Report Overview:
Total Clips (21)
Admissions; Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Athletics (3)
College of Business Administration (COBA); College of Podiatric Medicine (CPM) (1)
College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
KSU at Salem (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Office of the President (1)
Safety (6)
Students; Town-Gown (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Admissions; Enrollment Management and Student Affairs (EMSA) (1)
Colleges find new ways to recruit today's social media savvy high school students (Garcia) 04/07/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio - If you want to reach a high school student you have to go where they are - online. So local colleges are using videos, e-mails and...


Athletics (3)
'Draft Day' covers Northeast Ohio 04/07/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

NORTHEAST OHIO LOCATIONS In addition to Cuyahoga Community College, which doubled for the Browns' offices, some of the locations used for the movie...

Kent State men's golf team struggles in final round, winds up seventh at Aggie Invitational (Wakeling, Robertson) 04/07/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State's men's golf team slipped into a tie for seventh place during Sunday's rain-soaked final round of the Aggie Invitational at the Traditions Club...

Kent State Roundup: Gymnast Case receives prestigious honor, advances to NCAA Championships (Biggin, Linder) 04/07/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State senior gymnast Marie Case was named the National Association of Collegiate Gymnastics Coaches co-Gymnast of the Year on Saturday, when she also...


College of Business Administration (COBA); College of Podiatric Medicine (CPM) (1)
Local colleges add healthy dose of grad programs 04/06/2014 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...turbulent field and looking to enhance their career prospects. Case Western Reserve University this fall will launch a new health management program, Kent State University is relocating its executive health care MBA program to the Cleveland area and University of Akron is in the early stages of...


College of Communication and Information (CCI) (1)
Business moves -- April 6 04/05/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University AnnMarie LeBlanc was named interim dean of Kent State University's College of Communication and Information, starting...


Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Social Media Scholarship (Karpinski, Lepp, Barkely) 04/07/2014 InsideHigherEd.com Text Attachment Email

...papers presented at this year's annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association annual meeting, faculty members and graduate students from Kent State, Louisiana State and New York Universities contributed to the growing body of research into the academic and personal consequences of cell...


KSU at E. Liverpool (1)
City prepares for spring cleaning 04/05/2014 East Liverpool Review - Online Text Attachment Email

...Chamber of Commerce board of directors. Assisting with CitySweep will be East Liverpool High School students, as well as students and faculty from Kent State University-East Liverpool.


KSU at Salem (1)
KSU branch campus offers hands-on horticulture experience 04/06/2014 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University Salem is one of the few in Ohio where hands-on experiences reach a new level as students in the associate of applied science-urban...


KSU at Tuscarawas (3)
Cleveland theater auditions for April 4 and beyond 04/04/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...inches or shorter to portray Charles "Snowball" Whitter in "Rhythm Rhapsody Revue." Performance: June 21 at Lincoln Theatre in Columbus and June 22 at Kent State University Tuscarawas campus in New Philadelphia. Paid position, plus per-diem for Columbus trip. Send head shot, resume and sample recording...

Finalists for dean at KSU at Tusc to visit campus (Nameth) 04/07/2014 Times-Reporter, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA The three finalists for dean of Kent State University at Tuscarawas will visit the campus over the next several weeks, giving public...

Show to feature students, faculty, staff 04/04/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

NEW PHILADELPHIA Kent State University at Tuscarawas will present “The Rose and the Rime” at 7:30 p.m. April 11 and 12 in the Performing Arts Center. Times Reporter...


Office of the President (1)
Kent State reception honors retiring Lefton (gallery) 04/07/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University President Lester Lefton kisses his wife, Linda, after he spoke during a send-off event for his retirement at the Kent State University...


Safety (6)
Arraignment of alleged KSU shooter delayed again Friday 04/07/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

An unnamed medical issue once again resulted in the initial court hearing for Wednesday's alleged Kent State University shooter being delayed for a second...

Authorities expect suspect to face more charges in KSU shooting (Peach) 04/04/2014 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent -- A man who shot himself in the hand during an argument with two women on Kent State University's main campus April 2 was charged with carrying a concealed weapon, but authorities expect more charges to be filed. Quavaugntay...

(VIDEO) FOX 8 Exclusive: Friend Said Kent State Suspect 'Knew Better' 04/07/2014 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio – Quavaugntay Tyler, 24 missed a second scheduled court appearance Friday on a felony charge of carrying a concealed weapon. Tyler is accused...

(VIDEO) Police Proud of Students, Staff after Kent State Lockdown (Peach) 04/07/2014 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio– Flashing lights, lots of police and loud sirens; that was the scene at Kent State University Wednesday night. “It was very nerve-racking....

Arraignment for Kent State gun suspect postponed 04/04/2014 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...arrested late Wednesday for carrying a concealed weapon (a fourth degree felony) pending further review by the prosecutor's office. He is a freshman Kent State student. During an argument with two female Kent State students, Tyler pulled a weapon that discharged immediately and struck...

(VIDEO) Bizarre past of the suspected KSU gunman Quavaughntay Tyler (Peach) 04/04/2014 WOIO-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

There's a story behind the man who had a gun go off into his own hand, sending the entire Kent State University campus into lockdown. The records surrounding the case are at Kent Municipal Court, and they give a snapshot into the mind...


Students; Town-Gown (1)
Kent launches Party Registration Program 04/07/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent police are hoping to help party throwers avoid potentially costly noise citations and cut down on neighborhood disturbances. Launched last week,...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent State Showcase students: Meet Tim Welsh 04/04/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's New York Musical Theatre Showcase is an annual event that strives to help launch the careers of some of the school's most...


News Headline: Colleges find new ways to recruit today's social media savvy high school students (Garcia) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - If you want to reach a high school student you have to go where they are - online.

So local colleges are using videos, e-mails and personalized ads to recruit today's media savvy teenagers. Their success will soon become evident as seniors decide this month where they will attend school this fall.

“It is such a hard market, it truly is,” said David Garcia, associate vice president for enrollment management at Kent State University. “We are all on the latest technology and every year we see what is out there new and how to communicate with the young folks.”

Universities still target students from lists of those who have visited the campus and taken the ACT and SAT. They continue to mail information and buy newspaper, billboard and television advertisements – but those efforts generally attract the attention of parents.

Teenagers have to be reached in other ways, said Rob Spademan, assistant vice president of university marketing at Cleveland State University.

Research shows that 70 percent listen to streaming radio, 25 percent are mobile-only online users and 90 percent watch online videos, he said.

So last fall CSU and Wyse Advertising redirected $80,000 of the $225,000 it spent to recruit in Cleveland, Akron, Canton, Buffalo, Detroit, Erie and Toledo to online radio and companies that place online ads.

