Report Overview:
Total Clips (31)
Alumni; Athletics (2)
Athletics (2)
Hospitality Management (1)
Information Services; KSU Esplanade; Town-Gown (1)
Institutional Advancement (1)
International and Intercultural Education; May 4; Office of the President (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
Library and Information Science (SLIS); Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)
Music (1)
Office of the President (3)
Research (1)
Safety (10)
Theatre and Dance (1)
University Libraries (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics (2)
Patriots WR Julian Edelman to co-host Kent State athletics auction (Geis) 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State has added some major star power to make its 3rd annual Athletics Scholarship Auction the best one yet. Julian Edelman, a former star quarterback...

Patriots' wideout to host Kent State Athletics Scholarship Auction (Geis) 04/14/2014 Tallmadge Express Text Attachment Email

Kent State has added some major star power to make its third annual Athletics Scholarship Auction the best one yet. Julian Edelman, a standout wide...


Athletics (2)
KSU spring football: Cousins Darren Goodson, Trayion Durham make football a family affair 04/14/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: College brought cousins Darren Goodson and Trayion Durham together. Now, the standout Kent State athletes are relying on football to help them...

Kent State Sports Report: Flashes turn in personal bests at Tennessee Relays 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State track and field athletes continued to notch personal bests in bunches last weekend at the Tennessee Relays. William Barnes took second in...


Hospitality Management (1)
Ten things to do in Northeast Ohio: April 11-17 04/11/2014 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

...restaurant will speak about his journey as a chef and his love for inventing and sustaining American cuisine at 4 p.m. in the Ritchie Hall Theater at Kent State University. This free event is open to the public and is sponsored by the Schwebel Baking Company. It is organized by the faculty and students...


Information Services; KSU Esplanade; Town-Gown (1)
Expansion of Kent State Wi-Fi network to bring more free access to Esplanade, city (Wearley) 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University and its surrounding city are working together to ensure large swaths of each have the wireless Internet connectivity modern society...


Institutional Advancement (1)
Dominion honors Kent, KSU 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Dominion East Ohio recently honored the City of Kent and Kent State University with a Community Impact Award recognizing the partnership efforts resulting...


International and Intercultural Education; May 4; Office of the President (1)
ALONG THE WAY: David Dix (Lefton) 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Lester Lefton, retiring after what appears to have been a very successful eight years as president of Kent State University, did not apply for the job,...


Journalism and Mass Communications (2)
Kent State, UA students selected for Knight scholarships 04/14/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Six area college students have been selected for scholarships in memory of longtime Akron Beacon Journal editor John S. Knight and public relations professional...

Student Journalist Files "Fabricated" Scene In Story Featured 04/14/2014 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

A student journalist is no longer writing for the Daily Kent Stater newspaper, as the paper says he "fabricated" a scene in a story earlier this week....


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Kent State Trumbull to have three fairs 04/13/2014 Vindicator - Online Text Attachment Email

A trio of fairs spanning a variety of interests will take place at Kent State University at Trumbull the week of April 27. All events will be in the Technology Building, 4314 Mahoning Ave. NW. Things kick off...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
April luncheon at Dennison Yard April 17 04/11/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...April luncheon at noon April 17 at the Dennison Yard, 313 Center St., Dennison. Speakers will include: Joe Belinsky, certified business advisor, SBDC Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The topic of discussion will be Your Business is Growing..How About Mine? Cost: $10, members; $15 for non-members....

Student Computer Designed Art Exhibit and Silent Auction set for April 24 04/11/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts are sponsoring the 10th annual Student Computer Designed Art Exhibit...


Library and Information Science (SLIS); Visual Communication Design (VCD) (1)
Former area librarian being featured at KSU for her pop-up collection 04/14/2014 Salem News Text Attachment Email

A former area librarian is being featured at Kent State University for a her pop-up book collection. Carol Davis, who retired from the Leetonia library...


Music (1)
Walter 'Doc' Watson, 80, former director of KSU music school, dies (Seachrist) 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Remembered as an enthusiastic educator, mentor Music was life for Walter “Doc” Watson. “Maybe the thing that marks it for you is when you're working...


Office of the President (3)
Ken Burns film 'The Address' airs a week before his talk at Kent State 04/14/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Every year, the students at Vermont's Greenwood School are challenged to memorize and publicly recite Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address....

University of Akron trustees edge closer to naming presidential finalists 04/14/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Within a few weeks, the University of Akron is expected to bring finalists to campus for interviews with administrators, faculty, students and others for...

Kent State shredded documents to hide information about presidential search, committee members say (Lovejoy, Mansfield) 04/14/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

KENT: Kent State officials were so intent on keeping their search for a new president secret that they destroyed search committee notes and documents....


Research (1)
Recycling on Kent commission agenda 04/14/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Kent Sustainability Commission will meet Tuesday to receive a update on downtown recycling, a Kent State University greenhouse gas study, discuss...


Safety (10)
Case against Kent State shooting suspect moving forward, court documents show 04/14/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio – Portage County prosecutors are moving forward with charges against a Kent State University student arrested in connection with a campus shooting,...

Charges dropped against student in Kent State shooting 04/11/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...April 2, university spokeswoman Emily Vincent said. The Columbus native was charged Wednesday with obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence, Kent State police said. The charges were dropped Friday during an initial court appearance. That night Tyler, also a freshman, pulled the trigger...

KSU student indicted on three felony counts in on-campus shooting 04/11/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

A Portage County grand jury has returned a three-count indictment against a Kent State University student accused of shooting himself in the hand during an argument on campus last week. Quavaugntay L. Tyler, 24, was charged...

Breana Francis charged in connection with shot fired on Kent State campus. 04/11/2014 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - Prosecutors are dropping the charges against a Kent State University student that was charged in connection with the shot fired on the Kent State campus April 2. Breana Francis, 20, was...

Case Dismissed Against Female in Kent Lockdown Incident 04/14/2014 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — The case has been dismissed against a student accused of hiding a gun used in the Kent State University shooting incident earlier this month....

Case Dismissed Against Female in Kent Lockdown Incident 04/11/2014 WJW-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- The case has been dismissed against a student accused of hiding a gun used in the Kent State University shooting incident earlier this month. Breana Francis, 20, of Columbus, faced charges of obstruction of justice and tampering...

Arraignment Set for KSU Shooting Suspect 04/12/2014 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...Portage County Court on Monday, following his indictment on charges in connection with the April 2 shooting incident that resulted in a lock-down on the Kent State campus. 24-year-old Quavauntay Tyler was indicted by a Grand Jury on counts of carrying a concealed weapon, tampering with evidence and...

Original Charges Dismissed against KSU Student 04/11/2014 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

The original charges of obstructing justice and tampering with evidence have reportedly been dismissed against a female student at Kent State University in the April 2 shooting incident that spawned a lock-down on campus. However, that doesn't necessarily mean that 20-year-old...

Man indicted over gunshot at Kent State 04/12/2014 Columbus Dispatch - Online Text Attachment Email

A Portage County grand jury has indicted a Kent State University student on three counts over a gunshot fired during an argument on campus last week. Quavaugntay L. Tyler, 24, was charged...

Kent State man pleads not guilty after shot fired 04/13/2014 WXIX-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio (AP) - A Kent State University student suspected of prompting a campus lockdown after shooting himself in the hand has pleaded not guilty to carrying a concealed...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Kent State students hope Showcase performances opened stage doors (Kent, Stillings 04/11/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...all came down to a two-minute, passion-packed, talent-saturated solo performance by each singer — enough to make agents and casting directors bite, as Kent State University musical theater students showed off their triple-threat skills in New York this past week. Hundreds of hours of preparation...


University Libraries (1)
Johnny Depp, 'Mad Men,' zentangle art, 'Orphan Black' and Rihanna: Pop 10 04/13/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Hollywood cinema and professor of American studies, will lecture on "Little Lindy Is Kidnapped: The Media Coverage of the Crime of the 20th Century" at Kent State University at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 17. The free lecture will take place in the Read Special Collections Classroom (Room 1018) at the...


News Headline: Patriots WR Julian Edelman to co-host Kent State athletics auction (Geis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State has added some major star power to make its 3rd annual Athletics Scholarship Auction the best one yet.

Julian Edelman, a former star quarterback for the Golden Flashes, who is currently a standout wide receiver for the New England Patriots, will co-host the 2014 event that is set for Friday, April 25, beginning at 6:30 p.m. on center court of the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

In addition, the live auction will feature the opportunity to win dinner for two with Kent State alumnus and legendary college football coach Lou Holtz.

"Our annual scholarship auction is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the athletic, academic and social success of our student-athletes," said KSU Senior Associate Athletic Director/Executive Director of Athletic Advancement Matthew Geis. "We are pleased with the show of support to date by our department, campus and community."

According to Geis, 250 tickets have already been sold for this year's auction -- up from 180 in 2013. The athletic department's goal is to sell 300 tickets, and Geis is confident that it will be reached.

Edelman started at quarterback for the Flashes from 2006-08. He rushed for 2,483 yards and passed for 4,997 yards and 30 touchdowns during his collegiate career, and set a single-season school record by piling up 3,190 total yards (1,820 passing, 1,370 rushing) as a senior in 2008.

Edelman was taken in the seventh round of the 2009 NFL Draft by the Patriots and was converted to wide receiver. He has developed into one of the league's top performers at wideout despite standing just 5-foot-10, collecting 174 catches for 1,770 yards and 10 touchdowns during his five-year pro career.

After catching 105 passes for 1,056 yards and six scores a year ago, Edelman became a free agent, but chose to stay with New England. He signed a four-year deal last month with a maximum value of $19 million that includes a $5 million signing bonus and $1 million guaranteed in 2014.

"I'm looking forward to getting back to the Kent State University campus," said Edelman. "I spent some great years there. It's an important place in my life, and playing football for the Golden Flashes was the springboard to my career in the NFL. I'm happy that I can help the athletic department by being a part of this year's scholarship auction."

All event proceeds support student-athlete scholarships, and last year's auction generated over $30,000 in scholarship support. This year's goal is to top $50,000.

The Athletics Scholarship Auction will feature over 100 silent and live auction items, including trips to Naples (Fla.), Lake Tahoe and Cabo San Lucas, a bus trip with sideline passes for the Kent State at Ohio State football game set for Sept. 13 in Columbus, and a 1972 football helmet signed by former KSU star player and current Alabama head coach Nick Saban.

