Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Art, School of (1)
Biological Sciences (2)
College of Nursing (CON) (1)
College of Public Health (COPH); Students (1)
Higher Education; Renovation at KSU (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (2)
KSU at Geauga (1)
Music (3)
Renovation at KSU (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Art, School of (1)
THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts 03/27/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University School of Art will present the 14th Annual National Juried Cup Show, on display through April 5 at the Downtown Gallery. Free...


Biological Sciences (2)
Thin People May Naturally Burn More Calories (Novak) 03/26/2014 Yahoo! Health Text Attachment Email

...that one person can stay slim while eating a lot of calories, while another tends to gain weight despite eating fewer? According to new research from Kent State University, the muscles of naturally thin people may just work differently. A research team, led by Chaitanya K. Gavini of the university's...

Why Thin People Might Eat More and Still Stay Slim: 'It's Not Just the Fact that They're More Active' (Novak) 03/26/2014 Blaze, The Text Attachment Email

...confirms this could be the case. Photo credit: Shutterstock “What is different about these people?” Dr. Colleen Novak, a biological sciences professor at Kent State University whose research focuses on the neuroscience of obesity,  asked . Kent State University researchers say that the current...


College of Nursing (CON) (1)
Dr. Gosnell to receive OSU alumni honor 03/26/2014 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...The alumni transformers will be recognized at the Centennial Gala to be held Saturday at The Ohio Union in Columbus. Gosnell joined the faculty of Kent State University in 1978 and served as dean of the College of Nursing for 15 years. She was appointed founding director of the Hiram College...


College of Public Health (COPH); Students (1)
Area briefs -- March 26 03/27/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

KENT Food drive KENT: Kent State University College of Public Health will kick off its annual Fill the Truck Food Drive for Kent Social Services' food pantry. Students...


Higher Education; Renovation at KSU (1)
OUR VIEW: Cooperative approach to funding education will pay off in Ohio; Different approach to funding high education will benefit all 03/27/2014 Twinsburg Bulletin Text Attachment Email

The $2.4 billion capital budget proposed by Gov. John Kasich includes $450 million for projects for the state's 37 institutions of higher education, including...


KSU at E. Liverpool; KSU at Salem (2)
Grandstand project gets no love in Columbus 03/26/2014 Morning Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...county's share would be spent in the following manner: - $223,850 to the Museum of Ceramics in East Liverpool. -$500,000 to the Salem campus of Kent State University for expansion of the science lab. -$420,00 to Kent State's East Liverpool campus for classroom renovations. ...

Grandstand not among state-funded projects 03/27/2014 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...county's share would be spent in the following manner: - $223,850 to the Museum of Ceramics in East Liverpool. -$500,000 to the Salem campus of Kent State University for expansion of the science lab. -$420,00 to Kent State's East Liverpool campus for classroom renovations. ...


KSU at Geauga (1)
Geauga County students get head start at joint Career Day 03/26/2014 News-Herald Text Attachment Email

...off a joint Career Day by addressing a group of about 150 sophomores from Berkshire, Ledgemont and Newbury high schools gathered at the Geauga Campus of Kent State University on March 26. A lengthy line of students waiting to meet McLeod and receive a free message-related wristband after his presentation...


Music (3)
Ensemble HD lines up more formal appearance at Kent State University 03/26/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

Case in point: a concert next week at Kent State University. At 8 p.m. on Monday, March 31, the group best known for playing at a bar in Cleveland's Gordon Square Arts District will appear...

Entertainment: Jazz 03/27/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Jazz Ensemble — 7 p.m. Monday, Nighttown, at 12387 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights. $5. 216-795-0550 or www.nighttowncleveland.com...

National tours are coming to Kent 03/27/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

From members of the Cleveland Orchestra stopping by to nat i o n a l touring acts performing this weekend, there is never a dull moment in downtown...


Renovation at KSU (2)
Ohio House approves $135 million for Cleveland-area capital projects 03/26/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Park and nearly $5.4 million for work at Edgewater Marina. Another $65 million would go to the seven counties surrounding Cuyahoga, including work at Kent State University, Lakeland Community College, Lorain Community College and the University of Akron. (See all the projects in all seven counties)....

OUR VIEW: Another sign of recovery for Ohio 03/27/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Capital works budget boosts Education, local government assage of a $2.4 billion capital works plan by the Ohio House of Representatives — the first...