“Instead of buying a specific web site, they look for people who fit the characteristics of the demographic,” Spademan said.

CSU can measure its success because if someone goes to CSU's website from an online ad the university can trace back to where the click originated, Spademan said.

“Ultimately we are able to follow those people if they come to us and apply and fill out the application and finish it,” he said. “They get a thank you for completing it.”

If someone doesn't complete an application they will later get a personalized ad that says they can complete their CSU application in 10 minutes.

“In marketing terms that is called a conversion – the action you want to have happen as a result of your advertising,” he said. “For us it is to get an application.”

CSU could tweak ads as well, and got more reaction when an ad saying students could save $5,000 in tuition and room and board under its freshman scholars program replaced one that said they could save 30 percent, Spademan said.

“The beauty of it is we are able to really look at things and measure them in a way that was unthinkable before,” he said. “We don't discount using outdoor ads or print ads but you can't measure it like you can the digital stuff.”

Research showed 91 percent of teens take an action as a result of watching a video, Spademan said.

“That is a very surprising number to us,” he said. “We changed from static banner ads to short videos.”

The videos brought in the most responses, according to the campaign results. All online efforts resulted in 857 applications, compared to 764 applications from other media and 1,200 from acquired or purchased student lists.

The University of Akron sends direct e-mails with embedded videos and video links that provide financial advice, said Eileen Korey, associate vice president and chief communications officer.

The university, which had an enrollment decline last year, spent $250,000 this year to hire Royall & Company of Richmond Virginia, which does “strategic enrollment management” for universities. Applications are up 44 percent, Korey said.

The company is handling the entire recruitment and application process, including revamping the university's application, which now says it will notify students within two weeks of acceptance.

“We are also getting out there with scholarship offers quicker,” Korey said.

Royall provides services at a level beyond what the university is are able to develop in-house due to time, resources and money, said Lauri Thorpe, associate vice president of enrollment management.

The majority of prospects that Kent State pursues are from those who took the ACT or SAT, said Garcia.

“We have a strong marketing campaign to reach out to students from sophomore on up,” he said. “We have analytics that will give us more information about what students are doing. Are they opening their e-mails? Are they clicking on certain parts of the web page? We look at the whole picture. How are students finding us and where are they going?”

He calls the process a “communication flow.”

“Each one is different,” he said. “If it is an out-of-state student the message is a little different than if a student is in the honors program.”

CSU tried something new this year by offering “instant decisions” to prospective students who brought transcripts and other information to its Spring Open House on March 29. About 100 students met with officials at the Next Steps Station and accepted admission for fall, Spademan said.

Once students are admitted, universities then work hard to get them to enroll, officials said.

Students receive e-mails and calls from university faculty, staff and alumni. Despite all the new efforts, the best promotion for a university is the traditional tried-and-true – a campus visit. Officials maintain if they can get a prospective student to visit the odds of enrolling go up exponentially.

"The emphasis we place in our message is that we would like for them to come visit our campus," Garcia said. "We feel strongly if they visit the campus they will send in an application.”

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News Headline: 'Draft Day' covers Northeast Ohio | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NORTHEAST OHIO LOCATIONS

In addition to Cuyahoga Community College, which doubled for the Browns' offices, some of the locations used for the movie include:

• Wildwater Kingdom in Aurora (where the Browns owner, played by Frank Langella, tells Kevin Costner that he needs to “make a splash” in the draft).

• Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland (where Langella calls Costner to tell him he is headed to New York City).

• Wade Park Lagoon (where a Browns wide receiver reports to Costner about a quarterback).

• Case Field at Case Western Reserve University (where another coach talks by phone with Costner).

• Dix Stadium at Kent State (as the location of a Wisconsin-Ohio State game featuring two draft prospects).

Source: Summit Entertainment

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News Headline: Kent State men's golf team struggles in final round, winds up seventh at Aggie Invitational (Wakeling, Robertson) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State's men's golf team slipped into a tie for seventh place during Sunday's rain-soaked final round of the Aggie Invitational at the Traditions Club in College Station, Tex.

The 30th ranked Golden Flashes fell two spots after closing with a 20-over-par 308 to join San Dan Diego State at 46-over-par for the tournament. LSU finished 19-over to claim the team title by two shots over host Texas A&M.

"I'm very disappointed in the amount of double and triple bogeys we made this week," said KSU associate head coach Rob Wakeling. "We have a lot of work to do as we prepare for our last few tournaments and the Mid-American Conference Championship coming up. We will get back to practice on Tuesday to work on our weaknesses.

"There were a lot of tough pins out there, so pars were at a premium today. Unfortunately, we ended up with too many double bogeys or higher and not enough pars. It was a frustrating day."

The Flashes made just eight birdies, but had 24 bogeys and seven holes of double bogey or higher.

Corey Conners, Taylor Pendrith and Kody Fry all shot 76 in the final round on the 7,146-yard, par-72 home of the Texas A&M Aggies.

Conners had his round at 2-under through five holes, but a difficult finish forced the senior to settle for a 10th-place individual finish at 8-over-par.

After opening with bogeys at his first three holes, Pendrith played his next 14 in even par before closing with a bogey at 18. The senior finished in a tie for 16th place individually at 9-over par.

Fry posted his best round of the weekend thanks to a 3-under-par stretch over the day's final five holes, including back-to-back birdies at the difficult 17th and 18th.

Kent State will travel to Ohio State University's Scarlet Course for the Robert Keppler Intercollegiate on Saturday.

TRACK AND FIELD

Several Kent State athletes overcame rainy conditions to produce strong showings at the Northeast Ohio Quad, held Friday at the University of Akron.

Former Garfield High School standout C.J. Carlisle won the javelin with a heave of 144-1. Taylor Wickey finished second in the 1,500 meters with a personal best time of 4:45.92. Tabitha Jacofsky took first in the 800 meters in a personal-record time of 2:14.90, followed by teammate Olivia Gaus (2:21.80).

Roseanne Erickson won the long jump with a leap of 20-0.25, while Alexandria Vintevoghel placed second in the 300 meters in a personal-best 10:28.95.

The 4x100-meter relay team of Ann Marie Duffus, Olivia Hallstein, Katie Reiser and Chanitta Westbrooks finished in second with a time of 46.48.

On the men's side, Wayne Gordon ran a personal-best 10.22 to take first in the 100 meters, the third-best clocking in KSU history. Teammate Riak Reese also set a new personal best time in the event, taking second in 10.34.

Matthew Tobin finished first in the 400 meters in a personal-best 47.37. Laron Brown set his personal best in the 200 meters, winning in 21.44, while Jesse Oxley captured the pole vault by clearing a personal-high 17-0.75 and Matthias Tayala won the hammer throw with a personal-best heave of 228-5.

