Report Overview:
Total Clips (17)
Alumni (3)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (1)
College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
KSU at Salem (2)
KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
KSU Museum (1)
Music (1)
Office of the President (1)
Research; Students (1)
Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
Theatre and Dance (1)
University Relations (1)
WKSU (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (3)
Kent State Grad Producing Movie 04/16/2014 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

...>> I am a browns fan, it's tough to be a browns fan because, it has been a tough 20 years. Cocreator and second producer rosa branca, canton native and kent state grad is the only charge of salem he is also the executive producer of cosmos that airs sundays on fox 8 shouldn't I been doing cosmos and...

Kent State Grad Producing Movie 04/16/2014 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

...a first location in the nation so how does that connect to the best location, ask the cast and crew of the new wgn america show salem. Brent rocha, at kent state grad is the executive are also a cosmos that appears sunday. Has been moving about two years simultaneously thoughtt I'll families from...

PFERD Names Tool Mobile Program Leader 04/16/2014 Contractor Supply - Online Text Attachment Email

...partners directly at their field locations throughout the U.S. Kwasny is originally from Ohio and earned his BS degree in Business Administration at Kent State University. His work experience includes time as a technician with ICI Paints also in Strongsville, Ohio. He will continue to reside...


Art, School of (1)
Arts on display in downtown Kent 04/17/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Keep up and get involved with the thriving arts community in downtown Kent this weekend. student art show and “people 's choice ” award Kent State...


Athletics (1)
Cleveland State, Kent State recruits sign in; Akron still waiting (Senderoff) 04/16/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...after junior Sebastian Douglas suffered a third knee injury that ended his career. The Vikings found one in Kenny Carpenter, 6-5, from Detroit, while Kent State landed junior college guard Deon Edwin. "I feel that Kenny has the potential to be an outstanding player in our program,'' Waters said...


College of Public Health (COPH) (1)
Marion Public Health study to address funding questions 04/16/2014 News-Herald - Online Text Attachment Email

Kent State University director to report findings Thursday at Temple Israel MARION — Marion Public Health will receive less of its funding from...


KSU at Salem (2)
Business news briefs -- April 17 04/17/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

CAREERS Agriculture information An Agriculture College and Career Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Veale Center Gymnasium...

Agricultural fair 04/17/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND: U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Warrensville Heights, will host an Agriculture College and Career Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Veale...


KSU at Tuscarawas (1)
Writers' Workshop recognizes local students' stories, artwork 04/16/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State Tuscarawas held the Writers' Workshop recognizing local students' stories and artwork April 11. Student choice winners were Lexi Brady...


KSU Museum (1)
Art Best Bets 04/17/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Fashion Timeline — Through June 28, 2015, Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive. Also, Glass: Selections From the Kent State University Museum...


Music (1)
Final New Music Series concert set 04/17/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The final concert of the 2013-14 Kent State University New Music Series will be presented at 8 p.m. Saturday in the Carl F. W. Ludwig Recital Hall on...


Office of the President (1)
Kent State University's presidential search should be on the record: editorial 04/17/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has foolishly overshadowed the selection of Beverly Warren, provost of Virginia Commonwealth University, by conducting a top-secret...


Research; Students (1)
Unique Wheels: Taking the 'Elf' for a Test Ride (Washko) 04/17/2014 WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio– Some new wheels on the Kent State University campus are turning people's heads in amazement. It's a solar-powered tricycle that rides like...


Students; Theatre and Dance (1)
'Pride and Prejudice' will take the stage at Kent State 04/17/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

There are few modern romances that can withstand literature's classic love stories. Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance concludes...


Theatre and Dance (1)
Theatre 04/17/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance — (E. Turner Stump Theatre, Center for the Performing Arts, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent State; 330-672-2787,...


University Relations (1)
Should a boss invite employees to attend a baby shower on company time? (Harvey) 04/17/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

Kent State vice president changes event following concerns KENT, Ohio -- An invitation to a business-hours baby shower sent by a Kent State University...


WKSU (1)
The PotMaker Makes Seed Starting Simple (VerWiebe) 04/16/2014 Lehman's Country Life Text Attachment Email

...easily with The PotMaker from Lehman's in Kidron, or at Lehmans.com. Today's article comes to us from Ann VerWiebe, a staffer at 89.7 WKSU, a service of Kent State University. We're proud to help support public radio, and were thrilled when Ann jumped at the idea to test one of our products. Ann's...