News Headline: THE LIST -- Area events and upcoming concerts | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University School
of Art will present the 14th Annual
National Juried Cup Show,
on display through April 5 at the
Downtown Gallery. Free and
open to the public. Location:
141 E. Main St., Kent.

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News Headline: Thin People May Naturally Burn More Calories (Novak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: Yahoo! Health
Contact Name: Kristen Fischer
News OCR Text: Why is it that one person can stay slim while eating a lot of calories, while another tends to gain weight despite eating fewer? According to new research from Kent State University, the muscles of naturally thin people may just work differently.

A research team, led by Chaitanya K. Gavini of the university's school of biomedical sciences, compared female rats that had a genetic tendency to be lean with those that had a genetic predisposition toward obesity. The team wanted to see how the physiology of each group's muscles affected their metabolism. The researchers had already discovered that an animal's intrinsic aerobic capacity (its ability to transport oxygen and use it during exercise) is a good indicator of its daily physical activity—those with a higher aerobic capacity are usually leaner than those with a lower one.

It's in Your Genes: Fried Foods Cause More Weight Gain in Some People

The rats in each group had similar amounts of lean body mass and weight, but those with high aerobic capacity were more active than those with low aerobic capacity. While resting, all of the rats used about the same amount of energy, but when they were subjected to mild exercise, the “lean" rats' genes showed “poor fuel economy," meaning they burned more calories than the "fat" rats—those with the genetic predisposition toward weight gain.

The study was published in the journal Endocrinology and Metabolism.

What caused the difference in the number of calories burned by the lean rats and the fat rats?

The researchers think it could be that the lean rats had higher levels of proteins that support energy expenditure and lower levels of proteins that encourage energy conservation. Calories can't just disappear—they have to be either used as energy or stored, usually as fat, explained Colleen M. Novak, Ph.D., one of the researchers.

“The muscles will use energy to move us around. But in some cases muscles can be less efficient at this," said Novak. "The energy can't disappear, though. In the case of muscles, it is dissipated as heat. That is why you get hot when you exercise.” She went on to note that when Gavini measured the temperature of the rats' muscles during physical activity, he found that the lean rats' muscles got warmer than those of the obesity-prone rats.

It may also be that the lean rats' sympathetic nervous system, which helps regulate the body's reaction to stress, played a role by stimulating the muscles to use more energy. “The thin rats have higher drive from the sympathetic nervous system to their muscles, but we are in the process of figuring out whether this is what might be causing the differences we see between the overweight rat and thin rat muscles," said Novak.

Read More: Stress and Excess Weight Could Make Conceiving More Difficult

“In the bigger picture, [the study] would also imply that any advantage these intrinsically lean people have in staying thin may be canceled out if they are not physically active,” she said.

“Genetics can be overcome,” Novak said.

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News Headline: Why Thin People Might Eat More and Still Stay Slim: 'It's Not Just the Fact that They're More Active' (Novak) | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: Blaze, The
Contact Name: Liz Klimas
News OCR Text: Much to the ire of those who exercise, eat right and still struggle with their weight, there are those individuals who can eat the same — if not more — work out the same amount and still be thinner. It would appear that it just comes naturally to them — and a new study confirms this could be the case. Photo credit: Shutterstock “What is different about these people?” Dr. Colleen Novak, a biological sciences professor at Kent State University whose research focuses on the neuroscience of obesity,  asked . Kent State University researchers say that the current obesity epidemic — about one-third of adults are overweight and one-third are obese — is likely the result of our lifestyles but genes also play a part. To see how genetics could impact obesity, researchers bred rats with specific genes  that were linked with either high activity or laziness. They found that those rats known to be more active, based on their genetic breeding history, would burn more calories when exercising that fat rats doing the same amount of exercise. The active rats were also more likely to move around frequently during the day. “It's not just the fact that they're more active that matters but also that they are burning more calories during activity,” Novak said, noting that these extra calories are being “wasted” by the thin rats as heat. “What is different in the brains of these rats that make them more active versus less active?” she asked. Researchers found thin rats produced more receptors that would stimulate the area of the brain that would cause them to choose to be active. Fat rats on the other hand produced less of these receptors. Thus, Novak told the university's news site that the fat rats don't move around less because they're overweight but because their brain function. Researchers are not yet sure why thin rats produce more of these receptors that would lead to activity than fat rats. None of this is to say that rats predisposed to be overweight can't avoid this tendency. Conversely, rats with genes that would suggest they should be thin won't necessarily mean be thin in reality. “In the bigger picture, [the study] would also imply that any advantage these intrinsically lean people have in staying thin may be canceled out if they are not physically active,” Novak said, according to Healthline News . This study was published in the journal Endocrinology and Metabolism . Read more stories from TheBlaze Judge Rules Justina Pelletier to Remain in State's Custody Christian Org Announces Major Policy Change on Gays ‘How We Got Our First-Grade Teacher Fired': Disturbing YouTube Videos Show Students Talking About Lies They Used to Can Their Teachers Is This Glenn Beck's Most Alarming Prediction Yet? Caught on Video: The Mere Presence of This ‘Blonde Woman' at Cairo University Sparks a Sickening Incident

