Report Overview:
Total Clips (13)
Alumni (1)
Art, School of; Students (1)
Board of Trustees; Higher Education; Office of the President (3)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Higher Education; Tuition (1)
Human Resources (1)
Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (1)
KSU Museum (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni (1)
CAREER EDUCATION : Sociologist and Best-Selling Author Dr. Bertice Berry Chosen to Address Colorado Technical University Graduates 05/21/2014 4 Traders Text Attachment Email

...perfect fit for this celebration.” Dr. Berry is a graduate of Jacksonville University in Florida and received her doctorate in sociology from Kent State University. She began her career in education, teaching sociology and statistics at Kent where she learned that integrating...


Art, School of; Students (1)
"Bravura" describes Kent State University student exhibition in Summit Artspace 05/21/2014 Knight Arts | Witnessing The Transformational Power Of The Arts Text Attachment Email

...there, and artists in fact have studios there. Yet there is room for still more, such as the current exhibit called “Bravura” that features the work of Kent State University seniors in their own show. Don Parsisson, who coordinates much of the displays on the third floor of Summit Artspace, said in...


Board of Trustees; Higher Education; Office of the President (3)
Kent State did not break any laws in its presidential search: Letter to the Editor 05/20/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...would be directly related to the confidentiality afforded to their interest. So why take all of these steps in seeking our next president? Because Kent State wasn't the only university in the country or in Ohio seeking a successful leader to take charge. When it comes to courting a top executive,...

KSU: Stories 'misleading' (Mansfield) 05/21/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Presidential Search Process Criticized, But Spokesman Says It Is Common, Used by OSU Kent State University offi- cials are about finished dis- cussing...

Letter to the Editor: Public misled about KSU president search 05/21/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The success of Kent State University's recent presidential search is already being felt across the region as Dr. Beverly J. Warren prepares to assume her...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
City of Cleveland misses important deadline; Old Humphrey Mansion demolished (photos) 05/21/2014 WKYC-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...last standing monument to Euclid Beach Park. The big Stucco house was built in the late 1800's - designated a historic landmark. A preservation group and Kent State University had come up with a plan to open up the lakefront and restore the old mansion. The property owners from Dallas, Texas want that...


College of Business Administration (COBA) (1)
Kent State College of Business to Hold Executive MBA Experience Day (Walker) 05/20/2014 PRLog Text Attachment Email

- KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University's College of Business Administration will hold an MBA Experience Day on May 31 at 12 p.m. on Kent State's main campus....


Foundation, Leadership and Administration (1)
Hang Up to Relax (Lepp) 05/21/2014 SUCCESS - Online Text Attachment Email

A study links cellphones and stress. A Kent State University study has found that students who were heavy cellphone users tended to be more anxious, have lower grade-point averages and...


Higher Education; Tuition (1)
Cleveland State University students receive $385 towards tuition and books by completing 30 credit hours of classes 05/20/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...officials said. The University of Toledo and University of Cincinnati, which froze tuition last year, increased it by 2 percent. Ohio State University, Kent State University and Central State University have not announced tuition rates. All other state four-year institutions raised it 2 percent or...


Human Resources (1)
KENT STATE RECEIVES 2014 LEADERSHIP 500 EXCELLENCE AWARD (Lefton, Vitale) 05/20/2014 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, May 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Kent State University has been selected as a recipient of the 2014 Leadership...


Institutional Advancement; KSU Foundation (1)
KENT STATE VICE PRESIDENT GENE FINN EMBRACES NEW OPPORTUNITY FOLLOWING RECORD SUCCESSES (Lefton) 05/20/2014 Federal News Service Text Email

KENT, Ohio, May 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release: Gene Finn is departing from his role as Kent State University's vice president...


Journalism and Mass Communications; Students (1)
Facebook quizzes are hot on the web, but could expose your information 05/21/2014 WFTS-TV - Online Text Attachment Email

...something of our personalities with each other. Plus, they give us something to do. “When I get bored I take them like non-stop because they're fun," said Kent State University student Mari Gannon. Gannon is like millions of other people who have fallen in love with the quizzes on Facebook. And the...


KSU Museum (1)
Fashions of Downton Abbey 05/20/2014 Strongsville Patch Text Attachment Email

...technology and shifts in the social and political landscapes changed women's lives and the way they dressed. Join Sara Hume, Assistant Professor and Curator of Kent State University Museum, for a PowerPoint presentation of women's clothing during this fascinating time, as depicted in the television series,...