News Headline: Kent State Grad Producing Movie | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Louisiana in movies and the witches have to do with northeast ohio going todd meany went to shreveport louisiana to talk to the cast and crew of salem and they know much about you. Said massachusetts was one of the first locations in the nation so how does that connect to the best? Asking the wgn america show salem. I went to mckinley high school in canton. >> No matter where you go, even in shreveport louisiana you can find that cleveland connections >> I am a browns fan, it's tough to be a browns fan because, it has been a tough 20 years. Cocreator and second producer rosa branca, canton native and kent state grad is the only charge of salem he is also the executive producer of cosmos that airs sundays on fox 8 shouldn't I been doing cosmos and salem simultaneously for two years and they are so completely different, one is about all of our potential as a species only can do what we aspire and salem is at the lowest the most demented aspects of us . Family on my moms side is from cleveland choosing you know seth reed's work he did work for a recent movie filmed in northeast ohio isn't't a work in a movie two called fun size >> He was the center rector from fun size>> Filmed at shaker heights but his work on salem that really shines it was constructed in a matter of two months they are team made a mini

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News Headline: Kent State Grad Producing Movie | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Which is louisiana movies with northeast ohio >> Todd meany tells us about the wgn america show salem massachusetts file a first location in the nation so how does that connect to the best location, ask the cast and crew of the new wgn america show salem. Brent rocha, at kent state grad is the executive are also a cosmos that appears sunday. Has been moving about two years simultaneously thoughtt I'll families from cleveland. He may not know seth reed but to seen his work for recently filmed in with ohio court on a movie two years ago, fun size. It is the director for fun size found in and around checker heightss by his work on sale in the shines a set was constructed in two months, they had made a small salem massachusetts and allowed thehu cast of become immersed in the 17th century, it is undertaking goes on among senator santorum was rigid 28 turned out to be 35 the premise is that which is real and taken over how the authentic set in for and into the mystique of salem. Very much a fan of horror and I had not done things like that in

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News Headline: PFERD Names Tool Mobile Program Leader | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: Contractor Supply - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jeffrey Kwasny will lead mobile training program.

The PFERD Tool Mobile program, which was launched in the U.S. ten months ago after proving successful in Europe and Australia, has a new applications Sales Engineer in charge. Jeffrey R. Kwasny has recently been appointed to implement the company's program in North America.

Kwasny will report directly to John Thompson, PFERD's National Technical Sales Manager and be responsible for bringing the highest standards of metalworking productivity to end users and PFERD distributor partners directly at their field locations throughout the U.S.

Kwasny is originally from Ohio and earned his BS degree in Business Administration at Kent State University. His work experience includes time as a technician with ICI Paints also in Strongsville, Ohio.

He will continue to reside in Valley City, Ohio and travel from his home office there to all scheduled Tool Mobile appointments. These metal finishing solutions' appointments will be primarily in the midwest area for the next several months.

As the program expands in the U.S., PFERD plans to launch more Tool Mobiles with additional Applications Sales Engineers under Thompson's direction.

Users or distributors in the midwest area wanting to learn how Jeff Kwasny can help them, may schedule a PFERD Tool Mobile metal finishing solutions session at their location, can visit www.pferdusa.com/toolmobile or call 1-800-342-9015.

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News Headline: Arts on display in downtown Kent | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Keep up and get involved
with the thriving arts community
in downtown Kent this
weekend.
student art show and
“people 's choice ” award
Kent State University's College
of the Arts presents a
new, annual juried art competition,
“Stratosphere.” The
show runs through May 10 in
the Downtown Gallery, 141 E.
Main St.
The theme for this year's
submissions is “Art and the
Body.”
Visitors to
“Stratosphere”
during the exhibit's
first 10
days will have a
chance to vote
for their favorite
artwork. The
piece with the
most votes will receive a special
“people's choice” award,
which carries a $500 prize.
That award — along with
awards for “best in show”
($1,000), second place ($500)
and third place ($250) — will
be announced and presented
at a special reception from 5
to 7 p.m. on April 24.
Both the gallery and the reception
are free and open to
the public.

