Report Overview:
Total Clips (41)
Alumni; Athletics (1)
Art, School of (1)
Athletics (2)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Business Administration (COBA); Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Commencement (2)
Dual Enrollment Programs; KSU at Stark (2)
KSU at Stark (12)
KSU at Stark; Office of the President; Office of the Provost; Psychology (1)
KSU at Trumbull (1)
KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
May 4 (12)
Research (1)
Sociology (1)
Town-Gown (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics (1)
Dri Archer another Mid-American Conference player closing in on NFL Draft 05/05/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio -- Like many college football players this spring, Kent State's Dri Archer is living the rock star experience. He has been constantly on tour....


Art, School of (1)
2014 Cleveland Arts Prize winners announced 05/05/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- An eclectic group of artists has been awarded the 2014 Cleveland Arts Prize, the organization announced Friday. They include theater...


Athletics (2)
Kent State Scholarship Auction shatters record by raising over $100,000 (Nielsen, Gies) 05/05/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The Kent State University Department of Athletics hosted its third annual Athletics Scholarship Auction on Friday, April 25, at the M.A.C. Center. The...

Corey Conners leads Kent State men's golf team to sixth straight MAC title (Page) 05/05/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

CARMEL, Ind. -- Kent State became the first team to win six consecutive outright Mid-American Conference men's golf championships by completing a 10-shot...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Bright futures envisioned for Kinsman, Duck Island and West 65th Street neighborhoods in Cleveland (Schwarz) 05/03/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...Livable Communities Initiative. The Duck Island plan was a collaboration among Tremont West Development Corp., Cleveland Neighborhood Progress and Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. “The connecting thread is about multi-modal [transportation] accessibility and Cleveland...


College of Business Administration (COBA); Marketing and Entrepreneurship (1)
Celebrations 05/05/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Danielle Flemister of Cleveland, a business student at Kent State, is the winner of the 2014 Rising Student Entrepreneur Award from the university's College...


Commencement (2)
College commencement ceremonies 05/03/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...ceremony.May 9University of Akron: 7 p.m. at the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron for business administration and engineering graduates. Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza, who is stepping down June 30 after 16 years at the helm.Kent State University Main campus: 6...

College commencement ceremonies 05/03/2014 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...ceremony.May 9University of Akron: 7 p.m. at the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron for business administration and engineering graduates. Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza, who is stepping down June 30 after 16 years at the helm.Kent State University Main campus: 6...


Dual Enrollment Programs; KSU at Stark (2)
Starting College Early: Dual enrollment (GIvan) 05/05/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

For Stark County students, college can begin in high school Marissa Biclawski is in her second semester of college, but she's already considered a sophomore....

Collaboration in Stark County: Schools work together to help students 05/03/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

... Other collaborations encourage students to earn transferable academic credits that are usable as students pursue associate or bachelor's degrees. Kent State University offers dual credit courses in Minerva and North Canton's Hoover High. Kent State at Stark offers courses at Lake, Perry...


KSU at Stark (12)
Walter F. Wagor resigns as dean of Kent State University's Stark campus; will return to faculty (Diacon, Wagor) 05/03/2014 Crain's Cleveland Business - Online Text Attachment Email

The dean of Kent State's largest regional campus has resigned his post and will return to the faculty. Walter F. Wagor has served as dean and chief administrative...

KSU Stark dean to return to teaching (Wagor) 05/02/2014 Repository - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader. Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials...

Nontraditional schools: Plenty of Alternatives: Online learning in higher education (Walker) 05/04/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...all college classes will be online. “Students are definitely interested in more online classes,” said Diane Walker, director of Student Services for Kent State University at Stark. Online offerings make it easier for students to take advantage of classes offered at other Kent State campuses,...

Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) 05/02/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. Make the pledge. Promise...

KSU Stark dean to return to teaching (Wagor) 05/02/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader. Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials...

Local colleges 'think green' (Wood) 05/02/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Part of being green and eco-conscious is to look at the world in a certain way. Brent Wood noticed the blue plastic recycling bins in offices throughout Kent State University at Stark were smaller than trash cans. So, after the trash was emptied, he turned the trash cans over and placed the recycling...

Local colleges 'think green' (Wood) 05/03/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Both Kent State University at Stark, and Stark State College are focusing on recycling and sustainability to help the environment, and to save money. ...

Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) 05/02/2014 Times-Reporter - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. Make the pledge. Promise...

Local colleges 'think green' (Wood) 05/03/2014 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Both Kent State University at Stark, and Stark State College are focusing on recycling and sustainability to help the environment, and to save money. ...

Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) 05/02/2014 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. That's what Kent State...

Kent Stark race gives kids 'Head Start' (Humm) 05/05/2014 Suburbanite, The Text Attachment Email

When it comes to this race, it's all about the Head Start. The sun was shining April 13 when more than 80 people came together to burn a few calories...

Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) 05/03/2014 North Neighbor News - Online Text Attachment Email

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. Make the pledge. Promise...


KSU at Stark; Office of the President; Office of the Provost; Psychology (1)
KSU Stark dean to return to teaching 05/03/2014 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader. Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials said....


KSU at Trumbull (1)
Kent State plans commencement 05/05/2014 Tribune Chronicle Text Attachment Email

SPEAKER TO ADDRESS COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY: Elizabeth Bartz, founder, president, and CEO of State and Federal Communications, Inc. will serve as the guest...


KSU at Tuscarawas (2)
150 Tuscarawas County students to participate in Project Lead the Way showcase 05/03/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...150 students from five Tuscarawas County schools will be demonstrating their engineering projects to the public at a Project Lead the Way showcase at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on May 8. The event will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Founders Hall. Kevin Gray from Lauren International...

150 Tuscarawas County students to participate in Project Lead the Way showcase 05/03/2014 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...150 students from five Tuscarawas County schools will be demonstrating their engineering projects to the public at a Project Lead the Way showcase at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on May 8. The event will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Founders Hall. Kevin Gray from Lauren International...


May 4 (12)
The HeldenFiles Online Kent State revisited 05/05/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Sunday is the 44th anniversary of the shootings at Kent State. CNN, for one, will have special that night with people recalling the events that day; more...

44 years ago students rioted at Kent State; what would they do today? 05/05/2014 Akron Beacon Journal, The Text Attachment Email

Forty-four years ago today, several hundred students at Kent State University continued a rampage of anti-war protests, staring down the barrels of military...

May 4 commemoration at KSU still heavy on emotion 05/05/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...to what they call the scene of the crime, a dark chapter in this nation's history. May 4, it's called. The annual commemoration of what happened at Kent State University on May 4, 1970, when Gov. James A. Rhodes ordered the Ohio National Guard there after word spread about student-led protests...

KSU reflects on May 4, 1970 05/05/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Annual event pays tribute to four students killed by national guard during ant-war protest The Kent State University community gathered in the Student...

May 4 movie in the works 05/05/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

A new theatrical feature motion picture will be produced by Hollywood-based TreeHouse Pictures, tentatively titled, “Ohio: The Kent State Story.” TreeHouse...

Speakers tell of May 4 shootings 05/03/2014 Tribune Chronicle - Online Text Attachment Email

VIENNA - On the 44th anniversary of the Kent State University shootings, a college professor who was there at that time as a freshman shared her story as well as what the May 4 Visitors...

What's going on? May 4 05/05/2014 Independent - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Are you looking for something to do? Here's what's happening around the area. Kent State shooting commemoration — Noon at Kent State Commons, Kent State...

( VIDEO) Kent State University victims and students remember May 4th, 1970 shooting 05/05/2014 WEWS-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio - A large crowd gathered just after 11 p.m. Saturday behind the Taylor Hall at Kent State University to honor the fallen. The crowd stood near...

Kent State University victims and students remember May 4th, 1970 shooting 05/04/2014 WEWS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

Four students were shot and killed on May 4th, 1970 at Kent State University, 9 others injured. This Sunday marks the 44 years anniversary of the Kent State shooting. KENT, Ohio - A large crowd...

(VIDEO) Campus Reflects on 44th Anniversary of Kent State Shootings 05/05/2014 Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV Text Attachment Email

KENT, Ohio — Kent State University marked the 44th anniversary of the killings of four students this weekend with a candlelight vigil, a program remembering...

Somber Anniversary at KSU 05/03/2014 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

It's been 44 years since shots rang-out on the campus of Kent State University, killing four students and wounding others when National Guardsmen opened fire on anti-war protestors at Taylor Hall. The annual...

Weekend Ceremonies Commemorate 1970 Kent State University Shootings 05/05/2014 WCBE-FM Text Attachment Email

Kent State University will pause this weekend to commemorate the 44th anniversary of the shooting deaths of four students during a protest of the Vietnam...


Research (1)
Look! It's a bike, it's a car -- no, it's an ELF (Washko) 05/04/2014 Stow Sentry - Online Text Attachment Email

...is an ELF, which stands for Electric, Light, Fun, vehicle driven and owned by Stow resident Paulette Washko, who is director of research compliance in Kent State University's Division of Research and Sponsored Programs. "It's really a lot of fun, good for the environment and my health," said...


Sociology (1)
Kent State professor compares iconic photo to Michelangelo sculpture 05/05/2014 CNNMoney.com Text Attachment Email

Jerry M. Lewis is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology. As a faculty marshal on May 4 he witnessed the shootings by the Ohio National Guard. He is featured...


Town-Gown (1)
Kent, Kent State say 'thanks' to safety forces (Lefton) 05/05/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

City and university leaders in Kent called together their police forces at the Kent Fire Department Tuesday to say “thanks” for the work they put in to...


News Headline: Dri Archer another Mid-American Conference player closing in on NFL Draft | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio -- Like many college football players this spring, Kent State's Dri Archer is living the rock star experience. He has been constantly on tour.

"I was just in Oakland,'' he said shortly after Easter. "I had workouts with the Cardinals, the Colts, the Dolphins. I worked out for the Bucs, too. The Patriots. Hey, I can't remember."

Since then, add the Detroit Lions and New York Jets to his travels.

The same can likely be said for several other Mid-American Conference players, including Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack, Northern Illinois safety Jimmie Ward, NIU quarterback/fullback Jordan Lynch, and even Ball State quarterback Keith Wenning. All are expected to be selected between the first and fifth rounds of the upcoming 2014 NFL draft.

After Mack, who is No. 4 on the latest CNN/SI Top 100 draft list, Ward checks in at No. 64 then Archer at No. 90. So the tour stops for Kent State's speedster are expected to continue until draft day.

Such is the life when everybody wants to see the blazing highlight reel in person. Archer quickly made up for a lackluster, injury filled senior season with a strong NFL combine performance that included a 4.26-second effort in the 40-yard dash.

That did not eclipse Archer's personal best of 4.21, or top the combine record of 4.24 by Chris Johnson in 2008. But it was more than enough to rekindle interest in the speedster who was a consensus All-American as a kick returner his junior season with the Golden Flashes.

"They are working me out with specials teams, a running back and doing receiving stuff, too,'' Archer said. "They got me doing a little bit of everything."

What looks like a glamor lifestyle from the outside, traveling from coast to coast, is far from it in reality. Sleep is haphazard and often uncomfortable, and the ability to maintain a workout regimen is difficult, if not impossible.

"Flying all the time, especially doing it every week, takes a lot out of you,'' Archer said. "But I do work out when I get a chance."

At the team workouts, Archer said one area of focus is on his ability to field punts. One reason the 5-8, 173-pounder returned to Kent for his senior season was to showcase his ability in that area. But the injury bug hit on Kent's first offensive series and Archer did not regain full health until mid-season.

Archer did return a pair of kickoffs after that, one for a 99-yard touchdown in the rain. But the same poor weather conditions made KSU coaches wary of letting him return punts without previous experience under fire. So that is one area NFL teams critique as best they can when Archer makes his visits.

"It's another part of the game,'' the Florida native said. "That's definitely something I have been doing a lot of (fielding punts). I'm more and more comfortable with it the more I do it."

Dri Archer file

Age: 21
Home: Laurel, Fla.
Position: Slotback/returner
Height: 5-8
Weight: 175 pounds.
Accolades: 2012 MAC Special Teams Player of the Year, first team All-MAC tailback.
By the numbers: Best season was 2012 - 1,337 yards rushing, 14 touchdowns, 9.7 yards per carry during the regular season; 30 receptions, 458 yards, 4 TD, 15.3 yards per catch. 15 kickoff returns, 573 yards, 3 TD.
Did you know: Archer only had two chances to return a kickoff in 2013, one became a 99-yard touchdown in the rain against Northern Illinois. He is on Mel Kiper's "Freak List" for the upcoming draft, and it is not because of his 4.26 speed.

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News Headline: 2014 Cleveland Arts Prize winners announced | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- An eclectic group of artists has been awarded the 2014 Cleveland Arts Prize, the organization announced Friday. They include theater directors, designers, filmmakers, visual artists, arts administrators and a gallery owner.

The winners of the 54th annual awards will be honored at a ceremony at the Cleveland Museum of Art at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 26.

The 2014 winners of the Robert Bergman Prize, awarded to "an exceptional individual/s who has shown passionate leadership and opened his/her field more broadly" are arts activists Deena Epstein and Kathleen Cerveny. Epstein is senior program officer for the arts at the George Gund Foundation. Cerveny is program director for arts and culture at the Cleveland Foundation.

The Martha Joseph Prize is awarded to individuals or organizations that because of "exceptional commitment, vision, leadership or philanthropy have made a significant contribution to the vitality and stature of the arts in Northeast Ohio." This year's honorees are gallery owner William Busta, who recently celebrated 25 years as a Cleveland art dealer, and Pamela Young, executive director of DanceCleveland.

