Report Overview:
Total Clips (14)
Alumni; Athletics (2)
Athletics (1)
Biological Sciences; Chemical Physics; Liquid Crystal Institute; Physics; Research (1)
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Police Services; Recreational Services; Town-Gown (6)
University Press (1)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Athletics (2)
Kent State's Varsity 'K' to induct seven into Hall of Fame 06/23/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

The 36th class of the Kent State University athletic department's Varsity 'K' Hall of Fame was announced on Friday. Seven new members will be inducted...

Former Kent State All-American golfer and 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis furnishes 'Birdie Bags' (Page, Linder) 06/23/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Former Kent State All-American golfer and 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis, who produced a pair of solid finishes on the PGA Tour earlier this month,...


Athletics (1)
Kent State pitcher Michael Clark signs free-agent contract with Texas Rangers (Duncan) 06/23/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State senior left-hander Michael Clark has signed a free-agent contract with the Texas Rangers. Clark, an Akron native, went undrafted despite...


Biological Sciences; Chemical Physics; Liquid Crystal Institute; Physics; Research (1)
KSU gets $1.4 million in grants 06/23/2014 Record-Courier Text Attachment Email

Kent State University has been awareded $1.43 million in National Science Foundation research grants, U. S. Rep. Tim Ryan announced Thursday. KSU has...


Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) (1)
Greenfield Community Garden gives a portion of Mayfield Road in South Euclid a greener look 06/23/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio -- There aren't too many cities in northeast Ohio, if any, where one walking along the community's main business thoroughfare sees rain...


Fashion Design and Merchandising (1)
Kent State fashion show dazzles audience 06/23/2014 Vindicator Text Attachment Email

Kent State University's Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising (the Fashion School) had its annual fashion show...


Journalism and Mass Communications (1)
Evolution of college newspapers: What does it mean for future of journalism programs? (McKenney) 06/23/2014 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

This fall, Audrey Fletcher will take the reins of Kent State's award-winning student newspaper as editor. For as long as she's known, the Daily Kent Stater's...


Police Services; Recreational Services; Town-Gown (6)
Kent residents return after gas leak 06/20/2014 Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The Text Attachment Email

...about 11 a.m. at the Four Seasons Apartments at 5956 Horning Road. About 67 residents were temporarily evacuated. The United Church of Christ and the Kent State University's Newman Center were used to house evacuated residents. PARTA assisted with transporting the residents. In addition, the...

Gas leak evacuates seniors 06/20/2014 Record-Courier - Online Text Attachment Email

...and the Kent Newman Center. Both served as initial evacuation sites before the group was relocated to the Student Recreation and Wellness Center on the Kent State University campus. Bill Buckbee, assistant chief of the Kent State University Police Department, said the American Red Cross...

Evacuation after Crash Snaps Gas Line in Kent 1:00PM UPDATE 06/20/2014 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...responders then set-up a 100-yard perimeter around the scene and ordered evacuation of several nearby buildings and businesses located on the east end of the Kent State campus and along State Route 59. Dominion East Ohio crews were called-in to shut-off the gas and there have been no reported injuries,...

Evacuation after Crash Snaps Gas Line in Kent 2:00PM UPDATE 06/20/2014 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...5956 Horning Road, causing the leak that brought emergency crews to the scene to get the residents and staff out. Another 60 employees working in the Kent State University Administrative Services Building across the street were also ordered out as a precaution as authorities set-up a 100-yard perimeter...

Evacuation after Crash Snaps Gas Line in Kent 3:00PM UPDATE 06/20/2014 WNIR-FM - Online Text Attachment Email

...5956 Horning Road just before 11:00AM, causing the leak that forced everyone out of the nursing home and affected another 60 employees working in the Kent State University Administrative Services Building across the street. Authorities set-up a 100-yard perimeter around the scene which also resulted...

Kent | Crash creates gas leak, forces residents out 06/23/2014 WKYC-TV Text Attachment Email

American Red Cross set up an emergency shelter at the Kent State Recreation and Wellness Center. KENT -- Just before 11 a.m. today, a vehicle crashed...


University Press (1)
Preserving our rich architectural tradition is their passion: Shaker Traces 06/20/2014 Plain Dealer - Online Text Attachment Email

...underappreciated yet rich architectural heritage. Recently, that passion, after detailed, painstaking work, has reached fruition in two distinct media. This year, Kent State University Press has published their Cleveland Goes Modern: Design for the Home, 1930–1970. The publication won the Society of Architectural...


News Headline: Kent State's Varsity 'K' to induct seven into Hall of Fame | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: The 36th class of the Kent State University athletic department's Varsity 'K' Hall of Fame was announced on Friday.

