Report Overview:
Total Clips (8)
Alumni; Entrepreneurship (1)
Athletics (1)
Dining Services (1)
KSU at Stark (2)
Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
Tuition (2)


Headline Date Outlet

Alumni; Entrepreneurship (1)
College Students Sell Flashcards and Notes to Pay for Back-to-School 07/21/2014 Delaware County Daily Times - Online Text Attachment Email

...scratching their heads, worried about the high price tag for reading materials on their fall semester syllabi. But Laura Gayle, a rising sophomore at Florida State University, is not concerned, because she has a secret trick to help her schoolmates cure their headaches: selling her class notes through...


Athletics (1)
Experienced Kent State looks for a return to winning ways: MAC Football 2014 07/22/2014 Plain Dealer Text Attachment Email

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Kent State football reached a high-water mark in 2012 when the Golden Flashes won the Mid-American Conference East Division title and played...


Dining Services (1)
LeBron James' return latest story in Cleveland's hospitality industry growth (Roldan) 07/22/2014 Crain's Cleveland Business Text Attachment Email

...others throughout the U.S. and world will have about Cleveland and the further growth this likely portends,” said Brooks, finance chair at John Carroll University's Boler School of Business. James' return this time is just part of a larger economic success story in Cleveland, compared with the...


KSU at Stark (2)
Kent State Stark's science building moves one step closer to opening (Williams, Hamilton, Wagor) 07/21/2014 Suburbanite - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Kent State at Stark's new science building is one step closer to opening. Faculty, staff, administrators and students got to sign their names...

Balloon fest kicks off Football Hall of Fame events 07/22/2014 WKSU-FM Text Attachment Email

...enshrinement ceremony isn't until early August, the city of Canton has already kicked off their Pro Football hall of Fame celebration. Thousands filled the Kent State Stark campus to watch the sky fill with hot air balloons in the annual Balloon Classic. Once the sun set, guests gazed at the...


Liquid Crystal Institute; Research (1)
New startup uses film for a 'virtual venetian blind' in 'smart' windows 07/21/2014 Plastics News - Online Text Attachment Email

A new Kent State University spinout company in Kent, Ohio, knows how to make windows switch from clear to opaque and vice versa. Flexible...


Tuition (2)
Student bills are going up again 07/22/2014 Mansfield News-Journal - Online Text Attachment Email

...Tuition at 11 of Ohio's 13 traditional, four-year public universities will rise this fall. Most of the universities chose to boost tuition as much as state limits would allow this year: 2 percent or $188, whichever is higher. Only three didn't: Bowling Green State University...

Tuition at most Ohio universities to rise again 07/21/2014 Tribune - Online, The Text Attachment Email

Tuition at 11 of Ohio's 13 traditional, four-year public universities will rise this fall. Most of the universities chose to boost tuition as much as state limits would allow this year: 2 percent or $188, whichever is higher. Some students complain that the increases are too much, but university...


News Headline: College Students Sell Flashcards and Notes to Pay for Back-to-School | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Delaware County Daily Times - Online
Contact Name:
News Text: It's back-to-school season already, and most college students are scratching their heads, worried about the high price tag for reading materials on their fall semester syllabi. But Laura Gayle, a rising sophomore at Florida State University, is not concerned, because she has a secret trick to help her schoolmates cure their headaches: selling her class notes through Flashnotes.com.

By providing a platform for college students to share their study guides and in-class materials, Flashnotes has developed a win-win situation for both students who are notes-seekers and students who are notes-takers. Founded in 2009 by Mike Matousek, a graduate of Kent State University, Flashnotes has become a resourceful marketplace to benefit student users to learn, share and make money.

That is exactly the dynamic solution Flashnotes intended to create. After making $1,000 by successfully selling his math study guide to his classmates during his senior year in college, Matousek realized it was a good way to push him to take notes more carefully; students would come to him for additional questions they had from the class. Simultaneously, he was able to develop a relationship with them.

"They would be open to getting help when they are stuck, and they would ask me questions that they wouldn't have, so they won't fall behind," says Matousek.