This year's Emerging Artist Awards go to designer Valerie Mayen and writer Brad Ricca. The Mid-Career Awards go to artist Kasumi and Cleveland Public Theatre executive artistic director Raymond Bobgan.

The Lifetime Achievement Award goes to filmmaker Richard Myers, an emeritus professor at the School of Art at Kent State University.

Honorees receive $10,000. The prize is funded by private endowments.

The ceremony at the art museum will be hosted by Ideastream journalist Dee Perry. Ticket prices are $225 (Patron Ticket), $125 (Donor Ticket) and $75 (General Ticket). A portion of each will be tax-deductible. Invitations will be mailed later this month. Tickets and information about the Patron, Donor and Supporter levels will be available on Monday, May 12, at clevelandartsprize.org.

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News Headline: Kent State Scholarship Auction shatters record by raising over $100,000 (Nielsen, Gies) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The Kent State University Department of Athletics hosted its third annual Athletics Scholarship Auction on Friday, April 25, at the M.A.C. Center. The event featured celebrity co-host Julian Edelman, a former star quarterback for the Golden Flashes who currently starts at wide receiver for the New England Patriots.

With Edelman's help, Kent State raised over $100,000 to benefit student-athlete scholarships -- over $70,000 more than last year.

"Over the past three years this event has grown substantially, both in attendance and in the number of items donated for the event," said KSU Director of Athletics Joel Nielsen. "Through the efforts of our organizing committee and staff, this event has provided resources that support and enhance the student-athlete experience."

The event featured both a live and silent auction that boasted over 100 items, including trips to Orlando (Fla.), Lake Tahoe and Cabo San Lucas, a bus trip with sideline passes for the Kent State vs. Ohio State football game that will take place Sept. 13, and a dinner for two with football legend and KSU alumnus Lou Holtz.

"This scholarship event was another great example of the passion our supporters, community, fans and alums have for Kent State athletics," said Flashes Senior Associate Athletic Director, Executive Director of Athletic Advancement Matthew Geis. "The support of our constituencies continues to play a vital role, ensuring our student-athletes realize success nationally in class, in competition and in life."

BASEBALL

Kent State's Alex Miklos was named to the Capital One Academic All-District baseball team. The junior outfielder qualified by having a cumulative grade point average above 3.30. Miklos entered last weekend batting .360. with 18 doubles and 35 RBI.

n Senior first baseman Cody Koch was named MAC East Player of the Week after batting .600 in five games last week. Koch ripped four doubles and two home runs while piling up eight RBI.

WRESTLING

Kent State sophomores Mack McGuire and Tyler Buckwalter were among 10 wrestlers named to the 2014 Academic All-MAC squad.

McGuire, a speech pathology major, earned his second straight trip to the NCAA Championships by finishing third in the 133-pound bracket at the MAC Championships. He finished second on the team in victories (27-15).

Buckwalter, a health and physical education major, carries a 3.92 cumulative grade point average in his third academic year at Kent State. After sitting out the beginning of the season with an injury, Buckwalter placed fifth at the MAC Championships.

Fifth-year senior T.J. Keklak was an honorable-mention choice.

TRACK AND FIELD

Jesse Oxley set a school record in the pole vault, earning one of 15 first-place finishes for Kent State at the Ohio Open last weekend in Athens.

Oxley cleared 17-3.75, edging the previous record of 17-3 set by Jamie Clymer in 1998.

Michael King won the shot put with a mark of 59-4; Jeremy Jancso took first in the high jump (6-0); Reggie Jagers won the discus (184-10); and Xavier Braxton won the long jump with a personal-best leap of 23-1.25.

Donovan Tolbert claimed the triple jump title by clearing 48-0.75, a personal best, while Granton Onken won the 1,500 meters in 3:58.35. William Barnes was a double-winner, capturing the 110-hurdles (14.26) and the 200 meters (21.67).

Miles Dunlap took first in the 400 meters (48.39), Riak Reese won the 100 meters in a personal-best 10.68, and Danny Young captured the 400-meter hurdles in 54.60.

The men's 4x100 relay team of Laron Brown, Reese, Nate Scales and Cody Seifert was also victorious (41.62).

On the women's side, former Garfield High School star C.J. Carlisle won the javelin throw with a heave of 150-5. Morgan Estes took first in the pole vault (12-5.5), and Erica Hutson notched a win in the 400 meters (55.76).

n Kent State took three of four MAC Athlete of the Week honors last week on the strength of stellar performances at the prestigious Drake Relays. Dior Delophont and Matthias Tayala were chosen MAC Field Athletes of the Week, while Wayne Gordon was named Track Athlete of the Week.

Delophont finished second in the high jump by clearing a personal-record 6-0.5, which is tied for sixth in the nation. She also finished seventh in the triple jump with a mark of 40-7.75 that leads the MAC.

Gordon placed sixth in the finals of the 100 meters with a time of 10.43, while Tayala finished first out of 27 participants in the hammer throw (231-6).

FOOTBALL

Kent State's Andrew Christopher and Max Plunkett were named to the 2014 National Football Foundation Hampshire Honor Society, comprised of football players from all divisions who maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better throughout their college career.

Plunkett contributed to the offensive line and special teams last fall. Christopher entered the program as a walk-on, but earned a scholarship and played a major role on the Flashes' defensive line in his last two seasons.

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News Headline: Corey Conners leads Kent State men's golf team to sixth straight MAC title (Page) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: CARMEL, Ind. -- Kent State became the first team to win six consecutive outright Mid-American Conference men's golf championships by completing a 10-shot victory on Sunday at Prairie View Golf Club.

With a 3-over-par total of 1,155 (286-284-282-303), the Golden Flashes increased their record of conference championships to 22. Senior Corey Conners added the 23rd individual MAC title won by a Kent State player since the event was first contested in 1947, and became conference medalist for the second time in the past three years.

"Winning never gets old," said Kent State head coach Herb Page, who was voted MAC Coach of the Year. "This is special because our seniors, Corey Conners, Taylor Pendrith and Kyle Kmiecik, have now never lost in this championship. And to win six in a row is a tribute to the support we get from above and the fact that it is important to the athletic department at Kent State to have a championship golf program."

Conners and Pendrith were voted the MAC co-Players of the Year by the league's coaches. Both were also selected to the All-MAC First Team and to the MAC All-Tournament Team, while Kmiecik was selected to the All-MAC Second Team.

Conners also won in 2012 with a 7-under-par total over three rounds at Rich Harvest Farms in Sugar Grove, Ill. He finished at 11-under 277 (72-67-65-73) to claim a five-shot victory over Pendrith, who won the MAC tourney last year.

"This is obviously pretty special and I feel very lucky," said Conners. "I'm happy with how I played and how the team did. We got the job done. Hopefully we can gain some confidence from this week, especially the way we played in the (third) round."

Kent State put a stranglehold on the team championship in that third round on Saturday, building a 23-shot lead with a 4-under-par 282. The Flashes needed that cushion, as they struggled to a 15-over-par 303 on Sunday that matched Ball State for the final round's highest score.

"We've had some ups and downs and inconsistencies, but this team is very resilient," said Page.

"We didn't play our best round on Sunday, but Saturday's round was one of the best I've ever been affiliated with. To have that big lead, we could afford to play a little less than our best. Corey and Taylor were both great all week, and when you have a third senior like Kyle Kmiecik, you win championships. Once again, they held it together."

Pendrith (71-70-69-72) was the only Kent State player to shoot par or better in all four rounds, finishing at 6-under for the tournament. Only Conners, Pendrith and Akron's Charlie Bull (4-under) closed the week in red numbers. Bull led the Zips to a second-place finish.

Kmiecik, freshman Josh Whalen and sophomore Sebastian Bendsen all shot 79 for Kent State on Sunday. Whalen (71-70-69-72-282) finished in 17th place at 11-over-par, while Kmiecik (71-73-78-79-301) and Bendsen (76-74-74-79-303) finished in 23rd and 29th place, respectively.

Kent State finished ahead of Akron to secure another full point in the PNC Wagon Wheel Challenge, giving the Flashes a 6.5-5.5 lead over the Zips with points still to be awarded in baseball and men's and women's outdoor track and field.

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News Headline: Bright futures envisioned for Kinsman, Duck Island and West 65th Street neighborhoods in Cleveland (Schwarz) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Litt, Steven
News OCR Text: Three new plans designed to update specific neighborhoods on the East and West sides of Cleveland aren't about to become reality overnight.

But by winning unanimous approval on Friday from the city's planning commission, all three visions gained an important measure of validation and took a step toward realization.

One plan highlighted opportunities for parks, housing development and streetscape improvements in the Duck Island neighborhood south of Tremont on the city's West Side that's poised for growth.

Another called for making a two-mile stretch of West 65th Street from Detroit Avenue south to Denison Avenue more bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly.

And the third proposed creating an arts and entertainment district in the Kinsman neighborhood on the city's far East Side, just south of Shaker Square.

The plans for West 65th Street and for Kinsman Road in Mount Pleasant were funded by the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency's TLCI project, or Transportation for Livable Communities Initiative.

The Duck Island plan was a collaboration among Tremont West Development Corp., Cleveland Neighborhood Progress and Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

“The connecting thread is about multi-modal [transportation] accessibility and Cleveland finally embracing the things that cities are good at,” said Terry Schwarz, director of the Kent State University Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, which produced the plans for Duck Island and Kinsman. “It's about reinforcing the urban experience.”

Developed at the behest of local community development corporations in collaboration with members of City Council, the plans could be used over time to justify significant local investments.

These could include a two-mile multipurpose trail along West 65th Street from Detroit Avenue to Denison Avenue, estimated to cost more than $5 million.

No funding for the proposal has been identified yet for the trail, said Michelle Johnson, a senior planner and project manager for the Cleveland office of Environmental Design Group, which authored the vision for the West. 65th Street Corridor.

Yet she said the city has committed $400,000 for initial improvements such as bike lanes and curb extensions that could have a dramatic effect.

The question facing the neighborhood is whether to spend the money now, or to use it as a local matching amount for larger sums to be sought through the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency, or NOACA, which coordinates transportation investments in the region.

In the Kinsman neighborhood, the new plan called for installing a traffic circle at the five-point intersection of East 140th Street and Kinsman and Union roads.

The proposal would smooth the flow of traffic at a complex intersection and create the opportunity for new development. Another goal is to make the neighborhood more walkable.

“We realized the biggest barrier to this district is we realized we are not a pedestrian friendly area,” said Leslie Conwell, assistant director of the Mount Pleasant Now Development Corp.

The Duck Island proposal examined ways in which the small neighborhood, framed by Lorain Avenue to the north, West 25th Street to the west, and Train Avenue and Scranton Road to the south and east, is also framed by a continuous ring of wooded slopes, as if it were a small hill town set apart from Ohio City to the north, and Tremont to the south.

The plan suggested ways in which the green slopes could be used to capture storm runoff, planted with produce as terraced community gardens, or cultivated to create seasonal bursts of color, like Daffodil Hill at Lakeview Cemetery.

In a sense, one edge of Duck Hill is already powerfully defined, Schwarz said during her presentation of the plan. The western edge of the neighborhood is flanked by the Red Line Greenway, a recreational trail along light rail tracks of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority that are maintained by the Rotary Club of Cleveland.

The plan also identified parts of Duck Island where the neighborhood could accommodate townhouses or multi-unit apartments without disturbing the single-family residential character of the area.

Each plan attempted to update a portion of Cleveland that was planned and built in a great hurry a century ago when the city was an industrial powerhouse on the rise.

Now that the city is shrinking dramatically in population – and trying to attract new residents to old neighborhoods – it is grappling with how best to redefine itself, physically. And there's no single, cookie-cutter answer.

“What's striking to me about the three plans is that even though we have common tools, each neighborhood is telling is something a little bit different about what it needs,” Schwarz said.

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News Headline: Celebrations | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Danielle Flemister of Cleveland, a business student at Kent State, is the winner of the 2014 Rising Student Entrepreneur Award from the university's College of Business Administration and Cleveland Business Connects Magazine. She is the founder and CEO of her own business, Dunya Jeane, a clothing company that allows students to express their culture and diversity through clothing.

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News Headline: College commencement ceremonies | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SaturdayMalone University: 10 a.m. at Faith Family Church. Speaker: Amy Sherman, an author, senior fellow at the Sagamore Institution for Policy Research, director for the Center on Faith in Communities and senior fellow at the International Justice Mission's IJM Institute. SundayWalsh University: 1:30 p.m. at the Walsh campus quadrangle. (Inclement weather location is the Gaetano M. Cecchini Family Health and Wellness Complex).Speaker: Maryann Cusimano Love, an international relations educator, expert and author. Love will be awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters during the ceremony.May 9University of Akron: 7 p.m. at the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron for business administration and engineering graduates. Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza, who is stepping down June 30 after 16 years at the helm.Kent State University Main campus: 6 p.m. at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center in Kent for all advanced degrees. Speaker: Jerry Sue Thornton, former president emeritus of Cuyahoga Community College, who was a member of Kent State's recent presidential search committee. Thornton is now the chief executive officer of Dream Catcher Educational Consulting.May 10Aultman College of Nursing and Health Sciences: 10 a.m. at R.G. Drage Career Technical Center.Speaker: Michael Gallina, director of sales, outreach and organizational development for AultCare who has been an educator, administrator and coach in Stark County for more than 30 years. Gallina most recently served as superintendent at North Canton City Schools.University of Mount Union: 1:30 p.m. in the Peterson Field House.Speaker: Nancy Hill, a 1979 Mount Union graduate and current university trustee, who now serves as the president and chief executive officer of the American Association of Advertising Agencies. She will discuss “How do you want your eggs? – Empowerment vs. entitlement.”Kent State University Main campus: Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center in Kent.9 a.m. ceremony for bachelor's of arts and sciences, nursing, public health and the School of Digital Sciences.Speaker: Tracy Plouck, director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.1 p.m. ceremony for bachelor's of applied engineering, sustainability and technology, business administration and communication and information.Speaker: Richard Brandt, director of the Iacocca Institute and the Global Village for Future Leaders of Business and Industry at Lehigh University.5 p.m. ceremony for bachelor's of architecture and environmental design, arts, education and health and human services.Speaker: Love Goel, chairman and CEO of GVG Capital Group.University of Akron: E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron.