There will also be a raffle that evening for a two-week trip for four to Hawaii, complete with accommodations and a $500 airfare voucher. Only 75 tickets for this raffle will be sold at the price of $100 each, and they will be available for purchase 10 days prior to the event.

The reception and silent auction begin at 6:30 p.m., followed by a strolling dinner at 7:30 p.m. and a live auction at 9 p.m. Tickets are $100 per person and are limited. They can be reserved by calling Erich Karthan at 330-672-2078 or by visiting www.supportgoldenflashes.com.

FOOTBALL QUICK-HITTERS

• Sophomore Nick Holley and junior Tristin Boykin are getting major reps at running back during practice sessions this spring, while senior Trayion Durham recovers from offseason foot surgery. Holley made several plays during Wednesday morning's practice.

"We're gonna wear those two guys out," said KSU offensive coordinator Brian Rock. "Tristin and Nick Holley have been taking the majority of the reps, and I think both of them have a chance to be good players."

Durham was originally ruled out of spring practices, but is progressing well and may see some action before the spring ends.

• The Flashes have only two quarterbacks on scholarship in camp, returning starter Colin Reardon (redshirt sophomore) and redshirt freshman Nathan Strock, but Rock is high on both signal-callers.

"I think (Reardon's) done a good job of seeing things. The difference I see right now is he was worried about doing his job (last year), and now he understands a little bit more about the whole picture, which is a really good step to take. And Nate Strock shows some really good signs out there. He can sling it, he can run. I'm excited about those two."

• Sophomore cornerback Najee Murray, who joined the team midway through last year, but could not play after transferring from Ohio State, took snaps with the first team on Wednesday.

• Former Kent State speedster Dri Archer worked out for scouts from Indianapolis last week in Kent, and was scheduled to visit Tampa Bay on Wednesday.

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News Headline: Patriots' wideout to host Kent State Athletics Scholarship Auction (Geis) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Tallmadge Express
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State has added some major star power to make its third annual Athletics Scholarship Auction the best one yet.

Julian Edelman, a standout wide receiver for the New England Patriots and former star quarterback for the Golden Flashes, is expected to co-host the 2014 event that's set for April 25, beginning at 6:30 p.m. on center court of the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center.

In addition, the live auction will feature the opportunity to win dinner for two with Kent State alumnus and legendary college football coach Lou Holtz.

"Our annual scholarship auction is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the athletic, academic and social success of our student-athletes," KSU Senior Associate Athletic Director/Executive Director of Athletic Advancement Matthew Geis said. "We are pleased with the show of support to date by our department, campus and community."

Edelman started at quarterback for the Flashes from 2006 to 2008. He rushed for 2,483 yards and passed for 4,997 yards and 30 touchdowns during his collegiate career and set a school record by piling up 3,190 total yards (1,820 passing and 1,370 rushing) as a senior in 2008.

Edelman was taken in the seventh round of the 2009 NFL Draft by the Patriots and converted to wide receiver. He has 174 catches for 1,770 yards and 10 touchdowns during his five-year pro career.

Edelman caught 105 passes for 1,056 yards and six scores a year ago.

"I'm looking forward to getting back to the Kent State University campus," Edelman said. "I spent some great years there. It's an important place in my life and playing football for the Golden Flashes was the springboard to my career in the NFL. I'm happy that I can help the athletic department by being a part of this year's scholarship auction."

All event proceeds support student-athlete scholarships and last year's auction generated over $30,000 in scholarship support. This year's goal is to top $50,000.

The Athletics Scholarship Auction will feature more than 100 silent and live auction items, including trips to Naples (Fla.), Lake Tahoe and Cabo San Lucas, a bus trip with sideline passes for the Kent State-Ohio State football game set for Sept. 13 in Columbus and a 1972 football helmet signed by former KSU star player and current Alabama head coach Nick Saban.

There also will be a raffle that evening for a two-week trip for four to Hawaii, complete with accommodations and a $500 airfare voucher. Only 75 tickets for this raffle will be sold at the price of $100 each and they will be available for purchase 10 days prior to the event.

The reception and silent auction is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m., followed by a strolling dinner at 7:30 p.m. and a live auction at 9 p.m. Tickets are $100 per person and are limited. They can be reserved by calling Erich Karthan at 330-672-2078 or by visiting www.supportgoldenflashes.com.

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News Headline: KSU spring football: Cousins Darren Goodson, Trayion Durham make football a family affair | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: College brought cousins Darren Goodson and Trayion Durham together.

Now, the standout Kent State athletes are relying on football to help them become family.

Goodson, a 6-foot-5, 245-pound senior forward on the basketball team, and Durham, a 6-foot-1, 248 senior running back on the football team, didn't know they were related until a random Insta­gram photo led to the surprising realization last year.

“Crazy how it happened,” said Durham, who led the Golden Flashes with 766 rushing yards and scored a team-high tying six touchdowns last year. “We've talked a little about it, but just haven't been able to match up our schedules to be able to hang out.”

That changed recently when Goodson decided to walk on to the football team as a tight end, giving him the ability to play one more season of college sports before graduation as well as some time for the cousins to catch up.

“I knew of him because his school, Colerain, is really popular and just 15 minutes up the street from mine,” said Goodson, who averaged 9.1 points, 4.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists for the Flashes as a senior. “But I'd never met him.”

Adding more coincidence to Goodson's arrival in spring camp is the fact that the Flashes' receivers coach, Doc Gamble, was Goodson's football coach at Cincinnati Aiken High School.

“Coach Gamble was my high school head coach, and I didn't like him,” Goodson said. “So, I quit after my freshman year and just played basketball instead. But I was just a kid back then. Now, we're cool. He's one of the reasons I came out [to play football], too.”

Since those days, Goodson has mentally and physically grown up.

“[Aiken] was one of those schools where discipline came first,” Gamble said. “It was about molding them into young men and educating them. But now he's a changed man. Any problems we had are in the past.”

Although Goodson isn't playing during spring camp because of his class schedule, he's been out to most team practices and meetings and is looking forward to getting fitted for his football equipment this week.

“After practice the other day, I was out there messing around with [sophomore quarterback] Colin [Reardon], catching some balls a little bit after practice so people could see I can really play. It's something you don't lose over time — catching a football or shooting a jumper — no matter how long it's been.”

For Goodson, that's since the end of his freshman season at Aiken.

“The big thing that's a lot different from high school to college is the amount of plays you have to learn,” he said. “It's tougher to learn these plays and the blocking schemes. It's a lot more responsibility than I had in high school. Back then, it was just throw the ball up and go catch it.”

Come fall, a big part of Goodson's role will be blocking to help create holes for his bull-dozing cousin.

“Oh, yeah, I'll protect Trayion,” Goodson said. “I'll protect him real good. That's my blood.”

On the mend

Durham underwent surgery on his right foot two months ago when a nagging injury from last season worsened and required a pin to be inserted.

He has not practiced with the Flashes during spring camp, limited to testing the foot with light running in a straight line. Durham, who is expected to be healthy by preaseason camp in late summer, hopes to progress to side-to-side movements in the next week or two.

Kyle Payton returns

Junior tight end Kyle Payton was cleared medically to participate in spring practice after missing all of last season with a heart problem. A 6-foot-3, 247-pounder from Columbus, Payton participated in two practices before injuring his shoulder and being sidelined again.

It is not considered serious, but there's no timetable for his return.

Alumni support

Former KSU players Dri Archer and Fabrice Pratt watched Saturday's practice from the sidelines. When not traveling for NFL team workouts before the upcoming NFL Draft, Archer has spent time keeping in shape on campus.

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News Headline: Kent State Sports Report: Flashes turn in personal bests at Tennessee Relays | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State track and field athletes continued to notch personal bests in bunches last weekend at the Tennessee Relays.

William Barnes took second in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 13.99, moving into third on the school's all-time list with his new personal-record.

Wayne Gordon (20.57) and Riak Reese (20.89) took second and fifth, respectively, in the 200 meters with personal-best times.

Jailyn Twitty finished sixth in the triple jump with a personal-best leap of 49-5.5. Jacob Swords set a new PR in the 800 meters, taking fifth in 1:53.13, while Reggie Jagers finished fourth in the discus (180-5).

Matthew Tobin (48.25) and Laron Brown (48.51) went fifth-sixth in the 400 meters, while Michael King took fifth in the discus with a personal-best heave of 167-8. In his first 5,000-meter run, Julian Meyer took fourth with a time of 14:35.07.

Kent State's relay teams also fared well. The 4x400-meter relay squad of Tobin, Miles Dunlap, Swords and Brown set a school record while finishing third with a time of 3:08.97.

The Flashes' 4x800 relay group of Swords, Marteze Roper, Grant Onken and Jared Fleming won in 7:33.89, while the 4x100 relay team of Nate Scales, Reese, Barnes and Gordon was also victorious in 40.33.

On the women's side, Roseanne Erickson broke a 26-year-old school record while taking second in the long jump with a leap of 20-8. Ann Marie Duffus set a new school record while winning the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 13.49, and was fourth in the long jump (19-8.75).

Danniel Thomas was a double-winner, claiming the discus (184-2) and shot put (personal-best 53-7). Dior Delophont also won an event for KSU, claiming the high jump by clearing 5-11.25.

Erickson took second in the 100 meters in a personal-best 11.64 that's tied for second on Kent State's all-time list. Raquel Smiddy (personal-best 146-11) and Ada Nicholson-Burley (146-4) went 3-4 in the discus.

Joh'Vonnie Mosley placed second in the shot put (personal-best 53-1) and fifth in the discus (162-2). Former Garfield High School star C.J. Carlisle was fifth in the javelin (142-7), and the 4x800-meter relay team of Lauren Burnett, Tabitha Jacofsky, Taylor Wickey and Hannah Fleck placed second (8:53.94).

—————

Gordon (sophomore) was named MAC Men's Track Athlete of the Week after finishing first in the 100 meters at the Northeast Ohio Quad on April 4 in Akron with a time of 10.22, which leads the MAC and ranks eighth in the country.

—————

Thomas was chosen MAC Women's Field Athlete of the Week after placing first in the discus at the Northeast Ohio Quad on April 5. The sophomore broke a 19-year-old record at Kent State in the discus with a toss of 186-6, which ranks first in the MAC and fourth in the country.

GYMNASTICS

Kent State senior star Marie Case was named MAC Female Scholar Athlete of the Week after earning a trip to the NCAA Gymnastics Championships as an individual on April 5.

Case, an exercise science major who maintains a 3.515 grade point average, scored a 39.325 in the all-around at the Baton Rouge Regional to qualify for the NCAA Championships this weekend in Birmingham, Ala.