Currently based in Boston, the student-generated content sharing platform has attracted students from 367 colleges and universities across the country and even L'Université de Sherbrooke in Quebec. Over the last year, Flashnotes saw a 175% increase in the number of its users. According to Matousek, his team of 19 and he most recently gained $3.6 million in series A round investment led by Stage 1 Ventures, with Runa Capital, Soft Bank Capital and Atlas Venture participating; Flashnotes has raised a total of $6.6 million to date.

"We are really looking to growing and thriving for the next few years," says the 25-year-old CEO.

Flashnotes offers the flexibility for sellers to decide the price of their notes. Gayle, thus, sells most of her notes, 20 to 30 pages bundles per class, for $10 each. The price varies due to the subject, format and how much time and effort she's put in. If her notes are sold, she gets her "paycheck" from Flashnotes every Friday through PayPal, and she keeps 70% of the price of her notes, while Flashnotes keeps a 30% commission. When Gayle first started her note-selling business on Flashnotes last October, she had earned $1,500 within one semester.

"I don't really need a job, because I'm able to sell," she told MainStreet.

For cash-strapped college students looking at stifling student loan debt and grim employment prospects, this extra cash can be a welcome boon. For others, it's simply an efficient strategy to defray everyday costs while having a little extra pocket cash on hand.

Once the notes are uploaded on the website in formats like PDFs or Excel spreadsheets, Gayle is able to share the link of her notes to her classmates through emails and social media platforms like Twitter. Spreading the word is important, but the quality of a person's notes is the kicker.

Since Flashnotes has a star ranking system that presents reviews from previous customers and displays a preview of notes to the potential buyers, each bullet point that Gayle makes requires her a lot of work to be accurate. At the end of second semester last school year Gayle's revenue jumped to $2,600.

That's the mission of Flashnotes.

"We really want to give students an organized format of the content with the high quality that they need," Matousek told MainStreet.

The concept behind the note-trading behavior seems to be a lifesaver for college students who have to deal with the financial burden of their debts. Technology has also encouraged a series of online note collaboration products like Flashnotes and OneClass to offer students various online learning options. But would the online network for study materials be a disruption for traditional education? Does it invade professors' intellectual property? Is it really a helpful method to improve students' grades?

"It would be helpful for students who are not good at taking notes, but [the flip side is] it may encourage students not to attend class, not to challenge professors, or not to take their notes on their own," said William James, a marketing professor at Hofstra University. "Eventually it leads students to blind their brains without critical thinking."

After tasting the sweetness of being an active notes-seller on Flashnotes, Gayle, however, aims to continue selling her notes until she graduates. She told MainStreet, "I'm saving for my graduate school; I will definitely go all the way to the end."

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News Headline: Experienced Kent State looks for a return to winning ways: MAC Football 2014 | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plain Dealer
Contact Name:
News Text: CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Kent State football reached a high-water mark in 2012 when the Golden Flashes won the Mid-American Conference East Division title and played in a post-season bowl game for the first time since 1972. But without consistent big-play ability, or the ability to consistently create turnovers, the Golden Flashes staggered to a losing season in 2013. Now, with MAC football meetings set for Detroit on Wednesday, Kent hopes to regain its footing.

Bowling Green's Gabe Martin catches Kent State quarterback Colin Reardon (10) from behind last season.Akron Beacon Journal photo

Quarterback -- Sophomore Colin Reardon began his career in solid fashion, but nagging injuries and mounting pressure to reverse a losing skid led to some poor decisions down the stretch.

Now a year wiser, with 1,957 yards and 19 touchdowns worth of experience, the 5-11, 210-pound veteran should be viewed as a solid, stable, MAC quarterback who will not get his team beat. Behind him is freshman gunslinger Nathan Strock, who has no experience, but is known around KSU for his lightning arm.

Tailback -- The incumbent is senior Trayion Durham, but coming off a sub-par (766 yards rushing) junior season, plus off-season foot surgery that had to be revisited, does not inspire visions of a quick return to 2013 when Durham rushed for more than 1,000 yards. And while head coach Paul Haynes has not mentioned it, the thought of a redshirt season could come into play if Durham is not at full speed at the end of preseason camp.