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News Headline: Cleveland State, Kent State recruits sign in; Akron still waiting (Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Cleveland State found itself looking for a guard in the late signing period after junior Sebastian Douglas suffered a third knee injury that ended his career. The Vikings found one in Kenny Carpenter, 6-5, from Detroit, while Kent State landed junior college guard Deon Edwin.

"I feel that Kenny has the potential to be an outstanding player in our program,'' Waters said of the Cass Tech High product. "His skill level will continue to enhance, making him a dominant guard in the Horizon League in the future."

Carpenter, considered a top defender, averaged 16 points, 7 rebounds and 6 assists.

The Vikings still have one scholarship available.

"JE was pretty happy about it,'' Senderoff said of the signing. "He really wanted his brother to come here, but he didn't want to push him. He's different from Jason, not as tall (6-2) but where JE was a shooter, Deon really drives the ball and looks for contact.''

Edwin, a native of the British Virgin Islands and a qualifier out of high school, played one season at Southern Miss before averaging 22 points a game at Laramie County CC in Wyoming.

"He's a strong, physical guard, good athlete, who doesn't mind being physical," Senderoff said.

Kent State has one scholarship left and Senderoff said he is looking for a good fit, quite likely a post player who can play immediately, or a perimeter transfer who will be able to slide in for one of three departing guards after next season.

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News Headline: Marion Public Health study to address funding questions | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: News-Herald - Online
Contact Name: John Jarvis The Marion Star
News OCR Text: Kent State University director to report findings Thursday at Temple Israel

MARION — Marion Public Health will receive less of its funding from the city and more from the county if the health agency’s board follows the findings of a university study and the recommendation of health commissioner Tom Quade.

John Hoornbeek, director for the Kent State University Center for Public Policy and Health, at 6 p.m. Thursday at Temple Israel, 850 Mount Vernon Ave., will report on the results of the study that was commissioned by Marion Public Health in January to help guide the decisions about the share the city pays and the share the county pays to finance the operation of Marion Public Health. The League of Women Voters Marion will host the event.

Quade said the study was commissioned, in part, to address questions about the level of service provided by Marion Public Health to the city and county, respectively. He said Marion Mayor Scott Schertzer and Phil Winslow, chairman for the Marion County General Health, sought to know the impact of those findings on the amount of funding provided to the health agency by the city and county.

In addressing the city/county question, the study recommended charging the city separately for Marion Public Health’s work to enforce a city ordinance regarding tall grass and weeds, a service it does not do for the county, and dividing the rest of the costs for its services based on population, resulting in a determination the city would be responsible to pay 53 percent; the county would be responsible for 47 percent.

Since Marion Public Health was formed from the voter-approved consolidation of the Marion County and Marion city health departments Jan. 1, 2010, the city has paid 68 percent and the county 32 percent toward the health agency’s general fund budget.

“That was based on what the city and county were paying on public health prior to the merger,” Quade said. “It made sense at the time. ... There’s been nothing that validated that proportion since then.”

He estimated the change would reduce the city’s funding responsibility and increase the county’s by $30,000 to $80,000, adding, “That’s significant for both.”

He said he will recommend the health board begin a transition toward the new funding breakdown Jan. 1, 2015, spreading the change out possibly over two or three years to ease the transition. He said he hopes for “patience by the city and commitment by the county to keep moving forward.”

State guidelines charge Marion Public Health to establish an operating budget that includes local tax dollars as one of several sources of revenue, said Jo Ann Radwin-Zimmerman, of the League of Women Voters. The tax revenue is partially paid by the city and partially paid by villages and townships outside the city.

The study also showed the amount of tax support Marion Public Health receives is “right at the mean every way you looked at it,” Quade said. The tax is about $13 per resident, which is the average amount paid throughout the nation, he said. “Most local health districts nationally are funded the way we are,” through tax dollars, contracts and fees.

He said the report also states that best practice among public health districts is to have a carryover of at least 25 percent of the yearly operating costs.

“We’re currently below that 25 percent,” for the overall operating budget, he said. While the local general fund balance is close but below that threshold, the overall balance is significantly less.

