Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Accounting (1)
Athletics (2)
Commencement (1)
Educational Technology (Research Center for) (RCET (1)
English (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications; Office of the President (2)
Office of the President (3)
Research (1)
Wick Poetry Center (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Accounting (1)
Kent State University hosts 40th annual Meonske Accounting Conference April 24-25 04/22/2014 Hudson Hub-Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...the Institute of Management Accountants will host its 40th annual Meonske Accounting Professional Development Conference and Seminar on April 24-25 at Kent State University. "This conference is recognized as one of the top five accounting conferences in the country," says Norman Meonske, Ph.D.,...


Athletics (2)
Kent State notebook: Closer-turned-starter Brian Clark stabilizes rotation for Flashes' baseball team (Duncan, Senderoff) 04/23/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

When Jeff Duncan was brought in to replace longtime Kent State baseball coach Scott Stricklin, he knew all about the Golden Flashes' tradition and winning...

Kent State's Rob Senderoff linked to job at Southern Miss 04/23/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State men's basketball coach Rob Senderoff's name has surfaced in connection with the job opening at Southern Mississippi. In an article that appeared...


Commencement (1)
Selfie etiquette at college commencements: They're ok, just not on stage (Vincent) 04/23/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Pope Francis poses for selfies. So does President Barack Obama. But should a college graduate pose for a selfie while accepting his...


Educational Technology (Research Center for) (RCET (1)
Streetsboro third-graders take part in KSU learning lab 04/23/2014 Gateway News - Online Text Attachment Email

...Third-graders from Campus Elementary School learned about language arts and math using hands-on electronic equipment while visiting a learning lab at the Kent State University Research Center for Educational Technology. Campus Elementary School teacher Rita Kroeger's class of 24 third-graders traveled...


English (1)
(AUDIO) Language We Love To Hate (Howard) 04/23/2014 ideastream.org Text Attachment Email

Whatever was found to be the most annoying word for the fourth year in a row according to the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. Also up there:...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
AUDIO: Kent State's Thor Wasbotten Looks "Big Picture" At Journalism Program (Wasbotten) 04/23/2014 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Thor Wasbotten, Director and Professor of the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication spoke with WAKR's Ray Horner about the...


Journalism and Mass Communications; Office of the President (2)
(AUDIO) Kent State Presidential Selection Controversy (Leach) 04/23/2014 AkronNewsNow.com Text Attachment Email

Jan Leach clarifies the controversy surrounding the selection of the new president. To listen to audio, please click on link: http://www.akronnewsnow.com/wakr/jasen-sokol-show/item/152496-kent-state-presidential-selection-controversy...

Kent State's Presidential Search Still Raising Eyebrows At Journalism School (Goodman, Mansfield) 04/22/2014 StateImpact Oklahoma Text Attachment Email

Beverly Warren was elected the new president of Kent State University back in January, but her appointment is still under scrutiny. Most of the faculty at KSU's School of Journalism and Mass...


Office of the President (3)
Tressel, two others named as finalists as UA narrows search for president 04/23/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

The man who traded scarlet and gray for blue and gold is among three finalists for the presidency of the University of Akron. The school on Tuesday...

Burns shares vision of America 04/23/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

FILMMAKER SPEAKS TO 3,000 AT KENT STATE Renowned documentary filmmaker and historian Ken Burns shared with Kent State University his vision of the American...

(AUDIO) Documentarian Ken Burns unfolds images of America at Kent State 04/23/2014 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

Burns says his documentary on Shakers has a special place Ken Burns, called by many the great American documentarian, came to northeast Ohio Tuesday....


Research (1)
Sun-powered trike on Kent State University's campus is first in the state: Higher Education Roundup (Washko) 04/23/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - The greening of Kent State University's campus this spring includes the state's first “sun-powered trike.” The ELF (electric, light, fun)...


Wick Poetry Center (1)
(AUDIO) Michael Ruhlman, Gavin George and 'May 4 Voices' (Hassler) 04/23/2014 ideastream.org Text Attachment Email

Dan Polletta interviews acclaimed food writer Michael Ruhlman about his new book Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World's Most Versatile Ingredient,...