An injury to tailback Dri Archer last season may well have impacted his NFL draft stock, before being picked in the third round by Pittsburgh. While the 6-1, 245-pound Durham has the requisite NFL size, a sub-par senior season coming off foot surgery will do more harm than good for him and KSU. Behind Durham, there is little explosiveness -- with proven bulk, speed or elusiveness -- unless a freshman quickly emerges.

Receiver -- While there is some experience in this group, particularly a deep tight end position, there are no proven game-breakers in the ranks. Senior Chris Humphrey leads the group, but 51 receptions for 613 yards and 3 TD in the pass-happy MAC are mundane numbers for a No. 1 receiver. Josh Boyle's 19 receptions are the best among the returning Kent wideouts.

However, tight end is where KSU could make an impact, particularly if the Golden Flashes decide 6-4, 230-pound senior Casey Pierce (33 catches, 364 yards, 5 TD), fast improving 6-3, 230-pound sophomore Bryce Fackler, and 6-3, 247-pound junior Kyle Patton are good enough to employ a two tight-end offense. All three are quality receivers with size.

Offensive line -- This unit was key to Kent's big 2012 season and after some retooling last season, should start to emerge as a team strength again. All five projected starters have quality game experience. The fact that 6-4, 305-pound senior Terrell Johnson, the most veteran player in the unit, enters camp at backup tackle to sophomore Reno Reda speaks loudly about the depth and improvement of this outfit.

Overall, Johnson is the only senior on the two-deep, so the offensive line should improve. The emergence of 6-5, 285-pound sophomore Jake Witucki as a backup is another good sign as he was a prize recruit two years ago.

Defensive line -- Traditionally a team strength, this season should be no different. Senior Richard Gray returns after missing a season due to academics and is joined by versatile senior Nate Terhune, who can play both the interior and at end. Like the offensive line, this is a two-deep unit loaded with experience that could get better if any of a trio of freshmen tackles can crack the rotation inside to free Terhune to play any spot necessary.

Linebacker -- Matt Dellinger is Kent's top returning tackler (77) while DeVante Strickland, Darius Redmond and Elcee Refuge all return with plenty of game experience. What this group lacks, however, is big-play ability as not one of these linebackers forced a fumble or picked off an interception last season.

Secondary -- Sophomore Nate Holley did not take over as a starting safety until the end of last season, but proved to be an instant leader with two sacks, seven tackles for lost yardage and a fumble recovery. He joins another ballhawk in junior Jordan Italiano, who had 76 tackles last season. Cornerback Malcolm Pannell and Ohio State transfer Najee Murray offer some big-play ability, as Pannell led the team with three interceptions last season.

Special teams -- There is no electric return specialist to replace Archer, but 5-6 sophomore Earnest Calhoun cleanly handled punt returns last season and was decent returning kickoffs as teams shied away from Archer's side of the field. Junior Anthony Melchiori averaged 44.5 yards per punt and had a productive year kicking field goals (9 of 14).

For Kent State's complete roster, schedule, stats and more, click here.
http://www.cleveland.com/sports/college/index.ssf/2014/07/experienced_kent_state_footbal.html

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News Headline: LeBron James' return latest story in Cleveland's hospitality industry growth (Roldan) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2014
Outlet Full Name: Crain's Cleveland Business
Contact Name:
News Text: Now that the fervor surrounding LeBron James' return to Cleveland has tempered — at least until the weeks leading up to the season's first basketball game — the focus has turned toward how James' return to the Cleveland Cavaliers will compound the city's economic growth. For the area's robust hospitality industry, the next couple of years could be a game-changer.

The city is undergoing $5 billion in new development projects, more than triple the $1.5 billion in investment that downtown experienced in 2010 when James left Cleveland to play for the Miami Heat.

Cleveland's restaurants and bars already have been benefitting from the economic stimulus, and James' return no doubt will be another windfall for business, particularly at the high-end establishments and sports bars in the Gateway District and East Fourth Street.

“We've seen increases in sales every year on East Fourth,” said Ari Maron, partner of MRN Ltd., the developer behind East Fourth Street. “I would expect a 50% to 75% increase in restaurant sales on game nights, which would correspond to an approximately 20% increase in annual sales.