Page 2 of 2 - 10 a.m. ceremony for arts and sciences undergraduates.2 p.m. ceremony for arts and sciences graduate degrees and Summit College.Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza.May 11Kent State University at Stark: 3 p.m. at the Umstattd Performing Arts Hall in Canton. Speaker: Sandy D. Womack Jr., principal of the Altitude Academy at Crenshaw in the Canton City School District who also is an author, former two-time, All-American college wrestler and former principal of Lathrop Elementary and Hartford Middle schools.University of Akron: E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron. 10 a.m. ceremony for graduates of education, polymer science and polymer engineering and Wayne College. 2 p.m. ceremony for graduates of health professions.Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza.May 15National College Stark County campus: 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium of Timken High School in Canton.Speaker: Stark County Commissioner Janet Weir Creighton, who previously served as deputy assistant to President George W. Bush, director of intergovernmental affairs, Canton City mayor, Stark County auditor and Stark County recorder. Kent State University Main campus: 1 p.m. Cartwright Hall for doctoral degrees in podiatric medicine. Speaker: Allan Boike, who will become Kent's dean of podiatric medicine July 1. May 17Northeast Ohio Medical University: 10 a.m. at E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron. Speaker: Lois Margaret Nora, president and chief executive officer of the American Board of Medical Specialties who served as dean and president of NEOMED.May 18Stark State College: 2 p.m. at the Canton Civic Center. Speaker: State Sen. Scott Oelslager, R-North Canton, who represents the 29th Ohio Senate District, which encompasses most of Stark County.July 25Brown Mackie College in Jackson Township: 7 p.m. at First Christian Church in Canton.

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News Headline: College commencement ceremonies | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SaturdayMalone University: 10 a.m. at Faith Family Church. Speaker: Amy Sherman, an author, senior fellow at the Sagamore Institution for Policy Research, director for the Center on Faith in Communities and senior fellow at the International Justice Mission's IJM Institute. SundayWalsh University: 1:30 p.m. at the Walsh campus quadrangle. (Inclement weather location is the Gaetano M. Cecchini Family Health and Wellness Complex).Speaker: Maryann Cusimano Love, an international relations educator, expert and author. Love will be awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters during the ceremony.May 9University of Akron: 7 p.m. at the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron for business administration and engineering graduates. Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza, who is stepping down June 30 after 16 years at the helm.Kent State University Main campus: 6 p.m. at the Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center in Kent for all advanced degrees. Speaker: Jerry Sue Thornton, former president emeritus of Cuyahoga Community College, who was a member of Kent State's recent presidential search committee. Thornton is now the chief executive officer of Dream Catcher Educational Consulting.May 10Aultman College of Nursing and Health Sciences: 10 a.m. at R.G. Drage Career Technical Center.Speaker: Michael Gallina, director of sales, outreach and organizational development for AultCare who has been an educator, administrator and coach in Stark County for more than 30 years. Gallina most recently served as superintendent at North Canton City Schools.University of Mount Union: 1:30 p.m. in the Peterson Field House.Speaker: Nancy Hill, a 1979 Mount Union graduate and current university trustee, who now serves as the president and chief executive officer of the American Association of Advertising Agencies. She will discuss “How do you want your eggs? – Empowerment vs. entitlement.”Kent State University Main campus: Memorial Athletic and Convocation Center in Kent.9 a.m. ceremony for bachelor's of arts and sciences, nursing, public health and the School of Digital Sciences.Speaker: Tracy Plouck, director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.1 p.m. ceremony for bachelor's of applied engineering, sustainability and technology, business administration and communication and information.Speaker: Richard Brandt, director of the Iacocca Institute and the Global Village for Future Leaders of Business and Industry at Lehigh University.5 p.m. ceremony for bachelor's of architecture and environmental design, arts, education and health and human services.Speaker: Love Goel, chairman and CEO of GVG Capital Group.University of Akron: E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron.

Page 2 of 2 - 10 a.m. ceremony for arts and sciences undergraduates.2 p.m. ceremony for arts and sciences graduate degrees and Summit College.Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza.May 11Kent State University at Stark: 3 p.m. at the Umstattd Performing Arts Hall in Canton. Speaker: Sandy D. Womack Jr., principal of the Altitude Academy at Crenshaw in the Canton City School District who also is an author, former two-time, All-American college wrestler and former principal of Lathrop Elementary and Hartford Middle schools.University of Akron: E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron. 10 a.m. ceremony for graduates of education, polymer science and polymer engineering and Wayne College. 2 p.m. ceremony for graduates of health professions.Speaker: University of Akron President Luis M. Proenza.May 15National College Stark County campus: 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium of Timken High School in Canton.Speaker: Stark County Commissioner Janet Weir Creighton, who previously served as deputy assistant to President George W. Bush, director of intergovernmental affairs, Canton City mayor, Stark County auditor and Stark County recorder. Kent State University Main campus: 1 p.m. Cartwright Hall for doctoral degrees in podiatric medicine. Speaker: Allan Boike, who will become Kent's dean of podiatric medicine July 1. May 17Northeast Ohio Medical University: 10 a.m. at E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall in Akron. Speaker: Lois Margaret Nora, president and chief executive officer of the American Board of Medical Specialties who served as dean and president of NEOMED.May 18Stark State College: 2 p.m. at the Canton Civic Center. Speaker: State Sen. Scott Oelslager, R-North Canton, who represents the 29th Ohio Senate District, which encompasses most of Stark County.July 25Brown Mackie College in Jackson Township: 7 p.m. at First Christian Church in Canton.

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News Headline: Starting College Early: Dual enrollment (GIvan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: For Stark County students, college can begin in high school

Marissa Biclawski is in her second semester of college, but she's already considered a sophomore.

While the 19-year-old Kent State University at Stark student attended Jackson High School, she also spent half of her day at the college, studying psychology, sociology, writing and math.

Stark County high school students have the option of taking college classes at their high school, on a college campus or online through dual enrollment programs. The experience introduces high school students to the academic demands of college and the social environment — and it puts them ahead in credit hours once they sign up
full-time.

“Any way you do it, it's a great opportunity,” said Lisa Givan, pre-college programs coordinator for Kent State University at Stark.

COLLEGE AT HIGH SCHOOL

Early College High School, a program run in collaboration between the Canton City School District and Stark State College, gives students the chance to earn an associate degree while they complete their high school diplomas.

This year's class will be the sixth to graduate. Around 30 students are on track to join the about 150 in the school's history who have earned both degrees, Principal Ken Brunner said.

Most who complete the program transfer their two years of college credit and pursue bachelor's degrees at public universities across the state.

“You're, in a sense, going to cut your bill in almost half,” Brunner said.

The Early College High School students who earn college credit but not enough to get an associate degree are encouraged to enroll at Stark State College to finish.

Canton's program is one of 16 in the state. It's designed to reach first-generation college students — and not those at the top of their class.

Dennis Trenger, director of outreach at Stark State College, said most of the program's participants “are not 3.0 students generally.”

“A lot of these kids didn't have college in their vocabulary,” he said.

He gets to hand them their diplomas when they attend Stark State's graduation.

“It's so neat when I see those faces come up the stairs,” he said. “You couldn't imagine that feeling.”

Students can also take college classes at other area high schools.

Kent State Stark offers 12 classes — including Spanish, chemistry and art history — at four high schools. Those courses are taught by a high school teacher who has earned adjunct status with the university, Givan said.

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News Headline: Collaboration in Stark County: Schools work together to help students | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: About Stark Education Partnership

The school districts, colleges and universities in Stark County have been working for more than a decade to raise college attainment with appreciable results.

The cities of Massillon and Canton, as well as the county, now exceed the state and national averages on associate degree attainment. With a 3 percent gain since 2000, today 21 percent of Stark County residents have earned a bachelor's degree or higher.

You may be wondering why this is important. The community that has a well-educated workforce and can adapt to new educational needs is much more nimble at attracting new businesses and creating new job opportunities for its residents.

We have added new businesses to our community including Chesapeake Energy, Old Dominion Freight Line, Baker-Hughes and I2r Power Cable, and are expanding businesses including H.J. Heinz and Quest Specialty Coatings, LLC.

We are building programs that match specific certificates, associate, bachelor's, master's or doctorate degrees to current and future employment needs. In 2010, the University of Mount Union added two bachelor of science programs in mechanical and civil engineering.

Graduates of the fuel cell program at Stark State College may be employed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., Lockheed Martin, Contained Energy, Technology Management Inc., Nextech Materials, Ltd., Catacel Corp., Plug-Power, and over 900 companies in the Ohio fuel cell supply chain database.

If you visit http://oogeep.org/ you will find a listing of all of the area colleges, universities and school districts that have programs specific to the job requirements in the oil and gas industry. Stark State College is anticipating opening its gas and oil campus in downtown Canton in August.

Philanthropic organizations in Northeast Ohio have joined together and are creating a website on the health industry that will specify all job opportunities and all school district, college and university programs.

School districts also are responding to employer needs through their career/technical programs. For example, Marlington Local Schools developed the first oil and gas technologies high school curriculum in Ohio in 2012. Our high school graduates are going to college in increasing numbers.

From a college-going rate of less than 50 percent a decade ago, 73 percent of Stark County's Class of 2010 went to college by the fall of 2012, and it's not just graduates of suburban schools. More than 70 percent of Canton's McKinley High School and Massillon's Washington High School students now enroll in college within two years of graduating from high school.

DUAL CREDIT COURSES

Collaborative programs between our school districts, colleges and universities are on the increase. Often known as dual credit programs, students can take college courses while they are in high school. Stark County has the second largest dual credit enrollment among high school students of any county in the state, regardless of population. Last year, more than 1,500 students took advantage of these high school-based dual credit courses. Another 560 students enrolled in courses on college campuses.

Sometimes these courses result in certificates that allow high school students immediate access to employment. Examples are the availability of a welding certificate at Canton South, or an emergency medical technology certificate at Perry High in partnership with Stark State College.

Other collaborations encourage students to earn transferable academic credits that are usable as students pursue associate or bachelor's degrees.

Kent State University offers dual credit courses in Minerva and North Canton's Hoover High. Kent State at Stark offers courses at Lake, Perry and East Canton's Osnaburg Local. Mount Union offers courses in Alliance, Marlington, Minerva and at Plain where Malone University also offers a course.

Stark State College offers many courses taken at most school districts as well as specialized courses in fire safety on its main campus or online courses for school districts. The Canton City School District and Stark State College have sponsored an early college high school since 2004.

Stark County participates in regional activities to raise attainment in Northeast Ohio including the Talent Dividend sponsored by the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education (NOCHE) CEOs for Cities. The Talent Dividend's goal is to reach 1 million degree holders in the 16-county area by the end of 2014.

With 70,466 adults with degrees in 2012, and a growing college enrollment of over 25,000, Stark is doing its part.

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News Headline: Walter F. Wagor resigns as dean of Kent State University's Stark campus; will return to faculty (Diacon, Wagor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The dean of Kent State's largest regional campus has resigned his post and will return to the faculty.

Walter F. Wagor has served as dean and chief administrative officer for the university's Stark campus for the last four years. His last day as dean is June 30. An interim dean has not been named.

“Walter Wagor is a paragon of steady, wise and experienced leadership, and thus it is with regret that I accept his resignation,” said Todd Diacon, Kent State's senior vice president of academic affairs and provost, in a news release.

“I do so, however, knowing that he will continue in the Kent State family, and that he will return to his outstanding research on student success, which combines in the best manner a commitment to advancing and sharing knowledge,” Diacon said. “We are fortunate to have Walter at Kent State, and his shoes will be difficult to fill on the Stark Campus.”

Starting next fall, Wagor will teach as part of the psychology sequence in the university's regional campus system. Before the fall semester begins, he will work as a senior assistant to Wanda Thomas, the associate provost for Kent State system integration.

“I am, and always will be an academic at heart,” Wagor said in the release. “So, I look forward to reinvigorating that part of my professional life and to being more directly involved in the academic life of the university and in the lives of the students.”

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News Headline: KSU Stark dean to return to teaching (Wagor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2014
Outlet Full Name: Repository - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader.

Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials said. His last day as dean will be June 30.

Todd Diacon, Kent State University's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, will appoint an interim dean for the regional campus after consulting with administrators there, spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

There is no timetable for the university to name a new dean for Kent State University at Stark.

In a campuswide letter, Wagor said he made the decision to step down and join the psychology department.

“After careful thought and consideration of what gives me the greatest professional sense of achievement, I am returning to the classroom and will join the ranks of one of Kent State's finest group of faculty,” he wrote.

He cited some of the regional campus' accomplishments in his four years as dean, including beginning construction on a new sciences building, securing state funds for improvements to the fine arts building, and revising the campus strategic plan.

“I have thoroughly enjoyed the time I have served as your dean,” he wrote. “I look forward to continuing to serve Kent State University in new ways starting in July.”

Cynthia Williams, spokeswoman for the Stark campus, declined to comment further.

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News Headline: Nontraditional schools: Plenty of Alternatives: Online learning in higher education (Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Amy Knapp
News OCR Text: From brick-and-mortar schools to online learning, there are a number of options for Stark County residents who don't want traditional schools.

In 2011, nearly $35.6 billion was spent on self-paced online learning across the globe. Today, online learning is a $56.2 billion industry and it's expected to double next year.