News Headline: Kent State University hosts 40th annual Meonske Accounting Conference April 24-25 | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2014
Outlet Full Name: Hudson Hub-Times - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Ohio Council of the Institute of Management Accountants will host its 40th annual Meonske Accounting Professional Development Conference and Seminar on April 24-25 at Kent State University.

"This conference is recognized as one of the top five accounting conferences in the country," says Norman Meonske, Ph.D., professor emeritus at Kent State's College of Business Administration and national online instructor for the Becker CPA Review Course. "We are going to have two days packed full of high-quality practical training for members of the accounting and financial community. We encourage registrants to take advantage of the early and group discounts because we expect a sellout of 600 people."

The conference chairman is Nicholas Sucic, Vice President and Controller for the Davey Tree Expert Company in Kent.

The Friday morning (April 25) financial reporting panel features Dennis R. Beresford, Executive in Residence, J.M. Tull of Accounting, University of Georgia; Leslie F. Seidman, Executive Director, Center for Excellence in Financial Reporting, Pace University Lubin School of Business and former Chairman, FASB; Jay D. Hanson, Board Member, Public Company Accounting Oversite Board; James L. Kroeker, Vice Chairman, Financial Accounting Standards Board; and Daniel Murdock, Deputy Chief Accountant, SEC's Office of the Chief Accountant.

The keynote luncheon address "Achieving New Heights in Your Life" will be presented by Todd Huston, author, adventurer, world-record holder, inspirational speaker and inventor.

The first Friday afternoon session is "Quality Financial Reporting" by Accounting Today magazine's "Paul & Paul" featuring Dr. Paul B.W. Miller, Professor of Accounting, University of Colorado and Dr. Paul R. Bahnson, Professor of Accounting, Boise State University. The second afternoon session is "Accountants and Technology; Converging Trends + Technology = Opportunity" by Donald R. Tomoff, Founder, Invenio Advisors, LLC.

The April 24 morning session includes a "COSO 2013 Internal Controls" panel featuring Robert B. Hirth, Chair, COSO and Senior Managing Director, Protiviti; Stephen E. Soske, Partner, National Professional Services Group, PricewaterhouseCoopers; Jeffrey C. Thomson, President and CEO, Institute of Management Accountants; and Timothy F. Gearty, Partner, Gearty & McIntyre, LLP, National Director and Editor in Chief, Becker Professional Review.

The two concurrent Thursday afternoon tracks include "Conflict Management: Using Conflict to Your Advantage" by Timothy F. Gearty, Partner, Gearty & McIntyre, LLP, National Director and Editor in Chief, Becker Professional Review. Also included in Track1 is "The Speed of Trust and Personal Leadership" by Gabe Zubizarreta, Founding Principal, Silicon Valley Accountants. Track 2 includes "SEC Enforcement" by Robert Burson, Senior Associate Regional Director - Chicago Office, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and "Ohio Professional Standards and Ethics" presented by Dr. Norman R. Meonske, Professor Emeritus, Kent State University and National Online Instructor - Becker CPA review Course.

Attendees for both days will earn 16 hours of CPE. April 25 attendees will receive a free deluxe executive computer / iPad backpack and the opportunity to win a new Apple iPad Air.

For more information or to register, contact the Kent State University Conference Bureau at 330-672-3161 or go to www.ohio.imanet.org.

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News Headline: Kent State notebook: Closer-turned-starter Brian Clark stabilizes rotation for Flashes' baseball team (Duncan, Senderoff) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When Jeff Duncan was brought in to replace longtime Kent State baseball coach Scott Stricklin, he knew all about the Golden Flashes' tradition and winning ways.

However, Duncan also inherited a team in rebuilding mode, which has required some juggling of players' roles. Most notable is the change of roles for junior left-hander Brian Clark, who went from being the team's closer to its Sunday starter.

“We are a very talented team, but also a younger and unproven bunch,” Duncan said. “We have a lot of guys playing every day for the first time, and we didn't have a weekend rotation back from last year, either.”

The Flashes (25-13, 11-4 Mid-American Conference) did have the 6-foot-3, 215-pound Clark, a first-team All-Mid-American Conference selection last season who is fourth on the school's list of saves with 14.