Seven new members will be inducted on Sept. 6, along with the 1972 Flashes football team receiving the Team of Distinction honor..

The Class of 2014 includes:

Tara Delaney

Women's Golf (2004-08)

Delaney was named MAC Golfer of the Year in both 2006 and 2007. She earned All-MAC First Team honors in all four of her seasons at Kent State from 2005-08, helping the Golden Flashes to four straight conference championships. She was the co-medalist at the 2006 MAC Championships and won three career tournaments. She was the MAC Freshman of the Year in 2005 and the Carlow, Ireland native had 21 top-10 career finishes.

Kimberly Dimitroff

Women's Soccer (2004-07)

Dimitroff becomes Kent State's first women's soccer player to be inducted into the Varsity "K" Hall of Fame. A four-time All-MAC selection, she earned first team all-conference honors in three seasons. She was named MAC Freshman of the Year in 2004, helping the Flashes to a MAC regular-season championship. The Ontario native still holds Kent State's single season records for goals (16) and points (36) and held the career record for goals scored for seven years.

Bob Hallen

Football (1994-97)

Hallen was a four-year starter on Kent State's offensive line and an All-MAC First-Team selection in 1997. In 1998, Hallen became the first Kent State player selected to compete in the 49-year history of the Senior Bowl. Later that year, he was chosen in the second round of the 1998 NFL Draft by the Atlanta Falcons. Hallen, a Northeast Ohio native (Mentor) played 10 seasons in the NFL with Atlanta, San Diego and Cleveland.

DeAndre Haynes

Men's Basketball (2002-06)

Haynes became Kent State's first MAC Player of the Year in the 39-year history of the award in 2006. That season, he led the Golden Flashes to MAC regular season and tournament titles. He helped the Flashes to four straight 20-win seasons and three consecutive NIT appearances from 2003-05. The Detroit native is Kent State's career leader in both assists (625) and steals (229) and currently serves as an assistant coach.

Mike Lude

Administrator (1970-76)

Lude served as director of athletics from 1970-76. In 1971, he hired Hall of Fame coaches Don James and Ron Gray. A year later, Lude hired Tod Boyle, who led the Flashes to four MAC swimming titles over the next five years. In 1975, Lude appointed Judy Devine as assistant athletic director for women's sports. His time at Kent State included the Flashes' only outright MAC championship in football and a second place finish at the Men's NCAA Indoor Track & Field Championships. Lude reorganized Kent State's booster clubs into one Blue & Gold Club and played a strong role in the MAC's expansion from six teams to 10. He later served as athletic director at the University of Washington for 15 years.

Bill Swettenham

Men's Soccer (1966-69)

Swettenham finished his career as Kent State's all-time leader in both points and assists. In 1967, he scored 10 goals and added three assists. The following year, Swettenham totaled five goals and five assists. He was selected to both the All-Ohio Team and the All-Midwest Team.

Mindy Wirtz

Women's Track (1993-96)

Wirtz was a three-time All-American in discus, placing as high as second at the 1995 NCAA Championships. The following season, she was named MAC Track Athlete of the Year. Wirtz placed 10th at the NCAA Championships in shot put.

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News Headline: Former Kent State All-American golfer and 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis furnishes 'Birdie Bags' (Page, Linder) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Former Kent State All-American golfer and 2003 British Open champion Ben Curtis, who produced a pair of solid finishes on the PGA Tour earlier this month, is sponsoring a pair of events to support his Ben Curtis Family Foundation.

The charitable foundation was created by Curtis and his wife Candace, a graduate of Kent Roosevelt High School and Kent State University, and furnishes 'Birdie Bags' containing food and toiletry items for students at Holden and Longcoy elementary schools who receive free or reduced lunches.

A 'Toiletry Drive' is currently being held through Aug. 24. Those that donate any 10 unopened travel-size toiletries (shampoo, conditioner, toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, body wash, bars of soap) will receive a raffle ticket for a pair of drawings.

The first drawing, for two tickets to the 2014 WGC Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone Country Club in Akron, will be held July 27. The tickets are good for Aug. 2 or 3.

On Aug. 24, a drawing will take place for a Ben Curtis-autographed copy of 'Beyond the Fairways and Greens: A look inside the lives of PGA Tour families' and a dozen Titleist balls.

Toiletries may be dropped off at Wright Heating and Cooling in Kent, 4Cats Art Studio in Kent, Dontinos in Akron, SPC CrossFit in Kent, Windmill Lakes Golf Club in Ravenna or the Kent State University Golf Course.