Nearly 5 percent of college students are taking at least one course online and by 2019, about half of all college classes will be online.

“Students are definitely interested in more online classes,” said Diane Walker, director of Student Services for Kent State University at Stark.

Online offerings make it easier for students to take advantage of classes offered at other Kent State campuses, she said.

“If you are a student at Kent State Stark, you can take courses at any campus,” she said. “You might be taking six courses and they could be on any campus but you don't have to leave your computer.”

Walker said she sees all types of students taking advantage of online offerings.

“You have to be self-motivated since there isn't a requirement to come to class,” she said. “That could be a barrier to succeed. It really depends on a student's learning style.”

More and more students are requesting online classes, she said.

The convenience for students — especially those with jobs and family obligations — makes online classes a better option than traditional classes.

Kent State Stark offers an online class in almost every subject including justice studies, math and English, Walker said.

All of the online classes are staffed by the same professors that would be in the classroom teaching, she said. Online courses are a little more expensive than traditional classes, and a lot of online classes are accelerated programs allowing students to complete degrees in 18 months.

In the fall, Walker said 6 percent of all of the courses offered at Kent State Stark will be offered online.

Thirty-four percent of Kent State Stark students are taking at least one online course, she said.

Malone University's online bachelor's degree was ranked among the top online programs worldwide, according to U.S. News and World Report.

Malone offers online bachelor's degree in organizational, project, marketing, health services or environmental management. The programs are designed for nontraditional students with a minimum of five years of work experience who have some post-high school education. The degree may be completed in 14 months.

The school also offers online master's degrees in business administration and organizational leadership.

In the fall, the school will add a master's degree in nursing to its online offerings, said Malone spokeswoman Suzanne Thomas.

Thomas said the nursing degree will be a hybrid of traditional online learning. Students will be able to take courses online but still will participate in hands-on clinicals.

Walsh University does not offer any undergraduate programs online but offers a MBA and a master's degree in nursing.

During the spring semester, 120 students were taking advantage of the 183 classes offered, Director of University Relations Kelly Campbell said.

The Walsh MBA program has been recognized as a “best buy” for students seeking a high quality, low-cost online MBA degree by the national consumer group GetEducated.com.

Whether online, on campus or through a combination of both, students can earn a MBA through Walsh's DeVille School of Business in as little as 12 months. Walsh's accredited program offers specialties in health care management, management, entrepreneurship and marketing.

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News Headline: Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Patricia Faulhaber
News OCR Text: Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration.

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish.That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. The event was held on April 27 in the parking lot next to the pond and wetland area behind the campus. The bright, sunny afternoon made it a perfect day for area families to attend the event and enjoy the many environmental educational activities, entertainment, demonstrations, crafts and food. There also was a special tree-planting ceremony with Dean Walter Wagor. “In addition to helping plant a tree this afternoon, I also get to receive the recognition plaque from Tree Campus USA,” Wagor said. “Tree Campus USA is recognizing our efforts to plant trees on our campus and to be good stewards when taking care of all of the trees.”Tree Campus USA is part of the Arbor Day Foundation. It's main goal is to help colleges and universities around the nation establish and sustain healthy community forests. Tina Biasella, director of external affairs, was the coordinator for the event. She, along with other campus volunteers spent the afternoon helping attendees learn how to positively impact the environment.“We usually get between 500 and 1,000 people every year depending on the weather,” Biasella said. “It's just a great opportunity for families to come out and learn about the Earth and enjoy the weather. Kent is committed to protecting the environment and welcoming the community on campus.”Just a few of the activities included a children's area with face-painting and tie-dye T-shirts, a Tree Campus USA presentation, a guided nature walk and a magician's show. Singer Foster Brown performed children's nature songs. Bill and Barbara Tuttle are president and vice president, respectively, of the Vegetarian Club of Canton. They had a table setup and were talking to visitors about the health and environmental benefits of eating all plant-based foods and no meat. “Our goals as a club includes building community support and teaching people how to eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diets,” Bill said. “Members meet once a month to eat a vegan dinner together. We also offer a forum for speakers to talk about the healthy vegetarian way of life. We try to influence area restaurants to offer a vegetarian alternative on their menus. We've seen more and more restaurants offering such alternatives.”A group of Kent State students from the GEODES (Geologists Educating Others Dedicated to Earth Science) Club had an erupting volcano and rock display setup as a kids' activity. All of the geology majors have plans for the area they would like to work in after graduating.

Page 2 of 2 - “I would like to be hydrogeologist and work with purifying water and making it safe to drink,” Jena Freyermuth said.Fellow student Sean Hreha is also planning to work with keeping the water clean and working with the EPA on water issues. Amber Menegay and Joe Jeandervin are both looking forward to working in the oil and gas industry and Shannon Hunter wants to work with geophysics and glaciers. A nature walk around the pond located on the Kent State campus was conducted by Dr. Robert Hamilton. The pond and wetland area has been certified by the National Wildlife Federation as a natural habitat. It's also been certified as an outdoor classroom for faculty to use to teach students. There was plenty of information distributed on planting trees, recycling, animals and wildlife, Stark Parks talked with people about ways to enjoy nature and there was plenty of food and fun to go around. And, everyone that wanted one, got a free Douglas Fir tree seedling to plant at their home. According to earthday.org, more than one billion people in 190 countries take some sort of environmental action on Earth Day each year. Planting trees, cleaning up communities, holding festivals and helping educate others are among activities used to commemorate Earth Day. The tradition of celebrating Earth Day started in 1970.

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News Headline: KSU Stark dean to return to teaching (Wagor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader.

Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials said. His last day as dean will be June 30.
Todd Diacon, Kent State University's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, will appoint an interim dean for the regional campus after consulting with administrators there, spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

There is no timetable for the university to name a new dean for Kent State University at Stark.

In a campuswide letter, Wagor said he made the decision to step down and join the psychology department.

“After careful thought and consideration of what gives me the greatest professional sense of achievement, I am returning to the classroom and will join the ranks of one of Kent State's finest group of faculty,” he wrote.

He cited some of the regional campus' accomplishments in his four years as dean, including beginning construction on a new sciences building, securing state funds for improvements to the fine arts building, and revising the campus strategic plan.

“I have thoroughly enjoyed the time I have served as your dean,” he wrote. “I look forward to continuing to serve Kent State University in new ways starting in July.”

Cynthia Williams, spokeswoman for the Stark campus, declined to comment further.

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News Headline: Local colleges 'think green' (Wood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Part of being green and eco-conscious is to look at the world in a certain way. Brent Wood noticed the blue plastic recycling bins in offices throughout Kent State University at Stark were smaller than trash cans. So, after the trash was emptied, he turned the trash cans over and placed the recycling bins on top to remind people to recycle. “If you make it easier then they're going to contribute better,” said Wood, senior facility manager at Kent State Stark. “And to keep reminding them is a big part of it.” KSU Stark and Stark State College are among area schools increasingly focusing on recycling and sustainability, which has become part of a normal daily routine for students and staff. Both schools were among the 461 colleges and universities throughout the United States and Canada that just completed the 2014 RecycleMania Tournament at the end of March. Wood said the recycling has gone beyond the eight-week RecycleMania program and the university keeps the environment in mind yearround. Kent State Stark does several things on campus during sustainability day in October. Wood said he encourages professors to reduce lighting. The university also is able to control digitally the hallway lighting in the buildings. “Recycling is a focus, as well as an effort to reduce trash in the first place,” Wood said. “We're doing our part.” Major improvements and projects to save energy have been going on at both campuses. The schools have been working to surpass Ohio House Bill 251 goals, which require all state office buildings in Ohio to achieve a 20 percent reduction in energy consumption from 2004 levels by the end of this year. CAUGHT ‘GREEN-HANDED' College students are getting caught green-handed all the time. That was even one of the promotions on the KSU Stark campus. Photos of students caught with reusable containers in their hands were captured and shared on Twitter or Instagram during the RecycleMania program. At Kent State Stark, paper towel containers in restrooms have been replaced with hand dryers, and light fixtures have been changed to compact fluorescents with occupancy sensors. Wood said the less money that is spent on the electric bill, more money can be spent on students. The new sciences building under construction is all about being responsible in terms of energy savings. The building is being designed to meet LEED — Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — certification. For example, a section of the roof of the building will capture rain water and funnel it back into the soil instead of storm water systems. “It's going to be a pretty impressive building and very environmentally responsible,” Wood said. “It's something everybody should be doing.He said it takes an extra effort to go “green” but people seem to be increasingly more aware of the environment, which makes it easier to make reducing, reusing and recycling part of the normal routine. REDUCING CARBON FOOTPRINT Steve Spradling, director of the physical plant and construction at Stark State College, said no matter what age or year you are, school is a good place to get into a habit of going green because you can take that home or to the workplace. “We've always tried to save as much energy as possible,” Spradling said.   It's key to get students involved in sustainability, he said.   “You want to show that you care about the environment and care about waste and what's happening to the waste,” he said. “It not only helps the environment and school but it helps the students.” Energy-efficient buildings, sustainable courtyards with landscaping, solar panels on one building and solar tubes for hot water on another building are just a few of the upgrades on the Stark State College campus, and these can be used as educational tools. Receptacles have been placed outside for recycling and a green office program encourages recycling, turning off copiers when not in use, and printing documents only when necessary. Motion sensors for lighting are in the hallways and more LED lighting is being installed with longer bulb life and reduced energy usage. He said the building in the downtown Canton satellite campus will have all LED lighting. “We're open to being a test site — we've had companies come in and put lights in for us,” he said. “We're open to looking at different ways to save money.”

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News Headline: Local colleges 'think green' (Wood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Christina McCune
News OCR Text: Both Kent State University at Stark, and Stark State College are focusing on recycling and sustainability to help the environment, and to save money.

Energy Savings at Stark State College

• All sidewalk lights have been upgraded to Compact Fluorescent Lights, which provide a 60 to 70 percent energy reduction. Estimated savings: $1,600 annu...

Part of being green and eco-conscious is to look at the world in a certain way. Brent Wood noticed the blue plastic recycling bins in offices throughout Kent State University at Stark were smaller than trash cans. So, after the trash was emptied, he turned the trash cans over and placed the recycling bins on top to remind people to recycle. “If you make it easier then they're going to contribute better,” said Wood, senior facility manager at Kent State Stark. “And to keep reminding them is a big part of it.” KSU Stark and Stark State College are among area schools increasingly focusing on recycling and sustainability, which has become part of a normal daily routine for students and staff. Both schools were among the 461 colleges and universities throughout the United States and Canada that just completed the 2014 RecycleMania Tournament at the end of March. Wood said the recycling has gone beyond the eight-week RecycleMania program and the university keeps the environment in mind yearround. Kent State Stark does several things on campus during sustainability day in October. Wood said he encourages professors to reduce lighting. The university also is able to control digitally the hallway lighting in the buildings. “Recycling is a focus, as well as an effort to reduce trash in the first place,” Wood said. “We're doing our part.”Major improvements and projects to save energy have been going on at both campuses. The schools have been working to surpass Ohio House Bill 251 goals, which require all state office buildings in Ohio to achieve a 20 percent reduction in energy consumption from 2004 levels by the end of this year.CAUGHT ‘GREEN-HANDED'College students are getting caught green-handed all the time. That was even one of the promotions on the KSU Stark campus. Photos of students caught with reusable containers in their hands were captured and shared on Twitter or Instagram during the RecycleMania program.At Kent State Stark, paper towel containers in restrooms have been replaced with hand dryers, and light fixtures have been changed to compact fluorescents with occupancy sensors.Wood said the less money that is spent on the electric bill, more money can be spent on students. The new sciences building under construction is all about being responsible in terms of energy savings. The building is being designed to meet LEED — Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — certification. For example, a section of the roof of the building will capture rain water and funnel it back into the soil instead of storm water systems. “It's going to be a pretty impressive building and very environmentally responsible,” Wood said. “It's something everybody should be doing.”

Page 2 of 2 - He said it takes an extra effort to go “green” but people seem to be increasingly more aware of the environment, which makes it easier to make reducing, reusing and recycling part of the normal routine.REDUCING CARBON FOOTPRINTSteve Spradling, director of the physical plant and construction at Stark State College, said no matter what age or year you are, school is a good place to get into a habit of going green because you can take that home or to the workplace. “We've always tried to save as much energy as possible,” Spradling said. It's key to get students involved in sustainability, he said. “You want to show that you care about the environment and care about waste and what's happening to the waste,” he said. “It not only helps the environment and school but it helps the students.” Energy-efficient buildings, sustainable courtyards with landscaping, solar panels on one building and solar tubes for hot water on another building are just a few of the upgrades on the Stark State College campus, and these can be used as educational tools. Receptacles have been placed outside for recycling and a green office program encourages recycling, turning off copiers when not in use, and printing documents only when necessary. Motion sensors for lighting are in the hallways and more LED lighting is being installed with longer bulb life and reduced energy usage. He said the building in the downtown Canton satellite campus will have all LED lighting.“We're open to being a test site — we've had companies come in and put lights in for us,” he said. “We're open to looking at different ways to save money.”

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News Headline: Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2014
Outlet Full Name: Times-Reporter - Online, The
Contact Name: Patricia Faulhaber
News OCR Text: Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration.