Miles Dunlap won the 400-meter hurdles in 52.93, Richard Dahome took second in the 110-meter hurdles with a personal-best time of 15.01, and Jailyn Twitty was runner-up in the triple jump with a personal-best distance of 47-3.75.

Kent State's 4x400-meter relay team of Dunlap, Tobin, Danny Young and Brown also won in 3:19.69.



Juniors Dunlap and Tayala swept the men's side of the MAC Track and Field Athlete of the Week honors last week.

Dunlap, the MAC Track Athlete of the Week, opened the outdoor season with a second-place finish in the 400-meter hurdles (52.34) at the Lenny Lyles/Clark Wood Invitational on March 29 in Louisville, Ky.

Tayala was named the MAC Field Athlete as the Week after winning the hammer throw at that same meet. His mark of 225 feet was a new personal best, and fourth in both the nation and on Kent State's all-time list.

WOMEN'S GOLF

Due to lightning in the Dallas area on Sunday, the third and final round of the Dallas Athletic Club/SMU Invitational was canceled, leaving No. 37 Kent State in 12th place at 48-over-par 624. Baylor won the event at 15-over.

Wad Phaewchimplee finished the event 9-over and in a tie for 22nd place to lead the Flashes, while Jennifer Ha shot 10-over and tied for 27th.

"It was a bit of a tough week," said KSU coach Greg Robertson, "but we played against some good competition on a good course. We found some weaknesses that we hope to figure out before we start the MAC Championship."

The Flashes close the regular season at the Lady Buckeye Invitational in Columbus April 19-20 before vying for their 16th straight conference championship April 25-27.



Ha was named MAC Women's Golfer of the Week after her performance at the Mountain View Collegiate Invitational last weekend.

Ha tied for eighth place after shooting 1-over for three rounds, helping Kent State finish second at the event. The junior is the reigning MAC Women's Golfer of the Year and is currently ranked 79th in the nation according to the Golfweek/Sagarin rankings.

FIELD HOCKEY

Madison Thompson has been selected to play for the Canadian Indoor National team in the upcoming Pan American Cup in Uruguay, which begins today. She is one of 12 competitors to make the trip with Team Canada.

"Being on the younger side of the team and having the Pan American Cup be my first big international tournament is pretty nerve-wracking, but also extremely exciting," Thompson said. "It's an honor and privilege to be able to wear the Canadian colors and play among the best of the Pan American countries."

As a freshman Thompson was a Second Team All-MAC selection, totalling six goals and three assists.

BASEBALL

As part of Kent State baseball's 100-year celebration, an all-time team will be selected for a card set to be distributed at the game on May 16. Fans can still vote for the all-time team through 5 p.m. today.

After mulling over some very difficult choices, especially at the pitcher spot, here are my votes:

P: Dustin Hermanson, Steve Stone, Mike Nartker

C: Thurman Munson

1B: Greg Rohan

2B: Rich Rollins

SS: Jimmy Rider

3B: Mike Gulan

OF: Anthony Gallas

UT: John VanBenschoten

Coach: Scott Stricklin

SCHOLARSHIP AUCTION

The Kent State University Department of Athletics will host the third annual Athletics Scholarship Auction on Friday, April 25, beginning at 6:30 p.m. on center court of the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman, a former star quarterback for the Flashes, will be the celebrity co-host of the event that will feature over 100 silent and live auction items.

All event proceeds support student-athlete scholarships. Last year's auction generated over $30,000 in scholarship support.

Only a limited number of tickets will be sold. To reserve your spot by visit www.supportgoldenflashes.com.

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News Headline: Kent State Roundup: Gymnast Case receives prestigious honor, advances to NCAA Championships (Biggin, Linder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State senior gymnast Marie Case was named the National Association of Collegiate Gymnastics Coaches co-Gymnast of the Year on Saturday, when she also advanced to the NCAA Championships in the All-Around.

Case placed fifth overall at the NCAA Central Region in Baton Rouge, La., inside Pete Maravich Assembly Center.

"What an incredible honor it is for Marie to be awarded with this," Kent State head coach Brice Biggin said. "Having her tie with Rheagan Courville for the award is great, they are both great gymnasts as they both put on a great show today."

The Golden Flashes failed to advance as a team, closing out a successful season that saw the team finish with a 17-8 overall record.

Case's All-Around score on Saturday was a 39.325. She tied for fifth on the floor (9.900), tied for 15th on the beam (9.850), tied for 16th on vault (9.800) and tied for 21st on the bars.

SOFTBALL TEAM RALLIES FOR 8-3 WIN OVER AKRON

A huge seven-run sixth inning, highlighted by a Abbey Ledford homerun, lifted the Golden Flashes to an 8-3 win over host Akron at Lee R. Jackson Field on Saturday.

"I was really proud of the way we fought back today," said Kent State head coach Karen Linder. "We stayed with it, stayed focused, stayed confident. It was a huge win and finally the offense started to click for us late in the game."

The rally started with a leadoff double over the head of the centerfielder by junior Ariele Patterson. After a well-hit lineout by senior Kim Morgason, Linder went to her bench and got back-to-back clutch hits. Freshman Janel Hayes collected her first collegiate hit with a single the opposite way that scored Patterson to tie the game. Sophomore Michele Duffy followed with a double to right field.

"Ariele Patterson did a great job for us and had a lot to do with our comeback," Linder said of her right fielder, who also scored the Flashes' first run of the game following a single in the fourth inning. "And then our pinch-hitters came in and did their jobs and it kept us in the game. Jessacca Gironda, Janel Hayes and Michele Duffy all came in and got hits for us."

KENT STATE TAKES TWO OVER HOST OHIO

Kent State (18-10, 6-2 MAC) took a share of the Mid-American Conference East Division lead after sweeping a doubleheader at Ohio (5-22, 1-7 MAC) on Saturday (Apr. 5). They took the first game 11-1 before winning the second 5-3.

The two wins make it ten-straight for Kent State at Bob Wren Stadium in Athens, dating back to the 2009 season.

The Golden Flashes will go for the series sweep today at 1 p.m.

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News Headline: Local colleges add healthy dose of grad programs | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/06/2014
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Northeast Ohio's colleges and universities are injecting a dose of graduate programs related to health care into their repertoire in hopes of capitalizing on the uncertainty brought on by the Affordable Care Act and the region's reliance on the health care industry as an economic anchor.