In addition, 'The Featured Pairing' -- an evening with PGA Tour champion Ben Curtis -- is set for Friday, July 11, from 8 to 10 p.m. at The Secret Cellar wine bar located on East Main Street in Kent. Cost is $50 per person or $80 per couple and includes two drinks and an appetizer. Only 140 tickets will be sold.

To purchase tickets call The Secret Cellar at 330-678-9463. For more information on the Ben Curtis Family Foundation, visit the web site www.bencurtisfoundation.org.

Curtis finished sixth at the Memorial and 32nd at the St. Jude Classic earlier this month, lifting his season earnings total to $486,051.

MEN'S GOLF

Kent State senior Taylor Pendrith became the 26th player in KSU history to earn All-American honors.when he was named honorable mention on the 2014 PING All-American Team.

"What a great honor for Taylor Pendrith and a great way to cap off not only an awesome four-year career, but also a tremendous senior year," said Flashes coach Herb Page.

Pendrith finished in the top 20 in 11 of the 14 events in which he appeared during the 2013-14 season. The Mid-American Conference's Co-Player of the Year finished second at the MAC Championships in early May and also placed second in the Jack Nicklaus Invitational in late September. His season included nine top-10 finishes and six top-5 finishes.

A tie for third at the NCAA Sugar Grove Invitational last month earned Pendrith a spot as an individual in the NCAA Championship field at Prairie Dunes in Kansas, making him just the second Kent State men's golfer to appear in four consecutive national championships.

Pendrith led Kent State with a stroke average of 71.9 in 2013-14.

"Throughout the year Taylor played at the highest level," said Page. "He was Mr. Consistent for us, playing at an All-American level all year long over a very hard schedule. I'm very proud of him."

Last week, Pendrith shot a final-round 69 to win the 74th Monroe Invitational at Monroe Golf Club in Pittsfield, N.Y.

SOFTBALL

Kent State stars Emma Johnson, Kim Kirkpatrick and Maddy Grimm played for the Ohio College All-Stars during their exhibition doubleheader against the USA Softball Women's National Team last Tuesday in Akron.

Johnson started the opener and fared well in a 3-0 loss. She held Team USA scoreless through three innings before allowing two runs in the fourth, only one of which was earned. Johnson pitched 51⁄3 innings, allowing just one earned run on six hits with two strikeouts and a walk.

Kirkpatrick started in left field and batted leadoff in both games. She was 0-for-2 at the plate in the opener but did steal a base. In the nightcap, Kirkpatrick went 1-for-2 with a single off former Alabama All-American Jackie Traina, which was one of just five total hits surrendered by Team USA pitching on the night.

Grimm did not record a hit in three at-bats in Game 1, but made an impact defensively. She made two outstanding catches at third base and finished with five putouts.

"I am very proud of the way Emma, Kim and Maddy represented Kent State on a national stage against the best players in the country," KSU coach Karen Linder said.

FOOTBALL

Kent State has reportedly received two verbal commitments for its 2015 recruiting class, defensive tackle Alex Hoag and linebacker Troy Dipre.

Hoag is a 6-4, 255-pound defensive tackle from Venice High School in Florida, the same school that produced star speedster Dri Archer.

Dipre is a 6-1, 220-pound linebacker at Lakewood St. Edward. He piled up 106 tackles, seven sacks and a pair of interceptions while earning First Team All-Ohio honors as a junior last year.

Safety Jordan Italiano, defensive lineman Nate Terhune and punter Anthony Melchiori (Aurora) were named to Athlon's projected 2014 All-MAC Second Team.

The Flashes will open preseason camp on Monday, Aug. 4. The 2014 season opener is set for Aug. 30 at home against MAC rival Ohio.

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News Headline: Kent State pitcher Michael Clark signs free-agent contract with Texas Rangers (Duncan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State senior left-hander Michael Clark has signed a free-agent contract with the Texas Rangers.

Clark, an Akron native, went undrafted despite going 3-1 with a 1.07 ERA in 2014 for the Mid-American Conference Tournament champion Golden Flashes. He allowed just 27 hits and six earned runs in 501⁄3 innings of work, striking out 44.

Clark did not allow an earned run in his final seven appearances. He started the MAC Tournament championship game against Akron and pitched 62⁄3 shutout frames, allowing just four hits and one walk while striking out three.

"He had a great year for us," said KSU coach Jeff Duncan. "He's got really good stuff, stuff for the next level. His fastball has reached high levels here. If he works hard and everything lines up he could pitch in the big leagues one day. You never know how that will work out."