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish.That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. The event was held on April 27 in the parking lot next to the pond and wetland area behind the campus. The bright, sunny afternoon made it a perfect day for area families to attend the event and enjoy the many environmental educational activities, entertainment, demonstrations, crafts and food. There also was a special tree-planting ceremony with Dean Walter Wagor. “In addition to helping plant a tree this afternoon, I also get to receive the recognition plaque from Tree Campus USA,” Wagor said. “Tree Campus USA is recognizing our efforts to plant trees on our campus and to be good stewards when taking care of all of the trees.”Tree Campus USA is part of the Arbor Day Foundation. It's main goal is to help colleges and universities around the nation establish and sustain healthy community forests. Tina Biasella, director of external affairs, was the coordinator for the event. She, along with other campus volunteers spent the afternoon helping attendees learn how to positively impact the environment.“We usually get between 500 and 1,000 people every year depending on the weather,” Biasella said. “It's just a great opportunity for families to come out and learn about the Earth and enjoy the weather. Kent is committed to protecting the environment and welcoming the community on campus.”Just a few of the activities included a children's area with face-painting and tie-dye T-shirts, a Tree Campus USA presentation, a guided nature walk and a magician's show. Singer Foster Brown performed children's nature songs. Bill and Barbara Tuttle are president and vice president, respectively, of the Vegetarian Club of Canton. They had a table setup and were talking to visitors about the health and environmental benefits of eating all plant-based foods and no meat. “Our goals as a club includes building community support and teaching people how to eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diets,” Bill said. “Members meet once a month to eat a vegan dinner together. We also offer a forum for speakers to talk about the healthy vegetarian way of life. We try to influence area restaurants to offer a vegetarian alternative on their menus. We've seen more and more restaurants offering such alternatives.”A group of Kent State students from the GEODES (Geologists Educating Others Dedicated to Earth Science) Club had an erupting volcano and rock display setup as a kids' activity. All of the geology majors have plans for the area they would like to work in after graduating.

Page 2 of 2 - “I would like to be hydrogeologist and work with purifying water and making it safe to drink,” Jena Freyermuth said.Fellow student Sean Hreha is also planning to work with keeping the water clean and working with the EPA on water issues. Amber Menegay and Joe Jeandervin are both looking forward to working in the oil and gas industry and Shannon Hunter wants to work with geophysics and glaciers. A nature walk around the pond located on the Kent State campus was conducted by Dr. Robert Hamilton. The pond and wetland area has been certified by the National Wildlife Federation as a natural habitat. It's also been certified as an outdoor classroom for faculty to use to teach students. There was plenty of information distributed on planting trees, recycling, animals and wildlife, Stark Parks talked with people about ways to enjoy nature and there was plenty of food and fun to go around. And, everyone that wanted one, got a free Douglas Fir tree seedling to plant at their home. According to earthday.org, more than one billion people in 190 countries take some sort of environmental action on Earth Day each year. Planting trees, cleaning up communities, holding festivals and helping educate others are among activities used to commemorate Earth Day. The tradition of celebrating Earth Day started in 1970.

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News Headline: Local colleges 'think green' (Wood) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name: Christina McCune
News OCR Text: Both Kent State University at Stark, and Stark State College are focusing on recycling and sustainability to help the environment, and to save money.

Energy Savings at Stark State College

• All sidewalk lights have been upgraded to Compact Fluorescent Lights, which provide a 60 to 70 percent energy reduction. Estimated savings: $1,600 annu...

Part of being green and eco-conscious is to look at the world in a certain way. Brent Wood noticed the blue plastic recycling bins in offices throughout Kent State University at Stark were smaller than trash cans. So, after the trash was emptied, he turned the trash cans over and placed the recycling bins on top to remind people to recycle. “If you make it easier then they're going to contribute better,” said Wood, senior facility manager at Kent State Stark. “And to keep reminding them is a big part of it.” KSU Stark and Stark State College are among area schools increasingly focusing on recycling and sustainability, which has become part of a normal daily routine for students and staff. Both schools were among the 461 colleges and universities throughout the United States and Canada that just completed the 2014 RecycleMania Tournament at the end of March. Wood said the recycling has gone beyond the eight-week RecycleMania program and the university keeps the environment in mind yearround. Kent State Stark does several things on campus during sustainability day in October. Wood said he encourages professors to reduce lighting. The university also is able to control digitally the hallway lighting in the buildings. “Recycling is a focus, as well as an effort to reduce trash in the first place,” Wood said. “We're doing our part.”Major improvements and projects to save energy have been going on at both campuses. The schools have been working to surpass Ohio House Bill 251 goals, which require all state office buildings in Ohio to achieve a 20 percent reduction in energy consumption from 2004 levels by the end of this year.CAUGHT ‘GREEN-HANDED'College students are getting caught green-handed all the time. That was even one of the promotions on the KSU Stark campus. Photos of students caught with reusable containers in their hands were captured and shared on Twitter or Instagram during the RecycleMania program.At Kent State Stark, paper towel containers in restrooms have been replaced with hand dryers, and light fixtures have been changed to compact fluorescents with occupancy sensors.Wood said the less money that is spent on the electric bill, more money can be spent on students. The new sciences building under construction is all about being responsible in terms of energy savings. The building is being designed to meet LEED — Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — certification. For example, a section of the roof of the building will capture rain water and funnel it back into the soil instead of storm water systems. “It's going to be a pretty impressive building and very environmentally responsible,” Wood said. “It's something everybody should be doing.”

Page 2 of 2 - He said it takes an extra effort to go “green” but people seem to be increasingly more aware of the environment, which makes it easier to make reducing, reusing and recycling part of the normal routine.REDUCING CARBON FOOTPRINTSteve Spradling, director of the physical plant and construction at Stark State College, said no matter what age or year you are, school is a good place to get into a habit of going green because you can take that home or to the workplace. “We've always tried to save as much energy as possible,” Spradling said. It's key to get students involved in sustainability, he said. “You want to show that you care about the environment and care about waste and what's happening to the waste,” he said. “It not only helps the environment and school but it helps the students.” Energy-efficient buildings, sustainable courtyards with landscaping, solar panels on one building and solar tubes for hot water on another building are just a few of the upgrades on the Stark State College campus, and these can be used as educational tools. Receptacles have been placed outside for recycling and a green office program encourages recycling, turning off copiers when not in use, and printing documents only when necessary. Motion sensors for lighting are in the hallways and more LED lighting is being installed with longer bulb life and reduced energy usage. He said the building in the downtown Canton satellite campus will have all LED lighting.“We're open to being a test site — we've had companies come in and put lights in for us,” he said. “We're open to looking at different ways to save money.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/02/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name: Patricia Faulhaber
News OCR Text: Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration.

That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. The event was held on April 27 in the parking lot next to the pond and wetland area behind the campus.

The bright, sunny afternoon made it a perfect day for area families to attend the event and enjoy the many environmental educational activities, entertainment, demonstrations, crafts and food. There also was a special tree-planting ceremony with Dean Walter Wagor.

“In addition to helping plant a tree this afternoon, I also get to receive the recognition plaque from Tree Campus USA,” Wagor said. “Tree Campus USA is recognizing our efforts to plant trees on our campus and to be good stewards when taking care of all of the trees.”

Tree Campus USA is part of the Arbor Day Foundation. It's main goal is to help colleges and universities around the nation establish and sustain healthy community forests.

Tina Biasella, director of external affairs, was the coordinator for the event. She, along with other campus volunteers spent the afternoon helping attendees learn how to positively impact the environment.

“We usually get between 500 and 1,000 people every year depending on the weather,” Biasella said. “It's just a great opportunity for families to come out and learn about the Earth and enjoy the weather. Kent is committed to protecting the environment and welcoming the community on campus.”

Just a few of the activities included a children's area with face-painting and tie-dye T-shirts, a Tree Campus USA presentation, a guided nature walk and a magician's show. Singer Foster Brown performed children's nature songs.

Bill and Barbara Tuttle are president and vice president, respectively, of the Vegetarian Club of Canton. They had a table setup and were talking to visitors about the health and environmental benefits of eating all plant-based foods and no meat.

“Our goals as a club includes building community support and teaching people how to eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diets,” Bill said. “Members meet once a month to eat a vegan dinner together. We also offer a forum for speakers to talk about the healthy vegetarian way of life. We try to influence area restaurants to offer a vegetarian alternative on their menus. We've seen more and more restaurants offering such alternatives.”

A group of Kent State students from the GEODES (Geologists Educating Others Dedicated to Earth Science) Club had an erupting volcano and rock display setup as a kids' activity. All of the geology majors have plans for the area they would like to work in after graduating.

“I would like to be hydrogeologist and work with purifying water and making it safe to drink,” Jena Freyermuth said.

Fellow student Sean Hreha is also planning to work with keeping the water clean and working with the EPA on water issues. Amber Menegay and Joe Jeandervin are both looking forward to working in the oil and gas industry and Shannon Hunter wants to work with geophysics and glaciers.

A nature walk around the pond located on the Kent State campus was conducted by Dr. Robert Hamilton. The pond and wetland area has been certified by the National Wildlife Federation as a natural habitat. It's also been certified as an outdoor classroom for faculty to use to teach students.

There was plenty of information distributed on planting trees, recycling, animals and wildlife, Stark Parks talked with people about ways to enjoy nature and there was plenty of food and fun to go around. And, everyone that wanted one, got a free Douglas Fir tree seedling to plant at their home.

According to earthday.org, more than one billion people in 190 countries take some sort of environmental action on Earth Day each year. Planting trees, cleaning up communities, holding festivals and helping educate others are among activities used to commemorate Earth Day. The tradition of celebrating Earth Day started in 1970.

Return to Top



News Headline: Kent Stark race gives kids 'Head Start' (Humm) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: When it comes to this race, it's all about the Head Start.

The sun was shining April 13 when more than 80 people came together to burn a few calories and make a difference in the lives of children through the Spring Fun Run at Kent State University at Stark.

The event, which featured a 5K run for adults and a quarter mile run for kids ages 12 and younger, was also an opportunity to collect books for the Stark County Community Action Agency's Head Start program.

Stacie Humm, academic program coordinator at Kent State Stark said this is the second year the university has held two community runs – the Turkey Trot in the fall and the Fun Run in the spring. Both are at the Recreation and Wellness Center on the Frank Avenue campus in Jackson Township.

“We hold both events for two reasons,” Humm said. “First, it gets the community to spend time on our campus. Second, we use both the fall and spring races to raise donations for charities. In the fall we do a food drive for the Stark County Hunger Task Force and with the spring race, we ask runners to donate slightly used books for the Stark County Community Action Agency's Head Start program.”

This year's event collected more than 400 books as donations for Head Start.

With Flash, the Kent State mascot on hand to pose for photos and provide a little encouragement, the kids race got started. The kids ran as fast as they could around the track behind the Recreation and Wellness Center one time. The winner was 9-year-old Justin Coldsnow from Green.

Justin said he has been practicing this year by playing soccer and noted that he felt “pretty good” winning the race.

All of the kids received medals for participating.

The first-place winner of the adult race received a gift certificate from Giant Eagle. The first-, second- and third-place winners also received medals.

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News Headline: Kent Stark honors nature with tree planting, celebration (Wagor, Biasella) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: North Neighbor News - Online
Contact Name: Patricia Faulhaber
News OCR Text: Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish. That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration.

Make the pledge. Promise to reuse, recycle, restore, reduce, and replenish.That's what Kent State University at Stark students encouraged others to do during the school's sixth annual Earth Day Celebration. The event was held on April 27 in the parking lot next to the pond and wetland area behind the campus. The bright, sunny afternoon made it a perfect day for area families to attend the event and enjoy the many environmental educational activities, entertainment, demonstrations, crafts and food. There also was a special tree-planting ceremony with Dean Walter Wagor. “In addition to helping plant a tree this afternoon, I also get to receive the recognition plaque from Tree Campus USA,” Wagor said. “Tree Campus USA is recognizing our efforts to plant trees on our campus and to be good stewards when taking care of all of the trees.”Tree Campus USA is part of the Arbor Day Foundation. It's main goal is to help colleges and universities around the nation establish and sustain healthy community forests. Tina Biasella, director of external affairs, was the coordinator for the event. She, along with other campus volunteers spent the afternoon helping attendees learn how to positively impact the environment.“We usually get between 500 and 1,000 people every year depending on the weather,” Biasella said. “It's just a great opportunity for families to come out and learn about the Earth and enjoy the weather. Kent is committed to protecting the environment and welcoming the community on campus.”Just a few of the activities included a children's area with face-painting and tie-dye T-shirts, a Tree Campus USA presentation, a guided nature walk and a magician's show. Singer Foster Brown performed children's nature songs. Bill and Barbara Tuttle are president and vice president, respectively, of the Vegetarian Club of Canton. They had a table setup and were talking to visitors about the health and environmental benefits of eating all plant-based foods and no meat. “Our goals as a club includes building community support and teaching people how to eat a low-fat, low-cholesterol diets,” Bill said. “Members meet once a month to eat a vegan dinner together. We also offer a forum for speakers to talk about the healthy vegetarian way of life. We try to influence area restaurants to offer a vegetarian alternative on their menus. We've seen more and more restaurants offering such alternatives.”A group of Kent State students from the GEODES (Geologists Educating Others Dedicated to Earth Science) Club had an erupting volcano and rock display setup as a kids' activity. All of the geology majors have plans for the area they would like to work in after graduating.

Page 2 of 2 - “I would like to be hydrogeologist and work with purifying water and making it safe to drink,” Jena Freyermuth said.Fellow student Sean Hreha is also planning to work with keeping the water clean and working with the EPA on water issues. Amber Menegay and Joe Jeandervin are both looking forward to working in the oil and gas industry and Shannon Hunter wants to work with geophysics and glaciers. A nature walk around the pond located on the Kent State campus was conducted by Dr. Robert Hamilton. The pond and wetland area has been certified by the National Wildlife Federation as a natural habitat. It's also been certified as an outdoor classroom for faculty to use to teach students. There was plenty of information distributed on planting trees, recycling, animals and wildlife, Stark Parks talked with people about ways to enjoy nature and there was plenty of food and fun to go around. And, everyone that wanted one, got a free Douglas Fir tree seedling to plant at their home. According to earthday.org, more than one billion people in 190 countries take some sort of environmental action on Earth Day each year. Planting trees, cleaning up communities, holding festivals and helping educate others are among activities used to commemorate Earth Day. The tradition of celebrating Earth Day started in 1970.

