | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Note: An earlier story said the University of Dayton would win the men's tournament but Inside Higher Ed posted a correction Tuesday afternoon - saying it erred in its calculations and Dayton men would have made the Sweet Sixteen but would have been beaten by the University of Kansas, which would ultimately win the tournament. I

CLEVELAND, Ohio - The University of Dayton men and women not only succeed on the basketball court but also in the classroom, according to Inside Higher Ed's annual March Madness academic brackets.

In its brackets, teams advance based on their academic performance rate, the NCAA's multiyear measure of a team's classroom performance, Inside Higher Ed said. In this case it is from 2008-2012.

In the event of a tie, it looks at the NCAA's graduation success rate, which measures the proportion of athletes on track to graduate within six years. After that, the final tiebreaker is the federal graduation rate, a government measure of degree-holders that uses a slightly different formula.

Dayton would beat Ohio State University in the first round, make it to the Sweet Sixteen but lose to the University of Kansas.

The University of Cincinnati would lose to Harvard University in the first round, according to the Inside Higher Ed bracket.

In the women's bracket Dayton would advance to the Final Four. The projected winner is DePaul University in Chicago.

The University of Akron would advance to the Elite Eight, according to the bracket. Wright State University would lose to Kentucky in the first round.

Funding provided for co-op and internship programs: About 2,500 college students in Ohio will receive paid internships and co-ops in large and small industries in a program funded by $11 million from casino license fees.

The funding, over the next two years, was awarded to 10 community colleges and 15 public or private universities. They will partner with 30 other post-secondary institutions, including 11 Ohio technical centers. The colleges are required to match at least 100 percent of the awarded money with private funds, generally from partner businesses.

In 2012, $11 million was awarded to 23 institutions.

Campuses will create new or expand existing co-op and internship programs to better serve students and businesses.

The grants, announced by the Ohio Board of Regents, are part of Governor John Kasich's workforce development strategies to align Ohio's higher education curriculum with skills that are in demand by Ohio's businesses so that students have a better chance of securing jobs after graduation.

The awards to colleges in northeast Ohio are:

Cleveland State University and Cuyahoga Community College - $799,148, to re-focus career services on demand-driven business engagement and student personal and professional development; provide additional staff and technical support to academic departments and develop new systems to better measure how well programs work.

Cuyahoga Community College and Lakeland Community College – $870,740, to expand work-integrated learning to every student; enhance faculty professional development, increase integration of co-ops and internships into curriculum and provide students with scholarships, workshops, and job shadowing.

Kent State University and Ohio Northern University – $562,371, to expand business partner relationships and revise career services, coordinate operations across campuses.

Lorain County Community College – $524,674, for student engagement such as peer-mentors, networking, and professional development; expand faculty support and professional development and technical assistance to businesses.

University of Akron – $799,826, to increase the number of placements at current business partners and increase number of new business partners; provide funding to explore use of co-ops at small/start-up businesses and expand co-op experiences.

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News Headline: Ohio unveils nearly $2.4 billion in building projects in new budget | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Review - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS -- Gov. John Kasich and Republican lawmakers unveiled nearly $2.4 billion in planned building projects Tuesday, outlined as part of a new biennial capital budget to be considered by the Ohio House and Senate in coming weeks.

The total includes $675 million for school repairs, about $450 million for colleges and universities, $369 million for road, bridge and related public works projects, $100 million in Clean Ohio funding for farmland, open spaces and related projects, and $574 million for state agencies' capital needs. The latter includes monies for improvements at state parks.

The new capital budget is up from about $1.8 billion OK'd for 2013-14; most of the projects are backed by long-term debt issued by the state.

Administration officials estimate the spending proposal will create 31,000 jobs over the next several years.

The legislation included more than $14.7 million in projects in Mahoning County, about $1.1 million in Columbiana County, $14.8 million in Stark County and nearly $1.5 million in Trumbull County, including:

Statewide Development Centers in Mahoning County, $937,500 through the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities.