The carryover is needed to avoid disruption of services as the health district meets payroll obligations and other expenses in the first quarter of each year before taxes, fees and other revenue comes in, he said.

He said the cost of the study, which was paid for from Marion Public Health’s general fund, was $15,000.

“My expectation is that all the parties would take this and move forward with this,” he said. “That’s why we did it. There was some really strong debate. There was some concern we were going to spend some good money on a report. It’s our expectation that both the city and county would take the recommendation whether or not they put a nickel in it. So, we’re hoping they will.”

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News Headline: Business news briefs -- April 17 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CAREERS

Agriculture information

An Agriculture College and Career Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Veale Center Gymnasium at Case Western Reserve University (located at 2138 Adelbert Road, Cleveland).

Kent State's Salem campus is among the exhibitors scheduled to attend along with Case and Ohio State University.

The fair is free and open to high school students in grades 10-12 who have a strong interest in agriculture. Registration is encouraged. Information is available online at http://fudge.house.gov/2014-agriculture-college-and-career-fair.

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News Headline: Agricultural fair | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND: U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Warrensville Heights, will host an Agriculture College and Career Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Veale Center Gymnasium at Case Western Reserve University, 2138 Adelbert Road.
The free event is open to high school students in grades 10-12 who have a strong interest in agriculture.
Participants include the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Kentucky State University, Langston University, Cuyahoga Community College, Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, Ohio State University, Tuskegee University, Cleveland Botanical Garden, Farm Credit Services of Mid-America and Ohio Soybean Association.
To register or for more details, go to http://fudge.house.gov/2014-agriculture-college-and-career-fair

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News Headline: Writers' Workshop recognizes local students' stories, artwork | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State Tuscarawas held the Writers' Workshop recognizing local students' stories and artwork April 11.
Student choice winners were Lexi Brady and Bryandy Mossor of Carrollton; Rachel Gibbs and Sarah Grages of New Philadelphia; and Sam Carroll and Mason Miller of Strasburg. The overall winner was Sarah Grages and artwork design winner was Darian Kanouff of New Philadelphia.

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News Headline: Art Best Bets | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Fashion Timeline — Through June 28, 2015, Kent State University Museum, 515 Hilltop Drive. Also, Glass: Selections From the Kent State University Museum Collection through June 28, 2015; and Arthur Koby Jewelry: The Creative Eye through Oct. 5, 2014. 330-672-3450.

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News Headline: Final New Music Series concert set | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The final concert of the 2013-14 Kent
State University New Music Series will
be presented at 8 p.m. Saturday in the
Carl F. W. Ludwig Recital Hall on the
KSU campus.
Admission will be free.
Special guest artists will be the Akros
Percussion Collective, which includes
percussionists Matthew Dudack,
Alexandros Fragiskatos, Kevin
Lewis, Jeff Neitzke, Tom Roblee and
Bill Sallak. KSU faculty guest artists
will include countertenor Jay White,
flutist Alissa Shuster, cellist Keith Robinson
and pianists Sebastian Birch and
H. Gerrey Noh.
The program will include music
composed by three KSU faculty members,
Thomas Janson, Birch, and Noh.
This concert will feature the world
premiere of Noh's My Mother's Death,
a set of songs on poems by David Hassler,
performed by White with the KSU
New Music Ensemble, conducted by
Frank Wiley.
Performers in the Ensemble will be
soprano Alanna Furst, flutist Matthew
Watkins, oboist Toshiyasu Fujita, clarinetist
Elizabeth Franks, violinist Samuel
Huang, cellist Daniel Peters, percussionist
Alec Schumann, and Noh.
Huang and Noh will perform
Subito by Polish composer Witold
Lutosławski, one of the major composers
of the second half of the 20th
century. Shuster and Birch, members
of the music faculty at the KSU Stark
Campus, will perform
Birch's Flute Sonata.
Janson's The Lady
of the Lake, Trio No.
2 for Strings and Piano
will be performed
by Huang, KSU faculty
cellist Keith Robinson,
and Noh. Composed
in 2003 for Trio
Casalmaggiore, the composition is
based on the Arthurian legends.
The program will close with a performance
by Akros Percussion Collective
of Musik im Bauch (Music in the
Belly) by the German composer Karlheinz
Stockhausen.