“This is clearly a shot in the arm for the neighborhood that builds on existing positive trends of increased downtown housing, office attraction, infrastructure investments and energy,” Maron said.

Local economist LeRoy Brooks predicts that Cleveland-area restaurants, hotels and bars will experience an additional $57 million to $69 million in revenue annually. The estimate includes recovering the annual $48 million loss between 2010 and 2014, due to the decrease of 6,500 seats at Cavs games after when LeBron left. The revenue estimates are adjusted for 10% inflation.

A playoff run could inject an additional $30 million to $150 million back into the leisure and hospitality industry, he predicted.

He estimates the total economic impact as a result of LeBron's return at between $245 million and $521 million, only 0.5% of Northeast Ohio's overall $111 billion GDP, but still a meaningful gain.

“A very likely more important contribution comes from the view residents and others throughout the U.S. and world will have about Cleveland and the further growth this likely portends,” said Brooks, finance chair at John Carroll University's Boler School of Business.

James' return this time is just part of a larger economic success story in Cleveland, compared with the earlier part of his career between 2003 and 2010 with the Cavs, when he was arguably one of the main magnets for downtown entertainment and spending.

His departure did little to stymie Cleveland's momentum. Large-scale projects such as the Horseshoe Casino Cleveland, Cleveland Convention Center/Global Center for Health Innovation and the first phase of the Flats East Bank have come online, attracting global attention. The city's core daily population is 125,000, and its residential population has surged 28% since 2010, from 9,800 residents to 12,500 residents, the most in the city's history.

The Republican National Convention in 2016 is expected to further electrify downtown business.

Downtown's hospitality industry has followed suit. Cleveland experienced a net gain of 26 restaurants, or a 13% increase, since LeBron's departure. In the last two years alone, over 30 restaurants have opened downtown. More are on the way, including three restaurants at the luxe 9 hotel and apartments; Barrio at 5th Street Arcades; Hofbrauhaus at PlayhouseSquare; a food service provider at North Coast Harbor and Butcher & Brewer on East Fourth Street.

“We haven't just sustained the restaurant scene, but have grown it over the last couple years,” said Michael Deemer, vice president of business development with Downtown Cleveland Alliance. “This speaks to the strength of downtown market, which will get another shot in the arm when these huge crowds come to see LeBron play.”

Thinking outside the box

•A shipping container at North Coast Harbor is gaining new life in the form of a stationary food truck that serves gourmet street food. The Blazing Bistro, operated by Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry, is scheduled to open in late July and will operate Wednesday through Sunday during peak hours for North Coast Harbor Transient Marina and other North Coast venues.

“With the new marina fully operational and services like paddleboats and Jet Ski rentals available at North Coast Harbor, the district is transforming rapidly to become a place where people can touch the water in downtown Cleveland. This new food service complements the vision for the future of North Coast Harbor,” said Joe Marinucci, CEO of Downtown Cleveland Alliance, which is a partner in the project.

A new weekend tailgate event, Anchors & Ales, will provide residents and visitors another opportunity to enjoy the new North Coast Harbor amenity. That event is set for 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22 and Saturday, Aug. 23 and the same time Saturday, Sept. 13 and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14 in conjunction with Cleveland Browns home game.

Roaming around campus

Kent State University's Dining Services has rolled out its first food truck, Fork in the Road. The truck operates near the more remote northwest area of campus, and will also appear at athletic events and campus festivals. The menu includes burgers, tacos and salads, and will change with the availability of seasonal ingredients. “This definitely culinary-driven,” said Rich Roldan, director of Kent State's Dining Services. “It's going to be street food, but in a different fashion. It will be very good and healthy.”

A perfect pairing

•Talk about a respite from the office. Sommelier, fromager and Edwins founder Brandon Chrostowski is hosting a cigar and Cognac pairing at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 29, at Edwins Leadership and Restaurant Institute, 13101 Shaker Square. Chrostowski and the Edwins team will lead guests though expert pairings that elicit the cigar and spirit's subtle flavors. The event includes hors d'oeuvres and live entertainment. The event is $65 excluding tax + tip. For more information, call 216-921-3333 or visit http://edwinsrestaurant.org.