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News Headline: Dr. Gosnell to receive OSU alumni honor | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Davina Gosnell of Kent has been selected as one of 100 Alumni Transformers in Nursing & Healthcare by The Ohio State University College of Nursing during its centennial year.

She will be recognized for being among alumni of the college who have deeply impacted the profession of nursing and the healthcare system.

Gosnell is being recognized for her contributions to the profession in nursing education leadership, global health initiatives and research and publication.

The alumni transformers will be recognized at the Centennial Gala to be held Saturday at The Ohio Union in Columbus.

Gosnell joined the faculty of Kent State University in 1978 and served as dean of the College of Nursing for 15 years. She was appointed founding director of the Hiram College nursing program in 2006.

Following several years of clinical practice, she served as a consultant and supervisor of Home Health Services at the Ohio Department of Health. She has held visiting consultant appointments with the World Health Organization in Papua New Guinea, Great Britain and Denmark.

She is chair of the Board of Trustees of the Ohio Nurses Foundation and a member of the Board of Directors of UH Hospitals Geauga Medical Center.

She is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honorary.

She is the recipient of awards from The Ohio State University College of Nursing and the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing as well as a Distinguished Service Award from Hiram College.

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News Headline: Area briefs -- March 26 | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT

Food drive

KENT: Kent State University College of Public Health will kick off its annual Fill the Truck Food Drive for Kent Social Services' food pantry.

Students will collect donations through a community bag drop the first week of April.

About 2,000 paper bags will be distributed to select areas of Kent. Residents who receive a bag are encouraged to place their donation bags on their porches by 10 a.m. April 5, and students will return to pick them up.

Those who do not receive a bag may donate directly to the pantry at 1066 S. Water St.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Cooperative approach to funding education will pay off in Ohio; Different approach to funding high education will benefit all | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: Twinsburg Bulletin
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The $2.4 billion capital budget proposed by Gov. John Kasich includes $450 million for projects for the state's 37 institutions of higher education, including Kent State University, Northeast Ohio Medical University and other state universities.

All will share in capital improvements funding; Kent State is earmarked for $18.5 million for science lab renovations and NEOMED is in line for $1.2 million for heating, ventilation and air conditioning repair.

In the past, the capital budget set off a scramble of politicking and pork barreling as colleges and universities pushed for funding, with those that were most successful at lobbying being "rewarded" for their efforts. In Kent State's case, that sometimes worked well, but there were periods where the Kent campus seemed to be ignored when the money was being doled out in Columbus.

Kasich, who prides himself on an outside-the-box thinking, pushed the campuses to set aside their parochial interests in favor of a more cooperative approach, collectively identifying building needs. That meant that some might have to step aside to allow more pressing projects to get a share of the financial pie.

That approach seems to have worked. Members of the Ohio House Finance and Appropriations Committee, which is reviewing the capital budget, were told that all of the state's universities and community colleges support it.

"Our public colleges and universities, among the most powerful economic drivers in this state, have come together to both acknowledge and address the need to invest in the long-term maintenance of our campuses," Kevin Boys, president of Southern Community College, told the panel. "At the same time, our institutions ... are advancing projects that will, in a meaningful way, contribute to our great state's economic recovery as well as have an impact on student success and further encourage collaboration among our institutions."

Reversing the brain drain that sees many Ohio graduates leaving the state as soon as they get their degrees is vital if the state is to see a turnaround in its economic fortunes. Strong institutions of higher learning, with cutting-edge facilities and programs that make them competitive, are not luxuries but necessities. Focusing on cooperation, rather than competition, for state funding will make all of them stronger in the long run.