The programs, for the most part, are geared toward those currently entrenched in the turbulent field and looking to enhance their career prospects. Case Western Reserve University this fall will launch a new health management program, Kent State University is relocating its executive health care MBA program to the Cleveland area and University of Akron is in the early stages of working with hospitals to develop some sort of degree offering. They join Baldwin Wallace University's established health care MBA program, which is among the nation's oldest; it began in 1997.

The health care industry is undergoing a dramatic shift — one that could upend the current business model rooted in payment for the amount, not quality, of services rendered. The idea behind these graduate offerings is to train leaders who tactfully can lead that transition.

That said, the budgetary pressures facing health care providers, particularly hospitals, could be a concern for institutions launching such offerings. Higher education officials say many providers already have tempered their tuition reimbursements, which could limit interest in such programs. However, many education leaders suggest the rapidly evolving health care landscape is still working in their favor.

“There's a great deal of anxiety among a lot of the providers these days,” said Mark Votruba, a Case Western Reserve economics associate professor leading the development of the new master's degree. “The forward-looking ones are going to recognize they need to have people who are experts at managing their systems against this changing landscape.”

Case Western Reserve already has begun reaching out to local hospitals to market its two-year program. The university isn't necessarily starting from scratch in the health care realm, as its Weatherhead School of Management already has in-house expertise, including J.B. Silvers, a well-known health care finance expert.

Cozying up to Cleveland

Kent State this spring will relocate its two-year executive health care MBA program to the university's College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence, which Kent State acquired in 2012. The executive MBA launched in 2009, and student interest has fluctuated since, according to Laurie Walker, director of the university's executive MBA programs. She said the move should help the program recruit better from Cleveland's east and west sides.

Baldwin Wallace, the elder statesman in the health care management arena locally, has seen enrollment in its health care MBA program triple to about 60 students over the last 11 years since its director, Thomas Campanella, took over. The program offers classes on both sides of town — Beachwood and Berea — and requires its students hold jobs in the health care industry.

“During times of challenge, I personally believe — and I think people are showing this in the program — you need to invest in yourself,” Campanella said. “Consequently, because health care is evolving, you need to be in a position to take advantage of it. There's going to be winners and losers, both from an organizational standpoint and a career perspective.”

The University of Akron is in early discussions with regional hospitals about developing a specialized business program with a health care focus, according to Bill Hauser, director of graduate business programs. Hauser said it was too early to discuss specifics, though the university for 15 years has offered a health care concentration within its traditional MBA program.

“We received a lot from interest from area hospitals, and not just the three in Akron, about some possible programs,” Hauser said. “We're very serious.”

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News Headline: Business moves -- April 6 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University

AnnMarie LeBlanc was named interim dean of Kent State University's College of Communication and Information, starting July 1. She currently serves as director of Kent State's School of Visual Communication Design, one of the four schools in the College of Communication and Information. She succeeds Stan Wearden, Ph.D., who will retire on June 30 after 30 years of service.

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News Headline: Social Media Scholarship (Karpinski, Lepp, Barkely) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: InsideHigherEd.com
Contact Name: Carl Straumsheim
News OCR Text: Heavy cell phone and social media use may hurt students' grades and well-being, new studies suggests, but having friends and family at their fingertips may also be beneficial to those farthest away from home.

In papers presented at this year's annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association annual meeting, faculty members and graduate students from Kent State, Louisiana State and New York Universities contributed to the growing body of research into the academic and personal consequences of cell phone and social media use among undergraduate and graduate students. While part of their message -- all things in moderation -- echoed other findings, one paper suggested the opposite is true for for international students.

“The most common challenges faced by international students are psychological in nature (e.g., homesickness, loneliness, depression, stress, anxiety, alienation nd] isolation),” authors Neete Saha and Aryn C. Karpinski, a graduate student and assistant professor at Kent State, respectively, write in "The Impact of Social Media on International Students' Satisfaction With Life and Academic Performance." By studying survey results from 13 different institutions, Saha and Karpinski found international students often use social media to minimize stress from culture clash.

Almost 90 percent of the 415 international students surveyed said they were active on Facebook, and 85.4 percent said they used the voice-over-IP service Skype as the main way to contact friends and family. A majority of students said they used Skype weekly and accessed apps such as Facebook on their cell phones daily, and 86.7 percent percent of them said they believed their social media use either had no effect or a positive impact on their academic performance.

The students were even more in agreement about social media's impact on their personal lives. Only 13 percent said it had a negative effect on their well-being, compared to 78.9 percent who said it has helped them adjust to living abroad.

"Students believe that by being able to communicate with friends/family via social media, they are less stressed, depressed, or homesick, and they believe that [social networks] have neither a positive nor negative impact on their GPA,” a draft of the report reads. “[U]sing [social networks] and Skype (i.e., to communicate with friends and family more often) increases international students' satisfaction with life abroad, and will have a positive influence on their academic performance.”

Those findings stand in contrast to a different study co-authored by Karpinski along with fellow Kent State faculty members Andrew Lepp and Jacob E. Barkley. In a broader look at technology habits of college students in general, the researchers found “high frequency cell phone users tended to have lower GPA, higher anxiety and lower satisfaction with life relative to their peers who used cell phone less often.”

That study involved 536 undergraduates enrolled in general biology, world history and other introductory-level courses at a large, public university in the Midwest. The students rated their own well-being, level of anxiety and cell phone use, and gave the institution permission to release their academic records. For the purposes of the study, cell phone use included everything but listening to music.

“Interview data collected by the authors during an earlier study ... suggest that some cell phone users may experience anxiety as a result of a perceived and perhaps overwhelming obligation to remain constantly connected to various social networks through their phone,” the report, which appeared in the February 2014 issue of Computers in Human Behavior, reads. “Occasional solitude can be an important component of well-being and an antidote to the pressures of daily life.”

In more structured settings, however, social media may help students working in groups. Peter J. McAliney, a recent doctoral student at New York University, shared results from a study of 11 students in an upper-level blended class at a public university in the Southeast. In an email, McAliney highlighted results suggesting the students didn't set any rules for how they would use different social media platforms.

“Teams seemed to be comfortable with either working on the document together, in person, or editing their work serially,” the report reads. “As a result, it was sometimes confusing for team members to know which tool would be most appropriate for contributing to the group project or communicating with teammates. This sometimes resulted in inefficiencies within the team.”

McAliney also emphasized the personal benefits of using social media for group projects, and recommended institutions increase students' awareness of the different platforms at their disposal.

“As organizations embrace a team approach to address an increasingly competitive global business environment, higher education must provide students the skills necessary to succeed in team-oriented business environments,” the report reads. “Better knowledge, understanding, and application of how social media technologies can support group work could enhance the ability of individuals to work collaboratively in remote teams, an increasingly important requirement in today's workplace.”