International spotlight

•Scott Ryan, executive chef at The Country Club in Pepper Pike, nabbed second place in the Global Chefs Challenge world finals, held July 2-5 in Norway. The chef competed against culinary professionals from Asia, Africa/Middle East, Pacific Rim and Europe.

National news

•Restaurant rents have been rising over the last few years, putting pressure on eateries' bottom lines. Meanwhile, retail availability is mixed throughout the nation's major cities. The retail availability in Cleveland, among others, is rising, according to this story from Nation's Restaurant News.

•San Francisco's Healthy Food Incentives Ordinance, also called the “toy ordinance,” was meant to improve the nutritional value of fast-food kids meals. The ordinance prevented the fast food giants from giving away toys in kids' meals unless they met certain nutritional criteria. The Wall Street Journal reports on how the standard backfired.

•Raw meat is making a comeback, particularly at chef-driven eateries, though food experts warn of the possible health risks associated with eating it. The Washington Post takes a closer look at the trend.

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News Headline: Kent State Stark's science building moves one step closer to opening (Williams, Hamilton, Wagor) | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Suburbanite - Online, The
Contact Name: Patricia Faulhaber
News Text: Kent State at Stark's new science building is one step closer to opening. Faculty, staff, administrators and students got to sign their names on the final structural beam before it was set in place.

The new building is a state-of-the-art LEED Gold Certified building that is under construction behind the Main Hall on the Jackson Township campus. The building will be used for a number of classes including nursing, biology and geology. There will also be computer and general classrooms, a student lounge and group study spaces.

“We'll be renovating the current science labs in the Main Hall to become chemistry labs after the new building is open,” said Cynthia Williams, public relations coordinator.

The new building will have a large lecture hall, faculty offices, lab space and a green roof that can also be used for learning. Robert Hamilton, assistant professor of biological sciences, said he will be excited to see the building finished.

“Words can't describe the way I feel about moving into the new building,” Hamilton said. “This will be a quantum leap for our capabilities in offering courses and research.”

The first person to sign was Dean Walter Wagor on June 25. He made mention of how many people on campus have been waiting for the completion of the new science building.

“For those that have been waiting such a long time for the building, it's really there and it's really happening,” Wagor said. “This is such a crucial building for our campus and for a number of programs that will be using the building. We have a great nursing program and we just added the RN to BSN program that will be housed in the new building. The biology degrees we started a few years ago will also be there. Students regardless of their major will benefit from having the new building.”

The building is schedule to open in the fall of 2015.

Wagor also said building to LEED Gold standards demonstrates Kent State's commitment to being good stewards of the environment and to sustainability.

SUMMER EVENTS

Williams said there are a lot of things happening on the campus this summer.

There is a new interim dean, Denise Seachrist, who took Dean Wagor's place July 1. A new president, Beverly Warren, for the Kent State system started on the same date. She will be visiting the regional campuses including Kent State Stark over the next few months.

“Beverly Warren will be visiting our campus to learn how we serve our community. She'll spend a few days at each a campus to meet everyone working on campus as well as people in the different communities,” Williams said.

Williams said the Stark campus is also excited about being host to the Blues in Schools program. The program is open to a select group of Stark County high school musicians and includes a blues education and performance program.

Williams said the group plays all summer and uses the Kent State Stark campus to practice.

Kent State has been the group's home base for the past four years and we're excited to be a part of the group's efforts,” Williams said.

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News Headline: Balloon fest kicks off Football Hall of Fame events | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2014
Outlet Full Name: WKSU-FM
Contact Name:
News Text: CANTON -- Although the official enshrinement ceremony isn't until early August, the city of Canton has already kicked off their Pro Football hall of Fame celebration.

Thousands filled the Kent State Stark campus to watch the sky fill with hot air balloons in the annual Balloon Classic.

Once the sun set, guests gazed at the balloons as they illuminated the night sky with a special "glow" event.