News Headline: CAREER EDUCATION : Sociologist and Best-Selling Author Dr. Bertice Berry Chosen to Address Colorado Technical University Graduates | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: 4 Traders
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Dr. Bertice Berry, PhD., will deliver the commencement address to the
2014 graduates of Colorado
Technical University (CTU). CTU selected Dr. Berry for her
dedication to education as a former teacher and her ability to use a
combination of comedy and advice to connect with and inspire students.
The graduation ceremony will takes place in Denver on June 21, 2014.

“We're thrilled to have such an inspirational role model like Dr.
Bertice Berry share her experience and advice with our graduates,” said
Andrew Hurst, president of CTU. “She shares CTU's commitment to higher
education and we think she's a perfect fit for this celebration.”

Dr. Berry is a graduate of Jacksonville University in Florida and
received her doctorate in sociology from Kent State University. She
began her career in education, teaching sociology and statistics at Kent
where she learned that integrating humor into her lectures helped her
build strong connections with students.

Dr. Berry is also the author of 11 critically-acclaimed fiction and
non-fiction books that explore issues such as race, gender and culture.
She has also gained recognition for her work as an entertainer and
comedian, winning the national Comedian of the Year Award several years
in a row. Dr. Berry has appeared on numerous television programs,
including “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and
ABC's “20/20.” She was also the host and co-executive producer of her
own nationally syndicated talk show, “The Bertice Berry Show.”

“Earning a degree is among the most significant achievements in life,
and graduation gives us an opportunity to honor CTU students'
perseverance and personal commitment to their education,” Dr. Berry
said. “It is also an opportunity to celebrate the possibilities the
future holds and to look forward to the ways students can bring their
experience to life as they advance in their careers.”

Commencement Events

CTU's 2014 commencement ceremony will be held Saturday, June 21, 2014 at
1 p.m. at the Colorado Convention Center's Bellco Theatre in downtown
Denver. Graduates, family and friends who are unable to attend in person
can view a live webcast of the ceremony by visiting CTU's
YouTube page ( http://www.youtube.com/user/ctuniversity ).

CTU has planned a number of events to help graduates prepare for the
next steps after graduation, including a CTU “Get Connected: Networking
Reception” for graduates on Friday, June 20, 2014 at the Bellco Theatre
Lobby, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. MDT, sponsored by McGraw-Hill, will feature
a LinkedIn professional networking event to help attendees leave with
powerful, professional connections.

In addition, Keith Ferrazzi, an expert in business relationship
development and behavioral and organizational change, will speak with
graduates on Friday, June 20, 2014 at the Colorado Convention Center,
8:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. MDT about the importance of building meaningful
relationships. Those interested in attending Ferrazzi's virtual lecture,
which is part of CTU's 2014 “CTU Presents” lecture series, can visit the
following website to RSVP: http://ctupresents-keithferrazzi-webcast.eventbrite.com .

For additional information about CTU's graduation ceremony, please
visit: http://www.ctugraduation.com/ .

About Colorado Technical University

Founded in 1965, Colorado Technical University (CTU) provides higher
education to connect students to what matters most in reaching their
professional goals. CTU offers more than 100 undergraduate and graduate
programs taught by real-world faculty members who enrich the curriculum
with their industry experience and prepare students for today's
challenges and the hard-hitting problems of tomorrow. CTU's
personalized, online learning system allows students to control what,
where, when and how they learn. Students can also learn and connect on
campuses in multiple cities. With the help of faculty, industry
professionals and more than 70,000 alumni, CTU students can also grow a
powerful professional network to use their entire career. For more
information, please visit www.coloradotech.edu .