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News Headline: City prepares for spring cleaning | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: East Liverpool Review - Online
Contact Name: STEPHEN HUBA - Hancock County Reporter
News OCR Text: EAST LIVERPOOL-Spring cleaning in East Liverpool is serious business.

What started 18 years ago as a way to dispose of hazardous household waste has turned into a citywide event with a name and a growing roster of sponsors.

CitySweep 2014 will unite a host of organizations on April 26 toward a common goal, Mayor James Swoger said. "What it does is it cleans up our town," he said.

Started in 1997 by Heritage Thermal Services (then WTI), CitySweep is a way for East Liverpool residents to dispose of their household waste-hazardous and non-hazardous-and for downtown businesses to clean up their storefronts, officials said.

Public and private sector leaders gathered at Swoger's office on Friday to announce details about the cleanup event, including ways that it will be expanded this year.

New elements of CitySweep include a drug take-back program and a storefront cleanup initiative in downtown East Liverpool, officials said.

"It's a tremendous project, so I encourage everyone to take advantage of it," Swoger said.

The core event of CitySweep is the collection of household hazardous wastes, old electronics and, for the first time, unused pharmaceuticals at Heritage Thermal Services, 1250 St. George St., from 8 a.m. to noon April 26.

"Since our first collection in 1997, we have recycled and disposed of more than 121 tons of household chemical wastes and old electronic goods that otherwise would have been tossed in the trash or dumped into the local water supply," said Christy Pease, administrative services analyst at Heritage.

Up to 10 gallons or 25 pounds of household waste per vehicle will be accepted, including household cleaners, lawn and garden chemicals, pool chemicals, aerosol cans and antifreeze, paint and paint products, solvents, batteries, light bulbs, computer components, TVs and unused/expired pharmaceuticals.

Members of Heritage's Relay for Life team will be there to collect old cellphones, which either will be recycled or refurbished for resale, Pease said.

During the collection, Heritage will distribute $5,000 in grants for qualifying environmental projects and announce the winners of the third annual environmental essay contest.

"Since the program began in 1998, more than 100 organizations have received more than $62,000 in grants," Pease said.

Also participating in the drug take-back program are the East Liverpool Police Department and the East Liverpool City Hospital's Pharmacy Department. Residents will be able to drop off their unused medications simply by pulling up to the hospital on the day of CitySweep, said Karen Reaggle, certified pharmacy technician at ELCH.

The hospital also will accept mercury thermometers and replace them with digital ones, Reaggle said.

The city is participating in CitySweep through the police department, the street department, and the refuse and recycling department. Non-hazardous household waste will be accepted at the East End Car Barn, 1253 Pennsylvania Ave., from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26.

Appliances will be accepted at the Car Barn as long as they do not contain freon, said Ryan Estell, city service-safety director.

Downtown members of the Southern Columbiana County Regional Chamber of Commerce will be asked to participate in CitySweep by removing "earth related" materials-rocks, leaves, road salt, etc.-from their storefronts and putting the refuse in the street. From 4-6 p.m. April 26, city street sweepers will come by and remove it, said Todd Alexander, president of the Chamber of Commerce board of directors.

Assisting with CitySweep will be East Liverpool High School students, as well as students and faculty from Kent State University-East Liverpool.

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News Headline: KSU branch campus offers hands-on horticulture experience | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/06/2014
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University Salem is one of the few in Ohio where hands-on experiences reach a new level as students in the associate of applied science-urban forestry discipline, through the school's horticulture program, not only can earn a degree but have the advantage of a cooperative arrangement with Davey Tree Expert Service Co. for training and scholarships.

Students studying horticulture can earn either an associate or a bachelor's degree and focus their studies in professional tree care and arboriculture, turf-grass management or landscape management and design.

Arboriculture is the cultivation, management and study of individual trees, shrubs, vines and other perennial woody plants.

The instructor is internationally recognized Chris Carlson, who has practiced and promoted arboriculture and urban forestry the past 32 years.

He believes in what he teaches and recently had the KSU Salem campus designated a Tree Campus USA by the Arbor Day Foundation.

The campus will be recognized at an Earth Day celebration at 10 a.m. April 16. The campus is at 2491 state Route 45.

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News Headline: Cleveland theater auditions for April 4 and beyond | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Mark Rapp
News OCR Text: The Ted Lewis Orchestra/Canton Comic Opera Company. Seeking a male African-American singer/dance who is a tenor age 16-26 and five feet and six inches or shorter to portray Charles "Snowball" Whitter in "Rhythm Rhapsody Revue." Performance: June 21 at Lincoln Theatre in Columbus and June 22 at Kent State University Tuscarawas campus in New Philadelphia. Paid position, plus per-diem for Columbus trip. Send head shot, resume and sample recording to auditions@cantoncomicoperaco.com. For additional information, go to tedlewisorchestra.com or cantoncomicoperaco.com.

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News Headline: Finalists for dean at KSU at Tusc to visit campus (Nameth) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA

The three finalists for dean of Kent State University at Tuscarawas will visit the campus over the next several weeks, giving public presentations and answering questions.

The three are seeking the post being vacated by Gregg Andrews, who has resigned after serving as dean for the past 18 years. His resignation is effective July 1.

Stephen Nameth, dean of the Kent State University Columbiana County campuses and chair of the search committee, said he thought the new dean would be in place by that time.

The search has been accelerated because KSU will also have a new president this year. Lester A. Lefton is retiring as president and will be succeeded by Beverly J. Warren on July 1. “We want the new dean in place before Dr. Lefton leaves,” Nameth said.

The candidates are:

James E. Payne, provost and Bank One professor in business at the University of New Orleans. He has held that post since January 2013.

Payne, who earned his doctorate in economics from Florida State University in 1989, has oversight of the $65.9 million academic affairs budget at the University of New Orleans, according to his resume.

He lists as one of his administrative accomplishments securing a $100,000 endowed professorship for an artist in residence program for the Department of Film & Theatre from the New Orleans Theatre Association.

Payne will give his public presentation at 10 a.m. on April 14 in the Founders Hall Auditorium.

• Karla K. Leeper, vice president of board and executive affairs and chief compliance officer at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. She has held that post since November.

Leeper earned her doctorate in communications studies from the University of Kansas in 1993.

Her duties include providing leadership in oversight of the university's compliance program and developing a campus
culture for compliance through information, education, training and evaluation.

Leeper will give her public presentation at 10 a.m. on April 16 in the Founders Hall Auditorium.

• Bradley A. Bielski, vice president for academic affairs and dean of Thomas More College in Crestview Hills, Ky.

Bielski, who earned his doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Cincinnati in 1991, has served in his present job since 2004.