“In the beginning, it was a little rough,” Duncan said of Clark, who turns 21 on his next start Sunday. “He'd get to the third or fourth inning and tire out a little bit. But his last five or six starts have been tremendous as he's learned to sustain five-plus innings. It was a big transition for him because he's always been a reliever, basically his whole life and throughout his college career.

“Not only did he have success in the bullpen, but starting is a complete change after coming out of the bullpen for so long. However, we had a lot of unproven starters and he had the most experience and a highly touted arm. With our rotation now, we have a freshman [Eric Lauer] throwing on Friday, a sophomore [Nick Jensen-Clagg] throwing on Saturday and then Clark on Sunday.”

Baseball transportation

In an effort to help KSU's fan base to baseball games in the midst of construction on the David and Peggy Edmonds Baseball and Softball Training Facility, the school is offering auxiliary parking and shuttle service options to help alleviate parking congestion around Schoonover Stadium.

The shuttle service transports fans to and from the stadium continuously from 90 minutes before the first pitch until 30 minutes after the game.

Softball

Kent State junior Emma Johnson pitched a five-inning no-hitter in a 13-0 win over Toledo and was part of two shutouts as part of a 12⅔-inning scoreless streak over the weekend. In the three wins, Johnson, the reigning MAC Pitcher of the Year, struck out 18 and allowed three hits.

She also pitched a five-inning shutout in an 8-0 win and 2⅔ innings in another shutout for KSU (21-15, 7-3 MAC).

Johnson struck out nine and retired the last 13 batters in the no-hitter with a walk in the first inning preventing her from achieving a perfect game.

Men's basketball

The Flashes added depth to the guard position when Deon Edwin joined the team. A guard from the Virgin Islands, Edwin joined the Flashes after spending last season playing for Wyoming's Laramie County Community College.

A first-team All-Region IX selection, Edwin scored a Laramie County single-season record 675 points. He averaged 21.8 points per game (which ranked 10th in the country), and also led the Golden Eagles in rebounding (7.4) and added 3.0 assists per game.

“The thing that impressed me most about Deon is his physical style of play,” KSU coach Rob Senderoff said. “At 6-foot-3 and 205 pounds, he will be the strongest and most physical perimeter player on our roster. We have four returning perimeter players, so I felt we needed to add somebody with experience to go along with those guys to help us next year. I'm confident that Deon can step in and do that.”

Edwin's older brother, Jason, played two seasons for the Flashes (2003-04 and 2004-05) and averaged 12.2 points and 4.4 rebounds per game.

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News Headline: Kent State's Rob Senderoff linked to job at Southern Miss | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State men's basketball coach Rob Senderoff's name has surfaced in connection with the job opening at Southern Mississippi.

In an article that appeared in Tuesday's edition of The Clarion Ledger, writer Jason Munz mentioned Senderoff and six others as potential candidates to replace Donnie Tyndall, who left Southern Mississippi on Tuesday after accepting the top job at Tennessee.

Stan Heath, who led the Golden Flashes to the NCAA Tournament's Elite 8 in 2001-02, but was fired by South Florida after winning just 12 games last season, was also mentioned as a potential candidate at Southern Miss.

Senderoff has compiled a 58-42 record in three seasons at Kent State.

Last year's KSU squad finished 16-16, after his first two teams both won 21 games and advanced to the MAC Tournament semifinals.

Senderoff signed a three-year contract worth $250,000 annually when he was hired by KSU in April of 2011, and two years have been added since he reached his 20-win incentive in each of his first two seasons.

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News Headline: Selfie etiquette at college commencements: They're ok, just not on stage (Vincent) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio - Pope Francis poses for selfies. So does President Barack Obama.

But should a college graduate pose for a selfie while accepting his diploma during commencement?

Selfie Etiquette

The do's and don't of selfies, according to Emily Post's great-grandson, Daniel Post Senning, a spokesperson for the Emily Post Institute and webmaster for emilypost.com as reported by ABC News.

Celebratory events: Sure. Senning thought the selfie snapped by Ellen DeGeneres at the Oscars was great.

Hospitals – Appropriate if it doesn't intrude on anyone's privacy. He approved of Miley Cyrus' recent selfie when she was hospitalized.

Funerals and in church – Avoid. Obama was criticized after snapping a photo with other world leaders at a memorial service for Nelson Mandela last year.