Youngstown Radio Reading Service, $8,170 through the Ohio Broadcast Media Commission.

Southern Park Historic District in Mahoning County, $250,000 through the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission.

Butler Institute of Art in Youngstown, $279,717 through the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission.

Stambaugh Auditorium in Youngstown, $500,000 through the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission.

DeYor Performing Arts Center in Youngstown, $100,000.

The Nursing Outreach Initiative in Mahoning County at Eastern Gateway Community College, $250,000.

Elevator replacements at Youngstown State University, $2.5 million.

Utility upgrades and expansions at YSU, $2.5 million.

Campus building upgrades at YSU, $1.5 million.

Roof repairs and replacements at YSU, $1.5 million.

Instructional space improvements at YSU, $1 million.

Campus lighting upgrades at YSU, $800,000.

Moser Hall Advanced Manufacturing Lab at YSU, $700,000.

Restroom renovations at YSU, $400,000.

Youngstown Tech Block Building No. 5 at YSU, $1.5 million.

Museum of Ceramics in Columbiana County, $223,850 through the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission.

Science Lab Expansion at Kent State University in Salem, $500,000.

Classroom building renovations at Kent State University in East Liverpool, $420,000.

Tech Belt Oil and Gas Learning Center at Eastern Gateway Community College in Trumbull County, $250,000.

Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning repairs and replacements at Kent State University's Trumbull County campus, $950,000.

TBEIC Energy Integration Laboratory Shared Resource Center at Youngstown State University in Trumbull County, $250,000.

Pro Football Hall of Fame, $10 million.

Fine Arts Building renovations at Kent State University's Stark County campus, $1.5 million.

Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning repairs and replacements at Stark State College, $2.5 million.

Student Center One renovations at Stark State College, $500,400.

Atrium skylight glass replacement at Stark State College, $220,000.

Parking lot improvements at Stark State College, $95,710.

The list drew praise from Youngstown-area business leaders; the Youngstown/Warren Regional Chamber was involved in pinpointing projects for funding.

"We were pleased with the new application process imposed by the governor's office," Sarah Boyarko, the vice president for economic development, said in a released statement. "As the only private regional economic development organization in the Mahoning Valley, it was natural fit for the regional chamber to lead the effort. It was a smooth process, and we're pleased with the results.

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News Headline: Here's the list: Nearly $135 million in capital improvement projects for seven counties | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Gov. John Kasich has proposed a capital improvements budget that contains nearly $2.4 billion in spending over the next two years. Of that, about $135 million is proposed for Greater Cleveland.

The projects, many of which are improvements for Ohio's public colleges and universities, are contained in legislation introduced in the House on Tuesday. In addition to upgrades for higher education, the governor's list also includes many projects that target economic development, improving greenspace, and the arts and museums.

Here's a breakdown of the projects that the governor has proposed.