Clark was actually looking into a possible return to the Flashes, since he's only pitched three seasons at the collegiate level. He started his career at North Carolina State before transferring to Kent State in 2012.

According to Duncan, Clark was in Arizona on Sunday signing his contract with Texas. Duncan believes the Rangers will send him to their short-season Class A team in Spokane, Washington.

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News Headline: KSU gets $1.4 million in grants | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University has been awareded $1.43 million in National Science Foundation research grants, U. S.
Rep. Tim Ryan announced Thursday.

KSU has received three federal grant awards through the National Science Foundation:

Structure of the Nucleon and Few-Body Nuclear Systems with Electron Scattering Project received $570,000.

Oxytocin and the Ontogeny of Aggressive Behavior Project received $400,000.

Structure and Properties of the Twist-Bend Nematic Phase Project received $460,000.

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News Headline: Greenfield Community Garden gives a portion of Mayfield Road in South Euclid a greener look | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio -- There aren't too many cities in northeast Ohio, if any, where one walking along the community's main business thoroughfare sees rain barrels, followed by a solar-powered trash compactor, and then several two-tiered planters.

Those staples of "green" living are, however, quite visible on the north side of Mayfield Road at its intersection with South Green Road. The city's busiest intersection, and one of the busiest in the area, is looking a lot different these days after the implementation there of the Greenfield Community Garden.

The once stark corner has been brought to life with plants, wood and people tending to the gardens.

In addition to making the area look more attractive, there is another motive at play. The city's leaders are hoping the new additions will inspire local storefront owners to upgrade their properties, as well.

"For too long, many current building owners have refused to reinvest in their properties and take advantage of county grants to beautify their storefronts and attract new retail tenants to empty storefronts," said Community Services Director Keith Benjamin. "Embracing a public streetscape plan, like what we are in the beginning stages of implementing at Mayfield-Green, beautifies the area, sparks vitality and makes the corridor a better place, not only for people in cars, but also for pedestrians and bicyclists."

The beginning stage of the project came about after South Euclid became the only suburb to apply for grant money last year through Cleveland's Enterprise Community Partners' Change for Change Project. It did not get the grant, but during the course of the process of seeking the money, the city managed to raise $5,000 in donations.

It then received donations in the amount of $10,000 from its non-profit community development corporation, One South Euclid, another $5,000 from University Suburban Health Center, and $500 from Key Bank, which has a branch that stands at the corner of Mayfield and South Green Roads.

What was unveiled the week of Memorial Day has changed the look of a portion of the street.

"The city had extra planters that had been put out several years ago, so we started with those," said Housing Inspector Daniel Subwick, who served as an advisor on the project and who administers the city's six community gardens. "In these planters we have banana trees, Swiss chard and some decorative flowers."

The above-mentioned and newly constructed two-tiered planters, which feature cabbage, basil, tomatoes and more, are tended by organizations such as Key Bank and Notre Dame College, and residents like Pam and Jim O'Toole and Marissa Warrix, who is garden manager for the city's Warrendale Community Garden. They were designed through a partnership between One South Euclid and Nature's Landscape & Design.

Subwick said architect and resident Jeff Henderson came up with the idea of adding a message kiosk to help solve the problem of where the needed water for the garden would be found.

"It has a slanted roof, and the water rolls off and is captured in these barrels," Subwick said. The kiosk also features a message area where people can read about the benefits of rain barrels and other green activities.

The city purchased the Solar Recycler/Compactor with a $3,500 grant from the Cuyahoga County Solid Waste Management District. Residents can drop off in it plastics, glass, cans and more for recycling. The contents are compacted and when the box is full, a wireless message is sent to the service department alerting them for the need to empty the compactor.

"We hope to get more compactors and put them in parks and other public places," Benjamin said.

The streetscape, designed by the Design Collaborative of Kent State University, also includes new hangers, a metal city logo that doubles as a bike rack, benches and a soon-to-installed work of public art.

Benjamin said the current plastic signs heralding the city that now hang from utility poles will soon be replaced with metal signs. Economic Development Director Michael Love said more benches and trash cans will be added. On the west side of South Green Road, at the intersection, Mayfield Collision has donated an oversized Rock and Roll Hall of Fame "Guitarmania" guitar, painted in honor of the city's safety forces.

The crosswalks will soon be repainted to feature the city's logo.

And, Benjamin said, there is more to come as the city's master plan is developed.

One idea could result in more murals being painted, such as the one that now adorns the Hillcrest Karate Building on Mayfield Road, adjacent to Coffee Phix Cafe.

Benjamin said the project is meant to be a model that can be followed again in South Euclid, or in any city around the country to bring a more livable feel to cityscapes.