Traumatic events and accidents: Proceed with caution. People may take selfies to show their families and friends they are safe, but don't include anything that includes wreckage or a crime scene.

Public restrooms and other places where people can expect their privacy – Off limits.

Probably not, say college officials.

The president of Bryant University in Rhode Island received national attention after telling graduating seniors they cannot take selfies when they come onstage.

“I don't think their mom and dad and grandma want to get a picture of them holding up their cell phone,” Ronald Machtley told the New York Times.

Last year, some Bryant graduates used their phones to take pictures of their big moment, and the commencement committee worried that this year everyone would do the same, slowing down the ceremony.

A professional photographer takes a photo of each graduate at Bryant University, Machtley said.

Such photos, available later for purchase, are taken at nearly all commencements.

Officials at northeast Ohio public and private colleges say they haven't had problems with selfies at prior ceremonies and have not instituted any policies this year.

They said their presidents, like Machtley, have no problem posing with students after the ceremony.

But they are aware that today's smartphone-dependent graduates will take photos and selfies as they march in for commencement and during the ceremony, which can last for hours.

When is a selfie appropriate or inappropriate? Tell us in the comments below.

“There is plenty of time for selfies throughout the day and it's a very common sight off stage,” wrote Baldwin-Wallace University spokeswoman Shawn Smith Salamone in an e-mail.

Graduates at Lorain County Community College will be instructed to leave personal items, including cell phones, with their families, said Tracy Green, vice president for institutional development in an e-mail.

“We also set up a photo platform near the stage for families to use to take their own photos,” she wrote. “Additionally, the College hosts a reception for all graduates and their families immediately following the ceremony that has a designated photo station, with a professional backdrop, for students to use for casual photos with LCCC's President, Dr. Roy Church.”

But some college officials are embracing today's social media savvy graduates and encouraging selfies – just not on stage.

“Graduates will have an opportunity while back in lineup to take a photo with a portable frame (it's huge) and post to Twitter or Instagram,” Kent State University spokeswoman Emily Vincent wrote in an e-mail. “We plan on displaying the photos on the large screens in the ceremony hall prior to the start of the ceremony.”

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News Headline: Streetsboro third-graders take part in KSU learning lab | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Gateway News - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Streetsboro -- Third-graders from Campus Elementary School learned about language arts and math using hands-on electronic equipment while visiting a learning lab at the Kent State University Research Center for Educational Technology.

Campus Elementary School teacher Rita Kroeger's class of 24 third-graders traveled to the lab on school buses in the mornings for six weeks starting in February and running through mid-March.

"I liked the things we were able to do," Kroeger said. "We focused on fairy tales and mythology. My students are really into that."

Students were able to use hands-on equipment including iPads and Apple TV.

"Whatever they did on the iPad, they would show on the TV," Kroeger said. "They all got to learn from each other. We had a class blog that the students used. One parent told me she'd never seen her child so excited about school. The students loved it."

Campus Principal Kristen Cottrell, who discussed the trips to the learning lab during the monthly "promising practices" segment of the March 13 Streetsboro Board of Education meeting, said one student said, "I can't explain how much fun I had going to the lab."

"That's really an awesome feeling for a student to have about his education," said Cottrell.

Students took part in an Animoto project using a visual app that allows them to put together a video, choosing music and the background style, she said.

"Students can add pictures and text [to the background]," Cottrell said. "The students were really excited to create these videos. It's a pretty cool thing for third-graders to get to do."

For this assignment, Cottrell said students read two versions of "The Three Little Pigs."

"One was the traditional version," she said. "The other was told from the point of view of the Big, Bad Wolf. Students were supposed to compare and contrast the two stories, and say which one they thought was the real story."

Cottrell said Kroeger expanded on an idea used last school year by Campus teachers Tiana Snyder and Annette Lomis, who started "what is called a 'max journal' to help students talk about how they solve problems in math and explain it in words."

So Kroeger used that idea as a starting point, according to Cottrell.

"When she went to the lab, she had the opportunity to have students work in groups and use a program called 'Educreation' where they created quick presentations on their iPads that they showed each other," Cottrell said. "They talked about how and why they came up with the answers. It's a really fun process to watch them go through."