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News Headline: "Bravura" describes Kent State University student exhibition in Summit Artspace | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Knight Arts | Witnessing The Transformational Power Of The Arts
Contact Name: Roger Durbin
News OCR Text: Summit Artspace , a Knight Arts grantee , is such a cooperative and collaborative place. Local artist groups display their works there, and artists in fact have studios there. Yet there is room for still more, such as the current exhibit called “Bravura” that features the work of Kent State University seniors in their own show. Don Parsisson, who coordinates much of the displays on the third floor of Summit Artspace, said in an interview that he got a call from the School of Visual Communication Design to see if the school could mount its Photo-Illustration Senior Exhibition. Parsisson thought it was a great idea, for it would open up the space to other venues and do something for students and relations to a neighboring city. The result is that the exhibit takes up most of the central floor space of the large Summit Artspace building. What also occurred is that the captivating works (with an underlying commercial purpose) were brought to area art viewers by the students: Meg Billy, Megan Duffy, Kayla Lugo, Emily Engle, Chelsea Tobin, Michael Reece and Adriana Gonzalez. The opening reception for the group was chaotic, but fun. Certainly family members were there to support their children, but so were officials of the school and the many art lovers who were looking at the displays on the first floor of the building (“Adorned Spaces”) and the two-woman show in the back end of the third floor (by artists Bernadette Houk and Maggie Duff). The academic program in Photo Illustration has its majors use light, cameras and digital technologies to create, interpret and produce imagery from narrative, thematic and conceptual sources. Students practice basic camera techniques to gain a better understanding of photography as a creative skill in visual communication, and an advanced working knowledge of digital and film photographic systems through testing of procedures and use of special purpose materials. It all worked. Some really eye-catching and provocative pieces were on display. One that immediately jumped out was “Just One Bite” by Meg Billy. Billy's online biographical sketch says that she enjoys the photographic magic that can be created through the use of photo manipulation and retouching. Meg Billy, “Just One Bite.” “Bravura” will be on display 12-9 p.m. Thursday and 12-5 p.m. on Friday-Saturday through May 23rd on the third floor of Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St.,Akron; 330-376-8480; www.akronareaarts.org . Admission is free.

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News Headline: Kent State did not break any laws in its presidential search: Letter to the Editor | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Other Voices
News OCR Text: Contrary to what you may have read, no laws have been broken and no public records have been shredded. We followed an approach that has been mirrored by other research universities across the country and Ohio with consistent and successful results. The university has released more than 500 pages of documents in response to records requests. All expenses have had appropriate administrative review, were processed through normal procedures, and have been disclosed to the public. The cost of the search is comparable to those of other presidential searches conducted by research universities.

To ensure we complied with all legal requirements, our general counsel instructed the board and the search committee about their duties and responsibilities under state law, all of which were followed scrupulously. The responsibility for hiring the president rests solely with the board of trustees.

The trustees directed that this search should seek input from as many members of our community as possible. Board members held numerous meetings and forums with our stakeholders to seek their guidance. Unlike some universities that have used search committees comprised solely of trustees, the board wanted a more broadly representative group to direct our search. As a result, we invited leaders from academia, students, administration, alumni, and the community at large to participate in our 17-member Presidential Search Committee.

The search committee brought great professionalism to the task, and the group's signing of a confidentiality agreement is considered a best practice in executive searches that allows for comfortable, open dialogue. Further, committee members can make or discard notes kept for their personal use, which are not a public record under Ohio law. A review of similar searches and the advice of professionals overwhelmingly convinced the board the quality of candidates for our presidency would be directly related to the confidentiality afforded to their interest.

So why take all of these steps in seeking our next president? Because Kent State wasn't the only university in the country or in Ohio seeking a successful leader to take charge. When it comes to courting a top executive, timing and approach are critical.

The trustees believe the quality of the outcome of the search is a testament to the deliberations and the process we followed. The challenges of higher education, the need to educate our students to provide greater opportunities, and to expand our economy meant we could not afford to hire anyone but the best. It is precisely because of the strength and inclusiveness of our search process that the trustees have the highest confidence that we found the most highly talented next president of Kent State University, Dr. Beverly J. Warren.

When President Lefton announced his retirement last year, the board realized that it had an extremely important mission to accomplish. Our focus was to conduct a national search to recruit the candidate who best embodied the skills and qualifications necessary to take Kent State to the next level of excellence. We've now done exactly that, and I thank the search committee for its hard work and service.

So as we celebrate the close of the 2013-14 academic year, it is appropriate to applaud the many successes at Kent State University. On behalf of the board of trustees, I would like to thank and congratulate the Kent State community for its dedication and commitment to excellence. The trustees would also like to thank President Lefton for his remarkable service over the last eight years, while commending and thanking all of those involved in the search process that brought Dr. Warren to campus.