---

Here's a breakdown of the remaining 2014 festival schedule:

Saturday, July 26:

•Concert and fireworks in downtown Canton – 6 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Sunday, July 27:

•Pigskin run at Pro Football Hall of Fame – 8 a.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•Community parade in downtown Canton – 2:30 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Wednesday, July 30 – Friday, Aug. 1:

•Rib Burnoff at Stark County Fairgrounds – 11 a.m. until 10:30 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Friday, Aug. 1:

•Hall of Famer photo op at Pro Football Hall of Fame – 9 a.m.
•Fashion show luncheon at the Memorial Civic Center – 11:30 a.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•Enshrinees' gold jacket dinner at Memorial Civic Center – 5:15 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•Friday night reception at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – 6 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Saturday, Aug. 2:

•Timkensteel Grand Parade in downtown Canton – 8 a.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•Fanatics authentic autograph session at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – Noon.
•Returning Hall of Famers autograph session at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – Noon.
•Legends Club VIP enshrinement tailgate party at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – 4 p.m.
•Enshrinement celebration fan party at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – 4 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•Enshrinement ceremony at Fawcett Stadium – 7 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Sunday, Aug. 3:

•Enshrinees gameday roundtable at the Memorial Civic Center – 12:30 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•Special autograph session at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – 3 p.m.
•Legends club VIP NFL/Hall of Fame game tailgate party at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – 4 p.m.
•Fan appreciation tailgate party at the Pro Football Hall of Fame – 5 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
•NFL/Hall of Fame game at Fawcett Stadium. Buffalo Bills vs. New York Giants at 8 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Monday, Aug. 4:

•Drum corps international competition at Paul Brown Tiger Stadium in Massillon – 7 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS
http://www.wkyc.com/story/news/local/canton/2014/07/21/balloon-fest-kicks-off-football-hall-of-fame-events/12937549/

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News Headline: New startup uses film for a 'virtual venetian blind' in 'smart' windows | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Plastics News - Online
Contact Name: Kent State University Fitos
News Text: A new Kent State University spinout company in Kent, Ohio, knows how to make windows switch from clear to opaque and vice versa.

Flexible ITO Solutions, which goes by FITOS, has an informal development agreement with a smart window manufacturer that could use the technology to make windows that can block light.

Eventually, the technology could be used to create less expensive displays for touch-screen devices, according to FITOS CEO John West.

For now, the company is focused on commercializing the window technology. It works like “a virtual venetian blind” that can let in some light in while blocking the rest, according to West, a Kent State professor who led the development of the technology.

FITOS will make flexible, transparent films that can fit between panes of glass. The films contain indium tin oxide — the ITO in FITOS. The company controllably cracks that material, creating invisible electrode patterns that make it possible to control the movement of light through the window.

FITOS is based at Kent State's Centennial Research Park. West isn't yet being paid, nor is chief operating officer Cevin Cole. The only paid employees are Nick Diorio, a postdoctoral researcher at Kent State's Liquid Crystal Institute, and Paul Olson, a University of Akron student doing an internship in West's lab at Kent State.

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News Headline: Student bills are going up again | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/22/2014
Outlet Full Name: Mansfield News-Journal - Online
Contact Name:
News Text: MANSFIELD — Students already strapped for cash to pay for a college education won't get much relief this year. Tuition at 11 of Ohio's 13 traditional, four-year public universities will rise this fall.

Most of the universities chose to boost tuition as much as state limits would allow this year: 2 percent or $188, whichever is higher.

Only three didn't: Bowling Green State University froze tuition and fees on campus, The Ohio State University kept tuition the same for in-state students and Ohio University increased tuition by 1.5 percent.

Mansfield's two universities pride themselves on offering an affordable education well below the cost of traditional private and state universities, but they are not exempt from the budget squeeze.

In line with main campus, The Ohio State University at Mansfield froze tuition for full-time in-state students, but an extra fee charged to out-of-state students at Ohio State will increase by 5 percent.

“This particular year, we chose to keep the tuition side of it flat. In future years, we'll look at decreasing or keeping flat other components,” said Joseph Steinmetz, the provost at Ohio State.

A local OSU-M spokesperson could not be reached for comment.

At North Central State College, students will pay $3.30 more per credit hour, marketing director Keith Stoner said. For a full-time student taking 12 credit hours, that amounts to an added $40 per semester.

“Like every place else, expenses have gone up,” Stoner said.