Cottrell added she read an article recently describing the differences between a "digital native" vs. "digital immigrant."

"Our students are digital natives because they have grown up in an age where technology is prevalent," she said. "Some of us [who are older] are digital immigrants. It has not been in our world the whole time, so we're learning about it."

Kroeger said although she had heard of the program before, she got involved after talking last school year to a student teacher from Kent State who worked in the lab.

"We're excited to have this relationship with the university," she said.

Cottrell, who said the program has been in place at Kent State for 15 years, praised Kroeger for participating in six workshops last summer so she would be "proficient enough in the technology."

Cottrell said the learning lab helps "teachers integrate technology into what they already do. The students would solve a problem with an iPad and talk about how they solved it. It was really a wonderful learning experience to investigate technology."

Kroeger said she will receive a Martha Holden Jennings Foundation grant for $1,500 that will be used next school year, possibly for an Apple TV, she said.

Cottrell said she expects other Campus students to attend the KSU learning lab.

"We have the opportunity to bring other classes there," Cottrell said. "This will be a great opportunity for our district as a whole."

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News Headline: (AUDIO) Language We Love To Hate (Howard) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: ideastream.org
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Whatever was found to be the most annoying word for the fourth year in a row according to the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. Also up there: "you know" and "it is what it is." For some folks the most annoying words are the ones that have made the leap from the computer screen to every day conversation: LOL, OMG, epic and selfie. What are the words that annoy you the most?

Guests
Elizabeth Howard, Professor of English, Kent State University
P.K. Saha, Professor Emeritus of English and Linguistics, Case Western Reserve University
Sam Allard, Staff Writer, Scene Magazine

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.ideastream.org/soi/entry/61340

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News Headline: AUDIO: Kent State's Thor Wasbotten Looks "Big Picture" At Journalism Program (Wasbotten) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Thor Wasbotten, Director and Professor of the Kent State University School of Journalism and Mass Communication spoke with WAKR's Ray Horner about the story regarding a student who fabricated a story that was published in the Daily Kent Stater.

Thor also spoke about the program, those professors in the classroom, who are teaching their students about the high standards of ethics expected of today's journalists.

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.akronnewsnow.com/wakr/ray-horner-show/item/152489-audio-kent-state-s-thor-wasbotten-looks-big-picture-at-journalism-program

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News Headline: (AUDIO) Kent State Presidential Selection Controversy (Leach) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: AkronNewsNow.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jan Leach clarifies the controversy surrounding the selection of the new president.

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.akronnewsnow.com/wakr/jasen-sokol-show/item/152496-kent-state-presidential-selection-controversy

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News Headline: Kent State's Presidential Search Still Raising Eyebrows At Journalism School (Goodman, Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/22/2014
Outlet Full Name: StateImpact Oklahoma
Contact Name: Beverly Warren
News OCR Text: Beverly Warren was elected the new president of Kent State University back in January, but her appointment is still under scrutiny.

Most of the faculty at KSU's School of Journalism and Mass Communication are protesting the secrecy surrounding the late stages of the university's search that led to hiring Warren.

The Beacon Journal has been questioning the search for weeks, including why the university will not release the names of other finalists for the job and why it signed a contract that gave a private search firm control over key records.

The paper also has challenged the sketchiness of some expense reports charged by the firm and the decision to shred the notes of some search committee members.

Now the faculty at the journalism school is maintaining in a letter to the search committee and board of trustees that Kent State is violating at least the spirit of open government and public records law that the school teaches.

“I'm the first to admit that following the obligations of public records and public meetings laws creates a lot of work for government agencies,” says Mark Goodman, a journalism law professor.  ”But the reason why those laws exist are beyond the difficulty. They really are about ensuring effective public oversight and public buy in to the decisions that are made.”

The university insists it abided by the letter of the law and followed a process that got Kent State the best candidate for president. Spokesman Eric Mansfield says no one has challenged the qualifications of Beverly Warren.

“It's been more than three months since she was selected by the board of trustees. The cost of the search was reasonable compared to similar searches across the country. Certainly the person who was chosen, Dr. Warren, has the credentials that fit a person that we were looking for. And the invoices and the receipts that were released show the things that you would expect for a presidential search.”