Greater Cleveland capital projects
Agency/Institution Project description Appropriation
Cuyahoga County
Cuyahoga Community College Structural Concrete Repairs $7,000,000
Cuyahoga Community College Roof Repair & Replacements $2,900,000
Cuyahoga Community College Workforce Econ Dev Renovations $1,700,000
Cuyahoga Community College Geriatric Behavioral Bealth Project $500,000
Cleveland State University Engaged Learning Laboratories $9,000,000
Cleveland State University Main Classroom Renovation $4,000,000
Cleveland State University Center for Research and Innovation $1,600,000
Department of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Developmental Centers $375,000
Department of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Developmental Centers $500,000
Department of Developmental Disabilities Welcome House, Inc. $75,000
Department of Developmental Disabilities Providence House $191,640
Department of Natural Resources Flats East Gateway and Riverfront Park $3,500,000
Department of Natural Resources Euclid Waterfront Improvements Plan - Phase II Implementation $1,000,000
Department of Natural Resources The New Economy Neighborhood - Phase II $500,000
Department of Natural Resources State Park Renovations Upgrade $1,027,940
Department of Natural Resources City of Cleveland - Lakefront Access Project $5,000,000
Department of Natural Resources Shaker Heights Van Aken District $500,000
Department of Natural Resources Edgewater Marina $5,363,274
Department of Public Safety Brook Park Fac Reno & Improve $900,000
Ohio Broadcast Educational Media Commission Cleveland Sight Center $5,280
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Huntington House $75,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Bedford Historical Society $100,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Rainey Institute - Safe Parking $125,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Ukrainian Museum-Archives $125,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Cleveland African American Museum Restoration and Expansion $150,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Great Lakes Science Center $500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Cleveland Music School Settlement - Burke Mansion Performing Arts Center $255,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Cozad Bates House $365,131
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Beck Center $402,349
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Savanna Ridge Enterprise Zone - Cleveland Metroparks Zoo $500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission University Hospital Seidman Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center $500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Severance Hall $1,500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Western Reserve Historical Society $750,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Cleveland Institute of Art Campus Unification Project $1,000,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Gordon Square Arts District $1,000,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum $1,060,522
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Cleveland Museum of Art - Final Phase $2,000,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Playhouse Square Ohio Theatre $1,500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Cleveland Museum of Natural History $2,500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission West Side Market Renovation $500,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Lake Erie Nature and Science Center $300,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Karamu House $1,060,522
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Phillis Wheatley - Hunter's Cove House $350,000
Lorain Community College Think [Box] @ CWRU $1,000,000
Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Cornerstone of Hope Butterfly Treehouse $40,000
Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Bellefaire Jewish Children's Home $1,500,000
Geauga County
Department of Natural Resources Newbury Veterans Memorial Park $25,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Geauga County Historical Society $26,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Geauga County Historical Society $18,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Geauga County Historical Society $12,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Chardon Lyric Theatre $50,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Chardon Heritage House $200,000
Kent State University HVAC Repair and Replacements - Geauga $259,000
Lake County
Department of Natural Resources Perry Township Park lakeshore stabilization $350,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission South Leroy Historic Meeting House restoration $15,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Willoughby Fine Arts Association - Facility Expansion $500,000
Lakeland Community College Science Hall and Applied Health Technologies Building $3,520,000
Lorain County
Department of Natural Resources Black River Landing Pavilion $80,000
Department of Natural Resources Bruce L. Chapin Bridge - Northcoast Inland Trail $45,000
Department of Natural Resources All-Pro Freight Stadium Improvements $50,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Avon Lake - Folger House $150,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Columbia Station 1812 Block House Project $28,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Avon Isle renovation phase 2 $82,775
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Oberlin Gasholder Building/Underground Railroad Center $200,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Carnegie building renovation $500,000
Lorain Community College Health Careers Building Renovation $2,400,000
Lorain Community College SMART Center for Sensor Commercialization $2,000,000
Medina County
Department of Developmental Disabilities Medina Creative Housing $50,000
Department of Natural Resources Medina Community Recreation Center $30,000
Department of Natural Resources York Twp. Park $150,000
Portage County
Department of Natural Resources Shalersville Park walking trail $27,750
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Hayden Auditorium - Hiram $260,854
Kent State University Science Lab Renovations $18,500,000
Kent State University Western Res Public Media Multimedia Room Upgrade $50,000
Northeast Ohio Medical University HVAC Repair & Replacements $1,244,750
Northeast Ohio Medical University Roof Repair & Replacements $792,000
Summit County
Department of Natural Resources Nimisila Spillway Replacement Project $500,000
Department of Natural Resources Cascade Plaza Renovation $500,000
Department of Natural Resources Dam Rehabilitation - Parks $3,500,000
Ohio Broadcast Educational Media Commission Goodwill Akron-Production Equipment $5,188
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens Restoration $1,560,522
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Park Theater Renovation $159,780
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Akron Civic Theater $530,261
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission John Brown House and Grounds $50,000
Ohio Facilities Construction Commission Hale Farm $500,000
Kent State University Cleveland Orchestra - Blossom Music Center $1,750,000
Northeast Ohio Medical University Summa Regional Health Professions Virtual Care Simulation Labs $750,000
Ohio State University Hattie Larlham NEO Food Hub and Workfoce Development Center $250,000
Stark State Technical College Akron Global Business Accelerator $2,000,000
University of Akron Stow-Munroe Falls Distance Learning Center $50,000
University of Akron Law Building Renovation $5,000,000
University of Akron General Lab Renovations $4,000,000
University of Akron Auburn Science & Engineering Center $3,300,000
University of Akron Research Lab Renovations $2,500,000
University of Akron Electrical Infrastructure - Loops $2,500,000
University of Akron Central Hower Infrastructure $1,200,000
University of Akron Basic Renovations - Wayne $800,000
University of Akron Austen BioInnovation Institute $750,000
University of Akron E.J. Thomas Hall $1,000,000
University of Akron Battered Women's Shelter – Medina & Summit Counties $800,000