Some students complain that the increases are too much, but university advocates say the state's cap keeps increases to a fraction of what they were in past years.

The average tuition increase at Ohio's public universities was 9 percent from 1996 to 2006. Since 2010, the most public schools have been able to raise tuition in a year was 3.5 percent.

“It's not normal that the cap would be this low if you're looking at a relatively long history of the state,” said Bruce Johnson, president of the Inter-University Council, which represents Ohio public universities. “What you're talking about is barely inflationary growth.”

But when tuition increases are coupled with rising fees, it can add up.

Although it's too early to calculate total prices for next school year, the overall costs of getting a degree continues to inch up, even for those universities with tuition freezes. Costs outside of tuition are rising, too.

For instance, campus housing fees are rising past the national inflation rate, 2.1 percent, at Ohio State, Ohio University and the University of Toledo.

At NCSC, fees will remain stagnant this year for the most part, Stoner said, but in past years the college has added technology fees and course fees as needed.

He and other university leaders said rising costs, coupled with a long-term slide in state funding, have led them to place a greater share of the budget burden on students.

Where the state once funded more than half of NCSC's budget, it now comprises only 36 percent of the college's $18 million budget, Stoner said. Student tuition makes up 56 percent of the budget, he said.

“We have to meet our budget, and that's been harder in recent years,” Stoner said. “It seems like a tough fight every day.”

The total cost of paying for college remains high in Ohio compared with public universities in other states, according to new rankings by the U.S. Department of Education.

The report included fees beyond tuition, which aren't regulated.

One Ohio school, Miami University, made the top 5 percent of U.S. public schools with the highest tuition, with a net cost of $24,674 a year, based on 2011 data. But on the list of schools with the highest overall costs, five Ohio schools were among the top 25.

Ohio State ranked No. 9, at $20,000 a year. The University of Cincinnati was No. 16, ahead of Kent State University (No. 19) and Ohio University (No. 22).

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News Headline: Tuition at most Ohio universities to rise again | Attachment Email

News Date: 07/21/2014
Outlet Full Name: Tribune - Online, The
Contact Name:
News Text: Tuition at 11 of Ohio's 13 traditional, four-year public universities will rise this fall.

Most of the universities chose to boost tuition as much as state limits would allow this year: 2 percent or $188, whichever is higher.

Some students complain that the increases are too much, but university advocates say the state's cap keeps increases to a fraction of what they were in past years.

The average tuition increase at Ohio's public universities was 9 percent from 1996 to 2006. Since 2010, the most that public schools have been able to raise tuition in a year was 3.5 percent.

"It's not normal that the cap would be this low if you're looking at a relatively long history of the state," Bruce Johnson, president of the Inter-University Council, which represents Ohio public universities, told The Columbus Dispatch, (http://bit.ly/1tmpfKo). "What you're talking about is barely inflationary growth."

The total cost of paying for college remains high in Ohio compared with public universities in other states, according to new rankings by the U.S. Department of Education.

The report included fees beyond tuition, which aren't regulated.

One Ohio school, Miami University, made the top 5 percent of U.S. public schools with the highest tuition, with a net cost of $24,674 a year, based on 2011 data. But on the list of schools with the highest overall costs, five Ohio schools were among the top 25.

Ohio State ranked No. 9, at $20,000 a year. The University of Cincinnati was No. 16, ahead of Kent State University (No. 19) and Ohio University (No. 22).

Although it's too early to calculate total prices for next school year, costs outside of tuition again are going up at many Ohio schools.

For instance, campus housing fees are rising past the national inflation rate, 2.1 percent, at Ohio State, Ohio University and the University of Toledo. An extra fee charged to out-of-state students at Ohio State will increase by 5 percent.

"This particular year we chose to keep the tuition side of it flat. In future years, we'll look at decreasing or keeping flat other components," said Joseph Steinmetz, the provost at Ohio State.

He and other university leaders said that rising costs, coupled with a long-term slide in state funding, have led them to place a greater share of the budget burden on students.

Although most schools boosted tuition as far as the state would let them this year, three didn't: Bowling Green State University froze tuition and fees on campus, Ohio State University kept tuition the same for in-state students, and Ohio University increased tuition by 1.5 percent.

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