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News Headline: Grandstand project gets no love in Columbus | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: Morning Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LISBON - Three projects in Columbiana County would be funded with a combined $1.14 million included in the state's new capital spending budget, but the county grandstand is not among them.

Gov. John Kasich and the Republican legislators last week unveiled the new two-year capital spending budget which totals $2.39 billion. This is money used to fund local projects as well as public school and college construction projects, the Public Works Commission, state parks, state prisons and the Clean Ohio program.

The county's share would be spent in the following manner:

- $223,850 to the Museum of Ceramics in East Liverpool.

-$500,000 to the Salem campus of Kent State University for expansion of the science lab.

-$420,00 to Kent State's East Liverpool campus for classroom renovations.

The spending bill passed the Ohio House as proposed and now will go to the Senate, where committee meetings were scheduled to begin on Wednesday.

A host of other county projects had been submitted to the state for consideration, including:

-$450,000 to help pay for construction of the new grandstand at the county fairgrounds.

- $3.5 million for additional improvements to the county Port Authority's industrial park in Wellsville.

- $734,171 to expand the MARCS radio system beyond where it currently exists, which is at the county sheriff's office, highway patrol and in Knox Township, to all police and fire departments in the county lacking the service. This would provide a radio system for police and fire departments to communicate with each other and provide for a countywide siren warning system.

- $1 million to go toward hiring an engineering firm to come up with a new plan for turning Route 30 into a freeway from East Canton to state Route 11 in this county.

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News Headline: Grandstand not among state-funded projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: LISBON - Three projects in Columbiana County would be funded with a combined $1.14 million included in the state's new capital spending budget, but the county grandstand is not among them.

Gov. John Kasich and the Republican legislators last week unveiled the new two-year capital spending budget, which totals $2.39 billion. This is money used to fund local projects as well as public school and college construction projects, the Public Works Commission, state parks, state prisons and the Clean Ohio program.

The county's share would be spent in the following manner:

- $223,850 to the Museum of Ceramics in East Liverpool.

-$500,000 to the Salem campus of Kent State University for expansion of the science lab.

-$420,00 to Kent State's East Liverpool campus for classroom renovations.

The spending bill passed the Ohio House as proposed and now will go to the Senate, where committee meetings were scheduled to begin on Wednesday.

A host of other county projects had been submitted to the state for consideration, including:

-$450,000 to help pay for construction of the new grandstand at the county fairgrounds.

- $3.5 million for additional improvements to the county Port Authority's industrial park in Wellsville.

- $734,171 to expand the MARCS radio system beyond where it currently exists, which is at the county sheriff's office, highway patrol and in Knox Township, to all police and fire departments in the county lacking the service. This would provide a radio system for police and fire departments to communicate with each other and provide for a countywide siren warning system.

- $1 million to go toward hiring an engineering firm to come up with a new plan for turning Route 30 into a freeway from East Canton to state Route 11 in this county.

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News Headline: Geauga County students get head start at joint Career Day | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Donald Wayne McLeod, who speaks professionally on topics such as improving interpersonal communication, kicked off a joint Career Day by addressing a group of about 150 sophomores from Berkshire, Ledgemont and Newbury high schools gathered at the Geauga Campus of Kent State University on March 26.

A lengthy line of students waiting to meet McLeod and receive a free message-related wristband after his presentation attested to the man's impact.

“He was extremely enjoyable,” said Berkshire student Florida Domanski while awaiting her turn along with classmates Alex Sanda and Cassidy Mivner. “Most speakers don't get through to me, but he did.” She added that his message, which included presenting oneself in the best way possible, helped her to realize what's needed to secure optimal advantages for entering college as well as a career. 

Ledgemont Superintendent Julie Ramos also expressed satisfaction with the McLeod's message, describing the skills he discussed as “transferable” and “ageless.”

The purpose of the event, sponsored by Geauga Growth Partnership and Great Lakes Cheese, Inc., was to give students the tools to write effective résumés as well as how to successfully approach future interviews for college and careers.

Geauga Growth Partnership is a business-led organization dedicated to the retention, growth and attraction of jobs, investment and economic growth in Geauga County.

After McLeod's presentation, smaller group sessions conducted by several individuals and providing in-depth looks at multiple issues took place.

In a resume writing session, Stacy Barbe, employee relations specialist for Great Lakes Cheese, touched on the importance of correct objective statements .