And Mansfield notes the university released a list of its initial candidates for the job and a copy of the contract with the search firm.

“Much has been made of the contract with the search firm. That contract was signed in August and then released to the media in August. And then followed. We didn't get a lot of questions about it until after the process was concluded with the selection of Dr. Warren.”

But Goodman maintains that the university has created controversy where none needed to be.

“I think one factor that the university has totally failed to take into account is … the cloud that President Warren is going to come in under and I feel terrible for her that she has to experience that through no doing of her own.”

The letter was signed by 28 journalism school faculty, including the former director of the school, Jeff Fruit, and Jan Leach, the former editor of the Beacon Journal.

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News Headline: Tressel, two others named as finalists as UA narrows search for president | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The man who traded scarlet and gray for blue and gold is among three finalists for the presidency of the University of Akron.

The school on Tuesday announced it has cut the list of 19 applicants to three men who will be on campus next week for additional interviews and meetings.

They are:

• Ronald A. Nykiel, provost of University of Maryland Eastern Shore and former dean of business of Husson University in Bangor, Maine.

• Scott L. Scarborough, provost of the University of Toledo and former executive vice president for finance and administration of DePaul University in Chicago.

• Jim Tressel, executive vice president of student success at UA and the former national championship-winning football coach at Ohio State University.

Jonathan Pavloff, a UA trustee and search committee chair, said the university is encouraged that the process that began in August is nearing an end.

“We're at the point now where we are kind of excited to re-engage the university community again and bring those constituency groups back into the process by allowing them to meet with these three finalists,” he said by phone Tuesday afternoon.

Finalists will spend an entire day interviewing on campus and meeting with seven groups that include faculty, students, college deans, trustees and the public.

Finalists' schedule

Nykiel will be on campus Monday, Scarborough on Wednesday and Tressel on Thursday.

The open forums at which Nykiel and Scarborough will be available to the public are 3 to 4 p.m. during their on-campus dates. Tressel's open forum will be 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Thursday. The sessions will be held inside the UA Student Union Theatre.

Trustees are looking for a new leader to take on numerous challenges, particularly in terms of the financial demands confronting the school and its 27,000 students. With a staff of 5,000 and a $388 million budget, UA is among Summit County's largest employers.

Tressel has not spoken publicly about his candidacy, but in his application wrote that, “It is my opinion that we need more than a leader who can ‘hit the ground running.' ”

“The University would be better served by a leader who has been ‘on the ground' with the current team. ... Put simply, I believe I am the right leader at this time.”

UA officials might need to move quickly if Tressel is their choice.

Backers of Youngstown State University actively have been promoting Tressel for the open presidency there, and the YSU trustees' president has said that he would seriously consider Tressel for the job.

Tressel won four national championships in 15 seasons with the Penguins before leaving for Ohio State and has remained a big benefactor of the university.

YSU plans

YSU said it expects to cut its list of candidates to six to eight finalists this week.

Pavloff said it is not unusual for presidential candidates to be seeking more than one position, and UA trustees will not rush their process.

“Our process and our timeline is defined as we structured it. The fact that Youngstown is re-engaged in the process is coincidental,” he said. “Obviously, we're going to continue to conduct our search according to the guideline of our process.”

Tressel is the only finalist without a doctoral degree. Some consider it a huge hole in his resume.

Pavloff noted that Norman Auburn, UA's longest serving president, held only a bachelor's degree when he was hired in 1951. He served for 20 years.

Nykiel was an applicant for the Kent State University presidency that eventually went to Beverly Warren, provost of Virginia Commonwealth University.

KSU scrutinized

KSU's search has garnered local and national scrutiny. Critics have assailed the university for its reluctance to disclose the finalists' names.

KSU officials deny breaking any Ohio public records law while conducting the search and have said privacy guarantees made by using a private search firm brought out more and better-qualified applicants who did not want their names released publicly.

Pavloff acknowledged that he is aware of potential UA applicants who declined to pursue the job because of the public nature of UA's search.

“I can tell you that there were some candidates who, when confronted with the prospect of having their name announced, decided to withdraw,” he said. “Now, whether they would have been candidates that we would have invited to campus ... I cannot determine that because they withdrew from the process.