Return to Top



News Headline: KSU Stark dean to return to teaching | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader. Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials said. His last day as dean will be June 30.

Kent State University at Stark is getting a new leader.

Dean Walter Wagor plans to return to a teaching position next year, university officials said. His last day as dean will be June 30.

Todd Diacon, Kent State University's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, will appoint an interim dean for the regional campus after consulting with administrators there, spokeswoman Emily Vincent said.

There is no timetable for the university to name a new dean for Kent State University at Stark.

In a campuswide letter, Wagor said he made the decision to step down and join the psychology department.

“After careful thought and consideration of what gives me the greatest professional sense of achievement, I am returning to the classroom and will join the ranks of one of Kent State's finest group of faculty,” he wrote.

He cited some of the regional campus' accomplishments in his four years as dean, including beginning construction on a new sciences building, securing state funds for improvements to the fine arts building, and revising the campus strategic plan. “I have thoroughly enjoyed the time

I have served as your dean,” he wrote. “I look forward to continuing to serve Kent State University in new ways starting in July.

”Cynthia Williams, spokeswoman for the Stark campus, declined to comment further.

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News Headline: Kent State plans commencement | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SPEAKER TO ADDRESS COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY: Elizabeth Bartz, founder, president, and CEO of State and Federal Communications, Inc. will serve as the guest speaker for Kent State University at Trumbull's spring commencement ceremony at 7 p.m. Friday at Packard Music Hall, Warren. Bartz, a former Trumbull County resident, is a Howland High School graduate, and attended classes at Kent State Trumbull (1976-78) before receiving a bachelor's degree in journalism ('80) and a master's degree in political science ('82) from Kent State University. Bartz is very active in various professional societies, and community and volunteer efforts, sharing her time, talent, and resources. Her government affairs leadership positions include the State Government Affairs Council Executive Committee, the premiere state government affairs association for corporate and trade association executives.

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News Headline: 150 Tuscarawas County students to participate in Project Lead the Way showcase | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name: Jon Baker
News OCR Text: About 150 students from five Tuscarawas County schools will be demonstrating their engineering projects to the public at a Project Lead the Way showcase at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on May 8.

The event will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Founders Hall. Kevin Gray from Lauren International will be the keynote speaker. The public is invited to attend.

Before the showcase, the projects will be judged from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Students from Dover City Schools, New Philadelphia City Schools, Claymont City Schools, Tuscarawas Valley Local Schools and Indian Valley Local Schools will be participating.

Project Lead The Way is a non-profit organization that develops hands-on, project-based science, technology, engineering and math curricula for use by elementary, middle and high schools.

The program is in its sixth year in Tuscarawas County, according to Steve Stokey of Allied Machine and Engineering in Dover, a proponent of Project Lead the Way. He serves on the Project Lead the Way Ohio Executive Council.

Members of the council will attend the community showcase.

“The program has been growing,” he said. “We are anticipating we will have 2,300 students in Tuscarawas County taking at least one Project Lead the Way course.

“Next year, we're going to see about a 10 percent increase in the number of students, if the school levies pass.”

In addition to school funding, the program in Tuscarawas County has received about $1.27 million in donations from businesses, citizens and foundations over the past six years, he said.

Project Lead the Way makes it easier for area businesses to find qualified local candidates for jobs that require skills in technology, engineering and math, he said.

“What a great base of human capital we will have if we have highly trained and highly qualified students come out of our schools,” Stokey said. “Our message to the community is that we're trying to get our students prepared for the next level. What we've done is raise the bar so that we're at the same level as the best schools in Ohio.”

The local program is the “envy of the state,” he said. “They can't believe how well business, industry, the schools and Kent State Tuscarawas work together to fund the program and support the program and build that relationship around our students.”

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News Headline: 150 Tuscarawas County students to participate in Project Lead the Way showcase | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name: Jon Baker
News OCR Text: About 150 students from five Tuscarawas County schools will be demonstrating their engineering projects to the public at a Project Lead the Way showcase at Kent State University at Tuscarawas on May 8.

The event will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Founders Hall. Kevin Gray from Lauren International will be the keynote speaker. The public is invited to attend.

Before the showcase, the projects will be judged from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Students from Dover City Schools, New Philadelphia City Schools, Claymont City Schools, Tuscarawas Valley Local Schools and Indian Valley Local Schools will be participating.

Project Lead The Way is a non-profit organization that develops hands-on, project-based science, technology, engineering and math curricula for use by elementary, middle and high schools.

The program is in its sixth year in Tuscarawas County, according to Steve Stokey of Allied Machine and Engineering in Dover, a proponent of Project Lead the Way. He serves on the Project Lead the Way Ohio Executive Council.

Members of the council will attend the community showcase.

“The program has been growing,” he said. “We are anticipating we will have 2,300 students in Tuscarawas County taking at least one Project Lead the Way course.

“Next year, we're going to see about a 10 percent increase in the number of students, if the school levies pass.”

In addition to school funding, the program in Tuscarawas County has received about $1.27 million in donations from businesses, citizens and foundations over the past six years, he said.

Project Lead the Way makes it easier for area businesses to find qualified local candidates for jobs that require skills in technology, engineering and math, he said.

“What a great base of human capital we will have if we have highly trained and highly qualified students come out of our schools,” Stokey said. “Our message to the community is that we're trying to get our students prepared for the next level. What we've done is raise the bar so that we're at the same level as the best schools in Ohio.”

The local program is the “envy of the state,” he said. “They can't believe how well business, industry, the schools and Kent State Tuscarawas work together to fund the program and support the program and build that relationship around our students.”

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News Headline: The HeldenFiles Online Kent State revisited | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Sunday is the 44th anniversary of the shootings at Kent State. CNN, for one, will have special that night with people recalling the events that day; more about that in Sunday's HeldenFiles. Below, I have pasted a piece I wrote in 2010, for the 40th anniversary, about Kent State and its place in pop culture. Here goes:

The shootings at Kent State have inspired artistic interpretations — books, movies, songs, visual arts. But for those who consider the events 40 years ago a major historical moment, the amount of art devoted to them must seem slim.

For example, we already have had more scripted movies about Sept. 11 — which is still less than a decade ago — than about what happened on May 4.

Kent State is messy. Controversy still dogs what happened that day in 1970. The shootings are entangled in wars that America is still fighting, over the meaning of Vietnam and what is right for American culture.

''There's a struggle over the kind of memory of Vietnam and that history, how history is written,'' said Daniel Miller, a filmmaker, University of Oregon professor and Kent State student in 1970. ''Depending on who you talk to, you get different versions of it. . . .

''One of the recent examples that really presents what those arguments are in terms of polarization was the characterization of John Kerry . . . and everything that happened with the Swift Boat.''

Kent State, in at least one observer's view, is the equivalent of box-office poison in an entertainment world where controversy can be seen as economically damaging.

Look, too, at pop music. Historian Hugo Keesing is curator of the 13-CD set Next Stop Is Vietnam, due in July. He said recently there are more than two dozen recordings about Kent State. Next Stop box will highlight May 4 with the Beach Boys' Student Demonstration Time, Third Condition's Monday in May (The Kent State Tragedy) and Barbara Dane's The Kent State Massacre.

But Keesing said Ohio — the Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young recording made shortly after the shootings — is the only Kent State song to have made a significant commercial impact. Keesing wanted it in the Vietnam box but could not get permission.

Yet Ohio, written by Neil Young, never rose higher than No. 14 on the Billboard singles chart. (A live version was part of CSNY's Four-Way Street, which briefly topped Billboard's album chart in 1971.)

At the time of the Kent State shootings, the No. 1 song in the country was the Jackson 5's ABC. By the end of May, it was Ray Stevens' Everything Is Beautiful.

It took more than 10 years to have an extensive, nondocumentary screen consideration of Kent State: the February 1981 TV movie based in part on James Michener's book, Kent State.

The book had been criticized for its inaccuracies. So was the TV version. Viewing audiences, then in the early stages of the Reagan era, issued a collective yawn, and the movie tanked in the ratings.

'THE SEVENTIES'

The Seventies, a 2000 miniseries that began with a group of fictional young people at Kent State, was another flop. (Also, like 1981's Kent State, it was made far from Ohio.) Even in Northeast Ohio, The Seventies could not beat episodes of The X-Files and The Practice.

Beyond Vietnam, Kent is part of the culture wars that rage to this day and the wave of despair and cynicism that swept over American youth in 1969-70.

The year before the Kent State shootings, 1969, offers two indications of how complicated things could be:

• Woodstock — half a million kids, fun and music — was the upbeat view of what the nation might be. The Star-Spangled Banner was still cool, if Jimi Hendrix was playing it.

• The movie Easy Rider became a sensation with its long-haired, drug-dealing young characters, exploring alternatives to the American mainstream — only to be gunned down by people who hated them based on looks alone.

Easy Rider proved more knowing. The supposedly happy vibe of Woodstock nonetheless included mordant songs like Country Joe and the Fish's I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixing-to-Die Rag, with its line, ''Next stop is Vietnam.''

Violence and death seemed visible across the culture. The horror of the Altamont rock fest arrived in December 1969, around the same time that Black Panther leader Fred Hampton was shot by Chicago police. On the heels of Kent State came the shootings on another college campus, Mississippi's Jackson State.

On Meet the Press in September 1970, Harvard's Joseph Rhodes Jr. said, ''One of the hard things we have to get across in the country is . . . when you talk about punishing criminal students, you are sometimes talking about killing somebody's children.''

Through all the tumult, young people were dying in Vietnam, too. In Dear America: Letters Home From Vietnam, one GI hears of sorrowful reactions to Kent State and rants: ''Why don't your hearts cry out and shed a tear for the 40-plus thousand red-blooded Americans . . . who have given their lives so a bunch of bloody bastard radicals can protest?''

You can look across the events of 1969 and 1970 and ask why would anyone want to look back at that time?

''Few people want to revisit unpleasant subjects,'' said Bill Gordon, author of the book Four Dead in Ohio, and Kent State had ''too much baggage'' in cultural terms. It took eight years to get the book published, he said. In publishing, he said, Kent State is ''the equivalent of box-office poison.''

''Maybe it's one of those stories that is very, very hard for us as a country to face,'' said Dr. Lauren Onkney, vice president of education and public programs for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. ''One of those moments where we're fighting each other. I think one of the powerful things about Ohio is that the song has that anger and confusion and passion in it.''

Onkney, like Payne and Fire in the Heartland director Miller, believes students still are interested in what happened. Payne is heightening that interest by using newer forms of storytelling, having students essentially re-enact the events of May 4 through electronic social media such as Googlegroups.com.

''I think it's safe to say most people in the country know about Kent State,'' Miller said. ''And students know about it. I can talk about Fred Hampton's murder, for instance, and very few people know about that. No one knows about Jackson State. But if I say Kent State, most people will at least be knowledgeable in that students were shot and killed in 1970.''

But, he added, ''I think they have very little deep contextual knowledge.''

''In my teaching experience, when students have found out about it, they tend to be shocked,'' said Onkney, who will moderate a panel about rock music and Vietnam for the Kent anniversary. ''And even young people who have heard and loved [the song] Ohio, they don't necessarily know what it's about.''

Even some documentaries, Miller said, ''are really good at telling the facts of the day of May 4 but not very good . . . at providing any analysis or context for the event.''

He tried to remedy that with his film, which he believes has ''a story of Kent that hadn't been told.''

TRUTH VS. ART

Yet in big and small strokes, the 1981 movie is a reminder of how difficult it can be to convey essential truths through art. For example, Payne recalled one viewer complaining that the shooting took 13 seconds and in the 1981 movie, it was just 12.6.

An even more interesting perspective came from Louis Cusella, who knew shooting victim Bill Schroeder. He found the movie troubling because it made his friend look too good, exaggerated ''to purify his image.''

''On a personal level, I reacted favorably,'' he said in an essay for Communication Quarterly in 1982. ''On an analytical level, I found the composition flawed and inaccurate.''

But in art, there is sometimes a distinction to be made between fact and truth. Gordon thinks one thing that gets close to the essential truth of Kent State is, in fact, a novel: Not in Vain by Gerald Green, who co-wrote the script for the 1981 Kent State.

''It's been mostly overlooked,'' Gordon said. ''That really deserves a second look by people at Kent.''

Nor has Kent State faded entirely from memory, or the arts. Besides poetry and visual-arts efforts, there have been documentaries including the current Fire in the Heartland, in which Miller examines in detail student activism in Kent going back years before the gunshots.

Plays include Kent State: A Requiem, by J. Gregory Payne, who also teaches at Emerson College and was a historical consultant on 1981's Kent State. He says the play has been performed at more than 150 colleges and universities over the last 34 years, and will be staged again at Kent this fall.

There is even a children's history book, Kent State, in a Cornerstones of Freedom series.

England has a self-described ''progressive/psychedelic/rock'' band called Four Dead In Ohio, the name taken from the chorus of Young's song. While the band members weren't even born in 1970, guitarist Doug Mallett said via e-mail that ''we thought it was a strong and distinctive name and we also like that it has a significant historical background.'' At the same time, he said, ''a lot of people who come to our shows ask where the name came from.''

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News Headline: 44 years ago students rioted at Kent State; what would they do today? | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Forty-four years ago today, several hundred students at Kent State University continued a rampage of anti-war protests, staring down the barrels of military weapons and gagging on the mist of tear gas.

Four died in gunfire. Another nine were wounded.