Case earned her best score in the floor exercise with a 9.900, good for fifth at the regionals. She was also named the NCAA Central Region Co-Gymnast of the Year.

BASKETBALL

Former Kent State guard Mike Roberts was one of 10 officials selected to work the 2014 Final Four at AT&T Stadium in North Texas. Roberts, who played 89 games for the Flashes from 1982-86, served as the standby official for Saturday's national semifinal contests and Monday night's championship game.

FOOTBALL

Beef 'O'Brady's is the sponsor of Kent State's 2014 spring game and youth clinic on Saturday, April 26. Both events at Dix Stadium are free.

The Flashes will take the field at 1 p.m. Live action can be heard on WHLO 640 AM, with Ty Linder and Rob Polinsky on the call.

Kent State's football and cheer clinic begins at noon and is open to kids ages 4-14. Participants will receive free meal vouchers for Brimfield's Beef 'O' Brady's. To register, call Dennis Watson at 330-672-8830.

On Monday, April 21, the Water Street Tavern in downtown Kent will host a Spring Football Radio Show. Fans can meet head coach Paul Haynes and other coaches beginning at 5:30 p.m., then Haynes and Linder will go on air at 6 p.m. Giveaways and prizes will be available throughout the show, including a signed Kent State football helmet.

BASEBALL

Kent State junior centerfielder Alex Miklos was named MAC East Division Player of the Week a week ago. He batted .526 with a 1.105 slugging percentage and .609 on-base percentage in five games last week.

Miklos had an inside the park home run and a pair of stolen bases while lifting his conference batting average to .500.

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News Headline: Ten things to do in Northeast Ohio: April 11-17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Here's the latest installment of our weekly list of upcoming arts, culture and entertainment events that runs each week on CrainsCleveland.com.

Here's the latest installment of our weekly list of upcoming arts, culture and entertainment events that runs each week on CrainsCleveland.com.


Among the amusements of the next seven days: Jessica Lang Dance Co. at PlayhouseSquare, the Monster Drawing Rally at SPACES gallery, WTF'er Marc Maron at Hilarities, Second City's funny people at the Hard Rock Rocksino, "The Duellists" at Cleveland Cinematheque, a Yuri Gagarin party at Great Lakes Science Center, and more.


Send information about coming events to managing editor Scott Suttell at ssuttell@crain.com.

Art

Saturday, April 12: The Monster Drawing Rally at SPACES gallery in Cleveland is a live drawing event and fundraiser featuring more than 100 local artists. SPACES provides the bare necessities — pencils, charcoal, pens, markers, ink and paper — for the artists to create their work in front of spectators. The event, which runs from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., consists of one-hour drawing shifts with about 30 artists drawing simultaneously. As the drawings are completed, they will be hung on the walls and made available for purchase for $65 each. Admission is $5, though it's free for members and children 17 and under. Proceeds from the event provide direct support for SPACES' public projects. Information is available here.

Comedy

Friday, April 11, and Saturday, April 12: Fans of the “WTF with Marc Maron” podcast — and there are lots of you, based on the iTunes download numbers — should know that the man himself is in Cleveland this weekend at Hilarities. The podcast, for the uninitiated, features a deep-dive conversation with celebrities — mostly from the comedy world — that produces some remarkable candid revelations. The podcast's success has brought comedy veteran Maron to a new generation of fans, and he has expanded his world with a TV show and a best-selling book. Ticket information is here.

Thursday, April 17, through Saturday, April 19: Lots of famous comedians — Tina Fey, Stephen Colbert, Bill Murray and Steve Carell, for instance — got their start at Chicago's Second City comedy troupe. So you might catch a glimpse of a future star at “Happily Ever Laughter,” a Second City revue that's on stage at Club Velvet at the Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park. The show is said to “draw on classic material from the Second City archives” and will work in material based on current events. Second City shows are always a mix of scripted and improvisational elements, so the performers have to be quick on their feet. Go here for information.

Dance

Saturday, April 12: The Jessica Lang Dance Co. was founded in 2011 and has been gaining steady buzz in the dance world. Lang, formerly a dancer with Twyla Tharp's company, “features contemporary dance that goes hand in hand with the music, opera and mixed media compositions that she collaborates with,” PlayhouseSquare says in promotional materials. The repertoire ranges from “minimal and simplistic to rich and complex with visual ideas including remarkable sets and costumes.” Lang's goal is to transform “classical ballet language and rigor into artfully crafted, emotionally engaging contemporary works.” The show's at 8 p.m. at the Ohio Theatre. Ticket information is here.

Film

Saturday, April 12: Moviegoers today know Ridley Scott as the Hollywood force behind schlock like “Prometheus” and (especially) “The Counselor.” But a long time ago, even before the classics “Alien” and “Blade Runner,” he made a beautifully odd film called “The Duellists,” based on a Joseph Conrad story. The 1977 film stars Keith Carradine, Harvey Keitel and Albert Finney. It's about two Napoleonic-era French cavalry officers “who duel with each other repeatedly over a 15-year-period in a never-ending quest for justice and honor,” according to Cleveland Cinematheque, which is screening the film at 5:15 p.m. Saturday. Go here for information.

Science

Saturday, April 12: The “Yuri's Night” party at the Great Lakes Science Center gives “science fiction fans, space geeks and socialites the opportunity to dress as an intergalactic traveler or fearsome space creature – all in honor of celebrating space exploration.” It's a 21-and-over night (the event runs from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.) of dancing, music, beer and wine, hors d'oeuvres, a costume contest and more, celebrating the past, present and future of space flight. The “Yuri” in the event title is Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space. Music is by Abby Normal, Vibe & Direct, DJ 41 SE7EN and OZMTZ. Tickets are $55 in advance and $60 at the door. Click here for details.

Speakers

Monday, April 14: Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Charles Krauthammer comes to Akron to deliver a 7:30 p.m. address titled, “Inside the Obama Administration's Second Term.” It takes place at E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall and is part of the University of Akron Hood/Meyerson Lecture series. His most recent book is “Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Politics.” Krauthammer is a dedicated conservative and no fan of Obama, but he has been honored in the past by the liberal People for the American Way, which presented him its First Amendment Award. General admission tickets are only $10. You can get them here.

Thursday, April 17: Chef Rocco Whalen of Cleveland's Fahrenheit restaurant will speak about his journey as a chef and his love for inventing and sustaining American cuisine at 4 p.m. in the Ritchie Hall Theater at Kent State University. This free event is open to the public and is sponsored by the Schwebel Baking Company. It is organized by the faculty and students in the Hospitality Management program at Kent State. On top of the flagship Fahrenheit, Whalen has eateries inside the Horseshoe Casino, FirstEnergy Stadium and Quicken Loans Arena. He also just opened a restaurant in a Charlotte, N.C., high-rise. His latest addition is “Fahren-Lite” — new menu items that are light in calories and fat; a spinoff of Whalen's role in the Food Network show “The Fat Chef,” which highlighted Whalen's longtime struggles with weight and recounts how he lost 130 pounds.

Theater

Saturday, April 12: These are pretty straight-laced times, so the rock musical “Hair,” at the Stocker Arts Center at Lorain County Community College, might come as a bit of a shock to young audiences. But, as Stocker promotional material notes, this show “about searching for truth, peace and love in Vietnam War-era America continues to strike a resonant chord with audiences of all ages.” Even if you've never seen it, you've absorbed many of the show's hit songs: “Aquarius,” “Let the Sun Shine in,” “Good Morning Starshine” and “Easy to be Hard,” among others, became anthems of counter-culture and the sexual revolution. Tickets are $36 for orchestra seating and $29 for mezzanine seating. Click here to learn more.

With the kids

Saturday, April 12: Have a kid who's hooked on Sid the Science Kid? (Just skip this item if you don't know who Sid the Science Kid is.) If you answered yes to the question, you should know that the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is hosting “Celebrate Science with Sid the Science Kid!” The program is free with museum admission. It features screenings of the movie “Sid the Science Kid: What is a Rainbow?” at noon and 2 p.m.; bubble shows at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; live animals shows at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; photos with Sid in the museum lobby; bubble and rainbow activities and crafts; and free raffle prizes. Information is here.

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News Headline: Expansion of Kent State Wi-Fi network to bring more free access to Esplanade, city (Wearley) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University and its surrounding city are working together to ensure large swaths of each have the wireless Internet connectivity modern society increasingly demands and expects.

The university wants every inch of campus outside dorms and academic buildings (which are already all connected) covered with Wi-Fi signals. Meanwhile, the city is leveraging its town-gown relationship to help those signals extend through outdoor areas downtown, possibly even as far as the banks of the Cuyahoga River.

"But that's a future plan," said Jason Wearley, Kent State's executive director of infrastructure and division architect for information services.

Both KSU and the city are already heading in that direction. The bulk of the Lester A. Lefton Esplanade -- which runs from the sciences corridor beginning near the Liquid Crystal Institute westward through the student green and to Haymaker Parkway -- is already covered with wireless access.

But a recent agreement between the city and KSU will result in two new Wi-Fi hotspots being installed on utility poles around the Esplanade extension. Only a few segments of the walkway around the Business and Administration Building and Franklin Hall will lack outside Wi-Fi coverage, but those will addressed in the future, Wearley said.

Expanding the reach of the university's wireless network into the city is an overall part of downtown's ongoing revitalization, said City Manager Dave Ruller.

"(KSU President Lester) Lefton talks all the time about making Kent a destination, and he's 100 percent right, so we put a lot of thought into the sort of lifestyle amenities that attract and engage people, and technology quickly rose to the top of the list," Ruller said. "We want to make technology as ubiquitous in the public realm in Kent as it is in our private lives. Technology is how people connect and interact with their world, and we wanted to make sure that was part of the Kent experience."

The effort saves Kent money because the city doesn't need to create its own network by using the university's, which it is helping expand. The university benefits because of the end result for its students who often find themselves in the surrounding community.

"I think you will see the university take a giant step with Wi-Fi accessibility this year, opening up Wi-Fi along the Esplanade and as far as the new hotel," Ruller said. "Hopefully, the city can leverage that new Wi-FI backbone to add additional access points in the common areas downtown in the next year."

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News Headline: Dominion honors Kent, KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dominion East Ohio recently honored the City of Kent and Kent State University with a Community Impact Award recognizing the partnership efforts resulting in the $120 million in revitalization projects that have linked the city's
downtown with the campus. On hand to accept the award were, from left, Brendan Reynolds, KSU Corporate and Foundations Relations officer; Lori Wemhoff, executive director, Kent Area Chamber of Commerce, and Kent Mayor Jerry Fiala. “This award represents the hard work and commitment to collaboration by a lot of people,” said Fiala. “The downtown Kent of today is the result of many individuals and groups coming together to working as a team.”