Jane Murphy Timken

Chair, Kent State University Board of Trustees

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News Headline: KSU: Stories 'misleading' (Mansfield) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Presidential Search Process Criticized, But Spokesman Says It Is Common, Used by OSU

Kent State University offi-
cials are about finished dis-
cussing how the college han-
dled its recent presidential
search that has drawn the
ire of media and some of its
own faculty.
Jane Murphy Timken,
chair of the KSU Board
of Trustees,
penned a let-
ter to the edi-
tor appearing
in today's Re-
cord-Courier.
Chief univer-
sity spokes-
person Eric
Mansfield ex-
pects it will be
the last time
KSU officials
will address
t h e s e a r c h
process, which
has been criti-
cized at times by people on
campus, the media and the
public as overly secretive.
Some groups, including
the Akron Beacon Journal,
have suggested the univer-
sity may have potentially
shredded possible public
records, a violation of state
law, in an effort to maintain
secrecy, failed to provide ap-
propriate details in receipts
related to the $250,000
cost of the search con-
ducted by Storbeck/Pi-
mentel & Associates,
and otherwise turned a
deaf ear to those claim-
ing the search process
for the tax-support-
ed, public universi-
ty has been anything
but transparent, es-
pecially when juxta-
posed with searches
at neighboring colleg-
es like The University
of Akron, Hiram Col-
lege, and Youngstown
State University.
“There certainly
have been stories we
feel have been mislead-
ing and at times placed
our presidential search
out of context,” said
Mansfield.
KSU maintains it has
done nothing wrong
or illegal in the search
process culminating in
the selection of Bever-
ly J. Warren, provost
at Virginia Common-
wealth University, in
January to replace out-
going KSU President
Lester Lefton, who re-
tires from the post this
summer.
The university is
ready to move on.
“(Timken) wanted to
set the record straight
once and for all that we
followed protocol, we
did not violate any laws
or policies, we did not
shred any public re-
cords,” Mansfield said.
“The cost of this was
reasonable compared
to other searches out
there, and also we want
people to know that
this is a very common
practice used by Ohio
State and other univer-
sities, yet it's come un-
der intense criticism.”
“I would anticipate
this will be the last
statement from the
university regarding
the search of any kind,”
Mansfield added. “We
are focused now on the
transition of Dr. Lefton
to Dr. Warren.”
While the university
did not release a list of
potential finalists be-
fore announcing War-
ren as its next presi-
dent, the university in
December released ap-
plications of individu-
als who submitted cre-
dentials and letters of
interest to the college
in response to public
records requests.
Warren's application
was not in that list. She
told the Daily Kent
Stater the search firm
directly recruited her
for the job.
Faculty from KSU's
School of Journalism &
Mass Communication
wrote a resolution to
trustees last month to
“express our objection
to the way the universi-
ty has handled the re-
lease of public records
and the closed process
relating to the recent-
ly completed presiden-
tial search.” That was
followed by an April
21 ad in the DKS, tak-
en out by the same fac-
ulty who have decried
the process.
The top of that full-
page ad, which report-
edly cost more than
$1,000, read “We're em-
barrassed.”
“We're embarrassed
by our administra-
tion's refusal to dis-
close public records
related to the recent
presidential search,”
the ad read. “And we're
troubled over credi-
ble news reports that
some of these records
may have been shred-
ded to avoid public in-
spection.”
The (Cleveland)
Plain Dealer has not-
ed that KSU's search
process mirrors that of
OSU's, which has been
apparently less scruti-
nized by the public.
Members of KSU's
diverse 17-person
search committee did
sign confidentiality
agreements before en-
gaging in the vetting
process, which Man-
sfield asserts is akin
to processes seeking
CEOs for large com-
panies.
Referencing wheth-
er the search firm's al-
leged destruction of
notes taken by search
committee members
was legitimate, Man-
sfield pointed to Tim-
ken's statement.
“ ... our general coun-
sel instructed the
board and the search
committee about their
duties and responsibil-
ities under state law, all
of which were followed
scrupulously,” Timken
writes.
KSU officials assert
any secrecy was en-
couraged by the search
firm and that it was not
only legal, but essential
to an effective search.

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News Headline: Letter to the Editor: Public misled about KSU president search | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The success of Kent State University's recent presidential search is already being felt across the region as Dr. Beverly J. Warren prepares to assume her new role in July, yet stories about the completed search process have misled the public's perception of how and why we reached our decision.