Is there anything that would compel today's college students to take the same bold stand — to risk injury and arrest — as those students in 1970?

War? Obviously not. The conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq were far longer than Vietnam, there is no draft, and public polling shows that Americans have had little concern.

So, the Beacon Journal visited the campuses of Kent State and the University of Akron and asked: What would cause you to protest with the fervor of those four decades ago? The answers reflected a generation that has redefined political action, is far removed from war, and has a whole new set of concerns.

At the KSU Student Center, two African-American students have participated publicly in demonstrations of support.

Junior Darnell Craig Griffiths, 20, of Akron, said students do, in fact, gather around common issues. But he said, “It would have to be an event that pertains to us in this day and age and this decade that makes us feel like we have to come together as students as a collective.”

He said that Kent State's history plays a role. Students “are more quick to collectively get together over issues at this campus.”

He is in hospitality management and entrepreneurship and Pan African studies.

Friday, he attended the Black United Students commemoration of its own campus demonstration 44 years ago — two days prior to the campus shootings.

Sitting at a table with him, Kiara White, 19, of Akron, a sophomore English major, said “serious injustices going on with the school behind the scenes” would motivate her to take part in a demonstration.

She too marched Friday in the BUS demonstration and in the past took part in a local protest following the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Florida in 2012.

At Kent State, she said, “You have a lot of young people who are ready to go out and make some noise.”

Inside the UA Student Union, nursing students Allison Stanton and Julia Schwarz both have a high threshold of tolerance, saying it would take quite a bit to convince them to take part in a big demonstration or protest.

Both are white.

Stanton, 19, of Rocky River, a sophomore, said no one likes conflict.

“I would have to be really educated on the subject to have a strong stance on whatever side it is,” she said.

Schwarz, 20, of Medina, also a sophomore, said she too would need to be educated on the topic.

“I wouldn't just jump out there and be part of something,” she said.

And she said the idea of being part of a big demonstration really is foreign to her.

Schwarz said she imagines there are issues that could arise that could lead students to protest nationally and she thinks “some people are really well educated on issues,” and others aren't.

“The people who are well educated will protest and there are a lot of people who don't care and that are sitting back and just watching,” she said.

Protests redefined

National research suggests that young people have different definitions of community, communications, mobilization and political action, and that their activity is very different from people who grew up in the Sixties.

According to a survey of 3,000 young people nationwide, the MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics found that young people ages 15-25 are highly connected and often participate in some form of political action. Forty-one percent have done so, in some fashion, the study concluded.

It may be the posting of a video on social media, joining an internet group or expressing a position.

For example, a crusade begun in 2011 by a 22-year-old woman on Change.org caused the Bank of America to change its plans to levy a $5 fee on debit card transactions.

The study found that the activism cuts across racial and ethnic boundaries because social media and easy access to mobile devices facilitates connections and the sharing of information.

The finding that young people can express themselves and organize through social media — and get a reaction — suggests that confrontations can occur without face-to-face demonstrations.

At UA, senior Larry Miller, 31, of Doylestown, said he can understand the climate of 1970.

“If you are forced to go to war and aren't even sure why we were there and all your buddies were dying, I'd be a little pissed off,'' he said. ‘‘I would protest but I wouldn't throw rocks at anybody but I suppose if there was an unnecessary war and all my friends were dying, I would probably get pretty upset.”

Today, though, the science education major said: “It would take a hell of a lot to get me angry,” although he could see himself taking part in a protest over high tuition rates.

Michel Yuzik, a 16-year-old junior at KSU who finished high school in ninth grade, said for him, “it would have to be something I really care about.” War would be one of them.

He said he would join a protest against American involvement in the Ukraine or if a military draft were reinstituted — the issue that agitated so many young men in the Sixties.

Protecting rights

Still, though, some area students said they could see themselves in the streets over basic rights, the well-being of all, and economic issues.

Nate Lee, 30, of Stow, a KSU junior and an environmental geography major, said he could see himself taking part in demonstrations over climate change.

“I would love for us to band together and try to change how our society uses our resources,” said the student, who worked for two years with AmeriCorps in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state.

KSU's Stevie Boone, 20, of Garrettsville, a sophomore business management major with a dance minor, said she has taken part in gay rights and anti-Westboro Baptist Church protests.

“I am extremely strong-opinionated on a lot of things,” she said.

Zak Husein, 20, of Springfield Township, an international business major at UA and a first generation American whose parents are Palestinian, said he could see taking part in a demonstration “if they start taking away basic rights ... you have always lived with.”

He said for example, in Saudi Arabia, women do not have the right to drive.

“If they did something like that,” he said, he would join a protest.

Ben Stratton, 22, of Garrettsville, a Kent State junior math major, said something that he felt would have a negative impact on the economy could convince him to join a protest.

“The system we have now is very successful,” he said.

Race continues hot

Two UA African-American male students said race and crime could draw them into a protest.

J-Vonne Dominic Humphreys, 19, of Canton, a freshman, referred to the racial controversy surrounding Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, banned for life from the NBA last week.

“Racially charged things could get me to do something like walk” in a protest, said the political science/criminal justice major.

Gregory Burns, 19, of Canton, a sophomore athletic training major, said community safety events could motivate him.

“There are a lot of shootings and killings going on around the country and here,” he said.

The world, he said, “is kind of scary and messed up and I am about anything that is positive and making change.”

The report on young people and participatory politics can be found on the web at http://ypp.dmlcentral.net/sites/all/files/publications/YPP_Survey_Report_FULL.pdf

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News Headline: May 4 commemoration at KSU still heavy on emotion | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT: Rain or shine, warm or blustery cold, they keep coming back to what they call the scene of the crime, a dark chapter in this nation's history.

May 4, it's called. The annual commemoration of what happened at Kent State University on May 4, 1970, when Gov. James A. Rhodes ordered the Ohio National Guard there after word spread about student-led protests against the United States' invasion of Cambodia that President Richard Nixon had just announced on television on April 30. .

Following what was called a rock-throwing incident by some students on May 4 that was met with tear gas from the guard, four students lay dead that afternoon — Allison Krause and Jeffrey Miller, who were part of the protest; and Sandy Scheuer and William Schroeder, who were just walking to their classes.

Guardsmen fired 67 rounds in 13 seconds. Nine others were wounded, including Dean Kahler, who was paralyzed from the neck down.

Justice — say those close to the dead, wounded or the events of that day — was never served.

For them, May 4, 1970, will forever be an open wound.

Remembrance

Jennifer Schwartz Wright stood vigil late Sunday morning by the concrete lanterns in memory of her cousin and KSU freshman Allison Krause, who lost her life 44 years ago.

“This is absolutely where I need to be,” she said. “I've been coming every year since I was 15...

“I was nine months old when she was killed. I never knew her, but I could have known her,” Wright continued, her voice trailing off. “She was an honor student and she was my spiritual mentor, because I later found out from books she had that she was curious about art therapy too.”

Wright, who is executive director of her own art therapy studio in Cleveland, brought along her 8-year-old daughter Allison, named after her cousin.

Standing nearby was Michelle Touve-Holland of Streetsboro.

“I'm a peace marshal,” she said. “I'm here to make sure people maintain respect during any of the dialogues in the lots, vigils or the commemoration. I feel like I still come because it's important for us to remember that even the smallest decision affects our lives. Just walking to class that day affected two people's lives permanently.

Akron's Chuck Ayers, who was eyewitness to what happened that day, said he's unable to stay away from the May 4 commemorations.

“It's easier for me to come and exorcise those demons a little bit,” he said. “Then I can be fine for another year...

“It was a day my whole life changed,” the 66-year-old syndicated cartoonist, husband and father of two explained. “Everything I've done since then has been affected by it.”

Ayers, part of the KSU class of 1971, said he was on the grassy area “taking photographs for my class when the guardsmen regrouped, turned and headed to the pagoda. It was seconds later they opened fire.”

His photographs and drawings documenting the events of that day are on display in the May 4 Visitors Center.

Senselessness

Among the many poignant and powerful voices sharing memories of the four students who were killed was Chris Butler, who was best friends with Jeffrey Miller. Butler spoke about still having trouble reconciling the senselessness of what happened that day.

Talking about it as if he were in a one-on-one with his therapist, Butler said: “I ducked. He didn't.”

This year's event welcomed a speaker from Jackson (Miss.) State College who spoke about the not-often talked about police-sponsored shooting there, 10 days after KSU, that killed two and wounded 12 others. Students there were protesting historical racial unrest, the KSU shootings and what was thought to be the murder of a civil rights icon and his wife, found to be untrue. Some set fire to a dump truck — an act that was met with a barrage of bullets.

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News Headline: KSU reflects on May 4, 1970 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Annual event pays tribute to four students
killed by national guard during ant-war protest

The Kent State University
community gathered in the
Student Center Ballroom Sunday
to reflect on the 44th anniversary
of May 4, 1970 and
pay tribute to Jeff Miller, Allison
Krause, Bill Schroeder
and Sandy Scheuer, the four
students whose lives were ended
by National Gaurd gunfire,
as well as the nine students injured
on that day.

“Here at Kent State, our
ba t t l e for
truth, justice
and accountability
has lasted for
44 years. We won't give up,”
said Joe Lewis, one of the nine
wounded survivors of the student
protest that turned into
havoc.

Speaking in honor of Sandy
Scheuer, Alyssa Mazey, a
member of the Alpha Xi Delta
sorority to which Scheuer
also belonged, noted that
Scheuer was just an innocent
bystander on her way
to class when she was killed
by gunfire.

“It kills me to know that
the students lost their First
Amendment rights, but what
kills me even more is that innocent
students of this campus
lost their lives and their
loved ones suffered the consequences,”
Mazey said.

Ashley Manning, a member
of the May 4 Task Force student
organization, spoke for
Allison Krause, a 19-year-old
politically active freshman in
the student demonstrations
against the Vietnam War and
Cambodia campaign.

“When I consider Allison,
and the legacy she left behind,
I feel like I, or any other activist
on campus, or any other human
being in general, would
be lucky to have half the courage
that she did as a freshman,”
Manning said. “She was
robbed of so many opportunities
to use that courage and
strength to better the world
and the people in it.”

Tom Calahan, speaking
for Bill Schroeder, noted
that Schroeder was an Eagle
Scout, skilled athlete, member
of National Honors Society
and known by friends a being
“intelligent, curious and cautious”
while giving everything
he did 110 percent effort.

He questioned whether
the National Gaurdman
who shot Schroeder
ever apologized to the
victim's family for killing
their loved one, or had
told his family of how he
killed a student at Kent
State University.

“The man who killed
Bill Schroeder was not
held accountable for his
crime in a court of law,
however, I believe, that
he will be held accountable
in a higher court,”
Calahan said.

Chris Butler, a college
friend of Jeff Miller, reenacted
a conversation
between himself and a
therapist over the lasting
effect of the May 4
shootings on his life.

“I want closure, I want
resolution, I want justice.
It should've been
done a long time ago,”
Butler said. “I am so
confused about all this
still. I want to forget May
4 ever happened, but
then again I never want
to forget it. It's too important,
it's too significant.
I think every generation
must have its own
collective trauma to deal
with and I guess this is
mine no matter how
much I don't want it.”

Laura Davis, an instructor
of Kent State's
course on May 4, paid
tribute to Carole Barbato,
her friend and
colleague whom she
worked with the advance
the history and
context of May 4. Barbato
died on May 1.

Barbato published
five books and essays
on May 4, 1970, helped
facilitate the parking lot
markers near Taylor Hall
that indicate where the
students died on May 4,
served on multiple commemoration
committees,
wrote the text for
the Ohio Historical Society
site marker and May
4 walking tour, provided
many interviews, helped
get the site placed on
the National Register
of Historic Places and
worked along with Davis
for more than seven
years on the creation of
the May 4 Visitors Center
in Taylor Hall.

“Carole fulfilled a deep
personal and professional
commitment to
honor those who were
lost on May 4 at Kent
State, including her
childhood friend, Sandy
Scheuer, and Bill Schroeder,
whom she met after
she came to Kent
State,” Davis said. “She
saw through all the work
that she did, to promote
better understanding of
what happened on May
4, and in doing so she
served citizens today including
you here and will
serve future generations
for many many years to
come.”

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News Headline: May 4 movie in the works | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A new theatrical feature motion picture will be produced by Hollywood-based TreeHouse Pictures, tentatively titled,
“Ohio: The Kent State Story.”

TreeHouse Pictures is a film finance and production company with offices in Los Angeles and New York.

Recent TreeHouse Pictures credits include “Arbitrage,” directed by Nicholas Jarecki, released by Lionsgate/Roadside
Attractions in 2012, and featuring Richard Gere in his Golden Globe nominated role; “At Any Price,” starring
Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron, released by Sony Pictures Classics in 2012; “All is Lost,” starring Robert Redford
with J.C. Chandor directing, released by Lionsgate in 2013; and “That Awkward Moment,” starring Zac Efron, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan, released on more than 2,800 screens by Focus Features in 2014.

Alan Canfora, director of the Kent May 4 Center, said filmmakers have been working on interviews and “due diligence” in the past two years.

TreeHouse Pictures engaged a retired FBI supervisory special agent and audio forensics expert at JBR Technology,
and Canfora said they have uncovered information that confirms the word “fire!” preceding the National Guard gunfire on May 4, 1970, at Kent State University.

They are still in the process of analyzing the Strubbe reel to reel tape for the full text.

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News Headline: Speakers tell of May 4 shootings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: Tribune Chronicle - Online
Contact Name: BOB COUPLAND
News OCR Text: VIENNA - On the 44th anniversary of the Kent State University shootings, a college professor who was there at that time as a freshman shared her story as well as what the May 4 Visitors Center at the university showcases for those who remember that day and the generations born years later.