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News Headline: ALONG THE WAY: David Dix (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Lester Lefton, retiring after what appears to have been a very successful eight years as president of Kent State University, did not apply for the job, originally, but was recruited.

Sandra Harbrecht, who led the search for a successor for the outgoing president, Carol Cartwright, told a group recently that Lefton's name was not among those submitted to the trustees, "but we had heard of him and contacted him."

Harbrecht is president of a large public relations firm based in Columbus. She was a Kent State trustee when the board was chaired by Doug Cowan, who at the time was president and CEO of The Davey Tree Expert Co. Harbrecht headed the search committee that consisted of 17 persons, many of them drawn from the area.

Lefton came for an interview. He was well prepared and presented a vision for Kent State that appealed to the trustees.

The trustees called him at the Cleveland Airport, before Lefton had boarded the plane to return to Louisiana, and made him an offer.

"He accepted," Harbrecht said.

When a group of us at the Record-Courier interviewed the outgoing KSU president three weeks ago, he said his original goals included creating a culture of philanthropy, focusing on graduation rates, broadening the base of enrollment, and improving the buildings on campus, most of which were constructed a minimum of 40 years ago.

Most of the goals he mentioned were met. Donations are up, KSU having completed a $250 million campaign. Graduation rates are some of Ohio's best. KSU has aggressively recruited abroad and now has an international student component on campus that is closing in on 3,000 students, the vast majority of them full-tuition and excellent students. They're part of a growing enrollment and academically stronger student body. A campus renewal is beginning and its most dramatic initiative will be the new College of Architecture and Design building on the new Esplanade. The Lefton Administration also emphasized a system of internal financial accountability, each unit within the university having to manage by objective to justify expenses.

For many of us locals, the downtown renewal and the link with the campus will be how we think of President Lefton. There were plans on the table to do some of this before he arrived, but Lefton expanded the scope of the plans and was the guy who finally pulled the trigger.

Also interfacing with the local business community, the Lefton Administration shifted some KSU deposits to the local banks, a nice endorsement of local business in Kent and Portage County.

A tale of two presidents

During our interview, Lefton said he had recently met Brage Golding, the KSU president from 1977 to 1982, during a recent trip to Southern California.

"He's my kind of guy," Lefton said.

Golding was the one who straightened out Kent State after his predecessor Glenn Olds departed for Alaska. Golding has a doctorate in physics and lots of common sense. Not one to beat about the bush, he was the person who put things back together and left the foundation from which his successors, Michael Schwartz, Carol Cartwright and now Lester Lefton, were all able to do good things.

Cartwright and May 4

Former Kent State President Carol Cartwright, busy in retirement, authored a chapter in "Managing the Unthinkable: Crisis Preparation and Response for Campus Leaders," a book published by Stylus Publishing in Sterling, Va., and edited by Gretchen Bataille of the American Council on Education, and Diana Cordova of the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

It describes how Kent State in the 1990s, after the dedication of the May 4 Memorial at Taylor Hall, continued to struggle with turning the aftermath of the shootings into something meaningful and positive. Steps included an internal survey by Cultural Research, Inc. measuring how employees viewed May 4. A Centennial Commission that drew out people within and from without of Kent State looked into the future of the university how it might profit from the lessons of May 4. A request from the May 4th Task Force to somehow memorialize the spots where the four students who were killed fell, was honored. The Democracy Symposium, held near the end of the school year, was begun and focused on issues raised by the concept of free speech.

Efforts also began laying the groundwork for the May 4 Visitors Center, which opened in 2012, the sixth year of the Lefton administration, a strong advocate for it. The center is well worth a visit and will draw scholars of the war in Vietnam for which May 4 is credited as a pivotal event that changed the way the country assessed what we were doing.

Incredibly, Vietnam, though it remains Communist, has become an important trading partner with the U.S. and, in the game of politics, a factor in our efforts to contain China, whose domination Vietnam has historically feared.

More public transit needed

Functioning as a friendship family for the International Leaders in Education Program has reaffirmed to Janet and me
the need for good public transportation.

ILEP is a U.S. State Department funded program that brings teachers in secondary education to the United States for a semester to study both on campus and by working with teachers in area high schools. Kent State's Gerald Read Center for the Study of International Education has had the honor of hosting a chapter of this program for eight years.

Thank goodness for PARTA and Go-2Go Taxi, which provide some mobility for these remarkable and able teachers
who have been housed during this very tough winter at Pebblebrook near Walmart in Ravenna Township.

Last weekend, I picked up a couple of the scholars arriving from Pittsburgh by bus at the Greyhound station in Cleveland. Greyhound is a wonderful private mass transit service, but I did not feel very secure waiting at the station, especially after being approached in the restroom by a stranger who said he wanted to shake hands.

We have so many wonderful services in the United States. I wish we could do better at public transportation.

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News Headline: Kent State, UA students selected for Knight scholarships | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Six area college students have been selected for scholarships in memory of longtime Akron Beacon Journal editor John S. Knight and public relations professional Ludel Sauvageot.

A seventh student has received a scholarship from the Akron Press Club.

This year's Knight scholars are Anna Tultz of the University of Akron and Celia Fernandez, Carley Hull, Emily Mills and Madeleine Winer of Kent State University.

Each receives a $5,000 scholarship.

The Sauvageot scholar, who also receives $5,000, is Megan Caprez of Kent State University.

Lyndsey Schley of Kent State University has been selected by the Press Club for a $5,000 scholarship.

The Knight scholarships are awarded by the John S. Knight Memorial Journalism Fund; the Sauvageot scholarship is awarded by the Akron Press Club.

The scholars will be recognized at a noon luncheon April 25 at Greystone Hall, 103 S. High St. in downtown Akron.

James N. Crutchfield, a board member of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and former publisher of the Akron Beacon Journal, will be guest speaker.

Tickets for the lunch, sponsored by the Akron Press Club, are $20.

For reservations, contact Mary Lou Woodcock at 330-996-3291.

For information about the Akron Press Club, visit www.akronpressclub.org.

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News Headline: Student Journalist Files "Fabricated" Scene In Story Featured | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A student journalist is no longer writing for the Daily Kent Stater newspaper, as the paper says he "fabricated" a scene in a story earlier this week.

The student editor at the Kent State University newspaper says the journalism student admitted making up the lead of a story about cheerleading at Kent Roosevelt High School, including a racial remark that was never made.

The newspaper identified the student in print earlier this week as Michael Lopick.

The subject of the story, KSU freshman and Roosevelt High student Imani Sales wrote a letter to the editor that was published in Friday's Daily Kent Stater.

She wrote that the article stated "many things that weren't true" and says it included "quotes that I have never said"...saying the fabricated quotes offended her and were "hurtful" to her and others close to her at the school.

Sales says Lopick apologized to her, but says that "won't change the damage the article has done".

In an apology posted on the KentWired.com website, student editor Daniel Moore says the student journalist has been informed that "he is no longer welcome to work" for the Daily Kent Stater, and his previous stories have been removed from KentWired.com.

He did not work on the Daily Kent Stater staff. The stories were written for journalism classes, and then sent to the newspaper.

Moore says fabricating stories is "among the cardinal sins of journalism", and said the fictional scene harmed Sales, the Kent Roosevelt cheerleading squad and athletic department, and the school and its students and alumni.

He says the Daily Kent Stater is "taking every possible action to ensure this never happens again."

Lopick's name has been removed from KentWired.com, along with the original story, but appeared in the newspaper's print editions on Tuesday.

AkronNewsNow.com is unable to confirm Lopick's status at the university as of Friday afternoon.

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News Headline: Kent State Trumbull to have three fairs | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2014
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A trio of fairs spanning a variety of interests will take place at Kent State University at Trumbull the week of April 27.

All events will be in the Technology Building, 4314 Mahoning Ave. NW.

Things kick off when KSU at Trumbull hosts its annual Spring Job Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 29. Representatives from regional business, industry and Kent State will be on hand with information about various jobs and academic opportunities. Attendees are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes, and interview attire is recommended. The event is free and open to the public. Participants also will be able to participate in mock interviews and have resumes reviewed.

The KSU at Trumbull School of Nursing will host its annual Campus & Community Health Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 30. The free event will feature a variety of vendors with health care information and screening services available for students, faculty, staff and the public.

Students, faculty and staff of KSU at Trumbull will have the opportunity to connect with local nonprofit agencies to learn about volunteer and internship opportunities available to them throughout the community at the 2014 Spring Volunteer Fair from 1 to 3 p.m. May 1.

Goals of the fair include linking students to local organizations for volunteer and internship opportunities, serving the local community by offering organizations the opportunity to recruit volunteers at the campus, answering questions students, faculty or staff members have about the Experiential Learning Requirement and Alternative Spring Break opportunities at Kent State University and providing students and local organizations an opportunity to network with one another.

Representatives from a number of local nonprofit and/or nongovernmental agencies are expected to attend.

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News Headline: April luncheon at Dennison Yard April 17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Twin City Chamber of Commerce will host an April luncheon at noon April 17 at the Dennison Yard, 313 Center St., Dennison.

Speakers will include: Joe Belinsky, certified business advisor, SBDC Kent State University at Tuscarawas. The topic of discussion will be Your Business is Growing..How About Mine?

Cost: $10, members; $15 for non-members. No-shows will be charged. Guests may attend for speaker only at no charge. Reservations are needed no later than April 11. For more information: 740-922-5623.

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News Headline: Student Computer Designed Art Exhibit and Silent Auction set for April 24 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Tuscarawas and the Tuscarawas County Center for the Arts are sponsoring the 10th annual Student Computer Designed Art Exhibit and silent auction on April 24. The event will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the center, 461 Robinson Drive, S.E., New Philadelphia. More than 60 pieces of student artwork will be judged with the top three pieces to receive the honor of Best of Show that evening. In addition, all pieces will be available for a silent auction with the proceeds benefiting the Animation Imagineers Club, a campus club for students majoring in computer design, animation and game design. The exhibit also includes artwork submitted by high school students who are members of the 12 area high school Cyber Clubs.

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News Headline: Former area librarian being featured at KSU for her pop-up collection | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Salem News
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A former area librarian is being featured at Kent State University for a her pop-up book collection.