Much of the day's information was reinforced with data on USB flash drives which was viewed on computer screens. GGP provided the data storage devices which can be used as reference tools for students' future years. 

Later in the day, a talk on “How to WOW in an Interview” was delivered. Other discussions focused on social media background checks and drug testing. 

Patrick Walker, who attends Newbury High, said he was impressed by the importance placed on confidence. 

“You never know who (you might be meeting),” he said. “It could be a contact to get you a job.”

Takoeda DeLong of Ledgemont High said discovering how to deliver a good “hello” and strong handshake were among lessons she had learned.

Georgia Klemencic, GGP career education coordinator, said the Career Day evolved from an internship program begun a few years ago. The success of the event attended by Berkshire students in 2013 encouraged participation by Ledgemont and Newbury this year. Cardinal Schools also has expressed an interest in joining. 

“One of the things our businesses told us was that they want a workforce that is prepared,” Klemencic said. “This is our way of contributing to the workforce and our students in Geauga County.” 

Helping to coordinate the day was Tamara Hagerty, human resource officer for Great Lakes Cheese Inc.

“Our goal is to introduce the concepts so they're potentially more ready than other folks,” she said. “We want these students to have a leg up.”

Hagerty also noted that it was hoped students would realize they needn't seek distant locales when eventually job hunting.

“There's a lot of opportunity right outside your back door,” she said. “You can stay here and be successful.”

Additional Career Days are planned for area juniors and seniors.

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News Headline: Ensemble HD lines up more formal appearance at Kent State University | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Zachary Lewis, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: Case in point: a concert next week at Kent State University. At 8 p.m. on Monday, March 31, the group best known for playing at a bar in Cleveland's Gordon Square Arts District will appear at Kent's Ludwig Recital Hall.

The setting will be more formal – no hot dogs, tater tots or beer – and admission won't be free. But the spirit of the event will surely be similar, as the group presents a distinctly fresh program of modern and contemporary chamber music.

On tap, so to speak, are Kaija Saariaho's “Mirrors,” for flute and cello; David Lang's “Little Eye,” for cello and four others; Takemitsu's “A Bird Came Down the Walk,” for viola and piano; Esa-Pekka Salonen's “Laughing Unlearnt,” for solo violin; and Berio's “Sequenza VII,” for solo oboe and drone.

The second half of the program, by contrast, will feature a single work: Ligeti's Trio for Violin, Horn and Piano. Featured in that piece will be two guest artists: Richard King, principal horn of the Cleveland Orchestra, and pianist Randall Fusco.

The other works will be performed by Ensemble's standard roster, which consists of pianist Christina Dahl, flutist Joshua Smith, oboist Frank Rosenwein, cellist Charles Bernard, violist Joanna Patterson Zakany, and violinist Jung-Min Amy Lee. The latter five are also members of the Cleveland Orchestra.

Ludwig Recital Hall is located in KSU's Center for the Performing Arts at 1325 Theatre Dr. in Kent. Tickets, $5-$15, are available at kent.edu/music or at 330-672-2787.

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News Headline: Entertainment: Jazz | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Jazz Ensemble — 7 p.m. Monday, Nighttown, at 12387 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights. $5. 216-795-0550 or www.nighttowncleveland.com

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News Headline: National tours are coming to Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: From members
of the Cleveland Orchestra
stopping by to nat i o n a l
touring acts performing
this weekend, there
is never a dull moment
in downtown Kent.
Clevel and Orchestra at KSU
The Cleveland Orchestra
associate concertmaster,
violinist Jung-Min Amy Lee and
Ensemble HD will perform
on Monday in Ludwig
Recital Hall in the
Center for the Performing
Arts, 1325 Theatre
Drive on the Kent State
University Kent campus.
The show starts at 8 p.m.
The ensemble brings
a fresh take on classical
music spanning the
1960s to today.
Richard King, Principal
Horn of The Cleveland
Orchestra will join
Lee and pianist Randall
Fusco in the highlight
of the program,
the Trio for Violin, Horn
and Piano by twentieth
century composer
György Ligeti.
Tickets range from
$8 to $15. Admission
for full-time Kent State
students is free.
For tickets and more
information, call 330-
672-ARTS (2787) or visit
kent.edu/music.

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News Headline: Ohio House approves $135 million for Cleveland-area capital projects | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/26/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cuyahoga County alone would get about $65 million under Gov. John Kasich's two-year capital budget, which now heads to the Senate for consideration. More than a third of that is targeted at Cleveland State University and Cuyahoga Community College.