One South Euclid painted this picture in its grant proposal package concerning the benefits of a Greenfield Community Garden.

"Children walking home from school, bicyclists riding to the park, and those on their hurried morning commute would suddenly find themselves thrust into a flourishing garden environment.

"Eggplant and parsley erupting from the concrete where weeds and litter were once dominant. Fantastic variations of black-eyed Susans and rhododendrons swaying with the wind as the cars speed by. A gardener striking a cherry tomato from the vine and savoring its succulence before heading to the corner store. This is the idea behind Greenfield Community Garden."

And while those descriptive phrases ring sweetly, Benjamin reminded that there is more to be gained.

Benjamin said that when the private sector fails "revitalization projects become the responsibility of the public sector to work to prevent continuing disinvestment and decline."

"As we continue with our planned approach," Benjamin said, "it is our hope that the longtime owners of many of the properties in Mayfield and Green will also reinvest and renew their storefronts and realize the immense opportunities there are to work with the city to attract stable, long-term tenants in their storefronts."

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News Headline: Kent State fashion show dazzles audience | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Vindicator
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent State University's Shannon Rodgers and Jerry Silverman School of Fashion Design and Merchandising (the Fashion School) had its annual fashion show earlier this year, dazzling an audience that included Macy's executives and prominent designers mixed in with students, parents and faculty.

For the first time, the fashion show took place in the Kent State University Museum. The runway snaked through six of the museum's galleries, and the audience, seated within inches of the models, was treated to an immense richness of detail, privy to the subtleties of garments' textures, movement and construction.

The show featured the work of 34 student designers who presented a broad spectrum of evening wear, active wear and lingerie.

The show was capped by an awards presentation that included the induction of Tom Cole, former Macy's chief administrative officer, into the Fashion School Hall of Fame. In receiving this honor, Cole, a Kent State alumnus, joins the ranks of past inductees, such as Estee Lauder, Elsa Klensch, Allen Questrom, Michael Weiss, Ralph Rucci, Oscar de la Renta, Leonardo Ferragamo and Dana Buchman.

“Sitting here today and looking at the designs that walk down this aisle, I continue to be so impressed with what the Fashion School has done,” said Cole, upon accepting his award. “The first person I'm going to call is Allen Questrom, who is a former CEO of Macy's and will be thrilled to know that I've joined him in the Fashion School Hall of Fame at Kent State University.”

The late Margaret Clark Morgan was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. Clark and her husband, Burton D. Morgan, were champions of education and the arts and launched scholarship and technology endowments at the Fashion School.

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News Headline: Evolution of college newspapers: What does it mean for future of journalism programs? (McKenney) | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: This fall, Audrey Fletcher will take the reins of Kent State's award-winning student newspaper as editor. For as long as she's known, the Daily Kent Stater's gone to press five days a week. But this coming school year, the Stater will drop “daily” from its nameplate and print only three days a week.

“Initially, we were all kind of hesitant and nervous about it because we were so used to having it five days,” said Fletcher, a 20-year-old Canton native and magazine journalism major. “As journalists, we all love print.”

Soon, the newspaper will appear on newsstands on and around campus only Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, with fresh daily content on its robust website, KentWired.com. The reductions are expected to save Kent State's student media department almost $38,000 a year in printing and delivery costs.

The Stater, of course, isn't alone.

For much of the last decade, professional newspapers' business models have been uprooted by a dramatic decline in print advertising revenue, and news organizations have had trouble making up lost ground with online advertising revenue. Take The Plain Dealer, which last year scaled back home delivery from seven days a week to four.

Now, college papers are following suit, slashing print editions and other expenses to make up for losses in revenue, but also to emphasize the importance of the web to their students as they prepare for jobs in an increasingly multimedia-focused industry that places less of a premium on newsprint. Nationally, over the last few months, student papers at Columbia University, the University of Nebraska and Oklahoma State University all announced plans to scale back their print editions.

For years, it was believed college newspapers could weather the storm, particularly because advertisers saw value in the papers' targeted audiences — young adults willing to spend big money, for instance, on housing and entertainment on and around their respective campuses. Also, the newspapers typically are free, stacked near classrooms and dorms and have a strong pick-up rate.

“The revenue streams are changing,” said Mitch McKenney, a Kent State associate professor and former Akron Beacon Journal reporter who advises the student newsroom. “The posture here is to get ahead of that.”

Payoff for advertisers?

Earlier this year, the 125-year-old, twice-a-week University of Akron student newspaper, The Buchtelite, suspended operations. The move was due largely to the fact that it couldn't muster a staff, and many of its longtime employees stepped down for personal reasons or internships. Although it didn't publish its traditional editorial product in the spring at all, The Buchtelite published a housing guide, anchored with significant advertising from area rental companies.