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News Headline: Kent State University's presidential search should be on the record: editorial | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has foolishly overshadowed the selection of Beverly Warren, provost of Virginia Commonwealth University, by conducting a top-secret search for a new president in which the university destroyed interview notes from the search committee and refused to release explicit documents, according to the Akron Beacon Journal.

The university chose Warren in January to replace retiring president Lester Lefton.

In its defense, university officials said they did nothing wrong. "Kent State University neither has violated any public records laws nor has the university violated or failed to conform to any internal policy," Kent State spokesman Eric Mansfield said in an e-mail to the Akron Beacon Journal. "We have turned over all records that are relevant."

University spokeswoman Emily Vincent points out that the school released more than 500 pages of materials from 20 applicants -- but, we must add, without the names of the applicants.

And the skimpy details on the invoices and bills mean that the public has to trust, not verify, that the university spent at least $250,000 appropriately, according to numbers compiled by the Akron paper.

That's too much to ask.

About our editorials
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Not only were confidential search documents shredded but Kent State's general counsel, Willis Walker, told the Akron Beacon Journal that the documents were put under the control of the private executive search firm, Storbeck Pimentel and Associates of Media, Pa., to do with as they pleased.

Ohio's public record laws are not optional. They should be obeyed by all public entities.

Yet, unlike the University of Akron and Youngstown State University, which embraced a spirit of openness in their presidential searches -- revealing that former Ohio State University football coach and current UA Vice President Jim Tressel has applied for their top spots -- Kent State has chosen to cling to a loophole.

The Ohio Supreme Court in 2010 ruled that the Cincinnati Board of Education could withhold superintendent applications from the public because the material had never been stored by the board members.

Yet technicalities aside, an institution that depends on public funding and the public's good will should hesitate to trespass against Ohio's Sunshine Law, which rightly demands that public institutions be open and accountable. Kent State should take note and then apologize to its students, faculty, staff and to the public for this omission.

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News Headline: Unique Wheels: Taking the 'Elf' for a Test Ride (Washko) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio– Some new wheels on the Kent State University campus are turning people's heads in amazement.

It's a solar-powered tricycle that rides like a bike and drives like a dream.

It's called the ‘Elf.' “The name is very appropriate– electric, light, and fun, ” said Paulette Washko, ‘Elf' owner.

Washko wanted to reduce her carbon footprint and stay in shape at the same time so she purchased the ride.

“If I'm not in great shape after one year riding this, I will never be. I might as well give it up,” said Washko.

Washko is a student and works on the Kent State University campus. She drives her green ‘Elf' from Stow to the campus. She also runs her errands in it, even in bad weather.

“It's a lot of fun. There is a trunk. There's headlights and taillights, turn signals. My husband is gonna put a little stereo in it for me. I've ridden it in a snowstorm and the rain. I've had now for about a month.”

FOX 8 took it for a test drive around campus. Students couldn't help but stop and look at the ‘Elf' as it cruised around campus.

“I think it's cool that it's electric-powered. I don't have money for gas. I'm in college and I'm broke, so if I had one of these monsters to ride campus I'd be set,” said Max Fleck, a KSU student.

The bike's top speed is 20 miles per hour; it takes seven hours for it to get a full charge and even though it's a tricycle with a solar-powered motor, it's still considered a bike.

You can pedal the bike or use the electric assist.

“I can park it anywhere a bicycle can go. I don't have any gas costs, no parking costs. It's wonderful. It's a great invention. It can change the world if people would just let it,” said Washko.