His duties involve managing the academic affairs division of the college. Among the accomplishments he lists on his resume are expanding the number of degree program offerings at the associate, baccalaureate and master levels, working to raise millions of dollars of capital funds to improve academic facilities at the college and managing an annual budget of more than $10 million.

Bielski will give his public presentation at 10 a.m. on April 21 in the Founders Hall Auditorium.

Nine candidates for the post were interviewed about three weeks ago at a hotel at Akron-Canton Regional Airport by the search committee, Nameth said. The committee is made up of community members, faculty and staff.

The committee looked at the candidates' personality, academic background, fundraising abilities and work on capital projects. All candidates were asked the same questions.

“At the end of the two-day session, we took a vote and settled on the three we now have,” Nameth said.

No one can replace Andrews, he said, but the university wants someone who can work with the community, raise
funds, work with the faculty on contracts and be an advocate for Kent State Tuscarawas.

“It takes a special person, there's no question about it,” he said.

“We're real excited,” Nameth said. “We're going to have an outstanding dean on that campus in the next few months.”

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News Headline: Show to feature students, faculty, staff | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Pam Patacca
News OCR Text: NEW PHILADELPHIA Kent State University at Tuscarawas will present “The Rose and the Rime” at 7:30 p.m. April 11 and 12 in the Performing Arts Center.
Times Reporter







NEW PHILADELPHIA Kent State University at Tuscarawas will present "The Rose and the Rime" at 7:30 p.m. April 11 and 12 in the Performing Arts Center.

NEW PHILADELPHIA Kent State University at Tuscarawas will present “The Rose and the Rime” at 7:30 p.m. April 11 and 12 in the Performing Arts Center.

The show, which marks the debut of what is hoped to become an annual spring production on the Performing Arts Center's Dale Lauren Foland stage, will feature Kent State Tuscarawas students, faculty and staff.

“The Rose and the Rime” is the 2008 ACTF and Kennedy Center Honors award-winning show by Nathan Allen, Chris Mathews and Jake Minton

In this modern take on the world of fables, this is the story of the fictional town of Radio Falls, which has been frozen over by the Rime Witch for as long as anyone can remember.

Rose, a young girl and the town's shining beacon of hope, takes it upon herself to journey to the witch in the hope of finding out the truth about her town and changing fate.

Assistant professor of theatre Bill Auld is the show's director. Featured in the cast are Michaela Bennett, Alyssa Wallace, Elyse Bois-Jobidon, Jeanne DeWeees, Michelle House, Mike Lute, Jonathan Miday, Ashley Mizer, Alexandria Roberts, Makaya Sherrell, Sarah Spies, Kait Gallagher -Wilsterman and Don Irven.

Shawna Grimes is lighting designer, David Furbay is the sound designer and adjunct faculty member Tamara Benson is stage manager.

Tickets are $10 ($5 with a Kent State Flashcard) and can be purchased at the Performing Arts Center box office, online at www.tusc.kent.edu or by calling 330-308-6400. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Free parking is available for all shows.

Kent State Tuscarawas is at 330 University Drive NE in New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Kent State reception honors retiring Lefton (gallery) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University President Lester Lefton kisses his wife, Linda, after he spoke during a send-off event for his retirement at the Kent State University Student Center Ballroom on Friday evening. Lefton, who will retire as KSU's 11th president on July 1, has led the university since July 1, 2006. The event was hosted by the KSU Board of Trustees.

To view photo gallery, please click on link:
http://recordpub.com/news%20local/2014/04/05/kent-state-reception-honors-retiring-lefton-gallery

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News Headline: Arraignment of alleged KSU shooter delayed again Friday | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: An unnamed medical issue once again resulted in the initial court hearing for Wednesday's alleged Kent State University shooter being delayed for a second day in a row, according to the Portage County Sheriff's Office.

Quavaughntay L. Tyler, 24, a KSU freshman, is charged with one count of carrying a concealed weapon, a fourth-degree felony, after allegedly having a 9mm Ruger handgun on campus.

When the gun allegedly went off during an argument between Tyler and two women near Bowman Hall off Summit Street, multiple police agencies responded to look for him.

The incident caused a lockdown on the campus for several hours Wednesday night.

Tyler eventually was arrested at Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna, where he had sought treatment for a gunshot wound to the hand suffered during the confrontation on campus, police said.

Portage County Sheriff David Doak said "another medical issue" led to the cancellation of Tyler's arraignment Friday in Portage County Municipal Court in Ravenna.

He said he could not release any additional information on the medical issue due to health privacy rules.

Doak did say the reason Tyler was taken back to Robinson Memorial "was not related to the injury suffered during (Wednesday's) incident."

Tyler was back in the Portage County jail in Shalersville as of 6 p.m. Friday, he said.

Doak said it is likely Tyler will be arraigned on Monday.

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News Headline: Authorities expect suspect to face more charges in KSU shooting (Peach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent -- A man who shot himself in the hand during an argument with two women on Kent State University's main campus April 2 was charged with carrying a concealed weapon, but authorities expect more charges to be filed.

Quavaugntay L. Tyler, 24, was arrested in the incident, which locked down the Kent campus for several hours the evening of April 2. The investigation is ongoing, said KSU Police Chief John Peach. More charges are likely.

Tyler, originally of Cleveland, lives at Lake Street Apartments in Kent and is a freshman majoring in criminology and justice studies at KSU.

He was found and arrested while he was seeking treatment at Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna around 11:30 p.m., roughly three hours after authorities say he discharged his 9 mm Ruger pistol in a parking lot off Summit Street between Bowman and Satterfield Halls.

Only one shot was fired, and no one besides Tyler was injured. Peach said investigators are still determining the suspect's motives for brandishing the weapon and whether the gun's firing was truly accidental.

"At the time, there were witnesses telling us that there was an individual who appeared to be responding to a domestic dispute involving at least two females and during the end of that argument, he produced a handgun in which a round was discharged," Peach said during a press conference at KSU's Schwartz Center April 3.

Peach said Tyler told police he was carrying the gun because he was once a victim of an armed robbery.

Tyler has been on probation since February after being convicted of grand theft, a fourth-degree felony, for his role in a scheme to defraud a Walmart of $14,900 through fake/duplicated receipts.

He is in "some kind of relationship" with the women he was arguing with, both of whom are KSU students, Peach said. He said the altercation was "definitely" a domestic dispute. The women fled the scene after the gun went off, and one eventually called police to report the event.

Police have declined to release the identity of those women.

Tyler reportedly put the bloody weapon in a backpack with some ammunition, took it to a female friend in the Johnson Hall dorm and directed her to hide it. The gun was discovered there after Tyler told police where to find it.