Carol Davis, who retired from the Leetonia library in 1983, recently donated over 500 pop-up books to the university library and has now been invited to speak about collecting the books a special symposium next month.

Davis, who lives in Greenford, said she started collecting the books about 30 years ago, buying her first one for a friend while in Columbus. It was about the Royal Family.

"[My friend] was really interested in the Royal Family and I thought [the book] was something neat for her," Davis said about the purchase that spawned three decades of devotion.

"I bought them anytime something new came out," she said.

But 30 years is a long time and Davis said she did not know what her adult children would want with all the books.

"I figured the library was a perfect place for them to be," she said. "It took a whole pick up bed to get them there."

Davis will join two other collectors at the Pop It! Move It! Use It! Programming, Selecting and Exploring Children's Movable Books symposium May 2 in the second floor Governance Chambers at the university's student center. The event will feature renowned children's pop-up book artist and paper engineer Robert Sabuda.

The event is sponsored by the School of Library and Information Science and School of Visual Communication Design at Kent State University, and the Northeast Ohio Regional Library System (NEO-RLS). For information about the symposium visit http://bit.ly/PopItSymposium2may2014.

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News Headline: Walter 'Doc' Watson, 80, former director of KSU music school, dies (Seachrist) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Remembered as an enthusiastic educator, mentor

Music was life for Walter “Doc” Watson.

“Maybe the thing that marks it for you is when you're working and it doesn't seem like work,” the professor, composer, college administrator, accompanist, organist and jazz musician told a Record-Courier reporter in a 1978 interview.

The longtime director of the Hugh A. Glauser School of Music at Kent State University, Dr. Watson, of Kent, died Wednesday in Austin, Texas, following complications from a fall while visiting family. He was 80.

In 48 years since he moved to Kent in 1966 and began a 30-year teaching career at KSU — including 17 years as director of the School of Music — Dr. Watson had a lasting effect on many people.

Born Oct. 13, 1933, in Canton, Dr. Watson enrolled at KSU in 1952 upon his graduation from Canton Lehman High School. The start of his collegiate career was interrupted by a four-year stint in the U.S. Air Force, where he served as an instructor and bandsman.

Dr. Watson returned to college in 1957, earning bachelor's and master's degrees from Ohio University and a doctorate in composition from North Texas State University. He taught at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches,
Texas, from 1961-66, then returned to Ohio, teaching at KSU until his retirement in 1996.

Watson taught History of Jazz, which became one of the most popular courses at KSU in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Chas Baker was one of his students.

“Doc taught that course, encouraged me to finish my bachelor's and master's (at KSU),” he said. “I took History of Jazz from him, then he turned it over to me and I taught it for 30 years.”

After leaving the U.S. Army in 1969, Baker enrolled at KSU and got involved in a student jazz band “that kind of snuck around the school at night finding places to rehearse,” as jazz was “frowned upon.”

Watson later took that band and made it part of the curriculum, according to Baker and Denise Seachrist, current director of the KSU School of Music.

The university already had numerous musical performance groups, so Watson introduced a jazz band “under the radar” as a component of the curriculum — like a science “lab” course, Seachrist said. The band was known as the KSU Lab Band, and eventually produced numerous talented jazz musicians, she said.

“That says a lot about Walter, figuring out ways to get things done,” Seachrist said. “He was very skillful at that, and
instrumental in creating the jazz program at Kent State.”

The band later became “one of the best collegiate jazz bands in the country, if not the world,” Baker said, traveling to Switzerland to play in the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1970. Dr. Watson was involved in all aspects of making that happen, including fund-raising by having the band play every Monday night at a local Kent eatery and making connections through his membership in Kent Rotary.

“Doc was instrumental in all the machinations that had to occur to make that happen,” Baker said.

“Virtually the whole trombone section,” including Baker, ended up being hired by the Austrian Radio and Television
Network Big Band and played in Vienna for several years as a result of the Switzerland trip, he said.

Baker was back in the U.S. and playing for house bands at Playhouse Square in Cleveland and “gigging around” in 1977 when Watson offered him the job of interim director of jazz bands at KSU, he remembered.

Now retired, Baker said his 35-year career at KSU was “all because” of Dr. Watson.

“I think there are a lot of people who could tell stories about their careers hinging on what he did, and I'm one of them,” he said. “I had a great father, but Doc was like a second father to me. He was certainly a mentor the whole time I was there, and I certainly wouldn't have gotten my job if it weren't for him.”

Dr. Watson hired Seachrist in 1995 to teach at KSU's Trumbull Campus. They later were fellow members of both
Kent Rotary and the United Church of Christ.

Dr. Watson “loved to perform” throughout his career, whether it was for students, colleagues or at church, she said. He often turned down gigs and would give them to students so they could earn money and get exposure.

“He'd give me gigs he couldn't take,” she said. “He'd deliberately turn things down to give students the opportunity.”

Seachrist said Dr. Watson mentored both her and Susan Van Vorst, conservatory director at Baldwin Wallace University
in Berea and a recent inductee into the Kent City Schools' Hall of Fame.

Dr. Watson “said ‘I'm just so proud of you girls,' and meant that in the best possible way,” Seachrist said.

Dr. Watson also contributed to the musical life in local churches, serving as musical director and organist for the United Church of Christ in Kent and Pilgrim Church in Cuyahoga Falls. The Rev. David Pattee, pastor of the UCC in Kent, said Watson was choir director, organist and director of music there for 17 years.

His collaborator and successor there was Kerry Glann, a member of the KSU School of Music faculty from 2005-12.
Now a doctoral student in music at the University of North Texas — the same place Watson got his doctorate in composition — Glann said Dr. Watson had him as a guest conductor on some larger pieces of music at the church before asking him to come aboard as fulltime choir director.

Glann called Dr. Watson a “wonderful colleague” and joked that he “didn't' seem to mind a conductor 40 years younger than he was telling him what to do.” He also frequently hired KSU students as soloists.

“It was a three-way collaboration (between Dr. Watson, Glann and Pattee) and we appreciated his experience and
instincts in that type of thing,” Glann said. “It was a fun place to go to work.”

Upon Dr. Watson's retirement as church organist in spring 2011, Glann said jazz bands “from all over” showed up to play a concert they called “Walterpalooza.” Musicians played or sang some of Dr. Watson's arrangements, he said.

“A jolly guy,” Dr. Watson also loved telling jokes, “but he wasn't very good at telling them,” Glann said, laughing.

Dr. Watson produced more than 150 compositions in his career, and frequently was cited by the American Society of
Composers, Authors and Publishers, or ASCAP, for “outstanding contributions to serious music.” His work has been
performed at Severance Hall in Cleveland, the JFK Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., Carnegie Hall in New York City and at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Watson composed “Deborah Sampson,” an opera Watson composed for the U.S. Bicentennial celebration in 1976. The 50-minute work is about a woman who disguised herself as a man to fight in the American Revolution.
His “Buckeye Pride” march was once considered as a choice for Ohio's official state march in a bill that passed the Ohio House of Representatives but failed to make it through the state Senate.

Having worked with or studied under famed American composers — notably Samuel Adler, Aaron Copland and
Cleveland's Robert Shaw — Dr. Watson was a member of numerous professional societies, served as chairman of the Cleveland Composers Guild from 1973-77 and was a consulting editor for Ludwig Music Publishing Co. in 1974.

Pattee said the Watson family will receive visitors from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the United Church of Christ, 1400 E. Main St. in Kent. A memorial service and memorial concert also are planned, with dates to be announced, he said.

Seachrist said there is no shortage of Watson students, friends and colleagues willing to perform at the memorial concert “to really celebrate his life.”

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News Headline: Ken Burns film 'The Address' airs a week before his talk at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Every year, the students at Vermont's Greenwood School are challenged to memorize and publicly recite Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. And every year, New Hampshire-based filmmaker Ken Burns goes to this tiny school as a judge or honored guest for the recitations.

"I'd go as a neighbor who lives across the Connecticut River from Putney, Vt.," Burns said during a telephone interview. "And I thought, 'Somebody should make a film of this, but this is a cinema verite film. This is not what I do.' "

Burns is best known for sprawling documentaries about big American subjects. He was, for instance, the director, co-writer, chief cinematographer, music director and executive producer on "Baseball" (1994), the 18-and-a-half-hour documentary that became the most-watched series to air on PBS.

"But every year, I kept going back to Putney," he said. "And I'd tell the story of how my oldest daughter, Sarah, when she was 12, gave me the greatest Christmas present I've ever had -- which was, on Christmas morning, a perfect, flawless recitation of the Gettysburg Address."

Finally, Burns had a revelation: "You've really got to put your money where your mouth is." He should make this film.

The stirring 90-minute result of that revelation, "The Address," premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday, April 15, on WVIZ Channel 25 and WEAO Channel 49. It's more than a history lesson, as Burns realized as he watched the Greenwood students struggle with the meaning and importance of Lincoln's November 1863 speech.

A week after this PBS airing of "The Address," the acclaimed filmmaker will be giving a talk as part of the fifth Kent State University Presidential Speaker Series. Open to the public, the free ticketed event will be at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in Kent State's Memorial Athletic and Convocation (MAC) Center.

The free general admission tickets are available at the university's ticket site: kentstate.universitytickets.com. A limited number of $15 seats with chair backs are available for this event. During his stay at Kent State, Burns also will meet with students and media.

But before his Kent State address, there is "The Address" and an invitation for all of us to visit Putney. It's a trip well worth taking.

Founded in 1978, Greenwood is a small "boarding school for boys with complex learning difference," we learn in the opening minutes of "The Address." "Greenwood, which teaches and treats only 50 boys, ages 11 to 17, is often the place of last resort for desperate families. Many of their sons have been bullied and marginalized at other schools."

Memorizing and reciting the Gettysburg Address would be a formidable task for most adults, but, as the narration says, it's "a minefield of terrors, anxieties and difficulties for these children."

It's a story of struggle, of course, and it's a story of hope and triumph. You can apply that to the Civil War. You can apply it to each of the boys who finds the perseverance and courage to recite Lincoln's words before a packed audience.

""I wanted to put the Gettysburg Address in context during the 150th anniversary of it," Burns said. "The Gettysburg Address is presidential poetry at its best. In two minutes, he says it all. He hits it out of the park. Like a tent pole, it rivets you to the moment and makes you understand what the possibilities are."

Possibilities for an individual, a nation and the world.