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News Headline: Portage gets $21M in state budget for construction | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KSU, NEOMED, HIRAM COLLEGE ALL SLATED TO RECEIVE FUNDING IN BILL

COLUMBUS — Gov. John Kasich and Republican lawmakers unveiled nearly $2.4 billion in planned building projects
Tuesday, outlined as part of a new biennial capital budget to be considered by the Ohio House and Senate in coming weeks.

The total includes $675 million for school repairs, about $450 million for colleges and universities, $369 million
for road, bridge and related public works projects, $100 million in Clean Ohio funding for farmland, open spaces and related projects, and $574 million for state agencies' capital needs. The latter includes monies for improvements at state parks.

“This bill makes appropriations for the repair, renovation, reconstruction and construction of capital assets of state
agencies, colleges, universities and school districts,” Tim Keen, the governor's budget director, told members of the House Finance Committee Tuesday. “It also funds a program of grants and loans for local infrastructure projects throughout the state. And with the improved fiscal condition of the state, for the first time in six years, a portion of appropriations in this bill targets funds to support economic development projects of local or regional importance.”
Kasich added, “Our goal is to have the bill signed into law by April 2.”

The new capital budget is up from about $1.8 billion OK'd for 2013-14; most of the projects are backed by long-term
debt issued by the state.

Administration officials estimate the spending proposal will create 31,000 jobs over the next several years.

The legislation included nearly $21 million for projects in Portage County and more than $33 million in Summit
County, including:

Shalersville Park walking trail in Portage County, $27,750 through the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Hayden Auditorium at Hiram College, $260,854.

Science lab renovations at Kent State University, $18.5 million.

Western Reserve Public Media multimedia room upgrade at KSU, $50,000.

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning repairs at NEOMED, $1.2 million.

Roof repairs and replacements at the NEOMED, $792,000.

Dam rehabilitation projects in Summit County, $500,000 through the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens restoration, nearly $1.6 million.

Hale Farm project in Summit County, $500,000.

Cleveland Orchestra Blossom Music Center in Summit County, nearly $1.8 million through KSU.

Stow-Munroe Falls Distance Learning Center, $50,000 through the University of Akron.

Marc Kovac is the Dix Capital Bureau Chief. Email him at mkovac@dixcom. com or on Twitter at OhioCapitalBlog.

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News Headline: Kasich proposes $2.38 billion capital budget; Akron-area projects on list | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: State leaders are proposing a $2.38 billion construction budget for the next two years, including $10 million for the Pro Football Hall of Fame to rebuild Fawcett Stadium in Canton.

Gov. John Kasich unveiled the spending plan Tuesday; it now goes before lawmakers for hearings and approval.

The budget covers everything from parks to colleges to entertainment venues to state infrastructure.

In the Akron area, some of the most expensive projects include:

• $18.5 million to renovate science labs at Kent State University.

• $5 million to renovate the law building at the University of Akron.

• $1.5 million for restoration work at Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens in Akron.

• $1.75 million for the Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom Music Center.