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News Headline: 'Pride and Prejudice' will take the stage at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: There are few modern
romances that can withstand
literature's classic
love stories.
Kent State University's
School of Theatre
and Dance concludes
its 2013-14 season with
a production of one of
the greatest love stories
of all time, Jane Austen's
“Pride and Prejudice.”
The production
runs Friday through
April 27 in the E. Turner
Stump Theatre, Center
for the Performing
Arts, 1325 Theatre Drive.
The show starts at 8 p.m.
Tickets range from $8 to
$16. Tickets for full-time,
Kent campus undergraduates
are free of charge.
This year's production
of “Pride and Prejudice”
is written and directed
by Roe Green Visiting Director
Joseph Hanreddy.
“We first did this for the
Milwaukee Repertory
Theater about six years
ago,” Hanreddy said. “We
had a lot of success with
it. It's been done for a lot
of regional theaters. This
is the first time I've had a
chance to direct it.”
Hanreddy gives his
modern take on the beloved
work of literature,
while capturing all the
drama and complexities
of the original.
“It's very entertaining,”
Hanreddy said. “The humor
of the story and the
wit is delightful to experience.
I think the complexities
of relationships
is what makes the piece
so popular. We tried to
keep the essence of the
ideas and themes of the
novel. We tried to stay
faithful to Jane Austen's
language. In the process,
I had to invent a
language similar to her
style and quality of language.
We had to simplify
the plot, basically
turning a 300-page novel
into a two and a half
hour play.”
Set in early 19th century
England, “Pride
and Prejudice” portrays
the period's class structures
and social nuances
through the love story
of Elizabeth Bennet and
Mr. Darcy.
“Elizabeth thinks
of herself as a shrewd
young woman who can
tell someone's character
almost immediately
and she finds out, no, she
is a woman capable of
making great mistakes,”
Hanreddy said. “Darcy
is a character who has
a great secret that can't
be revealed and in his
need to protect that, he
comes across as a snobbish
person. We come to
find out that it's not that
way at all.”
Junior BFA musical
theatre major, Madeleine
Drees plays leading lady,
Elizabeth Bennet. Drees
has been acting since the
fourth grade.
“It's one of the greatest
love stories ever,”
Drees said. “I hope the
audience feels that. It's
really a journey the audience
is going to take
with us, in terms of their
love and development for
each other.”
To prepare for the role,
Drees spent countless
hours with her co-star
Cody Hernandez as Mr.
Darcy.
“Cody and I are pretty
good friends in real
life, so that helps with
the chemistry on stage,”
Drees said. “Working with
Cody has been great. We
feed of each other really
well, especially in the
wittier scenes. It makes
the audience want them
to fall in love by the end.”
Bennet and Mr. Darcy
will charm the audience
with their bantering and
quick wit.
“There's one scene
where I'm playing the
piano and we're sparring
back and forth,” Drees
said. “I think both of us
are trying to poke at the
other person. Sort of a
tally back and forth, one
for Elizabeth, one for
Darcy. They are attracted
to each other because
of their witty intelligence
and no one can understand
them on that kind
of level except each other.”
Throughout the play,
Bennet learns sometimes
her pride gets the best
of her.
“Elizabeth is a very
strong, independent
woman and she definitely
has her own opinions
about things,” Drees
said. “In the end, she realizes
she really is in love
with Mr. Darcy and she's
not as prideful as she
first thought she was.
In the end, she realizes
her pride and vanity was
what was getting in the
way of love all along.”
For tickets and more
information, call 330-672-
ARTS (2787) or visit online
at theatre.kent.edu.

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News Headline: Theatre | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's School of Theatre and Dance — (E. Turner Stump Theatre, Center for the Performing Arts, 1325 Theatre Drive, Kent State; 330-672-2787, www.theatre.kent.edu) Pride and Prejudice opens Friday and continues through April 27. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 2 p.m. April 27. $16, $14 for Kent State University alumni, faculty and staff, $12 for seniors and non-Kent State students $8 age 18 and under. Free for full-time Kent campus undergraduates.

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News Headline: Should a boss invite employees to attend a baby shower on company time? (Harvey) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/17/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State vice president changes event following concerns

KENT, Ohio -- An invitation to a business-hours baby shower sent by a Kent State University vice president to those who work in her departments raised concerns from employees who felt pressured to attend and bring a gift.

Iris Harvey, vice president of university relations, changed the venue and the time after an inquiry by The Plain Dealer.

“Due to the interests of many guests and concerns, we have made several accommodation changes,” she wrote in an e-mail to employees Wednesday afternoon.

The new location, the Central Gateway Conference Room in Kent, can only accommodate 21 guests for the 5:30 p.m. event on May 8. She had received enough responses so the venue was full, she wrote.

Harvey said earlier Wednesday she was quite surprised by the concerns and had planned the shower to celebrate the upcoming birth for her associate vice president, Justin Hilton, and his wife, Candace. She said no one was obligated to come or buy a gift.