Contrary to what you may have read, no laws have been broken and no public records have been shredded. We followed an approach that has been mirrored by other research universities across the country and Ohio with consistent and successful results. The university has released more than 500 pages of documents in response to records requests. All expenses have had appropriate administrative review, were processed through normal procedures, and have been disclosed to the public. The cost of the search is comparable to those of other presidential searches conducted by research universities.

To ensure we complied with all legal requirements, our general counsel instructed the board and the search committee about their duties and responsibilities under state law, all of which were followed scrupulously. The responsibility for hiring the president rests solely with the board of trustees.

The trustees directed that this search should seek input from as many members of our community as possible. Board members held numerous meetings and forums with our stakeholders to seek their guidance. Unlike some universities that have used search committees comprised solely of trustees, the board wanted a more broadly representative group to direct our search. As a result, we invited leaders from academia, students, administration, alumni, and the community at large to participate in our 17-member Presidential Search Committee.

The search committee brought great professionalism to the task, and the group's signing of a confidentiality agreement is considered a best practice in executive searches that allows for comfortable, open dialogue. Further, committee members can make or discard notes kept for their personal use, which are not a public record under Ohio law. A review of similar searches and the advice of professionals overwhelmingly convinced the board that the quality of candidates for our presidency would be directly related to the confidentiality afforded to their interest.

So why take all of these steps in seeking our next president? Because Kent State wasn't the only university in the country or in Ohio seeking a successful leader to take charge. When it comes to courting a top executive, timing and approach are critical.

The trustees believe the quality of the outcome of the search is a testament to the deliberations and the process we followed. The challenges of higher education, the need to educate our students to provide greater opportunities, and to expand our economy meant that we could not afford to hire anyone but the best. It is precisely because of the strength and inclusiveness of our search process that the trustees have the highest confidence that we found the most highly talented next president of Kent State University, Dr. Beverly J. Warren.

When President Lefton announced his retirement last year, the board realized that it had an extremely important mission to accomplish. Our focus was to conduct a national search to recruit the candidate who best embodied the skills and qualifications necessary to take Kent State to the next level of excellence. We've now done exactly that, and I thank the search committee for its hard work and service.

So as we celebrate the close of the 2013-14 academic year, it is appropriate to applaud the many successes at Kent State University. On behalf of the board of trustees, I would like to thank and congratulate the Kent State community for its dedication and commitment to excellence. The trustees would also like to thank President Lefton for his remarkable service over the last eight years, while commending and thanking all of those involved in the search process that brought Dr. Warren to campus.

Jane Murphy Timken, chair, Kent State

University Board of Trustees

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News Headline: City of Cleveland misses important deadline; Old Humphrey Mansion demolished (photos) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: But, time has now run out because the City of Cleveland missed an important deadline. One year ago, we told you about efforts to save the last standing monument to Euclid Beach Park. The big Stucco house was built in the late 1800's - designated a historic landmark. A preservation group and Kent State University had come up with a plan to open up the lakefront and restore the old mansion. The property owners from Dallas, Texas want that space to put up more mobile homes in their big trailer park and the house stood in their way. So, when the City of Cleveland missed an important deadline to appeal, the buildings fate was set. When the owners and their attorney noticed that the city had blown their deadline, they were ready to go. They had a big front-end loader on the property and this building was gone in just a couple of hours. “Who ever made that mistake needs to be held accountable,” said Councilman Mike Polensek. “As I said in a letter to the mayor, they need to be disciplined or fired.” “If the councilman wants to take that tack and say this is malfeasance, then he needs to have a conversation with his own council colleagues … one of which is on the commission,” said Chris Ronayne, Mayor's Chief of Staff. One of the neighbors took pictures as the backhoe began mangling the old house. Within a few hours, every connection with the past was crushed. Thousands of Cleveland residents still remember the glory days when Euclid Beach was the place to go in the summer and fall. “We used to swim in the fountain and the pool and everything … I'm heartbroken,” said former Euclid Beach employee Ruth Rasch. “[It was a] slow death year by year … nobody to take care of it,” added resident Steve Myer. Now the only thing left from days of Euclid Beach - the stone and brick entrance sign. There was supposed to be meeting Thursday night in the neighborhood to talk about the plans for the Humphrey Mansion. Now, there's not much to talk about. The building is history.