Police have not released that person's identity. She has not been charged.

Alerts informing students and faculty of a lockdown were first sent out at 9:48 p.m. April 2 via texted FlashAlerts in which everyone was directed to "shelter in place." The alerts, which included mass emails, also coincided with announcements through building PA systems and emergency sirens sounded by KSU police.

More than a dozen alerts were sent out in the three-hour period between when the shot was fired to when Tyler was arrested just before midnight. Many others learned what was happening through social media posts on Facebook and Twitter.

Officers from 10 different departments and Metro SWAT began scouring campus and clearing buildings beginning with the Business and Administration Building, Peach said, because witnesses claimed to see Tyler go in there.

Information came in during the searches from other witnesses suggesting Tyler "was probably off campus." Police informed area hospitals they were looking for a male suspect with a gunshot wound to his hand, and Robinson Memorial officials eventually reported admitting a patient matching the description.

Tyler was arrested at 11:55 p.m. at the hospital following treatment.

Peach credited police active-shooter training and ALICE training for students and faculty -- many of whom barricaded themselves inside classrooms -- for creating a relatively calm atmosphere that also promoted effective police searches.

"The incident night was truly humbling and gratifying because all the training that we've been doing among officers in this department, and training of students and faculty, all came together almost in a seamless way to the point that it seemed staged," Peach said. "That's how well it really worked."

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News Headline: (VIDEO) FOX 8 Exclusive: Friend Said Kent State Suspect 'Knew Better' | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio – Quavaugntay Tyler, 24 missed a second scheduled court appearance Friday on a felony charge of carrying a concealed weapon.

Tyler is accused of firing a gun on the campus of Kent State University late Wednesday, sending the campus into a lockdown for several hours while investigators were searching for him.

Among the places they looked was the off-campus apartment he shared with Angel Norvell.

Norvell, the mother of Tyler's three-year-old son, said she saw him earlier that morning and he seemed fine telling her he was planning on leaving to play basketball.

She said Tyler knew he should not have even had a gun.

“He knew better. He knew that he wasn't supposed to have it with the circumstances he had going on at the time. He knew he wasn't supposed to have it,” said Norvell.

Portage County court records show Tyler admitted to a theft charge in 2013 after he was arrested for stealing thousands from a Walmart store in nearby Brimfield where he worked.

Brimfield police called the case a ‘refund fraud scheme,' that involved the theft of as much as $21,000 over a period of six-to-eight months.

Kent State Police Chief John Peach said on Thursday that Tyler had been placed on probation in February and should not have been carrying a weapon.

Norvell said Tyler bought the 9mm Ruger before his arrest on the theft case.

“I am in the military, so I have a CCW license, and he wanted to get his so we both bought our weapons out of a gun shop, registering it and doing everything the legal way,” said Norvell.

But she said after Tyler got himself in legal trouble she tried convincing him to sell the gun back to the shop where he bought it.

Among the questions police are trying to answer during their ongoing investigation is what Tyler's intentions were when he drew the gun on Wednesday.

Norvell said she can't answer that question. “I have no idea and I swear I'm waiting on him to call me so I can ask him myself. What were you going to do with it? Because you are not going to shoot somebody. Are you trying to scare somebody so they would stop arguing or were you trying to show off?” said Norvell.

Tyler left the Kent State campus after the shooting and was later arrested at Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna where he went to get treatment for the wound to his hand.

Norvell said between the shooting and the time he was arrested Tyler did try to reach out to her but her cell phone power had drained and she never got the messages.

A criminal justice major at Kent State herself, Norvell said she knows that helping him at the time would have put herself in legal trouble, and understands that Tyler's legal troubles are serious.

“There's no way around it. You are going to be in trouble,” said Norvell. “He knew that. He knew he shouldn't have taken it (the gun) out of the house.”

Tyler remained hospitalized on Friday for treatment of the injury to his hand.

Chief Peach told FOX 8 News that police were continuing to inteview people and had been talking with Portage County prosecutors about appropriate additional charges.

Tyler could make a first appearance in Ravenna Municipal Court on Monday.

Investigators are also expected to take their case to a grand jury next week.

Get continuing coverage here.

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2014/04/04/fox-8-exclusive-friend-said-kent-state-suspect-knew-better/

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Police Proud of Students, Staff after Kent State Lockdown (Peach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio– Flashing lights, lots of police and loud sirens; that was the scene at Kent State University Wednesday night.

“It was very nerve-racking. You never think that something like this is going to happen to you. I was calling my parents and was like I have no idea what was going on right now,” said freshman, Sarah Rossignol.

Police were called out to campus after reports of a shot fired. The campus immediately went into lockdown. Students were told to stay in the dorms and classrooms were barricaded. Alerts were also sent out to notify everyone of the situation.

“If you were in a building you knew what was going on. If you were outside walking, people would pull you into buildings telling you you were going to stay there until everything's done, doesn't matter what you have going on; it can wait for a minute,” said Joshua Lewis who is a sophomore at Kent State.

Police said a student discharged a gun.

Kent State Police Chief John Peach said he's proud of how students, staff and police handled everything.

“This is overwhelmingly more successful than we could have ever hoped in a scenario like this,” he said at a press conference Thursday morning.

Chief Peach said while the security protocol was followed, there were other issues. Speakers in a few of the buildings didn't work.

“We made note of those speakers that had difficulties and we respond to them. The protocol is extremely good and really effective, but the equipment or something we're going to have to continue monitor, upgrade and improve and fix when necessary,” the chief said.

For the most part, students said they're pleased with the way police responded.

“They told us to stay calm and seek shelter and everything so we did and it seems like they took care of it. They took a little bit, but they got it taken care of, so I think they did a good job,” said freshman Connor Mingus.

Read much more on this story, here.

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2014/04/03/police-proud-of-students-staff-after-kent-state-lockdown/

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News Headline: Arraignment for Kent State gun suspect postponed | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name: WKYC Staff, WKYC
News OCR Text: There will be no arraignment for Quavaugntay Tyler today, according to the Portage County Common Pleas Court clerk.

Quavaughtay Tyler (Photo: Portage County Sheriff)

PORTAGE COUNTY -- There will be no arraignment for Quavaugntay Tyler today, according to the Portage County Common Pleas Court clerk. No reason was immediately given.

No new arraignment date has been scheduled.

Tyler, 24, originally from Cleveland, was arrested late Wednesday for carrying a concealed weapon (a fourth degree felony) pending further review by the prosecutor's office.

He is a freshman Kent State student.

During an argument with two female Kent State students, Tyler pulled a weapon that discharged immediately and struck his left hand.

No other person was injured. The women fled.