Other funding would benefit museums and Greater Cleveland's cultural assets. Among those: $2.5 million for the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, $2 million for the Cleveland Museum of Art, $1.5 million for Playhouse Square's Ohio Theatre, $1.5 million for work at Severance Hall, $1.1 million for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and $1 million for Gordon Square Arts District.

The legislation also designates money to improve parks and the lakefront in Cuyahoga County, including $5 million for the city of Cleveland's Lakefront Access Project with its walkway to connect downtown to the lake, $3.5 million for the Flats East Gateway and Riverfront Park and nearly $5.4 million for work at Edgewater Marina.

Another $65 million would go to the seven counties surrounding Cuyahoga, including work at Kent State University, Lakeland Community College, Lorain Community College and the University of Akron. (See all the projects in all seven counties).

Statewide, about $675 million is proposed for school construction, repairs and renovations. Another $455 million targets projects at Ohio's public colleges and universities.

The Kasich administration estimates that the projects could create as many as 31,000 jobs over the next several years.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, a Democrat, and Northeast Ohio business leaders have praised the capital bill, saying the money will help encourage the local economy.

But state Rep. Armond Budish, a Cleveland Democrat, said the GOP-sponsored capital bill continues a historical trend of giving Cuyahoga County only a fraction of the funding that other, less Democratic counties receive.

With a 2010 population of 1.28 million, Cuyahoga County would receive $50.62 per county resident under the capital bill. By comparison, Franklin County would get about $227.3 million, or $195.35 per resident, while Hamilton County would receive roughly $73.4 million, or $91.52 per capita.

Budish, who's running for Cuyahoga County executive, joined all Northeast Ohio House members in voting for the bill, saying his county needs the $65 million.

The only dissenting House votes came from two conservative Republican lawmakers, state Reps. John Becker of Union Township and Matt Lynch of Bainbridge Township.

House Speaker Bill Batchelder, a Medina Republican, disputed that Cuyahoga County has been shortchanged by the capital bill. He told reporters Wednesday that he hasn't heard any complaints about the county's share of the money.

"My sense is that they did well compared to other parts of the state," Batchelder said.

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News Headline: OUR VIEW: Another sign of recovery for Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 03/27/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Capital works budget boosts
Education, local government

assage of a $2.4 billion
capital works plan by the Ohio
House of Representatives — the
first such measure to include funding for
local projects in six years — is another indication
of economic recovery and positive
news for Portage County institutions
that will share in the state allocations.
More than $20 million
is earmarked for
projects in Portage
County, the lion's share
going to Kent State
University, which is set
to receive $18.5 mllion
for renovations and upgrades to science
facilities. Another $2 million will go to
Northeast Ohio Medical University for
improvements to facilities on the Rootstown
campus. Funding also is included
for renovation of Hayden Auditorium at
Hiram College.
The budget passed the Ohio House
by a near-unanimous vote. It goes to the
Ohio Senate, where passage is expected,
and then to Gov. John Kasich for final
approval.
As State Rep. Kathleen Clyde of Kent
observed, the capital works measure is a
boost not only to institutions of higher
learning but to municipalities that have
dealt with significant losses in local government
funding in recent years. The capital
budget is by no means a blueprint for
lavish spending, but it is a welcome indication
that the fiscal belt finally may be
loosening a bit after years of budget cuts
in the wake of the Great Recession of 2008.
House Bill 497 includes about $675 million
for school repairs, about $450 million
for colleges and universities, $369 million
for road, bridge and related public works
projects, $100 million in Clean Ohio funding
for farmland, open spaces and related
projects, and $574 million for state agencies'
capital needs.
The new capital budget is up from
about $1.8 billion for 2013-14, and most
of the projects are backed by long-term
debt issued by the state.
The items funded are not political porkbarreling,
but projects that will meet the
long-range needs of those receiving state
allocations. Many state institutions have
deferred needed work — or done without it
entirely — because of limited resources. The
money being allocated in the public works
budget is an investment in their future.
Of note, too, is the commendable effort
made by institutions of higher learning to
prioritize their needs and to work together
for the good of state education in general
rather than scrambling for a share of
the funding pie, as was the case in previous
funding cycles. Setting aside individuals
interests will help strengthen education
statewide.
After years of tight money, Ohio seems
to be turning the corner. This sign of econmic
recovery is a welcome one.

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