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News Headline: Kent State College of Business to Hold Executive MBA Experience Day (Walker) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: PRLog
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: - KENT, Ohio -- Kent State University's College of Business Administration will hold an MBA Experience Day on May 31 at 12 p.m. on Kent State's main campus.

Laurie Walker, director of Executive MBA Programs, will present an overview of the program design, curriculum, and schedule and admission criteria during lunch.

Additionally, Walker will discuss the program's international trip component, which is included in the EMBA tuition allowing students to gain a global business perspective at an inclusive price.

After lunch, students have the opportunity to attend an EMBA human resources class, meet EMBA adjunct professor Michael Duchon, Ph.D., and speak with current students about the program.

Experience Day complements the Executive MBA Information Sessions by giving students the chance to participate in classroom activities while also providing information about Kent State University's EMBA curriculum.

“They are both wonderful venues for learning about our Executive MBA program,” said Walker.

Kent State's EMBA is accredited by the International Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), which represents the highest standard of achievement for business schools worldwide.

Kent State University's EMBA program is currently in its 35th year, holding CEO Magazines highest ranking for colleges in North America, Tier-One, for the fourth consecutive year.

The EMBA Experience Day will take place on May 31 at 12 p.m. in room A311 of the College of Business Administration. The event is free and open to anyone interested in learning about a graduate business degree.

To register, visit www.kent.edu/business () or contact Joan Janosko at 330-672-EMBA (3622).

Contact

Michelle Parrish

***@kent.edu

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News Headline: Hang Up to Relax (Lepp) | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: SUCCESS - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: A study links cellphones and stress.

A Kent State University study has found that students who were heavy cellphone users tended to be more anxious, have lower grade-point averages and a reduced feelings of happiness. Researchers surveyed more than 500 students who allowed them to match their grade point averages with their levels of phone use. The researchers also took a standard test measuring anxiety and level of students' life satisfaction.

Kent State associate professor Andrew Lepp explains the study's findings: “Interviews with students suggest that they feel a sense of obligation to remain constantly connected to the network through their phone. This obligation to stay connected—while at home, at school, in the car, at the gym, in the park, etc.—appears to be a significant source of stress for students.”

And the results are not confined to school campuses or classrooms—this detrimental cellphone use happens in the professional world, too. Lepp believes adults feel the same stress with cellphones that constantly connect them to the office , to their work.

Lepp recommends that people disconnect daily, even if only briefly. “I think mental health requires it,” he says.

So, are you too connected? Start monitoring your cellphone use and start changing the habits that might negatively impact your performance and well-being.

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News Headline: Cleveland State University students receive $385 towards tuition and books by completing 30 credit hours of classes | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer
News OCR Text: "It is an extraordinary and so far successful program," CSU President Ronald Berkman told trustees Tuesday as he outlined the first-year results. "We did not have a good way to project what we'd see when we offered this incentive but we are very very encouraged by how students responded."

About 4,800 students are expected to complete the academic year - including the session this summer - with at least 30 credit hours and a 2.0 grade point average. They will receive the tuition rebate and book credits this fall.

Since the program is retroactive, a graduating senior receives $400 toward graduate school.

College students who complete 30 credit hours a year are on track to graduate in four or five years.

Berkman proposed the program, the only one at a public institution in Ohio, last year to encourage students to graduate and help the university attain more state funding, which will be based on retention and graduation rates.

Of course, success comes at a price. It will cost the university more than $1.8 million, but it is money well spent, Berkman said. The university had expected to spend about $1.2 million for the program.

About 35 percent of CSU's full-time freshmen students graduate in six years, one of the lowest rates among the state's four-year public institutions. Studies have shown that college students are more likely to graduate if they don't interrupt their education and take as many classes as possible.

Berkman said the tuition rebate is part of the university's efforts to encourage student success, including setting a 120-credit hour requirement for a degree and adding intensive advising.

The tuition credit was equal to the 2 percent tuition increase approved by trustees in 2013.

Trustees on Tuesday approved another 2 percent tuition increase for the upcoming academic year. Public universities were limited by the state to no more than 2 percent or $188, if that is higher than 2 percent of the current tuition.

Full time CSU undergraduates who take 12 to 17 credit hours a semester will pay $9,636 annually in tuition and fees beginning this fall, $187 more than last year.