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News Headline: What's going on? May 4 | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Independent - Online, The
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Are you looking for something to do? Here's what's happening around the area.

Kent State shooting commemoration — Noon at Kent State Commons, Kent State campus, Kent. Idris Syed, lecturer in Kent State's Department of Pan-African studies, has been the faculty adviser for the May 4 Task Force, a student organization, since 2009. The May 4 Visitors Center will have extended hours from 2 to 6 p.m. Information: www.m4tf.org.

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News Headline: ( VIDEO) Kent State University victims and students remember May 4th, 1970 shooting | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio - A large crowd gathered just after 11 p.m. Saturday behind the Taylor Hall at Kent State University to honor the fallen. The crowd stood near the Victory Bell holding candles in remembrance of May 4th, 1970.

It was 44 years ago that four students were killed after 67 shots were fired in 13 seconds by the National Guard.

The students were pushed over to the parking lot of Prentice Hall as they were protesting the Vietnam War.

Students and volunteers are still standing in the parking lot area where the four students died. The students will stand there for 12 hours honoring the victims in the very spot where they were shot and killed.

Around 7 p.m. Saturday, a forum was held where survivors answered questions and spoke about the day they will never forget.

"To me, May 4th means life, but it also means death and murder," said Dean Kahler, who was shot and will never walk again.

"This is a horrific thing and [the students'] blood was spilled on this campus. It should never be forgotten," he said.

Another survivor, Joe Lewis, wants immunity to be given to the shooters. He said that's how the truth can come out so we know what really happened that day.

"It's a continued quest for the truth," Lewis said. "The memories need to be an example of what went wrong."

Sunday at noon there will be a commemoration of the events that took place that horrible day in Kent State University history.

To view video, please click on link:
http://www.newsnet5.com/news/local-news/oh-summit/kent-state-victims-and-students-remember-may-4th-1970?autoplay=true

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News Headline: Kent State University victims and students remember May 4th, 1970 shooting | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: WEWS-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Four students were shot and killed on May 4th, 1970 at Kent State University, 9 others injured. This Sunday marks the 44 years anniversary of the Kent State shooting.

KENT, Ohio - A large crowd gathered just after 11 p.m. Saturday behind the Taylor Hall at Kent State University to honor the fallen. The crowd stood near the Victory Bell holding candles in remembrance of May 4th, 1970.

It was 44 years ago that four students were killed after 67 shots were fired in 13 seconds by the National Guard.

The students were pushed over to the parking lot of Prentice Hall as they were protesting the Vietnam War.

Students and volunteers are still standing in the parking lot area where the four students died. The students will stand there for 12 hours honoring the victims in the very spot where they were shot and killed.

Around 7 p.m. Saturday, a forum was held where survivors answered questions and spoke about the day they will never forget.

"To me, May 4th means life, but it also means death and murder," said Dean Kahler, who was shot and will never walk again.

"This is a horrific thing and [the students'] blood was spilled on this campus. It should never be forgotten," he said.

Another survivor, Joe Lewis, wants immunity to be given to the shooters. He said that's how the truth can come out so we know what really happened that day.

"It's a continued quest for the truth," Lewis said. "The memories need to be an example of what went wrong."

Sunday at noon there will be a commemoration of the events that took place that horrible day in Kent State University history.

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News Headline: (VIDEO) Campus Reflects on 44th Anniversary of Kent State Shootings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Fox 8 Morning News - WJW-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio — Kent State University marked the 44th anniversary of the killings of four students this weekend with a candlelight vigil, a program remembering the fateful day, and a look at activism then and now.

But at the site of the shootings, you saw a number of people just walking quietly and reading markers about what had happened.

To this day, no one is exactly sure why it happened.

Four unarmed students – Allison Krause, Jeffrey Miller, Sandra Scheuer, and William Schroeder – died when the National Guard opened fire during a protest of the Vietnam War.

Nine other people were hurt.

“People were running back up North Lincoln, saying ‘they're shooting at us,'” recalls Mark Kaufman, who was heading to join the protest before he encountered people running toward him and away from the gunfire.

One of the featured speakers was 19-year-old Allison Krause's sister, Laurel.

“My sister, Allison, stood for peace,” Laurel said. “She believed in peace, and in her last act on this planet, she died for peace.”

Laurel Krause says it's significant that, before a United Nations panel last year, the U.S. government acknowledged the deaths at Kent State that day in a new way.

“The U.S. government has never spoken about Kent State and connected the words ‘murder' and ‘killing' to it,” she says.

While reflecting on the anti-war movement, Mark Kaufman looks out at Kent State, and also thinks of the children and by now, the grandchildren, that the victims from that day may have had.

“There may be ten or fifteen people living who do not exist,” he said quietly, “because of what happened here at Kent State.”

To view video, please click on link:
http://fox8.com/2014/05/04/campus-reflects-on-44th-anniversary-of-kent-state-shootings/

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News Headline: Somber Anniversary at KSU | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/03/2014
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: It's been 44 years since shots rang-out on the campus of Kent State University, killing four students and wounding others when National Guardsmen opened fire on anti-war protestors at Taylor Hall. The annual candlelight vigil will be held tonight as people remember the tragedy that occurred during the height of the Vietnam War on May 4, 1970.

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News Headline: Weekend Ceremonies Commemorate 1970 Kent State University Shootings | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: WCBE-FM
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University will pause this weekend to commemorate the 44th anniversary of the shooting deaths of four students during a protest of the Vietnam War.

Panel discussions are scheduled on campus tomorrow to reflect on the May Fourth, 1970 shootings and the evolution of political activism. An annual candlelight vigil in the parking lot where the students were killed by Ohio National Guard troops begins Saturday night and runs into noon on Sunday, when commemoration ceremonies begin.

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News Headline: Look! It's a bike, it's a car -- no, it's an ELF (Washko) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/04/2014
Outlet Full Name: Stow Sentry - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Stow -- Since mid-March, motorists and shoppers may have seen an odd green and roughly egg-shaped vehicle on bicycle wheels rolling around on area roads or parked outside local stores.

It is an ELF, which stands for Electric, Light, Fun, vehicle driven and owned by Stow resident Paulette Washko, who is director of research compliance in Kent State University's Division of Research and Sponsored Programs.

"It's really a lot of fun, good for the environment and my health," said Washko.

The 150-pound ELF is manufactured by North Carolina-based Organic Transit. According to the company's website, www.organictransit.com, it is classified as a bicycle under federal law. It has a backwards tricycle configuration, with two 26-inch wheels in front and one in back. Its body, made from a composite material, shields the driver from the elements and includes a trunk. It is designed so that the windshield sheds water and does not need wipers, at least at lower speeds.

It can be pedaled, which Washko said she does primarily, reaching speeds of up to 20 mph, but it also has a 600-watt electric solar-powered motor to supplement foot power. It takes about six or seven hours to recharge the battery by leaving the ELF in the sun, but Washko said the battery is removable and can also be recharged by plugging it in.

Washko said she ordered her ELF in January for a base price of $5,000 and received it around March 12 and has used it extensively since then, both to get to work and for errands around town. Stores she has driven it to on errands include Giant Eagle and Target on Route 59 and Aldi and Drug Mart on Fishcreek Road.

"My goal is anywhere around town within 10 miles of my house," said Washko, adding that "it's been all around town" and people often comment about it.

"The response has been positive. It's gotten a lot of interest," she said.

Washko said she began thinking about an alternative form of transportation for local travel about a year ago when the lease on her car was coming to an end.

"How all this came about is I was trying to be more green and be a good role model for our boys," said Washko, referring to sons Drew, 22, Noah, 19, and Cole, 14.

"It's important to me to set a good example and hand off a clean planet to them," said Washko.

Initially she thought about using a conventional bicycle, but worried about riding it in bad weather, especially in winter.

In December, she learned about the ELF when she watched a television program about it that her husband, Robert, recorded for her.

"I jumped out of my chair and said 'Oh my God, that's exactly what I have been looking for,'" she said.

Washko said that after about seven weeks of use, she is convinced she made a good decision.

"It's a great little vehicle. I encourage everyone to try it," she said.

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News Headline: Kent State professor compares iconic photo to Michelangelo sculpture | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: CNNMoney.com
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Jerry M. Lewis is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology. As a faculty marshal on May 4 he witnessed the shootings by the Ohio National Guard. He is featured in 'CNN Special Report Witnessed: The Killings at Kent State' airing Sunday at 7p E.T.

Source: John Filo/Getty Images

The most important carry over from the anti-Vietnam War movement is John Filo's famous picture of Mary Vecchio screaming over the body of Jeffrey Miller. John was a Kent State University photo-journalism major. He was acting as a news professional even though he was student at the time. He said in a 1990 interview that immediately after the firing had stopped, "I thought, I've got to get out of here. Then I said, Wait a minute. What am I doing? You say you're a journalist, let's go." He thought it was essential that he take his pictures out of the Kent area in order to escape the clutches of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. There had been persistent rumors that the FBI had been confiscating camera and film over the weekend. John drove the back roads of Pennsylvania to Tarentum to have picture published saying to the editor who he knew from previous work that he thought he had some good pictures.

The Valley Daily News of Tarentum, Pennsylvania published the picture as well as putting it on the Associated Press wire service. John won the Pulitzer Prize and other awards for his picture.

The girl in the Pieta picture was Mary Vecchio a 14 year-old run-away from, Florida. She eventually found her way to Kent arriving on the campus May 1, 1970, four days before the shootings and leaving immediately afterward for Indianapolis. Soon after the picture was published in Newsweek, she was tracked down by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and returned to her home. The picture had an immediate impact on the Vecchio family, said Mary Vecchio. Her family received many letters most of them hostile.

Vecchio was a self-described antiwar activist. What kind of activist was she? There were three ways that students got involved in the antiwar movement. First, there were the core activists who did most of the work of organizing rallies, writing pamphlets, sending letters to newspapers and so forth. Next were the secondary activists, who were interested, did a little work, but for the most part just lent the movement moral support. Lastly were "event participants" (rally attenders), whose main activity was to show up at programs and demonstrations such as large rallies and teach-ins. I would put Vecchio in the latter category.

It is possible to interpret and understand the picture by comparing it to the Pieta of Michelangelo. The Pieta was commissioned on August 25, 1498 by the Cardinal of San Donigi. At the time, Michelangelo was an unknown artist. However, the Pieta was not an unknown image to worshipers of the time. Many artists had used it. Robert Coughlan writes:

Until the 15th Century, the theme of the Pieta belonged almost exclusively to the artists of the northern Europe, whose gruesome figure of Jesus and Mary, mainly of wood, seemed designed to shock worshipers into awareness of Christ's sacrifice. Michelangelo's Pieta dramatically shifted the conventions but portraying the dead Christ as . . ."still alive, His veins distended by the pulse of life . . . Mary who was traditionally portrayed in agony and disfigurement in her sorrow, is depicted with physical and spiritual beauty showing her grief with her left hand.

Most people experience Michelangelo's Pieta which is in the Vatican as a photograph. Both women use their faces and hands to express their grief over the tragic deaths. Michelangelo's Pieta and the Mary Vecchio photograph are framed as triangles with the top being the heads of each Mary while the bases are the earth for the Pieta and the parking lot for Jeffrey Miller. The Mary Vecchio picture shows the shock and horror of the shootings at Kent State by the look on Mary's face. Next, her upraised hands, as if in prayer, capture the sorrow of the moment. The Mary by Michelangelo expresses her grief over the death of her son with her left hand.

Jeffrey Miller is seen lying on his stomach while the Christ lies on his back cradled by Mary. Jeffrey Miller's vitality before the moment of the shooting is illustrated by the blood on the Prentice Hall parking lot, while the Christ's blood is seen in his pulsing veins.

Both are outdoor scenes. The Pieta has dirt at the feet of Mary, while the Vecchio picture is on the tarmac of a Kent State University parking lot.

There are differences. Michelangelo's Pieta has no one else in the frame–only Mary and Jesus; the Kent State picture Kent State show students present. The student standing near Jeffrey Miller is closer to his body than is Mary Vecchio.

Why has the picture been influential? One cannot be completely certain why this picture was been used so often, but it is possible to suggest a basic reason. The Mary Vecchio picture captures the passion of the anti-Vietnam War conflict for audiences who see this cultural object. It has emotional power. Many see Michelangelo's Pieta in the Filo's photograph. This suggests an answer to why John Filo ‘s picture of Mary Vecchio, the “Anti-Vietnam War Pieta”, picture has had such a long cultural life and will continue to be an iconic symbol of the Vietnam era.

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News Headline: Kent, Kent State say 'thanks' to safety forces (Lefton) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/05/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: City and university leaders in Kent called together their police forces at the Kent Fire Department Tuesday to say “thanks” for the work they put in to keep the community safe.

“You all know how much work goes into keeping the peace, but we wanted to make sure you knew we knew
how much goes on and how much we appreciate it,” Kent City Manager Dave Ruller said, referencing that the
unsanctioned College Fest block party that led to riots and mass arrests on College Avenue has dissipated in
recent years. “Thankfully, it's been a really quiet couple years. It was another really, really quite, nice peaceful
weekend so it seemed perfect to do a little celebration.”

In September 2012, the KSU Board of Trustees and city of Kent formed a joint patrol district on the Lester A. Lefton Esplanade between the western edge of campus and the city of Kent for police services in that area.

As a token of appreciation and a symbol of that partnership, commemorative T-shirts were given to police forces Tuesday.

“Keeping our students safe in our community is, I think, the number one priority,” KSU President Lester Lefton said. “There are 50,000 people who are dependent on the police and fire fighters, the EMTs, all the people work every day and potentially put themselves at really serious risk. We recognize that their welfare is dependent on the work that
you do.”

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