Now, with a core staff in place, The Buchtelite is planning to return to campus this fall with a twice-a-week print edition and a new website in tow, according to Roger Mezger, a former Beacon Journal and Plain Dealer reporter who advises the University of Akron paper.

“Advertisers were calling,” he said. “They want The Buchtelite.”

Regarding the Stater's reduced print schedule, Tami Bongiorni, the advertising manager for Kent State's Office of Student Media, said she's begun sharing the news with some of the paper's larger clients — many of whom weren't surprised.

“Ironically, some are relieved, due to their limited advertising budgets,” she said.

“They feel this will give them better value since the papers will be kept longer within the buildings, stands and classrooms.”

With that in mind, Bongiorni said the largest effect will be felt from a decline in revenue from classified ads. Many of the paper's classified advertisers run every day, so the student media department is bracing for a loss of two full days of revenue per client. She said the Stater is one of the few college newspapers that bring in big dollars from the classified ads. Many college papers, for instance, have seen their classified ad revenue plummet with a surge in newer online options like Craigslist.

Some of Ohio's largest college newspapers — Bowling Green's BG News and Ohio State's The Lantern — have been through this rodeo before. The BG News shaved two days off its five-day-a-week print schedule in fall 2011, while The Lantern axed its Friday print edition in fall 2009.

“Like all college newspapers, The Lantern is affected by rising print costs,” said Daniel G. McDonald, professor and director of Ohio State's School of Communication. “The printing schedule, like many aspects of the paper, remains part of the discussion of how to best reach our readers.”

Bob Bortel, Bowling Green's director of student media, said reducing the print frequency helped stabilize the newspaper. However, not all of the advertisers who ran in the cut days invested their dollars elsewhere in the operation.

“I think it did help in the short term to stabilize us, but print revenues continue to erode,” Bortel said.

Also Bowling Green's student paper relies on significant dollars from the university to prop up its operations, and those too have steadily eroded. At one point, Bowling Green subsidized the paper with about $125,000 each year, though that number now hovers at less than $40,000.

Thinking digital first

While declining print revenue no doubt played a leading role in the demise of some college newspapers' print editions, their leaders stress there are lessons to be learned about the importance of focusing on the web as a primary medium. The web, after all, is where readers, especially college-aged ones, continue to migrate. Bowling Green's shift, for instance, helped bulk up the paper's website into a 24/7 news operation.

“It fits well to de-emphasize the print product,” Bortel said, “but you can't recoup dollar-for-dollar losses from print in other channels. It's just not possible.”

As for Kent State, Fletcher is hopeful axing the print edition two days a week will encourage her staff to be more mindful of the web. On a typical production day, the Stater's staff arrives at about 5 p.m. to start piecing together the next day's newspaper. With all that attention on the print edition, she admits, “Our web coverage suffers.”

“When I first told everyone that we were cutting back, some were pretty upset about it,” Fletcher said. “Most of that is because as long as we've been at Kent, it's been five days. We care about the print product and not having it makes people nervous. But if we're not printing every day, we started thinking about how can we use our time better for the web? Then we got more excited about it.”

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News Headline: Kent residents return after gas leak | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Akron Beacon Journal - Online, The
Contact Name: Beacon Journal Publishing Co
News OCR Text: A car struck and damaged a pipeline, spewing natural gas into the air and forcing the evacuation of a Kent senior citizens apartment complex Friday morning, police said.

The incident happened about 11 a.m. at the Four Seasons Apartments at 5956 Horning Road. About 67 residents were temporarily evacuated.

The United Church of Christ and the Kent State University's Newman Center were used to house evacuated residents. PARTA assisted with transporting the residents.

In addition, the American Red Cross set up an emergency shelter at the Kent State Recreation and Wellness Center.

Dominion East Ohio workers were at the scene making the repairs. Fire crews remained at the scene, but residents were expected to return later in the afternoon.

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News Headline: Gas leak evacuates seniors | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Record-Courier - Online
Contact Name: Diane Smith
News OCR Text: More than 40 residents of the Four Seasons apartment building on Kent's east side were evacuated Friday because of a gas leak.

The Kent Police Department said a car struck the building at around 11 a.m., causing damage to a gas line. There are about 67 residents in the building, and all who were home, plus their pets, were evacuated.

The building, at 5956 Horning Road, is immediately east of two area churches, the United Church of Christ in Kent and the Kent Newman Center. Both served as initial evacuation sites before the group was relocated to the Student Recreation and Wellness Center on the Kent State University campus.