"Lincoln is in the middle of the Civil War." Burns said. "He's on the ground of the greatest battle ever fought on American soil. And he offers a vision of the future. And then you watch the boys and see it all recapitulated in life. It becomes a kind of internalized life lesson for them -- a kind of talisman that they will carry around with them for the rest of their lives."

Burns also used the Greenwood students to narrate the film. As part of a public outreach campaign, he is challenging everyone to read the Gettysburg Address and submit their own videos to learntheaddress.org.

Among those who have submitted videos are Presidents Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, as well as Carol Burnett, Bill Gates, Louis C.K., Bill O'Reilly, Wolf Blitzer, Gwen Ifill, Stephen Colbert, Jimmy Kimmel, Uma Thurman, Steven Spielberg, Usher, Taylor Swift and Bob Schieffer.

"It proves that Lincoln was right, that words matter, that we did have a new birth of freedom, because each of these boys undergoes his own new birth of freedom as he struggles and overcomes his learning difficulty and then publicly recites the Gettysburg Address," Burns said of "The Address."

Since the Academy Award-nominated "Brooklyn Bridge" in 1981, Burns has directed and produce some of the most celebrated and highest-rated documentaries in TV history. His landmark PBS series "The Civil War" attracted an audience of 40 million during its premiere run in 1990.

His other long-form documentary projects include the eight-part "The West" (1996); the 10-episode "Jazz" (2001); the seven-part "The War" (2007), a look at World War II through the prism of four American towns; and ""The National Parks: America's Best Idea" (2009).

His many documentaries airing in one or two parts include "The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God" (1984), "Huey Long" (1985), "Mark Twain" (2001), "Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson" (2005) and "The Dust Bowl" (2012).

His films have won 12 Emmy awards, and Burns has been the recipient of more than 25 honorary degrees.

"I really like that the last two films, 'The Central Park Five' and 'The Address,' have been very different stylistically," Burns said. "That's exciting to me, having become an old man by turning 60."

Yet "The Address" is not that far removed from his previous work. Thematically, obviously, there's a strong link to "The Civil War." The simple up-close-and-personal approach echoes an early work, "The Shakers." And the bottom-up view of history is reminiscent of "The War."

"I would agree on each of those points," Burns said. "It's a different kind of film for me, but it certainly is of a piece."

His next documentary, "The Roosevelts: An Intimate History," is a seven-episode series that will air this fall. Also in production are films on Jackie Robinson, the Vietnam War and the history of country music

In addition to being the spring Presidential Series talk, Burns' appearance will serve as the keynote address for this year's Symposium on Democracy. The Kent State Presidential Speaker Series brings high-profile the university "for serious, thought-provoking discussions and conversations."

The Symposium on Democracy is part of Kent State's commemoration of the tragic May, 4, 1970, events that had a profound impact on the university and the nation. Its mission is to promote "scholarship that seeks to prevent violence and to promote democratic values and civil discourse."

For more information about Kent State University's Presidential Speaker Series, visit www.kent.edu/president/speakers. For questions about the Kent State Presidential Speaker Series event, call 330-672-2216 or email ksupresidentialspeakers@kent.edu.

"I'm looking forward to seeing the May 4 Visitors Center and seeing where it all happened," Burns said. "I'm sure it's going to be tremendously moving. That's the thing I most I want to see and experience."

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News Headline: University of Akron trustees edge closer to naming presidential finalists | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Within a few weeks, the University of Akron is expected to bring finalists to campus for interviews with administrators, faculty, students and others for the big job on campus: president.

“Honestly, I want to move this along as quickly as I can,” search committee chairman and UA trustee Jonathan Pavloff told the Beacon Journal.

Pavloff and fellow trustees Roland Bauer, Olivia Demas and Ralph Palmisano have been meeting since August about a successor to President Luis Proenza, who steps down July 1 to return to teaching.

The four trustees met again last week to refine a list of 15 candidates; four others who originally applied have dropped out. The university is making arrangements to bring an unspecified number for visits.

Trustees hired the search firm R. William Funk and Associates of Dallas to help them make one of the biggest decisions around — who will be the next person to lead 27,000 students, 5,000 employees and a $388 million budget at one of Summit County's largest employers.

UA's rules require the search to be open. The names of applicants and their resumes are posted on the UA website at www.uakron.edu and the finalists' visits to campus will be open to all.

In contrast, Kent State consistently has refused to release the names of those whom it considered to replace Lester Lefton, who retires July 1 or document much of how it spent $250,000 in tax dollars and student tuition.

KSU trustees brought Beverly Warren, provost of Virginia Commonwealth University, to campus as the lone finalist and required the 17 members on the search committee to sign confidentiality agreements.

At UA, most of the candidates are presidents and vice presidents at other colleges or universities.

Three candidates are from the Akron area — Ronald Bucci, interim vice president for professional and support services at Akron Children's Hospital; Martin Belsky, UA's Randolph Baxter Professor of Law and former dean of the university's law school; and Jim Tressel, UA executive vice president for student success.

It is Tressel's application that has drawn the most interest, given that he gave up the plum job of football coach at Ohio State because he lied to the NCAA about player infractions of rules.

Since joining UA two years ago, however, he has been promoted and now is one of Proenza's two top lieutenants, overseeing virtually all aspects of university life apart from the classroom and athletics.

Neither UA candidate has a doctorate, which is often required, or at least preferred, in college presidents. Tressel's highest degree is a master's in education and Belsky has a law degree.

But UA trustees do not appear bent on hiring someone with a doctoral degree anyway, although they have not said so publicly.

The job profile on the UA website does not mention any educational qualifications at all, just that the successful candidate will be “financially astute and a consummate friend- and fund-raiser'' who will be “student-centered,” among other skills.

Pavloff told the Beacon Journal the most important qualification is that the new president “can stay focused on our ability to provide a quality education. There's nothing more important to the economic health of our region.”

Pavloff said he is confident trustees will have a new president in place by the time that Proenza moves on to his yearlong, paid sabbatical.

Meanwhile three other trustees on the Presidential Transition Committee aim to ensure a smooth transition between Proenza and his successor and are coordinating events to recognize Proenza's presidency.

The full trustee board has nine voting members, all of whom will weigh in on the selection of the president.

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News Headline: Kent State shredded documents to hide information about presidential search, committee members say (Lovejoy, Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Kent State officials were so intent on keeping their search for a new president secret that they destroyed search committee notes and documents.

Search committee member Tom Janson, a music professor, said KSU shredded his notes and documents after he interviewed prospects.

“The notes are gone,” said anthropology professor Owen Lovejoy, another search committee member. “Everything's been taken care of. We shredded anything with personal data.”

When asked for comment about the reports of the shredding, KSU spokesman Eric Mansfield did not respond directly to the question.

He reiterated what he has in the past — that KSU has done nothing wrong.

Kent State University neither has violated any public records laws nor has the university violated or failed to conform to any internal policy,” he said in an email. “We have turned over all records that are relevant.”

Meanwhile, the University of Akron and Youngstown State University have conducted open searches for new presidents, making it possible to know, for example, that former Ohio State University football coach and UA vice president Jim Tressel is a candidate at both institutions.

Secrecy ensured

Details slowly emerging underscore the extent to which the public, tax-supported Kent State went to ensure that it could conduct its search in private, away from the public eye, to keep names of candidates secret and to prevent disclosing how much it spent on individual candidates.

Not only did KSU require search committee members to sign confidentiality agreements, the university signed a contract addendum giving its private search firm, Storbeck Pimentel and Associates of Media, Pa., the power to decide what records are released to the public.

As a result, when the Beacon Journal and other media asked for public records showing how the $250,000 in taxpayer and student tuition money was spent, the university deferred to Storbeck Pimentel, which declined to deliver documentation that normally would be available.

For example, KSU provided the Beacon Journal with detailed receipts from Storbeck Pimentel employees for such things as airport food, but for the presidential candidates, the company submitted invoices for chauffeurs, hotels, airfare and meals with only generic descriptions, such as “candidate travel expenses.”

There was no description of what they may have purchased to eat while traveling, whether they made stopovers or billed for items that may not be permitted under state law — at least, according to what was provided to the Beacon Journal.

Non-specific answers

When asked how KSU vice president Charlene Reed, who coordinated the search for the university, confirmed that invoices were appropriate, Mansfield said “the approval process was appropriate for each expense.” He did not offer an explanation as to how that was done with such oblique invoices.

Ohio law requires documents regarding employee searches to be made public on request. That obligation extends to materials “in the sole possession of private search firms used in the hiring process,” according to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's Sunshine Manual.

However, media or other members of the public must file lawsuits if public bodies refuse to comply with the law — a time-consuming and costly process.

When it came to the search itself, only the 17 members of the search committee — some from KSU, a few from the community — had access to Storbeck Pimentel's secure database of applications.

Committee members reviewed “somewhere between 10 and 3,000” candidate resumes, Lovejoy said.

Richard Marsh, a KSU trustee and search committee chairman, took the search to the next step, deciding who would be interviewed in person at the Cleveland Clinic Intercontinental Hotel in November.

The university housed and fed about 30 search committee members and candidates over three nights at a cost of more than $20,000, at least according to invoices provided to the Beacon Journal. About $400 in liquor was charged to outgoing president Lester Lefton's privately funded discretionary account.

Marsh gave search committee members four pages of pre-formatted questions and space to write their observations of hourlong interviews with each candidate, Janson recalled.

He and Lovejoy estimated they interviewed 12 or 18 candidates over the weekend. Janson said he doesn't remember exactly how many because his notes were destroyed. Lovejoy refused to be more precise.

Janson said the committee broke into two groups, each of which interviewed one candidate. Then the groups switched rooms to lessen the risk of a candidate seeing another contender for the job.

Some variety

One candidate was a current KSU employee; another used to work there. No other candidates were from Ohio's public universities, Janson said.

Warren, the eventual victor, was especially well prepared, he recalled. She knew and greeted the search committee members by name: “She was extremely friendly.”

According to the Daily Kent Stater student newspaper, Warren had to be persuaded by Storbeck Pimentel to take a hard look at the KSU job.

Another candidate pushed the hiring of his spouse as a package deal — an option Janson said he viewed as irrelevant to his role on the committee. And another had studied KSU's finances — yet he based his assessments on 2008 documents, too out-of-date to be of value today.

Janson said candidates' views of why they wanted to come to KSU ranged from, “Because my parents live in Cleveland” to “Ohio has the best benefits.”

One candidate, a minority from Los Angeles, pulled out fairly early because, Janson believed, he had another offer.

After the interviews, he said, search committee members ranked the candidates on paper, without discussing them. A priority list of the top candidates was produced for the board of trustees.