The campus was put into lockdown after a report of a gun shot.

Police pursued the suspect and received reports that someone matching his description was at the Business Administration Building. The police ordered a shelter in place advisory for the Kent Campus.

One of the women from the argument called Kent State Police and told them that the suspect is probably wounded.

Police located Tyler at Robinson Memorial Hospital around 11:30 p.m. Wednesday where he sought treatment for his injury. Police recovered a weapon.

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Bizarre past of the suspected KSU gunman Quavaughntay Tyler (Peach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: WOIO-TV - Online
Contact Name: Paul Orlousky
News OCR Text: There's a story behind the man who had a gun go off into his own hand, sending the entire Kent State University campus into lockdown.

The records surrounding the case are at Kent Municipal Court, and they give a snapshot into the mind of suspected gunman Quavaughntay Tyler. His name was not unfamiliar with investigators.

Kent State Police Chief John Peach disclosed the details about Tyler. Records show that for more than six months the young man pocketed cash that wasn't his. He stole $21,000 from the Walmart in Brimfield where he was an employee, then; he posted internet pictures of himself holding the wads of cash. Tyler either returned bogus cell phones, or stole them and had friends return them with phony receipts he created. Tyler pocketed all of the profits.

Loss prevention officers watched him on surveillance video cameras.

When confronted he admitted what he did and in a hand-written confession filled with grammatical errors documented, I have took money from Walmart only because I had no other way. What I can do is make things rite.

Still, Tyler has a record of being trouble, and bringing trouble, to all of those around him. A woman who he had stash his gun in her dorm room is now in hot water, and there are thefts which have happened on campus that he is a suspect in.

Because of the fired gun and campus-wide lockdown, he'll have to return to court for the Walmart thefts.

"Judges put you on probation for a reason. They want to give you a shot to rehabilitate and do the right thing," noted John Peach, Kent State Police Chief.

Because Tyler's probation violation included carrying a weapon he could also face federal charges.

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.19actionnews.com/story/25167973/bizarre-past-of-the-ksu-gunman-quavaughntay-tyler?autostart=true

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News Headline: Kent launches Party Registration Program | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/07/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent police are hoping to help party throwers avoid potentially costly noise citations and cut down on neighborhood disturbances.

Launched last week, the Kent Police Department's pilot Party Registration Program could ultimately lead to fewer fines for citizens and fewer distractions for police -- if residents play along.

Modeled after programs in other college towns across the country, the program allows Kentites to register their neighborhood get-togethers with the city. In return, if there is a complaint, the resident will receive a phone warning before cops arrive on their doorstep.

The program is geared specifically toward noise complaints, said Kent police Lt. Jim Prusha.

If a party is registered, and police receive a complaint about the property, a dispatcher will call and notify the contact person, initiating a grace period the hosts can use to bring the event under control before an officer arrives.

"We basically give them a 20-minute window to either get the party under control, get people who maybe aren't supposed to be there out and that sort of thing," Lee has said.

When an officer drives by, if everything seems orderly, they will continue on.

Information about the program can be found online via a link on the www.kentpd.org homepage or from brochures available at the Kent police department. Registering parties have to print out the form and submit it two days before their event.

The program launches just in time for the tail end of the spring semester at Kent State University, which seems to regularly coincide with large, annual, non-university-sanctioned parties that have taken names such as "College (Avenue) Fest" and "Drinkin' on Lincoln (Street)".

The registering option provides a warning system for residents to preempt arrests or citations. It could also help free up police who often trek between multiple gatherings on heavy party weekends.

"We would like our off to be able to focus on bigger things rather than go from party to party to party every weekend," Prusha said.

However, Prusha noted, a complaint beyond simply loud noise (including anything related to violence or other disorderly conduct, for example) will still warrant a police response regardless of whether the event is registered with the city.

While the program is extended to the whole community, it was created with Kent's college-age population in mind.

Lee noted the majority of roughly 350 noise-related complaints in 2013 involved "college-age individuals." Police don't specifically separate reports that involve KSU students, though, and not every noise complaint is tied to a party.

After a year, police will reevaluate the program's effectiveness. At Clemson, Prusha noted, the program has been credited with reducing the overall number of both noise citations issued and neighbor complaints in general.

The same effect is hoped for Kent.

"This is just a trial period," Prusha said. "We're ready to give it a whirl."

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News Headline: Kent State Showcase students: Meet Tim Welsh | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's New York Musical Theatre Showcase is an annual event that strives to help launch the careers of some of the school's most talented seniors. The students have prepared a show they'll perform Monday and Tuesday in front of New York agents, casting directors and talent managers.

We'll follow four Kent State University students to the New York Showcase, and after the performance, let readers know how they did. Today, meet Tim Welsh. Read more about Showcase at www.ohio.com .

Tim Welsh has been immersing himself in the theater and musical theater worlds in multiple ways.

The Kent State University senior wrote the lyrics to the uplifting song Now , composed by fellow musical theater student Connor Simpson as the opening and closer for this year's New York Showcase. The song speaks specifically to this moment in time for the 14 performers as they're poised to break into the business.

Boardman High School graduate Welsh comes from a musical family: His father sings opera and his mother plays flute and handbells. Growing up, he was involved with the violin, choir and theater at school.

“I quickly realized nothing made me as happy or made me feel as comfortable as theater,” the baritone said. “It was never really a question; that's just always what I was gonna do.”

Welsh has played some memorable characters at Porthouse Theatre, including the comical Luther Billis in South Pacific and senior citizen Joe Zutty reliving his glory days as a firefighter in Working .

The performer said he has enjoyed the broad theater conditioning he has received at Kent State, especially discovering Shakespeare. Last year, he played the foolish Nick Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream at school.

The graduating senior thinks of his KSU musical theater degree as a double major in voice and acting, with a minor in dance.

“I hope that my work in the future starts to break that wall down” between musical theater and regular theater, he said. “I think that really great work happens when you look at the work as the same — it's just different material but you approach it with the same focus.”

Welsh, who co-founded the student company Transforum Theatre at Kent, has done writing and directing for that group and also assistant-directed Legally Blonde this year with associate professor Amy Fritsche.

He is looking forward to the Showcase performances, specially tailored to focus on each of the 14 singers as a person. Welsh will sing the comical D & D (about Dungeons and Dragons geeks) by comedian/Broadway actor Stephen Lynch combined with the tune Fight the Dragons from the 2013 musical Big Fish .

Welsh is realistic enough to know that agents sign singers on the spot if they can use them in a show immediately: “We are their source of income.”

He said he's willing to go anywhere to work as an actor but will start out pursuing the New York dream: “While we're young and fresh and right out of the gate, why not take that risk?”

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