Bill Buckbee, assistant chief of the Kent State University Police Department, said the American Red Cross set up an emergency shelter there, and provided about 42 residents with pizza, cookies and water. A few residents went to the homes of family members, Buckbee said, and several were not home to be evacuated.

Many of the seniors at the recreation center were accompanied by their pets, while some worried about animals they had to leave behind.

Janet Johnston had a tearful reunion with her tortoiseshell calico cat, Muffin, who was brought in by an officer from the KSU Police Department. Later, an officer also reunited another woman with her cat, Peanut.

Johnston said she was coming home from the store Friday when she was ushered onto a bus and evacuated. She was unable to get into her apartment to retrieve the cat.

She spent most of her time at the shelter worrying about her pet, who she said was "almost dead" when her son-in-law found her in his barn 14 years ago, and expressed surprise that she let the firefighter pick her up.

"She's my baby," she said.

Alice Ross, accompanied by her love bird, Charlie, and Betty O'Brien sat in the back of the room, eating pizza and talking about how quickly the evacuation took place.

"It happened real fast," O'Brien said, adding that she barely had time to take care of a few quick things before she was rushed outside. "I thought it was just a fire drill."

Gretchen Julian, director of the recreation center, invited the evacuees to make themselves at home, saying they were welcome to walk on the track or use the recreation center while they were there. When a few people said they didn't bring their swimsuit, Julian joked that there would be "no skinnnydipping."

Buckbee said the gas line had already been repaired, and emergency crews were fanning the smell of gas out of the building to make sure there were no effects on the seniors. He estimated that the seniors would be home before evening.

The Portage Area Transportation Authority assisted with transportation of the evacuees, and several area fire departments assisted the Kent police and fire and KSU police departments.

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News Headline: Evacuation after Crash Snaps Gas Line in Kent 1:00PM UPDATE | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Kent Fire crews remain on the scene of a natural gas leak on the city's east side, following a car crash into the building at Four Seasons assisted living facility in the 5900 block of Horning Road. The car apparently severed a gas line in the crash that happened just before 11:00AM, forcing everyone to evacuate the facility. Police and emergency responders then set-up a 100-yard perimeter around the scene and ordered evacuation of several nearby buildings and businesses located on the east end of the Kent State campus and along State Route 59. Dominion East Ohio crews were called-in to shut-off the gas and there have been no reported injuries, other than possibly the driver involved in the crash. You'll need to avoid the area. Evacuees are being sent to the recreation center on the Kent State campus.

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News Headline: Evacuation after Crash Snaps Gas Line in Kent 2:00PM UPDATE | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Nearly 70 residents at Four Seasons assisted living facility in Kent and many more from neighboring buildings were forced to evacuate after a car crash into a building broke a natural gas line just before 11:00AM Friday. Kent Police say a car rammed the Four Seasons facility at 5956 Horning Road, causing the leak that brought emergency crews to the scene to get the residents and staff out. Another 60 employees working in the Kent State University Administrative Services Building across the street were also ordered out as a precaution as authorities set-up a 100-yard perimeter around the scene. That also resulted in evacuation of several other buildings and homes nearby, including some located along State Route 59 to the north. Evacuation centers were set-up at United Church of Christ, the Newman Center on the KSU campus and a Red Cross shelter at the KSU Recreation Center. Dominion East Ohio shut-off the gas and worked on repairing the line before evacuees were allowed to return. Aside from possible injury to the driver involved in the crash, there were no reported injuries.

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News Headline: Evacuation after Crash Snaps Gas Line in Kent 3:00PM UPDATE | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: WNIR-FM - Online
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: Authorities in Kent gave the all-clear and lifted an evacuation order on Friday afternoon for most of the people affected – more than three hours after nearly 70 residents at Four Seasons assisted living facility in Kent and many more from neighboring buildings were forced out when a car crashed into a building and broke a natural gas line. Kent Police say a car rammed the Four Seasons facility at 5956 Horning Road just before 11:00AM, causing the leak that forced everyone out of the nursing home and affected another 60 employees working in the Kent State University Administrative Services Building across the street. Authorities set-up a 100-yard perimeter around the scene which also resulted in evacuation of several other buildings and homes nearby - including some located along State Route 59 to the north. Evacuation centers were set-up at United Church of Christ, the Newman Center on the KSU campus and a Red Cross shelter at the KSU Recreation Center. Dominion East Ohio shut-off the gas and worked quickly to repair the line before most evacuees were allowed to return shortly before 3:00PM...although crews were still ventilating Four Seasons to eliminate any remaining odor as of 3:35PM.