“But, nonetheless the open records laws determine how we conduct the process, and that's what guides us.”

Pavloff and the other trustees on the search committee — Roland Bauer, Olivia Demas and Ralph Palmisano — have been meeting since August to find the successor to President Luis Proenza, who steps down July 1 to return to teaching.

Trustees hired the firm R. William Funk and Associates of Dallas to help in the search.

From an original list of 19 applicants, four dropped out early in the process.

Two of the remaining 15 candidates who did not make the cut to finalists are from the Akron area: Ronald Bucci, interim vice president for professional and support services at Akron Children's Hospital; and Martin Belsky, UA's Randolph Baxter Professor of Law and former dean of the university's law school.

UA has a Web page devoted to the search: www.uakron.edu/bot/president-search.dot.

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News Headline: Burns shares vision of America | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: FILMMAKER SPEAKS TO 3,000 AT KENT STATE

Renowned documentary filmmaker and historian Ken Burns shared with Kent State University his vision of the American experience Tuesday night, while reflecting on his trilogy of films chronicling the Civil War, baseball and jazz
music.

Nearly 3,000 people filled the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center for the speech, the spring installment of
Kent State's Presidential Speaker Series and keynote event for the Symposium on Democracy. The four-day series of
events focuses on democratic values to commemorate the events of May 4, 1970.

Burns stressed the significance of America's past and how it can reveal what lies ahead in the future.

“Too often as a culture we have ignored this joyful historical noise becoming in the process blissfully ignorant to the
power of those past lives and its stories and elements and moments have over this moment, and indeed our vast, unknown future and the opportunities and challenges that future presents for our democratic society,” he said.

Quoting essayist Gerald Early, Burns said American civilization will be known for three things when studied
2,000 years from now: The Constitution, baseball and jazz. “‘They're the three most beautiful things Americans have.

Baseball reflects the story of America: Thousands of games won and lost, heroic and not-so-heroic careers rising and falling, Burns said, adding that it offers a prism through which American events are reflected, such as the struggle of racial equality, which Jackie Robinson helped to further on the diamond of our national pastime.

The Civil War is the closest our country came to suicide, Burns said, adding that generations later the war and Abraham Lincoln are still recalled when America seeks to redefine itself.

“We have counted on Abraham Lincoln for nearly a century and half when the tide and overflow of human events has threatened to capsize us,” he said. “We return to him for a sense of unity, conscious and national purpose and still he
and the Civil War have much to teach us.”

Jazz also proves a window into American society's racial struggles, he said.

“The only art form created by Americans that is recognized around the world, an enduring and double expression of our genius and our promise,” he said. “Jazz insists and offers perhaps the explosive hypothesis that those who have
had the peculiar experience of being unfree in a free land can actually be at the center of our history.”

His movies, he said, while focused on different subjects, have each revolved around one question: “Who are we?”

“Each film offers an opportunity to pursue this question, and though never answering it fully of course, nevertheless deepens the question with each succeeding project,” he said. “American history is a loud, raucous, moving, exquisite collection of noises that in the aggregate often combine to make the sweetest kind of music I know, and I've tried to
listen to this music as much as I can in putting together the films we have made.”

Each of the three subjects, Burns said, show that Americans can create and recreate something from nothing.

“What each of the three subjects daily reminded us was that the genius of America is improvisation,” he said. “Our unique experiment, a profound intersection of freedom and creativity in nearly every gesture.”

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News Headline: (AUDIO) Documentarian Ken Burns unfolds images of America at Kent State | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Burns says his documentary on Shakers has a special place

Ken Burns, called by many the great American documentarian, came to northeast Ohio Tuesday. He was the fifth visitor in Kent State University's Presidential Speaker Series—WKSU's Tim Rudell reports on what he came to say…and to see.

Student of the people
Ken Burns has been studying America and telling its stories with award-winning films for a quarter of a century. So, when he took a moment to talk with reporters before his public appearance, WKSU's Tim Rudell asked him what he sees in this one corner of the country.

“Well, I'm a Midwestern boy, and I grew up in Ann Arbor, so I see a lot that of things that are very familiar to me. A college town, and a big campus, and the influence of students. I grew up in the 1960's. There was a much more activist student body. But I see the same thing. I mean, there is the same kind of questing. There's the same curiosity. And I think that's what you hope stays alive.”