• $4.5 million for work at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center's Thorne Hall in Wooster.

• $10 million to the Pro Football Hall of Fame for the 22,000-seat Fawcett Stadium, where the NFL's annual Hall of Fame Game is held and the Canton school district and Walsh and Malone university football teams play.

“That is tremendously good news for us,” hall of fame spokesman Joe Horrigan said Tuesday.

The $24.3 million stadium project includes rebuilding the stands and adding electronics, Horrigan said. The stadium was built in the late 1930s.

The annual enshrinement ceremony and game have a significant impact on the local economy through tourism, he said.

The hall of fame now will launch a campaign to raise the rest of the money needed, with that work beginning later this year after the preseason game between the New York Giants and Buffalo Bills.

State Sen. Frank LaRose, R-Copley Township, estimated that there were “something like $900 million worth of requests” from communities and entities.

“There were a lot of wonderful community projects that we were able to fund,” he said. “There were many that were worthy that didn't make the cut for whatever reason. And there were many that got a significant amount less than they asked for.”

Overall, the spending plan would provide $675 million for local schools; $454.5 million for Ohio's 37 public colleges and universities; $369 million for local infrastructure projects; $100 million for the Clean Ohio program; and $574.3 million for maintenance and renovations at state-owned facilities.

A full list of projects is available online at: http://obm.ohio.gov/SectionPages/Budget/FY1516/.

Two years ago, the capital budget totaled $1.85 billion.

Capital budgets have been scaled back for years because of a lack of money, Kasich spokesman Rob Nichols said. He estimated that the last comparable capital budget was in 2005-06, when it was $2.48 billion.

Kasich, Senate President Keith Faber, R-Celina, and House Speaker Bill Batchelder, R-Medina, said in a statement that the state is able to boost the amount of money for construction projects “because we've managed our money well.”

“I'm glad it's happening, and I'm glad that so many of these requests were developed independently by local communities based on their own needs and priorities,” Kasich said.

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News Headline: Tickets gone for Robert Edsel event | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/18/2014
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: No tickets remain for Kent State University at Stark's Featured Speakers Series lecture “Monuments Men” with art historian and author Robert Edsel, according to a news release from the school. The event is scheduled for April 7 in The University Center at Kent State Stark. For more details, contact Cynthia Williams at 330-244-3262 or cdwillia@kent.edu or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/events/featuredspeakers.

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News Headline: Tickets gone for Robert Edsel event | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/18/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: No tickets remain for Kent State University at Stark's Featured Speakers Series lecture “Monuments Men” with art historian and author Robert Edsel, according to a news release from the school. The event is scheduled for April 7 in The University Center at Kent State Stark. For more details, contact Cynthia Williams at 330-244-3262 or cdwillia@kent.edu or visit www.stark.kent.edu/about/events/featuredspeakers.

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News Headline: $17M for proposed Valley improvements in state budget | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Incubator, YSU and Stambaugh among those that would benefit from $2.4B capital budget

COLUMBUS

The Youngstown Business Incubator, Youngstown State University, Stambaugh Auditorium and others would benefit from about $17 million for proposed Mahoning Valley improvements in the state's $2.4 billion capital budget.

Gov. John Kasich and Republican lawmakers unveiled the planned building projects Tuesday. The projects are part of the new biennial capital budget, which will be considered by the Ohio House and Senate in coming weeks.

The total statewide includes $675 million for school repairs, about $450 million for colleges and universities, $369 million for road, bridge and related public works projects, $100 million in Clean Ohio funding for farmland, open spaces and related projects, and $574 million for state agencies' capital needs including improvements at state parks.

“With the improved fiscal condition of the state, for the first time in six years, a portion of appropriations in this bill targets funds to support economic development projects of local or regional importance,” Tim Keen, the governor's budget director, told members of the House Finance Committee on Tuesday.

“Our goal is to have the bill signed into law by April 2,” he added.