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News Headline: Kent | Crash creates gas leak, forces residents out | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/23/2014
Outlet Full Name: WKYC-TV
Contact Name:
News OCR Text: American Red Cross set up an emergency shelter at the Kent State Recreation and Wellness Center.

KENT -- Just before 11 a.m. today, a vehicle crashed into the Four Seasons Apartments on Horning Road, causing damage to a gas line. A gas leak occurred which resulted in the evacuation of approximately 67 residents.

Kent Fire Department, Kent Police Department, and Kent State University Police Department personnel responded. Additional area fire departments also responded to assist.

The United Church of Christ and the Kent State University Newman Center both opened their doors to temporarily house evacuated residents. PARTA assisted with transporting the evacuated residents.

American Red Cross set up an emergency shelter at the Kent State Recreation and Wellness Center.

Dominion East Ohio has responded to the scene and stopped the leak.

Repairs are in progress and it is unknown how long the residents will be displaced.

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News Headline: Preserving our rich architectural tradition is their passion: Shaker Traces | Attachment Email

News Date: 06/20/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer - Online
Contact Name: George Becker
News OCR Text: SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio – For much of their respective careers, James and Nina Freedlander Gibans have recognized the need to document and preserve Cleveland's underappreciated yet rich architectural heritage. Recently, that passion, after detailed, painstaking work, has reached fruition in two distinct media.

This year, Kent State University Press has published their Cleveland Goes Modern: Design for the Home, 1930–1970. The publication won the Society of Architectural Historians' Western Reserve Award for 2014.

In January, with videographer and director Jesse Epstein, WVIZ/PBSideastream aired University Circle: Creating a Sense of Place . Nina Gibans is the film's project director and executive producer. Additional screenings will take place later this summer.

The book's focus is on the Modern movement – and the area's architectural history. Based on an award-winning exhibition of the same name, it highlights 24 homes across Northeastern Ohio, including four in Shaker Heights, and six prominent architects, each a Cleveland Arts Prize winner. They are Don Hisaka, John Terence Kelly, Robert Little, William Morris, Ernst Payer, and Fred Toguchi.

Commentary is from the architects, their clients and those who have restored the structures; more than 150 drawings and photographs complement the writing that make the case for understanding and preserving this rich heritage. In fact, some of the homes featured in the book have been torn down since the project began; others may be altered or disappear in the future, Nina Gibans said.

In discussing the book, she said it is the "only book about Modern architecture that is represented in this area," with homes designed by architects who were guided by the legendary Walter Gropius and Mis Van Der Rohe.

"I dug into their stories," Gibans said. "Why did these clients choose these architects? Why was the land (for a home) chosen?"

Gibans said it was imperative that she team with her husband because of his experienced architect's sensibilities.

The film, which took three years to make, features the history, public art and architecture of University Circle, a cultural mecca that attracts an estimated 3 million visitors annually. Until now, Gibans said, nothing existed that told its story, from the perspective of land ownership and design, to its cultural scale and cope.

The film is available as a DVD and in downloadable formats. Additionally, there are 18 hours of taped archival material now housed at Cleveland Statue University's Center for Public History and Digital Humanities. Funding came from the Ohio Humanities Council, several foundations and more than 50 individuals.

Nina Gibans said "dozens" of participants told stories "pertinent to understanding this area." Narrators are Hunter Morrison, former planning director for the City of Cleveland, now executive director, North East Ohio Sustainable Communities Coalition, and Dee Perry, senior host/producer, WCPN-FM, WVIZPBSideastream.

As longtime residents of the Shaker Square area, Nina and James Gibans have had a lifelong interest in preserving the past. The book and film exemplify that keen belief.

"I've always believed that if you don't write it down or record it, you don't have it," Nina Gibans said. "History will disappear."

Hathaway Brown Theatre Institute to perform Sweeney Todd next month:

With a cast of 24 students, Hathaway Brown's Theatre Institute (HBTI) will perform the Stephen Sondheim musical July 5, 10, 11 and 12 at 7:30 p.m. and July 6 and 13 at 2 p.m. Performances will take place at the school, 19600 North Park Blvd.

This is the second year of the Institute, a co-ed program open to students across the region in first grade through college. Tickets range from $11-$15 each.

Besides Sweeney Todd, HBTI will present the musicals You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, from July 18-17, and A Chorus Line, Aug. 1 – 10.

For more information about HBTI or Sweeney Todd, please contact Kathleen Osborne, HB's Director of Communication & Outreach, at kosborne@hb.edu or 216.320.8785.

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