Then — nothing, as Janson remembered it. “I never heard another word.”

Trustees took over

The selection process shifted to the full KSU Board of Trustees, who interviewed two or three leading candidates at KSU's College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence in December in executive session.

Instructions to a chauffeur on invoices indicate trustees shuttled unnamed candidates from Independence hotels to garages in the basement of the college and eventually to the airport. The media were waiting in the lobby for the trustees' executive session to end and their regular meeting to begin.

Warren, the 65-year-old, No. 2 official at the tax-supported VCU in Richmond, was introduced at a special trustees' meeting in January.

This month, she declined to talk about the process that will bring her to Kent State starting in July.

“I believe it would not be helpful for me to speak of a process that I did not design or implement,” she emailed.

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News Headline: Recycling on Kent commission agenda | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent Sustainability Commission will meet Tuesday to receive a update on downtown recycling, a Kent State University
greenhouse gas study, discuss the possible future projects and to review fracking reports.

The meeting will be at 5:30 p.m. at Kent Council Chambers, 325 S. DePeyster St.

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News Headline: Case against Kent State shooting suspect moving forward, court documents show | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio – Portage County prosecutors are moving forward with charges against a Kent State University student arrested in connection with a campus shooting, court records show.

Breana Francis, 18, is accused of hiding the gun that 24-year-old Quavaugntay L. Tyler fired on campus on April 2, university spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

Prosecutors dropped the charges in Municipal Court after a Grand Jury indicted Francis with felony charges, according to court documents. The maneuver was procedural.

The Columbus native was charged Wednesday with obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence, Kent State police said.

That night Tyler, also a freshman, pulled the trigger of a 9 mm handgun during an argument with two women he was dating, police said. Tyler fired once, and the bullet struck his left hand, officials said. No one else was injured.

But before he sought treatment at Robinson Memorial Hospital, Tyler ran to Francis' dorm room, and asked her to hide the gun, police said.

The shooting sparked a lockdown on campus for more two hours, which students spent hunkered down in dorms and classrooms.

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News Headline: Charges dropped against student in Kent State shooting | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Breana Francis, 18,was accused of hiding the gun 24-year-old Quavaugntay L. Tyler fired on campus on April 2, university spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

The Columbus native was charged Wednesday with obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence, Kent State police said. The charges were dropped Friday during an initial court appearance.

That night Tyler, also a freshman, pulled the trigger of a 9 mm handgun during an argument with two women he was dating, police said. Tyler fired once, and the bullet struck his left hand, officials said. No one else was injured.

But before he sought treatment at Robinson Memorial Hospital, Tyler ran to Francis' dorm room, and asked her to hide the gun, police said.

The shooting sparked a lockdown on campus for more two hours, which students spent hunkered down in dorms and classrooms.

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News Headline: KSU student indicted on three felony counts in on-campus shooting | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Meyer, Ed
News OCR Text: A Portage County grand jury has returned a three-count indictment against a Kent State University student accused of shooting himself in the hand during an argument on campus last week.

Quavaugntay L. Tyler, 24, was charged with carrying a concealed weapon, tampering with evidence and inducing panic, authorities said Friday.

He is scheduled to be arraigned in a video appearance from Portage County Jail at 10:30 a.m. Monday before Common Pleas Judge Laurie J. Pittman.

The most serious charge, tampering with evidence, is a third-degree felony carrying a potential penalty of nine months to three years in prison.

In the May 2 incident on the KSU campus, police said Tyler got into an argument with two female students about 8:30 p.m. in the Bowman Hall parking lot.

As he was taking out the gun, a 9mm semiautomatic Ruger pistol, he shot himself in the left hand. Kent State Police Chief John Peach said only one shot was fired and no one else was injured.

Tyler was arrested about three hours later when he went to Robinson Memorial Hospital for treatment.

Minutes after the gunshot, KSU officials issued lockdown alerts for the campus. The lockdown order was lifted at about the time Tyler was being arrested.

He remains in Portage County Jail, unable to meet terms of a 10 percent $40,000 bond.

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News Headline: Breana Francis charged in connection with shot fired on Kent State campus. | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - Prosecutors are dropping the charges against a Kent State University student that was charged in connection with the shot fired on the Kent State campus April 2.

Breana Francis, 20, was originally charged with obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence.

According to police, Francis hid Quavaugntay Tyler's gun after he allegedly discharged his gun during a domestic dispute near Bowman Hall last week.

Francis appeared in a Kent courtroom April 11 when the charges were dismissed.

She was arrested April 4 in her Johnson Hall dorm room on the college campus. She was booked in the Portage County jail.

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News Headline: Case Dismissed Against Female in Kent Lockdown Incident | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/14/2014
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — The case has been dismissed against a student accused of hiding a gun used in the Kent State University shooting incident earlier this month.

Breana Francis, 20, of Columbus, faced charges of obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence. Prosecutors say there will now be further review of her case.

Quavaugntay Tyler, 24, faces charges, accused of firing a shot into the ground on campus late April 2. He allegedly drew the weapon during an argument between two women, and accidentally shot himself in the hand before fleeing.

Police previously said Francis then hid the gun for Tyler.

Read much more on this story, here.

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News Headline: Case Dismissed Against Female in Kent Lockdown Incident | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV - Online
Contact Name: Darcie Loreno
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- The case has been dismissed against a student accused of hiding a gun used in the Kent State University shooting incident earlier this month. Breana Francis, 20, of Columbus, faced charges of obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence. Prosecutors say there will now be further review of her case. Quavaugntay Tyler, 24, faces charges, accused of firing a shot into the ground on campus late April 2. He allegedly drew the weapon during an argument between two women, and accidentally shot himself in the hand before fleeing. Police previously said Francis then hid the gun for Tyler. Read much more on this story, here. http://fox8.com/2014/04/11/case-dismissed-against-female-in-kent-lockdown-incident/

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News Headline: Arraignment Set for KSU Shooting Suspect | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/12/2014
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A Cleveland man is due for video arraignment in Portage County Court on Monday, following his indictment on charges in connection with the April 2 shooting incident that resulted in a lock-down on the Kent State campus. 24-year-old Quavauntay Tyler was indicted by a Grand Jury on counts of carrying a concealed weapon, tampering with evidence and inducing panic. He shot himself in the hand while reportedly pulling a weapon during an argument with two women outside Bowman Hall.

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News Headline: Original Charges Dismissed against KSU Student | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The original charges of obstructing justice and tampering with evidence have reportedly been dismissed against a female student at Kent State University in the April 2 shooting incident that spawned a lock-down on campus. However, that doesn't necessarily mean that 20-year-old Breana Francis of Columbus is in the clear. Fox 8 News reported on Friday afternoon that prosecutors dropped the original charges while additional investigation is conducted into the incident. 24-year-old Quavaugntay Tyler of Cleveland shot himself in the hand – reportedly while pulling a gun during an argument with two other women outside Bowman Hall, then ran to Johnson Hall to ditch a book bag containing the weapon and ammo with Francis.

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News Headline: Man indicted over gunshot at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/12/2014
Outlet Full Name: Columbus Dispatch - Online
Contact Name: Ed Meyer
News OCR Text: A Portage County grand jury has indicted a Kent State University student on three counts over a gunshot fired during an argument on campus last week.

Quavaugntay L. Tyler, 24, was charged with tampering with evidence, carrying a concealed weapon and inducing panic, authorities said yesterday.

The most-serious charge, tampering with evidence, is a third-degree felony carrying a penalty of nine months to three years in prison.

In the April 2 incident, Tyler got into an argument with two female students about 8:30 p.m. in the Bowman Hall parking lot on the Kent State campus, police said. As he was taking out the gun, he accidentally shot himself in the left hand, police said.

Tyler was arrested about three hours later when he went to Robinson Memorial Hospital in Ravenna for treatment.

Minutes after the gunshot, KSU officials issued lockdown alerts for the campus.

Tyler was in the Portage County jail yesterday under a $40,000 bond.

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News Headline: Kent State man pleads not guilty after shot fired | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2014
Outlet Full Name: WXIX-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio (AP) - A Kent State University student suspected of prompting a campus lockdown after shooting himself in the hand has pleaded not guilty to carrying a concealed weapon.

A judge on Monday set bond at $40,000 and told 24-year-old Quavaugntay Tyler of Cleveland to stay away from the northeast Ohio campus.

It's not clear if he has an attorney.

Kent State police say the freshman fired only once last Wednesday night while arguing with two female students. No one else was hurt.

Police say Tyler was the subject of a campus theft investigation and was on probation from a separate theft case. He told police he had a gun because he'd been the victim of an armed robbery.

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News Headline: Kent State students hope Showcase performances opened stage doors (Kent, Stillings | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/11/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It all came down to a two-minute, passion-packed, talent-saturated solo performance by each singer — enough to make agents and casting directors bite, as Kent State University musical theater students showed off their triple-threat skills in New York this past week.

Hundreds of hours of preparation were behind those crucial two minutes for each of the 14 students performing in the 2014 New York Musical Theatre Showcase, held at the 100-seat, basement-level Laurie Beechman Theatre on 42nd Street. The goal was to present each of the graduating seniors' talents in the most professional light possible to help them obtain New York agents and jump-start their careers.

This year's Showcase, featuring six cabaret-style, 30-minute shows over two days, saw spotty attendance by industry professionals Monday but gained more momentum by Tuesday. Competition is fierce among universities to get agents to attend their showcases and see their schools' talent, Kent State professors said.

“We're up against Juilliard, CCM [University of Cincinnati's College Conservatory of Music], Baldwin-Wallace and IU [Indiana University] the same two days,'' said musical theater coordinator Terri Kent on Monday. Twelve other college showcases had been held in New York the previous weekend.

“The market is inundated with showcases now,” said Cindy Stillings, director of the School of Theatre and Dance. “The universities are throwing more and more money at it.”

By Showcase's end, all 14 KSU students had received interest from agents, casting directors or managers, who turned in response sheets indicating which performers they wanted to follow up with.

Powerhouse belter Brittnie Price received an email from the Price Group the first night, and another from 9Muse the second night saying, “I thought you were fantastic. I saw your showcase. Are you planning to move to New York?” She responded to both and met with Lisa Price of the Price Group on Wednesday.

“We just got to talk about where I see myself as far as my [acting] type and what's on Broadway now,” Brittnie Price said. “They were actually saying they don't have anyone like me.”