Trustees set a tuition credit limit this year, so students will pay $467.50 per credit hour if they take more than 17 per semester. Officials said the credit cap will affect about eight percent of students, and possibly fewer because courses were converted from four credit hours to three credit hours effective this fall.

The tuition increase will raise $3 million a year, but about $2 million will likely pay for next year's $187 tuition rebates and book stipends, officials said.

The University of Toledo and University of Cincinnati, which froze tuition last year, increased it by 2 percent. Ohio State University, Kent State University and Central State University have not announced tuition rates. All other state four-year institutions raised it 2 percent or $188.

CSU remains one of the least expensive universities in the state.

CSU trustees also raised tuition 2 percent for students in graduate school and 4.5 percent for students in its law school.

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News Headline: KENT STATE RECEIVES 2014 LEADERSHIP 500 EXCELLENCE AWARD (Lefton, Vitale) | Email

News Date: 05/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, May 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Kent State University has been selected as a recipient of the 2014 Leadership 500 Excellence Award by HR.com at the Global Leadership Excellence Forum held in Vail, Colorado, last month.

This award comes in recognition of Kent State's Division of Human Resources commitment to leadership development, in particular, the division's Institute for Excellence (IE). The mission of the Institute for Excellence at Kent State is to develop and promote a culture of excellence. Through its unique 10-month development opportunity for administrators and individual contributors, the institute is designed to improve the performance of Kent State's current and next-generation faculty and staff leaders.

"The Division for Human Resources' Institute for Excellence has proven to be a valuable resource for our current and emerging leaders," said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. "The institute continues to develop and promote a culture of excellence for faculty and staff at our university by building competency in collaboration, agility, foresight and strategic thinking."

For the past 30 years, Leadership Excellence has identified and recognized the Top 500 leadership organizations and their strategies and solutions. Kent State ranked in the top 15 in the nation, a ranking higher than many of the nation's most prestigious institutions. This year's Top 500 award winners were published in the April issue of Leadership Excellence Essentials and are now available online at www.hr.com/LE_April2014.

"Leadership is an art that requires constant practice and focus to master," said Debbie McGrath, CEO of HR.com. "The organizations recognized in the Leadership 500 Excellence Awards program significantly help their organizations grow and develop their leaders through some of the most impactful programs we have ever seen."

"The Division of Human Resources is honored to receive such a prestigious award on behalf of its work with the Institute for Excellence," said Joe Vitale, Kent State's interim vice president for human resources. "The investment that is made on behalf of the division, and the individual participants, demonstrates a mutual and relentless commitment to provide best practices in leadership acumen while empowering our next-generation leaders."

The Institute for Excellence at Kent State is now in its fourth year. With an alumni base of more than 90 members to date, the institute started as a vision of Lefton and his cabinet. It has proven to be an invaluable tool to help high performers become better leaders and create a culture of excellence at Kent State.

Since its founding as a teacher-training school in 1910, Kent State has become an engine for economic, cultural and workforce development in the region and beyond as one of the premier Ohio colleges. This Ohio university also has earned acclaim for applying new knowledge to address the needs of the communities it serves and society as a whole through a vast array of continuing education courses and much more. To learn more about Kent State, visit www.kent.edu.

For more information about Kent State's Division of Human Resources, visit www.kent.edu/hr. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Kim Hauge, 330/672-7505, khauge@kent.edu; Bob Burford, 330/672-8516, rburford@kent.edu

Copyright © HT Media Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

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News Headline: KENT STATE VICE PRESIDENT GENE FINN EMBRACES NEW OPPORTUNITY FOLLOWING RECORD SUCCESSES (Lefton) | Email

News Date: 05/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Federal News Service
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: KENT, Ohio, May 19 -- Kent State University issued the following news release:

Gene Finn is departing from his role as Kent State University's vice president of institutional advancement and executive director of the Kent State University Foundation for a similar position with Columbia University in New York.

During his tenure at Kent State, Finn led the successful completion of the $250 million Centennial Campaign, which raised more than $265 million for the university's endowment, capital projects and current-operating funds, with particular emphasis on student scholarships. Most recently, Finn managed the foundation's construction of the new Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center that opened last year in downtown Kent, Ohio.

Finn's final day with Kent State will be July 31, 2014.