The new capital budget is up from about $1.8 billion OK'd for 2013-14; most of the projects are backed by long-term debt issued by the state.

Administration officials estimate the spending proposal will create 31,000 jobs over the next several years.

The legislation included more than $14.7 million in projects in Mahoning County, about $1.1 million in Columbiana County and nearly $1.5 million in Trumbull County.

The Youngstown Business Incubator sought $5 million to renovate The Vindicator's office building on the corner of Vindicator Square and West Boardman Street for an incubator expansion. The incubator received $1.5 million.

“We knew we'd have to do it in phases, but we're pleased with the funding,” said Barb Ewing, YBI's chief operating officer. “We have to determine our priorities and where [the money] will have the best impact. It's likely we'll focus on office space first rather than manufacturing space.”

The incubator wants to use the building to expand its focus on additive manufacturing and business-to-business software, she said.

The incubator will seek other funding, including money from the U.S. Economic Development Administration, for this project, Ewing said.

Also, the incubator is negotiating with the newspaper to buy the building, she said. The incubator is using other money to purchase The Vindicator building, and expects to buy it as soon as possible, Ewing said.

The list drew praise from Youngstown-area business leaders; the Youngstown/Warren Regional Chamber was involved in pinpointing projects for funding.

“We were pleased with the new application process imposed by the governor's office,” said Sarah Boyarko, vice president for economic development. “As the only private regional economic development organization in the Mahoning Valley, it was a natural fit for the regional chamber to lead the effort. It was a smooth process, and we're pleased with the results.”

YSU is using its $11 million in funding for maintenance and repair, reducing operating expenses, modernizing classrooms, enhancing technology, expansion and completion.

Kent State University at Trumbull plans to use the money for ventilation and air-conditioning repair and replacement at its campus in Champion, while Kent State University at Salem and KSU at East Liverpool will see a science-lab expansion and $420,000 for classroom building renovations, respectively.

Eastern Gateway Community College plans to fund projects at the Jefferson County campus.

Stambaugh Auditorium will use its $500,000 grant toward an exterior beautification project that will include cleaning and pointing the building's facade and replacing the monumental steps on the building's Fifth Avenue side.

The exterior of the 1926 building has never been cleaned and bears decades of discoloration, according to Matt Pagac, general manager of the hall.

The limestone stairs are in a state of disrepair and were damaged even more by the harsh winter, said Pagac. Engineering work is underway to prepare for the project.

The remainder of the project funding will come from a capital campaign that is currently underway. Pagac could not pinpoint when the work will begin.

The Butler Institute of American Art is slated to receive $279,717, which is earmarked for the installation of a new public elevator, which will replace the old elevator in the original section of the museum. Louis A. Zona, director of the Butler, said some worn-out air-conditioning units in art storage areas also will be replaced.

The Youngstown Developmental Center in Mineral Ridge received $937,500 through the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities to replace heating and air-conditioning systems in three buildings — a 27-bed residential cottage, the administrative building, and the central training and day services facility.

The systems being replaced are 20 years old and badly in need of replacement, said Zach Haughawout, deputy director of legislative affairs and communication for the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities.

“The department is pleased we are able to repair these units and believe the improved units will significantly improve airflow and increase the comfort of the people we serve,” Haughawout said.

Boardman Township representatives applied for $1.8 million in collaboration with Boardman Park and the 4-H club toward the end of last year to create a Southern Park Historic District at the end of Raupp Avenue. The township received a large property donation from Clarence R. Smith Jr. and purchased 11.1 acres of the Smith property last year.

“The township is very excited; this will allow us to get started on the multiphase project for that area,” Administrator Jason Loree said. “It is looking pretty good; really it is going to bring a unique project to Boardman.”

The hope is to have a place for the community to gather, a museum, a place for parties and a place for people to reflect on the area that once was the place to be. The $250,000 received from the grant was just a portion of what was requested, but Loree said the funds are a nice starting amount.

“Basically, [this area] was a community asset for over 100 some years ago and not many people know of its existence today,” he said.