May 4th, 1970
Burns also says he has a specific interest in northeast Ohio right now, and in visiting the May 4th Memorial at Kent State -- because of one of his film projects…

“The themes that we engage in our films seem perpetual; about the nature of human freedom; about the role of the government; about the question of race; all sorts of sort of sub themes to American history. And in some ways I make the same film over and over again…and in some ways each film is utterly unique. And so all of this is grist. And I am anxious to be here. I am working on a film on the history of Viet Nam War and May 4th 1970 is a hugely important day. And the introduction of our film has the iconic image of the woman standing over the body of her friend…and the lines are: ‘the Viet Nam War was a decade of agony'.”

Love ‘em all
Perhaps the most iconic of Ken Burns films also has to do with war…the Civil War. But he has done many other documentaries that drew acclaim and tremendous viewership…from “Baseball” to “Jazz.”

So which is his personal favorite?
“You know, I'm the father of four daughters…here comes the cop-out, right? And I would be a terrible father if I liked one of them more than the other…and I don't. And so, “Civil War” will be part of the first line of my obituary. I keep trying really hard not to make sure that isn't, but I understand why that is. But I made a little film, my second film, after my first film on the Brooklyn Bridge, was about the celibate religious sect, the Shakers. They were in Ohio. Shaker Heights. They were an incredible group. And I love that film as much as I love the Civil War series.”

Something different
Burns typically has half a dozen film projects going at once— because they typically are panoramic tales that most of a decade to complete. But his latest, released a week ago, isn't like that at all. It is the story of a small boarding school for boys with social and learning issues that require special care.

“For the 35 years that this school, the Greenwood School has been in existence they've asked there boys to memorize and then publicly recite the Gettysburg Address. Which would be a challenge for anyone, but a minefield of anxieties and terrors for these children.”

Inspirational
And yet, Burn says, they do it…magnificently. In fact, he believes what the boys do in presenting what he calls “some of the greatest words in American history,” is so inspiring he posted it on the PBS website…where he also asks everyone to join them. “…In what could be the largest mass memorization in all of history, you go to PBS. Org, the address, and follow the prompts. And it allows you, your family, your friends, your class to upload what you've done. And this could be a terrific moment for all of us. The kind of medicine ti was for the United States during the Civil War…the kind of medicine it could be for us today. “

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.wksu.org/news/story/38948

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News Headline: Sun-powered trike on Kent State University's campus is first in the state: Higher Education Roundup (Washko) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - The greening of Kent State University's campus this spring includes the state's first “sun-powered trike.”

The ELF (electric, light, fun) pedal vehicle is owned by Paulette Washko, director of research compliance. It is one of about 400 manufactured by Organic Transit of Durham, N.C. It costs about $5,000.

The bright green “pod” is powered by pedals pushing its 26-inch tires. Uphill, the ELF hums as its solar-assisted 600-watt battery kicks in, according to a Kent State news release. It meets the federal standards for a bicycle.

Washko drives her ELF four miles from her Stow home to Kent State and locks it to a bike rack outside Cartwright Hall.

“You can't be sad when you're driving it,” Washko said in the release. You get to experience the outdoors with the convenience of not being exposed to the elements, and you get some exercise, all while commuting to work.”

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News Headline: (AUDIO) Michael Ruhlman, Gavin George and 'May 4 Voices' (Hassler) | Attachment Email

News Date: 04/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: ideastream.org
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dan Polletta interviews acclaimed food writer Michael Ruhlman about his new book Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World's Most Versatile Ingredient, prior to his appearance this weekend at the Beachwood Branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library. Plus Dee Perry welcomes 10-year-old piano prodigy Gavin George for a Key Bank studio performance prior to his concert this weekend with The Cleveland Women's Orchestra at Severance Hall. And ideastream arts reporter David C. Barnett shares the May 4 Voices to be heard on the anniversary of the Kent State shootings.

Guests
Michael Ruhlman, writer

Gavin George, pianist

Robert Cronquist, Cleveland Women's Orchestra

David Hassler, poet

To listen to audio, please click on link:
http://www.ideastream.org/applause/entry/61297

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