With Finn's departure, Steve Sokany has been named the university's interim vice president of institutional advancement and executive director of the Kent State University Foundation, effective Aug. 1, 2014.

Sokany currently serves as Kent State's senior associate vice president for institutional advancement, a role he has held since 2002. He first joined the university in 1993.

"Steve Sokany knows firsthand the positive impact that the Division for Institutional Advancement has made on the university, and he'llcontinue that momentum," said Kent State President Lester A. Lefton. "Steve is a strong, personable leader, and he is well-versed in the needs of our university community and in the relationships that have led to strong success for the division and the Kent State Foundation."

Sokany earned his Master of Business Administration degree with a concentration in nonprofit management from Kent State in 1996, and earned a Bachelor of Science in Marketing Management from the University of Detroit Mercy in 1990. He also has served as a board member for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland since 2006 and is currently co-chair of the Board of Directors for Gay Games IX, which will be held in Cleveland and Akron this summer.

Sokany lives in Cleveland.

Finn was appointed Kent State's vice president for institutional advancement in April 2007. As a member of the president's Cabinet, he is responsible for the university's Office of Institutional Advancement and Office of Alumni Relations. For more information about Kent State's Division of Institutional Advancement, visit www2.kent.edu/advancement.

For more information about the Kent State Foundation, visit www2.kent.edu/advancement/ksufoundation. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at htsyndication@hindustantimes.com

Eric Mansfield, 330/672-2797, emansfie@kent.edu; Bob Burford, 330/672-8516, rburford@kent.edu

Copyright © HT Media Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

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News Headline: Facebook quizzes are hot on the web, but could expose your information | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: WFTS-TV - Online
Contact Name: George Noleff
News OCR Text: Quizzes could reveal more about you than you think

Facebook quizzes about nearly every subject are popular, the hottest thing on the web.

CLEVELAND - Which U.S. President are you?

What era do you belong in?

What kind of dog would you be?

What Bible character are you?

Chances are, if you are on Facebook, you know the answer to those questions, and many more. Right now, those Facebook quizzes are the hottest thing on the internet.

The most popular quiz, so far, is “Which state do you belong in?” It has received 41 million hits and counting.

Media experts say the quizzes are popular because they are entertaining, and a way for us to share something of our personalities with each other. Plus, they give us something to do.

“When I get bored I take them like non-stop because they're fun," said Kent State University student Mari Gannon.

Gannon is like millions of other people who have fallen in love with the quizzes on Facebook. And the reason is simple.

"They have an entertainment value,” explains Stefani Moore, who teaches Mass Communications at Kent State University. “They are fun and silly and there's no scientific methodology really behind them so a lot of it is entertainment and it's kind of self-discovery, so we kind of learn who we are taking some of these quizzes."

What a lot of quiz takers may not realize is the quizzes serve another purpose: they are an easy and free way for marketers to collect data, especially when you share the results of your quizzes with your friends.

“You are now sharing your friends list, your likes and dislikes in music and movies, and those other bits of information available on Facebook and Twitter with whoever made the quiz,” said Millersville State University Communications Professor Stacey Irwin in an interview with moneytalknews.com.

While much of the information provided may seem pretty ordinary, it is a gold mine of preferences and demographic data for marketers.

If you do not want to give up the quizzes, but want to protect your privacy, there are things the experts say you can do.

Do not share your results publicly on Facebook or other social networking sites

Do not take quizzes that require your personal information

Become aware of the privacy policies of the social networking websites you use

Social media experts say not to expect the quiz mania to subside anytime soon. As long as people have questions, and want to share information about themselves in a fun and entertaining way, those quizzes will be around.

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News Headline: Fashions of Downton Abbey | Attachment Email

News Date: 05/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Strongsville Patch
Contact Name: Stephanie Gornall
News OCR Text: During the early 1900's, improved technology and shifts in the social and political landscapes changed women's lives and the way they dressed. Join Sara Hume, Assistant Professor and Curator of Kent State University Museum, for a PowerPoint presentation of women's clothing during this fascinating time, as depicted in the television series, Downton Abbey. She will also share information about the museum's upcoming exhibit "The Great War: Women and Fashion in a World Transformed."

Registration is requested. Register here or call (440) 238-5530 for more information. Program sponsored by the Friends of Strongsville Branch Library.

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