The township will look for more grants and donations to complete the project. Donations will be accepted at the Boardman Township Administration Building on Market Street.

Among the projects from the Mahoning Valley that failed to get funding was the Youngstown-owned Covelli Centre's amphitheater. The outdoor facility is estimated to cost $2 million to $3 million. The city had wanted money from the capital budget toward the amphitheater, but failed to get it.

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News Headline: Researchers Develop Living Liquid Crystal | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Design News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Researchers from Ohio's Kent State University and Illinois' Argonne National Laboratory have developed a type of liquid crystal that has the properties of a living organism, which may improve early disease detection.

The substance, which is being called living liquid crystal, is the byproduct of combining swimming bacteria and innovative, water-based, non-toxic liquid crystal. The substance is a biomechanical hybrid and reacts differently to different stimuli, giving researchers hope that it can be used to detect the presence of a disease in the early stages.

The living liquid crystal has the same energy storage capabilities as living organisms, which allows for internal motion of the substance. The unique liquid is also very easy to study from a visual standpoint, as it offers unparalleled clarity under a polarizing microscope. In one instance, researchers were able to clearly see a trail in the liquid substance, resulting from the introduction of 24-nanometer-thick bacterial flagella, which is 1/4000th the thickness of the average strand of human hair.

The researchers found that living liquid crystal acts as a magnifying glass for micro- and nano-scale reactions between molecules and viruses that are not easily detectable. The substance was also found to have varying reactions when exposed to different levels of oxygen, variable temperatures, and various surfaces, a reaction that has the potential for the development of microfluidic biological sensors.

The variability, sensitivity, and clarity of living liquid crystal makes researchers believe the substance may be a good candidate for early disease detection, such as the growth of cancer cells or the presence of an infectious disease in the early stages. Catching a disease in the early stages of infection is more cost effective to manage and more easily treatable.

The study was presented at the 58th annual Biophysical Society Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., in February. Research team members believe the best immediate use for the living liquid crystal is for the improvement of biosensing, but plan to continue studies to discover all the potential uses for the substance within applied science.

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News Headline: KSU gets grant for language academy | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University professors Brian James Baer and Theresa Minick, from the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies, have been awarded $225,000 in grants from the federal government STARTALK program to fund the 2014 Foreign Language Academy.

The STARTALK program is a presidential initiative that seeks to expand and improve the teaching of strategically
important world languages that are not now widely taught in the United States.

This year's Foreign Language Academy will consist of a student program for new learners of Chinese and Russian
and a teacher training program for K-12 teachers of these languages.

The student academy, now in its eighth year, is a four-week summer immersion program housed in Kent State's Honors College.

It is followed by an academic-year component consisting of monthly onsite sessions supported by online instruction.

Targeted to high school juniors and seniors, the program awards five college credits upon completion.

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News Headline: (VIDEO) This Week on Kaleidoscope - March 9, 2014 (Spivey, Okantah) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/19/2014
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Artistic Director at Karamu and Theatre Director-in-Residence at Kent State University African Community Theatre Terrence Spivey along with Director of Kent State University Center of Pan African Culture Mwatabu Okantah discuss Mr. Spivey's role at Kent State and what's ahead for the theatre season. For more information call 330.672.2300 or log on to http://www.kent.edu/cas/pas or call 216.795.7070 or log on to http://www.karamuhouse.

Executive Director for Connecting for Kids Sarah Rintamaki and parent Sarah Kader discuss programs available to parents who have children with autism and other disabilities. They also talk about the organization's March 20th Meet & Greet where parents can meet therapists and find out about programs and summer camps for their children. For more information call 440.250.5563 or log on to http://www.connectingforkids.org

The Urban League's Marva Richards and SeMia Bray discuss the Urban Youth Employment Program geared to those who are 16 to 24 year-old. For more information call 216.622.0999 or log on to http://www.ulcleveland.org.

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.newsnet5.com/about-us/this-week-on-kaleidoscope-march-9-2014

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