Brittnie Price, who has a huge vocal range and performed in the second national tour of Hair , said musical theater “types” refer to voice, body and character type. The actress, who is of mixed race, said being “ethnically ambiguous” means she can play a variety of roles, from an African chorus member in The Book of Mormon to a Hispanic girl in West Side Story .

She said Lisa Price will be emailing her additional songs she wants to hear her sing; she'll record them and upload them to YouTube for the agent. Brittnie Price, who will work at Cedar Point while finishing her coursework online this summer, said she'll move to New York in September and will continue following up with the Price Group.

Handwritten notes out

When professor Terri Kent saw that Showcase RSVPs were low the week before KSU's event, she mobilized, mailing handwritten notes to about 150 agents and casting directors. She, Stillings and associate professor Chuck Richie also made dozens of follow-up calls and continued email blasts once they got to New York to reinforce agent wrangler Jackie Collier's advance legwork.

“You do what you gotta do. I want them to work,” Kent said of her students.

Finely detailed direction and seamless, smooth transitions between soloists helped make for a professional-quality Showcase. At tech rehearsal Monday morning, choreographer MaryAnn Black reminded the girls to cross their ankles when seated and stressed that students should not fidget while watching others perform.

“Bring a sweater or something to put on between shows so you don't lose your voice,” Kent warned the girls, many of whom would be wearing sleeveless dresses to perform.

Just before the first 4 p.m. show Monday, Black and Kent — hairspray in hand — checked each of the girls' hair and makeup under the stage lights. The lower-maintenance guys dressed in urban chic casual wear.

The performances' excitement continued to build until the final show Tuesday, a full house dominated by Kent State alumni and friends. The celebratory show was introduced by composer/producer/writer Jeff Richmond, a Garrettsville native who attended Kent State in the '80s as a theater student.

“They are very talented, they are gifted and they have a very well-trained, professional-quality singing and dancing show,” he said in his Showcase introduction.

Richmond is working with his wife, actress, writer and producer Tina Fey, on the musical version of her movie Mean Girls . Kent State 2013 musical theater grad Tee Boyich is helping them with development.

“As we write songs, she [Boyich] sings them back to us,” Richmond said.

Over a drink after Showcase, Richmond told KSU singer Dylan Ratell — a tenor/countertenor who sings in the same range as a soprano — that he could see him as the busybody character Damian in Mean Girls .

“He's going to keep me posted as he writes and if he thinks there's anything in it for me he'll let me know,” Ratell said.

Showcase had more results for Ratell: He interviewed with agent Barry Katz at Dulcina Eisen Associates and will have a second meeting with agency owner Eisen next week. Ratell, who sang the Mary Sunshine song A Little Bit of Good from Chicago at Showcase, was excited to talk to the agent about gender-bending opportunities in musical theater, such as playing Miss Hannigan in Annie and Ursula in Little Mermaid .

“I think they're expecting me to be a trailblazer … playing those female villains and bringing an edge to it that's different,” said the Bay City, Mich., native, who transferred to KSU his junior year.

Jesse Markowitz, this year's Homecoming king, also received an exciting opportunity after singing I Believe from The Book of Mormon at Showcase. Casting associate Rebecca Scholl from the Broadway musical sent him a congratulatory email and invited him to an audition Wednesday at Pearl Studios, where future replacements for the Broadway and tour casts were being screened.

He sang 32 bars of I'm Not That Smart from The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee and hopes to be called back. Markowitz also met with manager Brian Zeilinger of Catapult — “He sees me as a leading man and he sees me in The Book of Mormon — and manager Wayne Gasser from the Gasser Group.

“I really get a good vibe from both of them,” said the bright-eyed, outgoing tenor, who will move to the city next month.

Jayson Kolbicz, who also had a meeting with Dulcina Eisen Associates, was approached at Showcase on Tuesday by Chapman Roberts, creator and producer of The Black Stars of the Great White Way Broadway Reunion: Live the Dream . Kolbicz interviewed with Roberts on Thursday about performing in the Carnegie Hall concert June 23 with legendary performers including Ben Vereen and Andre De Shields.

“I was offered the opportunity to sing with them in this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” the tall, handsome baritone said. “I'm beyond excited and honored.”

Here's some feedback that other Showcase performers received:

• Alto belter Caitlin Hamm met with Katz of Dulcina Eisen on Tuesday. He asked the red-headed, brassy singer if she'd ever heard of Ethel Merman, to which she replied, “They call me Caitlin Merman.” Hamm, who sang a rousing rendition of You Can't Get a Man With a Gun at Showcase, wants to market herself as the next big voice. She expects a follow-up meeting with owner Eisen and will perform in the Catskills this summer.

• Soprano Mackenzie Duan , who begins rehearsals for A Chorus Line in New Hampshire this weekend, met with Dulcina Eisen Associates on Thursday.

• Soprano Jennie Nasser met with Dulcina Eisen Associates on Friday and was asked by Impossible Casting to send head shots for print modeling opportunities.

• Rachel Wolin , who auditioned for Disney theme park character work Thursday, received interest from Joy Dewing Casting and Michael Cassara Casting.

• Brianna DeRosa , who got responses from several casting directors as well as agents, spoke with Leah Wagner-Stout from About Artists agency by phone and plans to follow up with her when she returns to New York.

• Stephen Carder , who highlighted his ballet technique, tried out for Disney theme characters Thursday and met with About Artists agency Friday.

• Brooke Upholzer , who will work for a fourth summer as a Disney World character, received interest from Joy Dewing Casting and Michael Cassara Casting.

• Grace Falasco , who will perform at Porthouse Theatre this summer, plans to interview with Catapult management in August.

• Connor Simpson , who composed the opening song Now for his classmates, met with Dulcina Eisen Associates and hopes for a second meeting in August. Bobby Cronin, in the audience with fellow composer Phillip Palmer, told music director Jonathan Swoboda that Simpson's tune Now was “fierce.”

• Tim Welsh said he was following up on feedback from three casting agencies: Joy Dewing, Impossible Casting and Michael Cassara. Welsh wrote the Now lyrics specifically about the Showcase students' experience as they work to break into the musical theater business.

Here is an excerpt (hear a sample with this story on www.ohio.com) :

Now it's here

It's the sound of beginning

One more step

On the upward slope

Straight ahead

Though the room is spinning

There's still time enough for hope

It's the breath before the plunge

It's the look before the lunge

The worst is in the wait

There's no time to hesitate …

The path's not clear

But it's mine

Any doubt

Or fear

Is just courage in the making

See it shine

Now

As Showcase wrapped up, nearly all of the students said they planned to move to New York between May and the end of the calendar year to continue pursuing musical theater work. Now, all of them have industry contacts, some are on file with agents and a couple may be close to signing.

“This [Showcase] is their New York debut and even if they don't get an agent out of it, this is the beginning of their career,” said associate professor Chuck Richie. “Actors never know when you're going to pop and they [industry professionals] notice.”

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News Headline: Johnny Depp, 'Mad Men,' zentangle art, 'Orphan Black' and Rihanna: Pop 10 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/13/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
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News OCR Text: Johnny Depp plays Dr. Will Caster, an expert in artificial intelligence who wants to create a self-aware, intelligent machine in the new science fiction movie "Transcendence." The cast includes Paul Bettany, Kate Mara and Morgan Freeman. Opens Friday, April 18.

2. "Mad Men's" end game

When we last saw Don Draper, (spoiler alert!) he was forced to take a leave of absence from his advertising firm after losing an important account. The story of how Don and the firm copes with these developments will fuel the upcoming seventh – and final -- season of "Mad Men," starting at 10 p.m. Sunday, April 13.

3. Fairy tale in dance

Costumed dancers, animated visual effects and eclectic music bring to life an updated version of a familiar fairy tale in "Snow White and the Magic Mirror: A Grimm Tale." The dance concert will be presented by Neos Dance Theatre and the University of Akron's dance program. Shows are 2 and 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 19 at E.J. Thomas Hall. $13-$28, www.uaevents.com.

4. Send in the clones

BBC America's science fiction show "Orphan Black" gathered big buzz in just its first season, and fans are eager to continue the tale of a woman trying to learn about her clones. Golden Globe nominee Tatiana Maslany plays Sarah Manning and all of her clones. "Orphan Black" returns at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 19.

5. New to DVD

"Philomena," the story of a woman (Judi Dench) who searches for the son she was forced to give up for adoption, was nominated for four Oscars and three Golden Globes. The film, directed by Stephen Frears, lands on DVD ($29.99) and Blu-ray ($34.99) Tuesday, April 15.

6. Ethel Merman's coming up roses

Broadway's original brassy dame is remembered in The Musical Theater Project's multimedia presentation "Loud but Honest: The Impact of Ethel Merman" at Notre Dame College. The concert tribute incorporates film clips and includes her trademark songs, including "I Get A Kick Out Of You," "Everything's Coming Up Roses" and "There's No Business Like Show Business." 3 p.m. Sunday, April 13 in the Notre Dame College Regina Auditorium, 4545 College Road, South Euclid. $18-$26.

7. Learn new art form

Explore zentangle art, a new meditative art form that allows beginners to create beautiful images from repetitive patterns. No previous art or drawing experience is needed. Join a zentangle art workshop at the Hudson Library and Historical Society, at 6 p.m. Monday, April 14. The class and supplies are free. Registration is required at hudsonlibrary.org. 96 Library St, Hudson.

8. Monster of a performance:

Rihanna and Eminem are set to perform their hit "The Monster" for the first time on television during the MTV Movie Awards. The pair previously performed together at the MTV Video Music Awards in 2010. Tune into the MTV Movie Awards at 9 p.m. Sunday, April 13.

9. Lindbergh lecture

The kidnap-murder of the Lindbergh baby and the trial of Bruno Richard Hauptmann in the 1930s transfixed the nation's attention and laid the blueprint for modern-day media frenzies. Thomas Doherty, a cultural historian with a special interest in Hollywood cinema and professor of American studies, will lecture on "Little Lindy Is Kidnapped: The Media Coverage of the Crime of the 20th Century" at Kent State University at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 17. The free lecture will take place in the Read Special Collections Classroom (Room 1018) at the Kent State University library, 125 Risman Dr., Kent.

10. Another trip to Fargo

Coen brothers Oscar-winning 1996 film "Fargo" is the inspiration behind a 10-episode limited series with the same name coming to FX. The series centers on a policewoman (Allison Tolman) paired with a rookie offer (Colin Hanks), and also stars Billy Bob Thornton, Keith Carradine and Bob Odenkirk and Kate Walsh. 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 15.

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