“It sounds like a wonderful teachable moment and appropriate changes were made,” said Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio, a nonpartisan group that promotes good government, when told of Harvey's actions. “It seems to me that something wasn't clearly thought through. It is good she clarified this.”

Turcer had earlier criticized holding the event during work hours and inviting all employees.

Since the gift registries were listed on the invitation “there is no confusion employees are expected to attend and actually give a gift,” she said. “That is what puts public employees in a really difficult position. They feel really beholden to those higher up. It should be about the birth of a child, not extorting gifts.”
Have you ever felt pressured to attend an event hosted by your boss? Tell us in the comments below.

Harvey oversees the offices of government relations, university communications and marketing and WKSU-FM. She had sent out a save-the-date notice in March to about 50 men and women, then an invitation this month to the shower scheduled from 3 to 5 p.m. in a room in the university's library. The invitation included where the soon-to-be-parents were registered for gifts.

An employee told The Plain Dealer he and several others felt they had to attend since it was being held during work hours and Harvey and other invited top administrators were their superiors.

Harvey said she planned to purchase the food and felt having the event during work hours and on university property was not an issue. She got emotional during the telephone interview Wednesday morning, saying the Hiltons had overcome difficulties to have a child.

“Maybe I was a little bit too enthusiastic,” she said about holding a baby shower. “The pregnancy is something to be welcomed and celebrated.”

Turcer said she understood how a baby shower is a joyous event.

“But one of the things that is really hard to balance, of course, is how you address a social aspect when you are a boss,” she said. “Certainly as a boss who's responsible and directing multiple employees at a public university.”

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News Headline: The PotMaker Makes Seed Starting Simple (VerWiebe) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/16/2014
Outlet Full Name: Lehman's Country Life
Contact Name: Karen Johnson
News OCR Text: Make biodegradable seed starter pots easily with The PotMaker from Lehman's in Kidron, or at Lehmans.com. Today's article comes to us from Ann VerWiebe, a staffer at 89.7 WKSU, a service of Kent State University. We're proud to help support public radio, and were thrilled when Ann jumped at the idea to test one of our products. Ann's an avid gardener, crafter, sewing maven and all-around creative person. This winter in Ohio has been tough and persistent. Even now, weeks after it has officially turned to spring, we can't be sure we're passed the final frost of the season. I decided to force the issue by starting seeds on what is commonly known as a “sunny windowsill.” I used the PotMaker to create tiny starter pots. What's really great about this product is that it allowed me to easily – and cheaply – make something that can be planted directly in the ground once my seeds have sprouted. The simple strip of newspaper used to make the pot biodegrades in the earth without disturbing the roots of the seedling during the transplanting process. To start, I took a sheet from the daily paper, ripped it in half and made 3” wide strips. I guess you could cut with scissors, but I chose the lazy route and tore the strips using my quilting ruler as a straightedge. The length doesn't need to be precise, just the width. Make sure your paper's 3 inches wide–any wider, and it won't form properly. Then, I rolled the newspaper around the Pot Maker “peg” and pressed into the base to form the pot's flat bottom. I found the pot rolled a little, but as soon as I added potting mix, it stabilized. Wrap the strip of paper snugly around the peg of the PotMaker. Press the peg firmly into the bottom plate of the PotMaker. This forms the pot. Paper pots, filled with potting soil and seeds, ready to water! The pots were larger than I expected and I was easily able to add dirt and a few seeds to each. I put them in a silicone baking dish (I really never liked cooking in this pan, but it's perfect as a waterproof holder), watered them and put them in the window to sprout. Despite absorbing the moisture, the tiny pots are sturdy enough to withstand the multiple waterings required to get my garden going. As I try to be optimistic about summer actually arriving, I can watch my tiny basil and zinnia plants sprout. In the sunniest window of my apartment…waiting for sprouts! Then I will pop the paper pots in the ground and collect my bounty – raised inexpensively by seed versus paying for plants at the nursery. And, all with just a little dirt and a few strips of discarded newspaper.     PS: An new email from Ann shows us this: sprouts ahoy! I have sprouts! And once it gets warmer (40° high today) I look forward to setting plants out to harden off. Thought this might be a nice addition to the article.   –Ann

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